Posts by tag: Fireblade

Honda March 24, 2018 posted by

Order of Magnitude – 1998 Honda CBR900RR

Honda developed their Fireblade with an eye on the ruler and the scale, keeping size and weight down so the 893cc engine could provide open-bike performance. Though often seen in white/blue/red or black/purple/yellow livery, the pearlescent yellow on this CBR has a less trendy but outstanding appeal.

1998 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

Honda developed a new inline four for the CBR900RR, nearly as compact and weighing just thirteen pounds more than it's 599cc brother.  Engineers optimized mid-range torque for the new engine, resulting in 65 ft.-lbs. at 10,000 rpm and 122 hp available.  The 45mm Showa dual-adjustable forks and fully adjustable Showa/Pro-Link rear were judged overly taut for the real road, but this set has been professionally adjusted for a full size adult.  At 296mm the front disks aren't oversized, but with four-piston calipers they can get the job done.  The compact package turns sharper yet with 16-inch front and 17-inch rear wheels.

Evidently having only three owners, this CBR looks way better than its 24,000 miles normally would.  Mods were all done recently, and mostly don't detract from the CBR's good looks, which would be easier to mess up with the monochrome paint.  Turn signal smoothing and tail-tidying are fairly personal, and the factory parts are included for the new owner.  From the eBay auction:

This bike has a few tasteful upgrades.  All of which I did myself.  When I purchased this bike, it was 100% bone stock OEM condition.  So I have all of the stock parts too that I will include in with the purchase as I have no use for them. Here is a list of the upgrades I did to it:

- Micron polished slip on exhaust ($350)
- Front & rear suspension re worked by Race Tech suspension ($1,200)
- Zero Gravity dark smoke tinted windscreen ($50)
- Pro Grip carbon fiber tank pad protector ($20)
- New Bridgestone Battlax tires w/ about 300 miles on them now ($300)
- Smoke tinted LED tail light w/ integrated turn signals ($45)
- Rear fender mud guard removed & license plate raised up
- LED license plate light
- Front LED turn signals hidden inside front grill inlays ($30)
- Black brake & clutch levers ($25)

The 893cc CBR was just the first generation, and for 1994 the transmission was updated to improve shifting.  The succeeding years brought three increased engine sizes and fuel injection, but kept the core principles of compactness, light weight and mass-centralization.  Project leader Tadao Baba was a factory worker and veteran test rider, but not a designer or engineer.  His vision gave the CBR900RR a multi-year head start when compared to rival open-class machines.  This updated survivor looks like it wasn't ridden hard or put away wet, and it'll be interesting to see where bidding goes...

-donn

Order of Magnitude – 1998 Honda CBR900RR
Honda November 21, 2017 posted by

Baby ‘Blade: 1992 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

The Honda CBR400RR was designed to appeal to buyers in certain countries that were limited to bikes of smaller displacement because of tiered licensing requirements or heavy taxes on larger machines. Racing classes in those markets also existed to campaign 400cc motorcycles, and were hotly contested by the usual suspects: Yamaha, Suzuki, and Kawasaki also had smaller versions of their popular sportbikes. Honda even went a step further, and offered a second 400cc sportbike in their V4-powered VFR400R. Unlike today's smaller-displacement offerings, these were grown-up sportbikes in miniature: instead of a simple single-cylinder engine or an economical parallel-twin, the CBR400 used a 399cc inline four with sixteen valves, gear-driven twin overhead cams, backed by a six-speed gearbox, and suspended in a stiff aluminum frame. Straight-line performance was modest by today's standards, but bikes in the class had handling that was often better than their more powerful, but generally heavier siblings.

Americans saw a variation of this bike in the short-lived CB-1 that used a slightly detuned version of the CBR's inline four, including the sexy gear-driven cams, but wrapped in a steel frame instead of the CBR's lighter aluminum beam design. A lack of bodywork on the CB-1 kept the weight reasonable compared to the sportier CBR and the bike was a good handler, but Americans just weren't ready for a pricey, naked machine like that in the late 1980s. Would the CBR have sold any better, had it been brought over? America had a pretty binary motorcycling culture through the 80s and 90s: people bought sportbikes or cruisers, with little interest in more practical machines. The CBR would have been similar to Yamaha's offerings, whose little FZR400 was actually more sophisticated than the bigger-engined, but heavier, steel-framed FZR600. FZR400 is certainly a cult bike now, but its relative rarity suggests the CBR wouldn't have been much of a success at the time, although I expect it might have sold better than the CB-1.

At the end of the day, without the laws and taxes that conjured the 400cc class into being, there isn't much to recommend the bike over the CBR600 or CBR900, aside from superlative handling. The main appeal here is rarity, agility, and the fun of a motorcycle you can cane the hell out of without needing the skills of a professional racer, or a helicopter airlift ride to the nearest trauma center.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Honda CBR400RR for Sale

Very rare 1992 Honda CBR400 (baby Fireblade) NC29 legally imported from Japan and currently titled, insured and registered here in NJ. Bike has 13220 miles, fresh Motul (brake fluid, engine oil and coolant) fluids, TSR slip on, new NGK plugs, Continental Attack tires, carbs were cleaned and fuel tank drained/cleaned. This bike is very clean and in excellent condition. Please feel free to message if you have any questions. 

From the relatively low-resolution photos, this appears to be a very nice example of a cool, grey-market CBR400RR, but unfortunately the Buy It Now price is an eye-watering $9,500. New Jersey's DMV may not be as draconian as California's in terms of emissions requirements, but they're even more strict in other ways, so the NJ title and registration suggests that the seller hasn't cut any corners making this legal although, as always, caveat emptor.

-tad

Baby ‘Blade: 1992 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale
Honda May 26, 2017 posted by

Battle of the 400s! Honda CBR400RR or Kawasaki ZXR400R

The collection from Utah keeps on giving! Up for grabs this week is your choice of either a CBR400RR or a ZXR400R; both are 1995 models, but winning the auction only allows you to choose one. So which of these two ultra-rare grey bikes do you choose? Read on before you decide!

From the seller:
These two 400's will be the last of the bikes I will be listing for sale. I've sold a lot of bikes and the honey hole is running dry.

This is a YOUR CHOICE auction. Up for your consideration is a 1995 Honda CBR400RR Fireblade with 22,014 kilometers (13,678 miles) or a 1995 Kawasaki Ninja ZXR400R with 25,254 kilometers (15,692 miles). High bidder will have their choice of bikes. You don't get both bikes, you only get to choose ONE for your high bid. Both bikes have scratches and scrapes throughout. The Fireblade has a Fat Daddy aftermarket muffler installed but also comes with its original stock OEM muffler included. Both bikes are in great condition and would make great candidates for restoration. Both bikes run perfectly like the day they were new. Both bikes will have new batteries, new fluids and filters serviced. Both bikes come with Utah state titles and are titled as motorcycles for street use. Fairings and components on both bikes are 100% OEM factory original. Both look very nice and have good curb appeal.


1995 Honda CBR400RR Fireblade



1995 Kawasaki ZXR400R Ninja



There has been some good feedback about this seller in the RSBFS comments section (see this post here) and we have definitely seen some amazing motorcycles. But how would you choose between one of these little rocket ships? Neither is exactly in concours condition, but that might just be the appeal. Both are riders, meaning that you could pick one, thrash on it until your face hurts from smiling so much, and then park it knowing that you did not just ruin some zero mile investment. You can check the auction out here. Activity has been moderate thus far, and the current bid for one of these beauties sits at $6k with a reserve still in place.

If you are looking to add a grey-market 400 to your collection, this is a great opportunity. This seller has liquidated a serious number of bikes, and this is the end of that line. It is rare to see a collection such as this thinned out in one fell swoop, but it is certainly exciting to watch! Act now for one of these housebroken machines; it may be some time before we see the likes of them again. Good Luck!!

MI

Battle of the 400s!  Honda CBR400RR or Kawasaki ZXR400R
Honda April 6, 2017 posted by

Obtainable: 1993 Honda CBR900RR

After a spate of Laverdas, Benellis and unobtainable Ducatis, this loved and used 900RR is a breath of fresh air. Here is a bike that begs to be ridden - and you CAN ride it because it is not a zero mile, museum quality garage queen. This is something mere mortals can own. And given that it is a first gen RR Honda, mere mortals *should* own one. At least once.

1993 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

Created with the singular goal of mass centralization, the CBR900RR was essentially an upgraded CBR600 chassis stuffed with slightly less than a 1-liter powerplant. A true factory hot rod, this was literally the size of a middleweight - but punched in a much, much higher weight class than that. It may see a bit tame today in the eyes of 200 HP rockets from the Big Four and BMW, but in the early 1990s this was revolutionary. The CBR900RR was the poster child for the hyperbike. It was all about handling and speed, and the 900RR delivered. In time the line evolved to the 929RR and 954RR, but the bike that started the revolution was this one: the Honda 900RR.

From the seller:
This is a great example of a classic un-molested low miles fireblade.

Comes with a clear Nevada title in hand with keys ready to ride home today.

14k miles (if you aren't familiar with the 900rr they have legendary longevity when it comes to Japanese sportbikes look into it)

Also has original tool kit, original front turn signals, service manual, And also Original brake reservoir cover and matching tank cover (not shown in photos)

This is an absolutely iconic sport bike, and most consider this color scheme to be the most sought after of the bunch, It just has that look of the 90s. I won't toot its horn too much as I will assume most people know what it is.

The seller has included a video of the bike in question as well. You have been forewarned: jump to the 1:02 mark, or turn your speakers off. The canned music is truly horrible. Thankfully the video includes the bike running, which makes up for the first minute of torture:

This is a used bike that has some 14k on the odometer. Like most vehicles that are nearly 25 years old, this one has some minor aging issues. The seller notes the various items in the ad. The Two Brothers exhaust looks and sounds good. I'm not a big fan of the rear fender delete (or the saggy turn signals), but it looks like a pair of stock units are included in the sale; these look like the front stalks, so you might need to inquire about the rears. Other than that, this appears to be a pretty well-kept survivor.

The best part of all of it is that this is a no reserve auction. Somebody is going home with a new-to-them motorcycle by the end of it all. Bidding is currently in the $3k arena at time of writing, and there are several days remaining before the gavel comes down. Bidding has been relatively active, which shows that there is interest in both this model as well as this price range. Check it out here. We do not see all that many first gen 900RR models, and when it comes to valuation these are likely the first to serious appreciate. Share your thoughts in the Comments section, and Good Luck!!

MI

Obtainable: 1993 Honda CBR900RR
Yamaha March 19, 2017 posted by

Collector Alert: 1998 Yamaha R1 with 4395 miles

1998 Yamaha R1 on ebay

Ahh the Yamaha YZF R1...not just the bike that moved the motorcycle world beyond the legendary Honda CBR900RR/ Fireblade but also the template for pretty much every superbike that followed.   When it was introduced the YZF-R1 changed the expecation of what a street superbike could by packaging a power to weight ratio that had only seen on pure track machines with a bike comfortable enough to use everyday.  It shouldn't be a surprise the R1 was named as "One-Of-The-10-Sportbikes-you-have-to-own!" by Practical Sportbikes in their Oct 2016 issue.   As motorcycling editor Phil West wrote

"In producing the  YZF R1 (Kunihiko) Miwa and his team not only revolutionized sportbike design, they created the template for every superbike to this day."

For anyone unfamiliar with the R1 development history, in 1996 most inside Yamaha believed the market for super-sportbikes was static or decreasing.  Faced with this lack of growth Yamaha decided the only path was to get a bigger share of the market "pie".  Authorization was given to start working on a new superbike with a mandate that it had to position Yamaha for both race and sales success.  This was a tall order given that the competition included the legendary Honda CBR900/Fireblade.

Lead by Kunihiko Miwa, a team of Yamaha engineers undertook the project guided by thee major concepts; make it have the highest power, make it have the lowest weight, and make ii have the most compact dimensions.  The result was a design that shortened the length of the engine by vertically stacking the gearbox (an unheard of feature for a streetbike) and then joined it with a new lightweight frame developed around the concept of ultra-light weight and rider control/ergonomics.  New handlebars/clipons, one piece brakes and even LCD gauges were all incorporated into the design.

Upon its launch in late 1997 the R1 delivered 150ps while weighing only 177kg  (that's 148gbp and 390 pounds in Imperial).  Not only did the R1 dramatically exceeded the performance of the competition, it and reset the bar that had been established by the Honda CBR900RR/Fireblade earlier in the decade, it also seemed like it came from a different planet compared to the Thunderace it was replacing.

This particular R1 is in the first year blue/silver color scheme which seems to have been more popular than the white/red style.  Condition looks to be absolutely pristine and the seller does a very good job with the photos showing the bikes condition.   While service history/details aren't much that is to be expected given the very low mileage.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • No scratches, only a few pin size marks from road dust
  • Mileage under 5000
  • Original exhaust changed when new, inever used and comes with the bike
  • Original paint, seats, tires and rear bike stand
  • Original books, keys, Bill of sale, copy of MSO, original title, service records and shop manual.
  • Bike has had only 2 collector owners in its 19 year pampered life.   Always stored in Heated and Air Conditioned Collector Garage

So what is this benchmarking blue beauty worth?  The current asking price for this one is at $6995 USD which is kind of high in my opinion but not out of line with what we have seen previously on RSBFS.  While this one is not in the red and white bodywork more currently prized by collectors, it is in amazing shape.  I think a fair price for this one is about $6400, maybe a bit more if the seller throws in fresh rubber or shipping.

One final note - I think is important to recognize that just a few years ago a 1st year Yamaha R1 wasn't high on the list of future classics for most collectors.  Everyone seemed to think it was a great bike, probably the final great sport bike of the 1990's, and yes it dethroned the Honda CBR900RR/Fireblade, but a future classic?  While these same collectors were probably still searching for a Ducati 916SP or Kawasaki Zx7RR or perhaps even a first year CBR900RR/Fireblade, prices for first year R1's were  starting to move up and are now no longer cheap.  The value will probably continue to rise over time so this might be a rare chance to get one before prices get out of reach.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Collector Alert:  1998 Yamaha R1 with 4395 miles
Honda January 17, 2017 posted by

Survivability – 1995 Honda CBR900RR

Honda designers set their sights on a slighter, lighter superbike for the early 1990's and based the new model on a 750cc in-house prototype. With a new 893cc engine installed, the resulting package was just a tad heavier than Honda's own 600, and had a substantial weight advantage on other unlimiteds.

1995 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

With Fred Merkel's '88-89 Superbike World Championships in the rearview view mirror, Honda executives wanted something new at the superbike end of the showroom.  New for 1992, the CBR900RR used the alloy twin-spar chassis, with aluminum swingarm.   For the 1994 update, Showa revised the spring rates for the cartridge forks and rear shock for the Pro-Link progressive rear.  The forks also had adjustable compression damping to help tame the quick front end with its 16-inch wheel.  A new nose for the fairing incorporated asymmetrical "fox-eye" headlights, another weight saver.

Under 10,000 miles and 20 years separate this CBR from the dealer's floor, and though it'd be hard to call almost any Honda rare, how many double-R's have been tucked away clean and stock ?  The Jersey-based owner keeps his comments spare in the eBay auction:

Very Rare Like New

Everything is original except D&D Slip-on

Peculiarly without a racing class since WSBK ruled a four-cylinder could displace only 750cc, the open-class CBR900RR set the world on its ear, with weight and handling from the class below, and power a match for any liter bike.  The angular and modern 1994 update remained true to the formula.  After that the inevitable weight gain and mission creep nudged the model toward daily driver or sport-touring realm.  For fans of the brand or the 'Blade, the 1994-5 model year is a great choice, and this example is unfettered with low miles...

-donn

Survivability – 1995 Honda CBR900RR