Posts by tag: FIve Valve

Yamaha October 14, 2017 posted by

Extreme-ly LE – 1989 Yamaha FZR750R / OW01 with 1277 Miles !

An iconic product of the WSBK race series, the Yamaha FZR-750R or OW01 was an homologation special which sold for more than twice what a more streetable FZR-1000 fetched, and cost Yamaha zillions.  Rather than a tarted-up road machine, Yamaha built the race bike - poorly suited for the road actually - equipped it for DOT inspection, and sold it to race teams and collectors.  Pre-owned by the latter, this OW01 was imported but never registered, and has been ridden only 1277 miles.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R for sale on eBay

Yamaha was playing a little catch-up after the first WSBK season, and prepared the FZR750R for 1989 year.  Based on a proper race engine, the OW01 has Yamaha's signature 5-valve heads, titanium connecting rods, and low-friction pistons with short skirts and only two rings.  Their EXUP exhaust valve adjusts exhaust flow and improves running outside of the 9,000-12,000 powerband.  The light alloy DeltaBox frame is thin but wide, capped by an aluminum fuel tank.  43mm conventional forks lead an Ohlins monoshock, and 4-piston Nissin brakes are up front.  Riding position in the full endurance fairing is uncompromising.

This Oregon owner has been a fine caretaker of #427, with no apparent wear or damage.  Even the footpegs are pictured, virtually unmarked.  It's without a stateside title, but some preparation for registration has been done.  From the eBay auction:

Out of the crate this is part of what you got for your money.

1.       Titanium con rods with light weight, short-skirt, stepped-top pistons.
2.       Hand polished ports on a big 5 valve head.
3.       Handmade aluminum fuel tank and handmade aluminum Delta box frame, etc.
4.       Huge magnesium Nissin racing calipers and 320 mm discs provide race quality stopping power.
5.       More magnesium parts to reduce weight.
6.       Quick release axle clamps.
7.       Light weight fiber cowling/fairing.
8.       Close ratio 6 speed gears.
9.       Ohlins adjustable rear shock.
10.     43 mm forks with full range of adjustment.

The OWO1 has the perfect balance of light weight, agility and power. The OWO1 represents one of the best handling and most exclusive Japanese sport bikes of the era and in my opinion, is one of the sexiest looking motorcycle design ever to come out of Japan.

Now about my 1989 OWO1 #000427

This a Japanese domestic model OWO1 with 1277 miles/2044 kilometers. Mileage and initial registration is documented on the Japanese vehicle registration form (shaken-sho). The Japanese shaken-sho is up-dated every two years through a physical vehicle inspection by the Japanese DMV.

This OWO1 is guaranteed to have never been raced. It is a beautiful motorcycle that is 100% stock except for two things. The original owner changed the single horn to a dual horn set-up for safety reasons. He also added a little more heat shielding to protect the light weight fiber cowling/fairing.

This bike has never been registered here in the U.S. You will receive the following from me after purchase so that you can register the bike.

  1.   (CBP form 7501(04/05). This form tells the DMV that customs has been cleared and the bike is ready to be registered.
  2.   A bill of sale
  3.   Because this bike is over 25 years old no EPA or DOT documents are necessary for registration.

This bike has been in storage for a while, so I have done the following before the sale. I have put in a new battery, changed the oil, filter, coolant, brake fluid, and spark plugs.

This OWO1 is extremely rare and beautiful. It is very hard to find one in this kind of condition. But, please keep in mind that it is not a new motorcycle so there are some minor blemishes.

Most OW01's went racing, with a dealer's team or privateers, and a factory race kit which added a few thousand to the already astronomical price.  Finding an almost un-used FZR750R has become a odyssey for some, since only a few hundred were made each year.  Though it never resulted in a championship, the OW01 made a healthy mark on WSBK, and under Carl Forgarty held the absolute lap record at the Isle of Man TT for many years.  From an era when factories' engineering chops could be seen and felt, fans speak reverently of discovering the little-known secrets of the OW01...

-donn

Extreme-ly LE – 1989 Yamaha FZR750R / OW01 with 1277 Miles !
MZ September 24, 2017 posted by

Cheap and Fun: 1995 MZ Skorpion Replica for Sale

Very much a sportbike designed for the masses, the MZ Skorpion Replica has everything you need, and nothing you don't. Included is a sophisticated frame, adjustable suspension front and rear, sleek bodywork, and a flexible, simple, reliable, and easily-serviced engine. What it doesn't have is expensive, difficult to maintain technology, or an excess of power that most riders really don't need anyway. A true sportbike with a simple, humble powerplant, it's a shame they weren't able to sell very many when new.

If you're not familiar with MZ, they were an East German motorcycle manufacture most notable for completely dominating two-stroke racing in the 1950s using Walter Kaaden's revolutionary expansion-chamber tuning. Factory rider Ernst Denger defected to the west, and gave the technology to Suzuki which effectively ended the dominance of MZ, then known as MuZ. The reborn MZ of the 1990s was a bit like Triumph of the same period: both built an entire family of motorcycles around the same basic frame and engine. MZ's frame was actually a bit more sophisticated than the Triumph's, and they used Yamaha's torquey 660cc five-valve single and five-speed gearbox. The result? A brace of sportbikes, a sport-touring machine, a dual-sport, and even a supermoto.

The Replica really was a high-spec machine, aside from that relatively pedestrian engine. 50hp and a wet weight of just over 400lbs don't offer scorching straight line performance, but that wasn't the point at all. The Skorpion was still capable of an honest 110mph and those triple-disc brakes, with Brembo Gold Lines up front, should bring things to a halt quickly. When new, motorcycleonline.com claimed it "was one of the best handling bikes we have ever tested" helped no doubt by the light weight, the well-developed frame, and the adjustable WP suspension. 

From the original eBay listing: 1995 MZ Skorpion Replica for Sale

For Sale, my 1995 Replica, number 87.  A little over 3200 miles on the odometer.  It is silver and charcoal and has several chips on rear upper cover. The bike has never crashed, everything works.  It comes with tools, owners manual, good battery and good tires. It is currently registered and ridden.  This bike does not need any repairs. Sold “as is” the bike is in Rhode Island and is available to be viewed prior to purchase.

This particular MZ Skorpion Replica has very low mileage, is in excellent condition, and looks great in a very appropriately German silver color. Bidding is up to just over $3,000 although there is plenty of time left on the auction so I'm curious to see where this ends up. Regular Skorpions generally go for surprisingly low prices, but the Replica might generate a bit more attention: just 16 made their way to the US in 1996. Skorpions have become pretty popular with Sound of Singles racers of late, although this one seems way too nice and unusual to chop into a race hack. Instead, it'd make the perfect partner for embarrassing much faster machines on fast canyon rides.

-tad

Cheap and Fun: 1995 MZ Skorpion Replica for Sale
Yamaha September 4, 2017 posted by

Unblemished: Original, Thousand-Mile 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

Obviously, the first-generation Yamaha R1 isn't particularly rare in terms of production numbers: this revolutionary sportbike turned the category on it's ear, offering big power in a middleweight package, and it sold well as a result. I'm posting this one up because, unlike most of the R1s you'll find on eBay and Craigslist, this one is almost completely stock, is pretty much perfect, and is barely broken-in, with a mere 1,138 miles on the odometer. Collectors take note: this thing is so clean you could basically eat off of it, and the chain still has the white grease on it that came from the factory!

It wasn't the first time a manufacturer had done something revolutionary in the sportbike world, but Yamaha definitely shook up the establishment with their follow up to the fast, but relatively heavy YZF1000 Thunderace when they dropped their YZF-R1 on an unsuspecting world. Introduced in 1998 and built through 2001, the R1 caught the other major manufacturers completely by surprise. It used an evolution of Yamaha's famous "Deltabox" aluminum frame and their five-valve "Genesis" inline four, now backed a six-speed gearbox with stacked shafts to keep the wheelbase short and maximize swingarm length, instead of the five-speed fitted to its ancestor.

With 150hp and weighing in at 419lbs dry, the bike featured the expected literbike power in a package as light as 600cc supersports at the time and it's still a compelling performer today, missing just twenty or so horses and the electronic aids required to manage it. Braking and handling were excellent, although the lack of a steering damper was a bit of an oversight, considering the power and handling available. Maintenance was a bit of a nightmare however: all that compact packaging meant plug changes and carb rejetting took more time on the R1 than they had on previous bikes. A small price to pay for such near perfection.

This particular bike has been lightly modified, but has just 1,138 miles on it. And it hasn't just been sitting in a corner, collecting dust on flat tires: it appears to have been lovingly maintained and is a very nice example in classic red-and-white "speedblock" Yamaha colors, although the R1 also came in a very striking blue.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

Up for sale my all stock, unmolested, absolutely 1138 actual miles R1. If you're looking for a first generation show collector R1 this is the real deal... You're not going to hear what the bad things are because there are no bad things: it's stunning in every way. It's new really like off the showroom floor. It's been in a climate controlled environment with humidity controlled at around 35% at all times. It still has that new bike smell when it's running if you know what I mean.

Still has the stock tires on it (Dunlop Sportmax 207's) which are in perfect shape with no dry rot. Stock chain still has the white grease on it as shown in pics. Only thing not stock is undertail and turn signals done in 2001. If you look at pics you can clearly see the nuts and bolts are still in new condition to match the authenticity of what condition the bike is. Inside of fairings and underneath also matches authenticity. It runs flawless with no hesitation at all. It has been kept up with oil changes every year just for show/collector status and preventative maint. Same for gas only non ethanol every 6 months with 2oz. of sea foam added at every fill. Bike is truly I think probably the nicest you will find in the US.Maybe the world. No dents dings, no fairings are cracked no broken tabs nothing at all. I mean just looking at the key ignition area you can tell. Fires to life after first push of sta rter button every time. Charging system perfect. It's a new bike really just kept in a time machine literally. That's really all I can say about the bike it's the real deal folks. The bike still to this day people ask new bike and I say no it's a 2000, they're shocked.

My feedback should speak for itself so no worries. If it's not what you expected I will give your money back I'm that honest in my description. Shipping is at your cost not mine but I will help out anyway I can to accommodate your needs. You're more than welcome to come look before you buy as matter fact I encourage you to if you're local. You will be so glad you got it and very proud. Just hope someone takes good care of it. That's it really nothing else to say. Ask any questions you want I will answer. More pics just ask.

The seller doesn't mention the frame sliders, but a little protection is no bad thing, and those turn signals aren't original, but I'd expect they are easy to source and put back to stock. It's hard to get my brain around the fact that someone would buy such a competent, easy-to-use motorcycle and then just basically maintain it, but for those of us who missed out on these soon-to-be collectible motorcycles, this offers up the chance to basically buy one new, only 17 years later...

-tad

Yamaha August 5, 2017 posted by

Bike of the Decade: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale

The Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP was named "Bike of the Decade" [the 1980s] by Cycleworld magazine, meaning it faced down some very tough competition, including the Ducati 851, Suzuki RG500, and the original GSX-R750. What made it so special? Well servo-actuated exhaust valves are pretty ubiquitous these days, but the big FZR was the first four-stroke to feature one on its five-valve Genesis motor. Yamaha's EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve varied exhaust flow to maximize high rpm power and low rpm torque, two characteristics that were often considered mutually-exclusive.

The 145hp and 79 ft-lbs of torque from the 1002cc engine aren't big news today, but still make for a very fast bike, even considering the slightly porky 460lb dry weight: we're still talking about a bike with a legitimate 170mph top speed and a supremely flexible powerband. The basic engine and five-speed package was good enough that Bimota saw fit to slot it into their lightweight YB11, and bike that still has the performance to surprise folks weaned on much newer bikes. The rest of the package was equally well-developed, and this iteration featured Yamaha's Deltabox II frame, upside-down forks, and new styling that replaced the twin-lamp endurance-style fairing with a sleeker, single trapezoidal unit that found its way into a couple of Bimotas as well...

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale

Attention Collectors! Bike of the Decade... 1992 FZR 1000 EXUP Delta Box Genesis Great Condition / Survivor > Always stored indoors on carpet! extra Rare Corbin seat with back rest, plus original mint solo seat with fairing. Must see pictures. 8738 miles. Just serviced Clear Title / resides in living room / tank drained, carbs cleaned / clean unused oil, and new fluids, serious inquires, Seller reserves the right to end auction early for private or collector sale. Sold as is, wonderful bike.

The FZR1000 in red and white is a great looking example of a 90s superbike. It's not especially valuable as yet, but has the potential to appreciate as people snap up the few remaining pristine, low-mileage examples. The $7,500 the seller is asking is steep, but this looks like it's in very nice condition, with low miles so, if you're into Yamahas, this might be a great opportunity to add a nearly pristine example of this very functional sportbike to your collection.

-tad

Bike of the Decade: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale
Yamaha June 1, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale in California!

Update 6.2.2017: Sold in just 12 hours! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

If you have a rare sportbike for sale, model years 1980ish to 2004ish, consider our Featured Listing service for $59. Email me to see to get started: dan@motoringblogs.com

When you think of Yamaha's homologation specials, you probably picture their extremely exotic OW01, but this very nice FZR750RU fulfilled a similar purpose: to homologate the 750cc FZR for racing, in this case the American AMA Superbike series. Spec is far lower than the OW01, but so are current prices and if you're looking to get into a collectible Yamaha, this would be a far more affordable proposition, and one you could actually ride.

The FZR750RU weighed in at around 460lbs dry, had the typical 17" front and 18" rear wheels of the era, used a close-ratio six-speed gearbox, and was powered by a 749cc version of Yamaha's five-valve "Genesis" inline four. Interestingly, the very limited-production RU was the only 750cc Yamaha imported during this era: there was no "normal" version, at least here in the USA. Of course, if you wanted a Yamaha sportbike during the late 1980s, you had plenty of other options to choose from: the light and nimble FZR400, the everyman steel-framed FZR600, even the big-bore FZR1000.

Five-valve engines are pretty rare and, although Volkswagen and Ferrari have dabbled in the technology, it was Yamaha's calling card for years. Typically, you're looking at three intake and two exhaust valves, and although complexity is increased, there are multiple theoretical benefits. The three smaller valves flow fuel and air more effectively and fill the cylinder faster than two larger valves that would fit into the same space, and the configuration creates a compact combustion chamber so the mixture can burn more efficiently. In addition, the smaller, lighter intake valves have less inertia and put less stress on the springs that close them.

This particular example of the FZR750RU looks very clean and well cared-for, with original parts, owner's manuals, and lots of quality photographs. It's especially nice that the seller includes several pictures of the bike without its bodywork, showing off the aluminum Deltabox frame and other bits that can accumulate grime and significant wear. What is the price for this bit of Yamaha history? The seller is asking $7,500 and can be contacted here: Bike is SOLD

It should also be noted that Jay has been an RSBFS regular for years, buying and selling nearly 10 bikes through the site in that time.

From the Seller: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale

One owner 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU limited edition homologation motorcycle.  One of 200 imported into the US, only  4420 original miles, a rare bike that will continually rise in value.  The single owner took great care of this bike, it was a weekend rider for the for the first few years then it was parked and stored, last registered in 1995.  I have most of the original paperwork and documentation, including the original owners manual, service manual, warranty manual and I have the original title.  The owner is a retired engineer, he documented and cared for the bike as you would expect.  I have a stack of index cards filled with notes about the care and service of the bike. The factory service manual has signs of use and a few hand written notes. 

I have serviced the bike and ridden it about 50 miles.  The service included replacing all fluids (brake/clutch fluid, coolant, fuel and oil), ultrasonically cleaned and rebuilt carbs, drained and replaced the fuel.  I put a lot of time into cleaning the brake caliper pistons and seals.  I also replaced the rear brake pads, a few pieces of factory hardware and re-installed the stock screen.  The bike includes a few oil filters, a NOS set of tires, a aftermarket screen, a rear stand and some other small bits.  This bike is ready to ride except for the potentially original tires currently fitted.  Everything felt good when I rode it around but I haven't pushed it very hard. 

Targeted for the American market, the FZR750RU is not especially valuable yet and may never achieve the desirability of the OW01 but, with just 200 examples of the 1988 model built to exactly meet AMA minimum production numbers, it certainly has the potential to appreciate significantly, and it's a very handsome example of 80s sportbike style.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale in California!
Bimota November 1, 2016 posted by

Nineties Flyer: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale

1991-bimota-yb8-r-side

With lightweight bodywork held on by just a few bolts [note the one-piece tank-and-tail unit] and a plastic fuel cell, the Bimota YB8 used plenty of tricks learned on the racetrack and was pretty far ahead of its time. Based on the previous YB4 and YB6 but powered by the larger FZR1000 engine, approximately 250 were produced between 1990 and 1994. Bimota claimed 149hp from the FZR1000 engine, up a bit compared to the stock bike due to Bimota ignoring the "gentleman's agreement" of the time and applying the usual tuning tricks, and the inline four puts its power to the rear wheel through the Yamaha's standard five-speed box. Top speed is a 173mph but, as always with Bimota, it's the cornering that impresses the most.

1991-bimota-yb8-l-side

It's hard to blame a small manufacturer if they wanted to recycle or slightly update an existing frame, especially if the donor engines slot in easily. Looking at the later YB11, the frames look very similar and, as was pointed out by one of the Commentariat, I wonder if a Yamaha R1 engine and transmission might slot in there without too much persuading... Somehow, that doesn't seem to be as sacrilegious an idea as it would be for something like, say, a Ducati. The resulting bike should be a shade lighter than the original R1 if the manufacturers' dry weights are to be believed...

1991-bimota-yb8-clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale

Very are super bike, mint condition, needs nothing, we ship at buyer's expense can ship worldwide. Runs excellent, reasonable reserve, rare opportunity.

1991-bimota-yb8-r-side-rear

The listing doesn't include much information and the bike is clearly part of a larger collection. That's unfortunate although, obviously restoring that engine should be much easier than for some other obscure motorcycles. Bidding is up to just $5,200 with the Reserve Not Met, but Bimotas of this era seems to be going for around the $10,000 mark these days. Sure, for the price, you could buy a couple of nice Yamaha R1's, but that's hardly the point of this bit of Italian exotica.

-tad

1991-bimota-yb8-front

Nineties Flyer: 1991 Bimota YB8 for Sale