Posts by tag: four cylinder

Kawasaki January 8, 2018 posted by

Green and Clean: 1993 Kawasaki ZXR400R

Happy Monday RSBFS readers! The dreaded winter slowdown has yet to arrive - plenty of fantastic bikes continue to pop up despite the onslaught of weather across the US. If you are snowed in and looking for something to do, adding a rare bike to your collection from the comfort of your home might be an ideal winter activity. And if you need something to melt the snow, this hot ZXR400 might just be your ticket.

1993 Kawasaki ZXR400R for sale on eBay

Built for a time where the Big Four were concerned with the declination of the 250cc two stroke class, the 400s were intended to be the four stroke equivalent of a GP bike. Requisite top-shelf components are found throughout, including aluminum frame, upside down front forks (normal today, but race-worthy stuff in the 1990s), lots of suspension adjustability and big, 300mm brakes signaled the track intent of the small ZXR. On the power side, the rise of the small four stroke was based in RPM. Lots of RPM. With a redline north of 14,000 revolutions per minute, the liquid-cooled four cylinder with four-valves per offers up close to 60 horsepower (depending on the market). Packaged in a tidy, 350-ish pound serving size, the ZXR is a razor sharp missile...provided you are under 6 feet. Bigger riders may show a lot of knees and elbows, hardly comfortable and certainly not very aerodynamic.

From the seller:
Up for sale is a gorgeous 1993 Kawasaki ZXR400R “M” model in mint condition with only 5,045 kilometers (3,134 miles). Bike is completely stock except for steel braided brake lines. All fairings and components are 100% genuine factory Kawasaki. Brand new Dunlop Sportmax tires have been installed. Bike runs like the day it was new. Just serviced with New battery and fluids. This is a premium ZXR. Museum quality. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use.

A bit sharper than contemporary 400s - at the expense of overall usability - the little green screamer was a solid effort to supplant the quarter liter two strokers. The hype was real and the 300cc class today owes this bike a debt of gratitude. This ZXR400R looks great. This is a classic grey-market bike in classic Kawasaki livery. The passage of time is tough on performance benchmarks, but tips the scales when it comes to laws of supply and demand. This bike is being offered in a Buy It Now auction format for $10,800, with the seller open to offers. That is a premium price for a 400, but 25 years on it is getting harder and harder to find an unmolested example. Check this one out here, and join the large number of people watching what will happen. Good Luck!!

MI

Green and Clean:  1993 Kawasaki ZXR400R
Yamaha May 4, 2017 posted by

Track Weapon: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

I was almost hesitant to post this monster, concerned that our passionate but sometimes purity-obsessed readers would find it less of an object of desire and more an abomination. For sure, this Nico Bakker-framed Yamaha TZ750 is a mongrel, a beast. A chimera, if you will. The engine? A ferocious liquid-cooled two-stroke four-cylinder race engine and six-speed gearbox from the TZ750, which alone should be enough to at least give this thing a second look. The Bakker frame is from 1980, although it was purpose-built for the TZ to cure the bike's notoriously sketchy handling. But then you've got mismatched 17" wheels, modern-ish suspension and R6 bodywork. Hey, at least it's almost all Yamaha-sourced!

And as a racing machine, the bike's constant evolution is far more in keeping with the original intent than some perfectly preserved collectible. In a way, it's even cooler than a period-correct TZ750: each and every one of those is a piece of history and should probably be cared for as such and ridden with kid gloves. This? It will handle better than folks like Kenny Roberts, who raced the TZ750 back when it was new, could ever have imagined and mere mortals can take it to the track and ride it in anger. And possibly not die.

When introduced in the 1970s, the TZ700 and TZ750 that followed became the bikes to beat on racetracks in Europe and in the United States, where they dominated AMA racing for years. This was a motorcycle from the era where engines were making rapid leaps in terms of raw performance, while suspension design, tire technology, and handling advanced more slowly: even the early bikes with just 90hp were shredding rear tires and trying to eject their pilots. By the time 1980 rolled around, the TZ was making much more like 140hp in a lightweight package that was good for 185mph top speed, with solid reliability.

Early machines used a frame with a twin-shock rear suspension that was later updated one with thicker tubing and a monoshock in 1975. Unfortunately, handling was never much more than "adequate," with pilots hanging on for dear life as much actually riding them, which explains the Nico Bakker frame seen here, something the seller claims is just one of five made for the TZ. Nico Bakker is, of course, one of the most talented frame designers of all time, and his work has graced racebikes, low-volume specials, and even production roadbikes built by everyone from Suzuki to Laverda.

From the original eBay listing: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

This is a 1980 Nikko Baker chassis TZ750. Number 5 of 5 that were built for the Big TZ. Yamaha used these aftermarket chassis to rectify the problems with their ill handling factory chassis. These frames were far superior to the stock units and Yamaha used them until they figured out a solution for their own. This bike has been modified with the correct pieces to keep it AHRMA and WERA legal. It is a weapon in any Vintage class you care to run it in. Nikko Baker used the Full Floater style rear suspension with a link and conventional type shock. As apposed to the limited adjustability of the stock mono shock modified backbone Moto Cross unit Yamaha was using. An Ohlins remote reservoir unit replaced that. Upgraded fork tubes ( conventional style ) from a late model Honda CBR900RR with adjustable internals from KPS suspension. Set up for a 180 lbs rider. A 17" Honda 5 spoke 3.5, aluminum wheel is used up front with 310mm HRC rotors and 4 piston Nissan calipers for stopping power. A billet Yoshimura top triple tree and aftermarket billet clip ons. As for the rear wheel it has a 3 spoke 17" Marvic 5.5 Magnesium wheel. Taking advantage of readily available, easy and inexpensive parts instead of the custom Nikko Bakers hand formed tank and tail section. A 2001 R6 tank was used along with a 2004 R1 race tail section. Fits excellently and can be aquired all over incase anything gets damage in a crash. We use the stock style fairing still. Nothing works as well or keeps the integrity of the original TZ like the stock unit. All the original body and engine parts that came on the unit go with the bike also. Like stock Yamaha forks and triple trees, Astrolite wheels ( 18" x 5.0 rear and 18" x 3.0 front ) Spondon front calipers, and hand formed aluminum fuel tank ect. Tank is about $2500 to $3000 and over a year wait time to get.

Engine wise it has a complete rebuild on her and every go fast goodie made for the TZ750. New Renstar individual cylinders with reed cages, Renstar billet crank shafts, new transmission ( set up and cut by Paul Gast ) Lentz chambers with 10" aftermarket aluminum silencers. Along with the 40mm Lectron high velocity power jet carburetors Magura 1/4 turn throttle and cables and Brembo radial master cylinder . It has all the best stuff to make an amazing Vintage liter bike slayer.  Bike comes with loads of spares too. Cylinders, heads, crankshafts, rod rebuild kits, pistons clutch parts, transmission, gearing and tons of spare Lectron tuning needles and parts. Also have the original factory round slide Mikuni carbs and cables. Plus more misc parts and gaskets.

I have only one issue. I couldn't source out a new Ignition stator and box. So after unit was completed i sent it out to be gone thru as a precaution. It will be back and installed on unit by time of delivery.

Is it a pure collectible museum-piece? Absolutely not, not even close. Is it beautiful? Well, if pure function is your idea of beauty, then maybe it is. Keep in mind that if you're a fan of originality and want something closer to the stock TZ750, the seller does mention that the original bodywork, wheels, and other parts will come with the bike, although I'd want to verify exactly what that includes before dropping money if that's the direction I wanted to go. I've got no idea how to value something like this, but the seller obviously does: the Buy It Now price is set at $45,000. The comments section is open, so let me know what you guys think about this beast! And remember: keep it civil guys.

-tad

Track Weapon: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale
Yamaha March 7, 2017 posted by

On the bubble? 1988 Yamaha FZR400

In the feast-or-famine world of eBay, we seem to be experiencing a bit of a glut from the Fizzer 400 quarter. We don't always see a ready supply of these bikes, but in the first part of 2017 we have witnessed a steady stream. That is the good news. A RSBFS fan favorite, there is much to recommend when it comes to this little 400cc machine. While HP is not impressive, this in-line four will rev to the moon, and with an aluminum delta-box twin-spar frame, adjustable suspension and a tidy riding position, cornering speeds usually surpass those of the bigger (heavier) bikes. What's not to love? Well, therein lies the bad news: prices are rising on these underrated sport bikes. If you have one now, hang on to it. If you are in the market for one, tread carefully (and prepare to spend some cash). Or wait to see if the bubble bursts.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

This FZR400 is claimed to be an original one-owner bike with fewer than 3,000 miles on it. The pics show a clean bike with no discernible rash. There seems to be a slight mark on the upper left corner of the fairin, but is easily forgiven on a bike of this age. Even the tops of the trees are free from the swinging key syndrome. The bodywork appears to be intact, and overall the bike is very clean and presents well. Given the difficulty of finding parts for these models, we recommend to purchase the best example you can find; the more complete the better. This looks like a complete bike, with some spares. Did I mention it is clean?

From the seller:
Up for your consideration is an original 1988 FZR400 Motorcycle with 2,609 original miles. Motorcycle has had one owner and stored in the garage since new. The auction includes owners and service manuals, spare keys and period performance parts that were never installed. The bike needs carb work to idle well.

I often wonder about additional performance parts included with the sale of a stock motorcycle. I wonder about exceptionally low miles in a cable-driven odometer world. The devil's advocate in me also wonders about the idle issues; is this simply a case of sitting unused too long, or is there something else lurking behind the scenes. Why are the tank cover mount grommets and screws missing/broken (or appear to be) - oversight or other? To be precise, this bike is not completely stock - the NRC case covers are clear aftermarket items. Again, the devil on my shoulder prods at me; is this preventative maintenance or evidence of a previous boo boo? There is nothing nefarious going on that I can tell from the advert, but if I had any Spidey sense it might be tingling, prompting me to either ask more questions or check the bike out in person.

Of course the devil that is poking at me sprang up from the asking price: $7,500. That would be a serious high-water mark for one of these models, and at that price I would expect perfection. We typically see FZR400s as $3,500 - $5,000 bikes, with exceptional examples fetching a bit more. You can't blame a seller for trying to get top dollar, and you can be sure I will be watching this one carefully, as it could be a price barometer for the type. If nothing else, we continue to see good examples of the FZR400 in the market - and that is something that should make all of us very happy. Check it out here and let us know what you think.

MI

On the bubble? 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Yamaha July 19, 2016 posted by

Hidden Away Handler – 1989 Yamaha FZR-400

Wheeled to the back of a collection after only 962 miles, this lightweight Yamaha four-stroke could easily be returned to riding status.  The only really sporting four-stroke 400 imported to the States, of the underwhelming total sales here, many were raced and subject to engine transplants.  Showing a serious mid-size buy-it-now, this is a bike any rider could enjoy, and a highly skilled rider could enjoy it immensely.

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left

1989 Yamaha FZR-400 for sale on eBay

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 right front

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 binnacle  201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left fairing

In stock trim, the almost pint-size 399 cc's provide 60 hp, mostly between 8,000-14,000 rpm.  Below the power band it's perfect around town.  Above 8,000 the over-engineered DeltaBox frame provides a stable platform with 41mm conventional forks and rear monoshock.  Brakes are dual front 298mm disks with 210mm rear.  Wheels are different sizes to aid handling, 18-inch rear following a 17-inch front.  Classic red-white paint grabs attention for the endurance-styled fairing.

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left rear

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 right rear wheel  201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left tank

Presented by a serious collector, this FZR doesn't look to have suffered the usual collateral damage from storage wars - from the eBay auction:

Absolutely MINT 1989 Yamaha FZR400. This may be the finest one in the US.

Premium motorcycle, premium price reflecting its condition and the extra swingarm. All original, no modifications. Never dropped, raced, crashed or otherwise damaged. It's been sitting in an enclosed storage unit or my garage since I purchased it two years ago.
 
Comes with buffed 1990 FZR400 swingarm for the perfect combination of a virtually new FZR400 with the later Deltabox swingarm. 
 
One tiny rock chip in upper left headlight fairing. Front master cylinder sticks from lack of use. I've discounted the price by $200 to cover the minor repair. The carbs need cleaning.

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 right fairing

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left front wheel  201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left seat

Imported only 1988-90, the premium-priced FZR-400 was a tough sell next to the new 600.  Continental riders had a choice of Kawasaki and Honda small sports, but beautiful engineering and build quality couldn't protect the exchange rate and pre-EXUP power specs for long.  These long-past corporate missteps now ensure rarity, especially for a stock peach as displayed here.  Riding like a larger sportbike, the performance envelope of the FZR-400 is wider and more accessible to more riders.  Just a carb cleaning, new rubber, and tune-up stand in the way of this great ride, oh you'll also have to get past ( over ? ) the display stand...

-donn

201600719 1989 yamaha fzr400 left front

Hidden Away Handler – 1989 Yamaha FZR-400
Triumph July 14, 2016 posted by

Getting Closer: Low-Mileage 2004 Triumph Daytona 600 for Sale

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 R Front

Earlier versions of the reborn Triumph’s Daytona didn’t bother trying to compete head-to-head with the Japanese sportbikes, which was probably a wise move: the early, spine-framed 900cc bike was well-built and made plenty of useable power, and the later T595 [actually a 955cc] added superlative handling to the mix, but both were far too heavy to compete directly against their counterparts from the Land of the Rising Sun. But by the time this Daytona 600 came around, Triumph felt they were ready to take on the Japanese directly, without having to fall back on Euro-snobbery or “character.”

Close, but no wasabi.

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 L Side

The CBR-looking TT600 came first, but it was cursed with unrefined fuel-injection and was definitely not a looker. The Daytona 600 seen here that was introduced in 2003 has an angular, stealth-fighter style that is well-balanced, but looks like it’s trying just a bit too hard. It certainly hasn’t aged as well as the T595, although maybe it just needs a few more years to grow on me…

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 Dash

Revised Keihin electronic fuel injection smoothed out the earlier TT600’s powerband, although extremely oversquare bore and stroke dimensions of 68mm x 41.3mm mean that the bike is pretty gutless below 7,000 rpm. That’s pretty standard for the 600cc class, but testers noted the Daytona’s gutlessness was particularly pronounced. It was also down a few horses on the competition at the top and, in the ultra-competitive 600cc class, just a couple ponies can make the difference between success and failure. Handling was first-rate though, with a nice balance of agility and stability, all without being overly harsh.

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 L Rear

Looking at the Daytona 600 as a used bike buy, when cutting-edge performance is no longer quite so important, those minor flaws seem far less important, and the bike does offer up very striking, almost kit-bike looks and enough performance and handling to keep even experienced riders entertained. The only question is parts availability: these are pretty uncommon bikes here in the US and don’t seem to be all that well supported by the aftermarket either.

Today’s example has just 824 miles on it and appears to be in excellent condition, with a price that might just have you wondering whether you might have room in your garage for something just a bit odd for the sake of being odd.

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 Fairing Detail

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Triumph Daytona 600 with 824 Miles for Sale

You are looking at a 2004 Triumph Daytona 600 with 824 miles on it. It is Tornado Red in color and powered by a 599cc fuel injected engine and 6 speed transmission. This bike comes with 2 keys. There are no dents or dings on the bike that I can find, however there are scratches on the rear fender, mirrors, and exhaust. The chrome and aluminum are in good condition and the tires have good tread left on them.

 

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 Clocks

It's always funny to me when sellers list how much tire life is left: they’re wear items, and tires on sportbikes last just a few thousand miles anyway.  More of a question for collectors: are the original turn signals included, since they appear to be missing... These Daytonas were certainly competent sportbikes, but there’s really nothing to recommend them over a GSX-R600 or R6 except for styling, which is subjective, and their rarity. If you’re a collector of quirky rare bikes in general, or Triumphs in particular, this low-mileage example is certainly worth a look, especially at that $3,450 Buy It Now price. If you’re looking for a bike to ride, you’re probably better off with the earlier Daytona T595 triple or the later 675, both of which provide less gimmicky styling and character that’s noticeably different when compared to the Japanese sportbikes of their respective eras.

-tad

2004 Triumph Daytona 600 R Side

Getting Closer: Low-Mileage 2004 Triumph Daytona 600 for Sale
Suzuki November 6, 2015 posted by

Rare Retro Brute: 2003 Suzuki GS1200SS for Sale

2003 Suzuki GS1200SS L Side Front2

A very rare Japan-only thug that would seemingly have been ideal for the US market, the Suzuki GS1200SS was unfortunately never sold here. It featured retro endurance-racer bodywork and the big, understressed four-cylinder from the long-serving Bandit, packaged with modern running gear to create a bike that was slightly ahead of its time.

2003 Suzuki GS1200SS R Side Rear

On paper, it's basically a retro-styled Bandit with pretty uninspiring specifications: limited by government regulations to just 100hp from the big, 1156cc air and oil-cooled 16-valve four, the bike was saddled with a twin-shock frame and weighed in at 460lbs dry.

2003 Suzuki GS1200SS Cockpit

But in the real world, where bikes actually live, the combination of a broad powerband, comfortable ergonomics, and a stable chassis mean lots of miles and lots of smiles. And, as the seller mentions, if you don't like that adequate and likely very torquey power figure, there's an entire catalog of upgrades and performance parts available for these bikes: the Bandit motor is pretty much the Small Block Chevy of the motorcycle world and has been used in everything from road-racers to drag-racers.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Suzuki GS1200SS for Sale in New Zealand

Bike is in New Zealand! Will ship at owner's expense, more than happy to assist with details and facilitate smooth freight transaction.

Right, this is your chance to own what is a very rare motorcycle, The GS1200SS was made in limited numbers for the Japanese domestic market as a salute to the golden age of 80's muscle bikes and their success in the Sukura 8hr races.

Some of these GS1200SS escaped to New Zealand mostly the black ones and about 4 red and black models.

This is my second GS1200SS they are an incredibly capable do anything all day long super sports, tourer or track bike if you felt the urge.

This bike has an very low 13,204 Miles or 21,251 kms ( Speedo and Odometer are in KPH) Strong Bulletproof under-stressed motor. This bike is still factory restricted (to 100hp) but apparently it's not hard to get another 40hp with some work. (I never felt the need to go any faster but good to know there's more power waiting to be tapped should you desire.)

Includes original stock muffler.  Two minor scuffs to paint on tank (possibly belt buckle rub)  Otherwise perfect.

UK mag practical sports bikes issue 20 has a very favorable writeup and comparison with the GS1200SS and the original GSXR1100.

2003 Suzuki GS1200SS L Side Front

These are really cool-looking bikes, with that huge dual-headlight fairing providing plenty of wind protection, although I could do without the luggage rack on this example. Easy to remove, I'm sure. This needs some simple carburetor work and a full Sanctuary exhaust system and it'd be just about perfect.

Keep in mind: this bike may be a pain to import as anything but a display piece if you live here in the US. And that's a shame, since this is a bike to be ridden, not simply looked at. Unless by "display" you mean "parked up outside your favorite diner after a 200 mile morning ride."

-tad

2003 Suzuki GS1200SS R Side

Rare Retro Brute: 2003 Suzuki GS1200SS for Sale