Posts by tag: FIve Valve

Yamaha August 5, 2017 posted by

Bike of the Decade: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale

The Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP was named "Bike of the Decade" [the 1980s] by Cycleworld magazine, meaning it faced down some very tough competition, including the Ducati 851, Suzuki RG500, and the original GSX-R750. What made it so special? Well servo-actuated exhaust valves are pretty ubiquitous these days, but the big FZR was the first four-stroke to feature one on its five-valve Genesis motor. Yamaha's EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve varied exhaust flow to maximize high rpm power and low rpm torque, two characteristics that were often considered mutually-exclusive.

The 145hp and 79 ft-lbs of torque from the 1002cc engine aren't big news today, but still make for a very fast bike, even considering the slightly porky 460lb dry weight: we're still talking about a bike with a legitimate 170mph top speed and a supremely flexible powerband. The basic engine and five-speed package was good enough that Bimota saw fit to slot it into their lightweight YB11, and bike that still has the performance to surprise folks weaned on much newer bikes. The rest of the package was equally well-developed, and this iteration featured Yamaha's Deltabox II frame, upside-down forks, and new styling that replaced the twin-lamp endurance-style fairing with a sleeker, single trapezoidal unit that found its way into a couple of Bimotas as well...

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale

Attention Collectors! Bike of the Decade... 1992 FZR 1000 EXUP Delta Box Genesis Great Condition / Survivor > Always stored indoors on carpet! extra Rare Corbin seat with back rest, plus original mint solo seat with fairing. Must see pictures. 8738 miles. Just serviced Clear Title / resides in living room / tank drained, carbs cleaned / clean unused oil, and new fluids, serious inquires, Seller reserves the right to end auction early for private or collector sale. Sold as is, wonderful bike.

The FZR1000 in red and white is a great looking example of a 90s superbike. It's not especially valuable as yet, but has the potential to appreciate as people snap up the few remaining pristine, low-mileage examples. The $7,500 the seller is asking is steep, but this looks like it's in very nice condition, with low miles so, if you're into Yamahas, this might be a great opportunity to add a nearly pristine example of this very functional sportbike to your collection.

-tad

Bike of the Decade: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale
Yamaha June 1, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale in California!

Update 6.2.2017: Sold in just 12 hours! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

If you have a rare sportbike for sale, model years 1980ish to 2004ish, consider our Featured Listing service for $59. Email me to see to get started: dan@motoringblogs.com

When you think of Yamaha's homologation specials, you probably picture their extremely exotic OW01, but this very nice FZR750RU fulfilled a similar purpose: to homologate the 750cc FZR for racing, in this case the American AMA Superbike series. Spec is far lower than the OW01, but so are current prices and if you're looking to get into a collectible Yamaha, this would be a far more affordable proposition, and one you could actually ride.

The FZR750RU weighed in at around 460lbs dry, had the typical 17" front and 18" rear wheels of the era, used a close-ratio six-speed gearbox, and was powered by a 749cc version of Yamaha's five-valve "Genesis" inline four. Interestingly, the very limited-production RU was the only 750cc Yamaha imported during this era: there was no "normal" version, at least here in the USA. Of course, if you wanted a Yamaha sportbike during the late 1980s, you had plenty of other options to choose from: the light and nimble FZR400, the everyman steel-framed FZR600, even the big-bore FZR1000.

Five-valve engines are pretty rare and, although Volkswagen and Ferrari have dabbled in the technology, it was Yamaha's calling card for years. Typically, you're looking at three intake and two exhaust valves, and although complexity is increased, there are multiple theoretical benefits. The three smaller valves flow fuel and air more effectively and fill the cylinder faster than two larger valves that would fit into the same space, and the configuration creates a compact combustion chamber so the mixture can burn more efficiently. In addition, the smaller, lighter intake valves have less inertia and put less stress on the springs that close them.

This particular example of the FZR750RU looks very clean and well cared-for, with original parts, owner's manuals, and lots of quality photographs. It's especially nice that the seller includes several pictures of the bike without its bodywork, showing off the aluminum Deltabox frame and other bits that can accumulate grime and significant wear. What is the price for this bit of Yamaha history? The seller is asking $7,500 and can be contacted here: Bike is SOLD

It should also be noted that Jay has been an RSBFS regular for years, buying and selling nearly 10 bikes through the site in that time.

From the Seller: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale

One owner 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU limited edition homologation motorcycle.  One of 200 imported into the US, only  4420 original miles, a rare bike that will continually rise in value.  The single owner took great care of this bike, it was a weekend rider for the for the first few years then it was parked and stored, last registered in 1995.  I have most of the original paperwork and documentation, including the original owners manual, service manual, warranty manual and I have the original title.  The owner is a retired engineer, he documented and cared for the bike as you would expect.  I have a stack of index cards filled with notes about the care and service of the bike. The factory service manual has signs of use and a few hand written notes. 

I have serviced the bike and ridden it about 50 miles.  The service included replacing all fluids (brake/clutch fluid, coolant, fuel and oil), ultrasonically cleaned and rebuilt carbs, drained and replaced the fuel.  I put a lot of time into cleaning the brake caliper pistons and seals.  I also replaced the rear brake pads, a few pieces of factory hardware and re-installed the stock screen.  The bike includes a few oil filters, a NOS set of tires, a aftermarket screen, a rear stand and some other small bits.  This bike is ready to ride except for the potentially original tires currently fitted.  Everything felt good when I rode it around but I haven't pushed it very hard. 

Targeted for the American market, the FZR750RU is not especially valuable yet and may never achieve the desirability of the OW01 but, with just 200 examples of the 1988 model built to exactly meet AMA minimum production numbers, it certainly has the potential to appreciate significantly, and it's a very handsome example of 80s sportbike style.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale in California!
Bimota November 1, 2016 posted by

Nineties Flyer: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale

1991-bimota-yb8-r-side

With lightweight bodywork held on by just a few bolts [note the one-piece tank-and-tail unit] and a plastic fuel cell, the Bimota YB8 used plenty of tricks learned on the racetrack and was pretty far ahead of its time. Based on the previous YB4 and YB6 but powered by the larger FZR1000 engine, approximately 250 were produced between 1990 and 1994. Bimota claimed 149hp from the FZR1000 engine, up a bit compared to the stock bike due to Bimota ignoring the "gentleman's agreement" of the time and applying the usual tuning tricks, and the inline four puts its power to the rear wheel through the Yamaha's standard five-speed box. Top speed is a 173mph but, as always with Bimota, it's the cornering that impresses the most.

1991-bimota-yb8-l-side

It's hard to blame a small manufacturer if they wanted to recycle or slightly update an existing frame, especially if the donor engines slot in easily. Looking at the later YB11, the frames look very similar and, as was pointed out by one of the Commentariat, I wonder if a Yamaha R1 engine and transmission might slot in there without too much persuading... Somehow, that doesn't seem to be as sacrilegious an idea as it would be for something like, say, a Ducati. The resulting bike should be a shade lighter than the original R1 if the manufacturers' dry weights are to be believed...

1991-bimota-yb8-clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Very are super bike, mint condition, needs nothing, we ship at buyer's expense can ship worldwide. Runs excellent, reasonable reserve, rare opportunity.

1991-bimota-yb8-r-side-rear

The listing doesn't include much information and the bike is clearly part of a larger collection. That's unfortunate although, obviously restoring that engine should be much easier than for some other obscure motorcycles. Bidding is up to just $5,200 with the Reserve Not Met, but Bimotas of this era seems to be going for around the $10,000 mark these days. Sure, for the price, you could buy a couple of nice Yamaha R1's, but that's hardly the point of this bit of Italian exotica.

-tad

1991-bimota-yb8-front

Nineties Flyer: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale
Bimota October 27, 2016 posted by

Super and Leggera: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

1998-bimota-yb11-l-front

1990s Bimotas currently represent an amazing value, and this 1998 YB11 Superleggera has superbike performance, Yamaha reliability, and is very rare, all for under $10,000. “Superleggera” or "super light" is a style of construction that stresses lightweight materials and construction: Ducati’s Superleggera is so super and leggera that it actually weighs less than the British Superbike Championship Panigale including ballast... So while 400lbs dry may not be considered the absolute lightest bike out there by today’s standards, it’s still in the hunt and was a solid 30lbs lighter than the YZF1000 that donated its engine and gearbox.

1998-bimota-yb11-r-side

Plenty of superbikes these days weigh the same and make far more than the YB11’s 145 peak horsepower, but without their electronics and sophisticated traction control systems, they’d likely be wrapped around a tree in short order. The five-valve Yamaha engine that powers the YB11 should be far less peaky than something like an MV Agusta F4 or even a BMW S1000RR, as evidenced by the 5-speed gearbox, which suggests a reduced need to chase narrow powerbands. It says much about the original bike that it’s nearly 20 years old and, with 170mph top speed, can at least keep modern superbikes in sight, especially on the road.

1998-bimota-yb11-gauges

The only catch with that “Yamaha reliability” thing could be actual access to the Yamaha parts on the YB11. That beam frame may be light and strong, but Bimota didn’t worry about things like “servicing” when they designed this beast, and other bikes they've built aren't easy to service: for the similar, Suzuki GSX-R1100-powered SB6R, you actually need to drop the engine to change the front sprocket. The clutch slave? Drop the engine. And the alternator drive on the SB6R tends to fail due to overheating. Guess what you have to do to work on that?

1998-bimota-yb11-l-rear

Those beefy 51mm Paioli forks provide excellent roadholding but could be difficult to source parts for. And when I say “could” I mean, “I know one that was sidelined for a couple years with leaky seals because the parts were unavailable.” Although I'm sure it'd be possible to swap in the front end from a modern superbike, if you're friendly with someone who can knock up a set of custom triple-trees...

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

A Unique and Rare Super Bike On Display in the New England Motorcycle Museum!

Extremely rare! Only 650 made! Not many opportunities to buy unmolested, low mileage Bimotas present themselves! Act now!

Borderline savage power-to-weight ratio! There was nothing in its class that could touch it in sheer acceleration

This bike features an engine based off the Yamaha YZF1000 and featured a larger air box, reworked carburetors & a 4 into 1 pipe that turned the Yamaha engine into a rocket ship without comprising its superb reliability!

Immense handling capabilities! Extremely light weight makes for easy input and lean angle limits that are most likely well beyond the rider’s capabilities.

This hand crafted, Italian made motorcycle is gorgeous and the photos speak for themselves! Here’s your chance to own this Italian Stallion!

Ready for your exotic collection

1998-bimota-yb11-tank

The seller does include a video of the bike with a walk-around, but doesn't fire the bike up. It's pretty clear from the photos that this bike is in superlative condition and has just 3,000 on it. I’m not sure if the YB11 has similar servicing issues as Bimota's SB6, but I’d consult with a specialist shop or spend some time on the forums before assuming these will be cheap or easy to maintain. Plus, bodywork might prove a little difficult to replace if you take a tumble. That being said, I’d buy one in a heartbeat: with a Buy It Now price of just $9,500 it’s rare, fast, and Italian. It even has passenger accommodations, something of a rarity for Bimotas in general.

-tad

1998-bimota-yb11-r-side

Super and Leggera: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Bimota September 7, 2016 posted by

Framing the Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike For Sale

1988 Bimota YB4 R Side

Although it's often the slinky bodywork that people remember about Bimotas, the frames are what really define them. The Bimota YB4 was designed around Bimota’s signature and unmistakable beam frame they used throughout the late 80s and 90s. No soft, moulded contours here: the spars look like girders that were extruded by some giant, industrial device, then cut and welded into place, with access to that five-valve Yamaha "Genesis" engine clearly an afterthought... The frame was amazingly stiff and, equipped with typically top-shelf suspension bits at both ends, the YB4 offered superlative handling.

1988 Bimota YB4 Front

Introduced in 1987, the YB4 started out as a pure racing machine, with no road-legal counterpart. But when rules were announced for the new World Superbike racing series, Bimota was forced to make a limited number of roadbikes for homologation purposes in order to compete. The bike was successful in both the earlier Formula 1 championship that predated the roadgoing YB4 as well as the later fledgling World Superbike series, where it successfully competed against Yamaha’s own highly-developed OW01, a testament to the YB4’s handling prowess.

1988 Bimota YB4 Dash

Of course, being a Bimota, the engine is far more pedestrian than the beautifully crafted frame and sleek bodywork. The YB4 was powered by a 749cc version of the five-valve Yamaha “Genesis” motor which, while not very exotic, packed plenty of performance, and that powerplant was backed by the standard Yamaha six-speed gearbox. The roadbike weighed in at a claimed 396lbs dry and used fuel injection, but the racing machines featured carburetors. Just over 300 were built and unusually, the YB4 is visually almost identical to the bigger-engined and more common YB6 that was stuffed full of 1000cc Genesis motor.

1988 Bimota YB4 Carbs

Today’s YB4 isn’t a road bike, or even a road bike converted into a track-only machine. This YB4 is actually the reason we have any roadgoing YB4s at all: it’s a genuine World Superbike racing bike as raced by Steve Parrish’s team with Keith Huewen at the controls.
From the original eBay listing: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike for Sale

Bimota YB4 Racing WSBK - ex-Huewen/Parrish Team Yamaha Loctite UK

M.Y. 1988 VIN 000037

It is the 1988 Bimota YB4 WSBK Team Yamaha Loctite Parrish/Heuwen The bike was raced in 1988, ridden by Keith Huewen who is now a Moto GP commentator. It was ridden in the British Championship and also some World Championship events like the Hungaroring.

It has all the genuine parts with special quick release pipes magnesium sump etc. and very important it is exactly as it was raced. There were originally only 4 imported to the UK Team Loctite had problems with the fuel injection and converted them all back to carburettors.

Iconic bike of an iconic race era. Ride, parade and collect! Bulletproof investment.

1988 Bimota YB4 L Side Unfaired

According to the seller, the bike is currently in the UK, but that shouldn’t pose much of a problem for the well-heeled or seriously dedicated collectors considering a purchase of this machine. What's it worth? Well, it's basically a successful racing machine from an exotic Italian manufacturer that was campaigned by a famous rider for a famous team, making it a one-of-a-kind piece of motorcycle history.

-tad

1988 Bimota YB4 L Side

Framing the Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike For Sale
MZ April 8, 2016 posted by

Budget Blaster: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup for Sale

1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup R Side

Not every exotic needs to try and tear your arms out as soon as you twist the throttle, and not every rare motorcycle needs to cost a packet to buy or run: sometimes our need to be just a little bit different clashes with life’s practical considerations. For riders in that particular situation, may I present the MZ Skorpion Sport Cup, a big, thumping single wrapped in sports bodywork and featuring a name virtually forgotten here in the Decadent West.

1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup R Side Front

MZ was originally an East German manufacturer of two-stroke motorcycles back when East Germany was actually a place. All you fans of sporting Japanese two-strokes should be familiar with them: they absolutely dominated two-stroke racing in the late 1950s until MuZ rider Ernst Degner defected and brought their Walter Kaaden-developed expansion-chamber tuning techniques to Suzuki where he helped develop their bikes and continued his racing career.

1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup Dash

But then in the mid-1990s, seemingly out of nowhere, an entire range of new machines sprouted up, all badged as MZs. The modular design recalls Triumphs of the same era, and the line of bikes included the dual-purpose Baghira, the supermoto Mastiff, sport-touring Traveller, and the various Skorpion variants. All were built around Yamaha’s 660cc five-valve single backed by a five-speed gearbox. 48hp and a weight not much over 400lbs with a tank of fuel means that the lightweight Skorpion was capable 110mph with excellent handling and good reliability.

1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup R Side Front Wheel

From the original eBay listing: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup for Sale

Conceived by the acclaimed UK design firm SeymourPowell, the MZ Skorpion represents a motorcycle design perfect storm of sorts. The elegantly simple, yet rigid chassis inspired by (some might say stolen from) the work of Tigcraft's Dave Pierce contains an ultra simple and reliable XT660cc engine as well as electrics from Yamaha. The world class Grimeca and Paoli suspension and braking components come from Italy. All of this was designed and assembled by the German engineers at MZ - one of the oldest, most venerable marques in the history of  motorcycling.

The Skorpion didn't sell in large numbers, but had a solid following in the racer community. It's exceptional handling and simplicity spawned single model MZ Cup series all over Europe and the United States in the 90s and the beginning of the 21st century. This particular variant - the Sport Cup - came with a full fairing, and was made to compete in the US and UK MZ cup series as stock, with no modifications allowed. Because of the popularity of the class, few unraced, clean Sport Cups exist today.

The Skorp also appeals to every day riders. It is refreshingly small in size, light weight and has the broad power and bulletproof reliability inherent in the Yamaha dirtbike inspired power plant that is still being built today. Simple and reliable, it is an easy bike to maintain and, unlike many exotics, most of the wearing components interchange with various Yamahas of the period and are therefore quite available. Motorcycle News calls it "light, lithe, generally reliable, and reassuringly practical" and "one of the best singles of modern time".

This particular bike is in truly excellent condition. It was garaged all of its 3,500 mile life and has been kept clean and well maintained. The only non-stock component is a center stand from its sister model, the Traveller. While not the norm on the club racer, it makes for easy wheel and chain maintenance, and is easily removed. It also comes with the full original toolkit, the factory solo seat cover to replace the rear seat, and the original owners manual.

1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup L Side Rear

These bikes are virtually forgotten now, and can be had for very small sums on the rare occasion you can actually find one. This example has almost insanely low mileage, considering the bike’s nature, and appears to be in very good condition. The Buy It Now is just $3,000 with very little interest so far. A one-make racing series was available for the bikes at the time, and they are very popular for use in single-cylinder racing classes today, but it’d be a shame to see one this nice get chopped into a track bike.

-tad

1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup L Side

Budget Blaster: 1997 MZ Skorpion Sport Cup for Sale