Posts by tag: Featured Listing

Honda January 8, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR400R / NC30 – Super Clean !

Update 1.8.2018: Now on eBay, links added. -dc

Long-time friend and regular around RSBFS, Greg at Deftone Cycles had some kind of luck with his last shipment of gray-market machines. This 1990 VFR400R has just about 14,000 km ( 8,500 miles ) but the condition is exceptional.  The third generation was certainly the charm for the petite Honda, as the NC30 variant had the widest torque band, least twitchy handling, and outstanding build quality.

1990 Honda VFR400 for sale on eBay

The NC30 was built for 4 years, an eternity in the fast-moving sportbike world.  Honda's well-tested 399cc V-4 generates the nice whir of gear-driven cams, as well as 59 hp.  The NC30 re-introduced the 360-degree crankshaft, where pairs of cylinders fire together for a torquier delivery.  The chassis was revised for the 1990 model year and reviewed as the strongest and most stable of the 400-four stroke group.  House suspension is adjustable for preload and rebound, and triple discs are appropriately sized at 269mm.  Styled like its 750cc sibling, the VFR400 shows off the single-sided swingarm with a 4-2-1 left side exhaust.

Requiring very little refurbishment, this monochromatic VFR is stock except for the exhaust and without most of the usual corrosion.  Greg has this to say about the bike :

100 percent stock. Except aftermarket Header and Silencer.
Condition: Excellent.
Right side lower fairing stress cracks.
Small hairline fracture upper left.
Mileage: 8,647 / 13,917 Km

Though shoot-outs from the day accused Honda of resting on their laurels, the easier-to-ride VFR400 may have been the best solution for its intended fledgling riders, if not aspiring racers.  The drivetrain is more tractable than the usual pint-size, and the package is surprisingly capable for a junior - skilled riders will find their rewards.  Deftone Cycles asks $7,500 for the pleasure and Greg can be reached - here -

-donn

Featured Listing – 1990 Honda VFR400R / NC30 – Super Clean !
Kawasaki December 16, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale

There are no points for second place. Unbeknownst to Kawasaki and Honda, both manufacturers were developing the Next Big Thing in the 1970s, an affordable, reliable, inline four-cylinder motorcycle displacing 750cc's. Unfortunately, Honda's CB750 was first to market by several months, leaving Kawasaki with the unenviable choice: be the also-ran, or delay their machine to come up with something special. The Z1 that followed may not have been first, but the 903cc engine meant its performance blew the CB750 into the weeds, and the Kawasaki Z1R seen here was an evolution of that muscular 70s machine.

Of course, by the time the Z1R was introduced, the overall package was pretty long-in-the-tooth, with a dual-shock rear suspension and spindly front forks. Most of the updates were cosmetic, with more modern, angular styling and cast wheels. Frame reinforcements and triple disc brakes improved handling and stopping, and a displacement bump to 1015cc took care of the straight-line performance enhancements. The 550lb wet weight and long wheelbase mean that it won't exactly carve corners, but that same long wheelbase should make it easy to blast away from stoplights in a howling cloud of tire and exhaust smoke.

While the Z1R may not have been cutting-edge when it was new, time has been kind to it and the crisp styling and classy silver-blue color look very sharp today. Like all 70s muscle bikes, the Z1R has definitely been increasing in value, perhaps as a result of its association with its even wilder sibling, the turbocharged Z1R TC. The seller refers to this as a "nut and bolt, frame-off restoration" and it certainly looks the part.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale

Coming out of my private collection (only because I just restored another 1978 Z1R) is my matching numbers 1978 Kawasaki Z1R with 9,300 original miles in pristine restored condition. This was a full nut and bolt, frame-off restoration with no expense spared, with over $20,000 in parts, labor, and paint refinishing.

The engine was completely disassembled and bead-blasted, then rebuilt to factory specifications with new: pistons, rings, camshafts, cam chain and adjuster, transmission undercut, multi-angle valve job, bearings, seals, carburetors were rebuilt and synchronized, all the hardware new old stock "NOS" or re-plated/zinced/re-chromed.

The frame was bead-blasted, treated, and powder-coated in a matching "OEM" black finish. The forks and brake calipers/master cylinders were completely rebuilt. The wheels were bead-blasted and powder-coated back to "OEM" standards with new tires, "NOS" cables, and wiring harness.

The bodywork was meticulously refinished using the "OEM" paint code and looks like it did when it sat on the Kawasaki showroom floor. The tank and side cover emblems are new old stock "NOS." The original Kawasaki 4-into-1 Z1R exhaust has been replaced with a very similar late 70s triple-chromed 4-into-1 exhaust that looks stock but sounds better. 

Every single part, nut, and bolt has either been replaced with new, rebuilt, or refinished to the highest "OCD" restoration standard. She looks, starts, and runs just like she did in 1978. Please don't hesitate to call or text me with any questions or concerns: 954-816-0806 Bob.

This immaculate, show-winning Z1R is worthy of any motorcycle museum, and will be your pride and joy, sitting in your private collection.

Don't miss out. Tell your wife these bikes are appreciating 15% or more each year and you can get it in time for Christmas.

Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas!

Honestly, I haven't crunched the numbers, but I'd bet he's right about that rate of appreciation: the values of 1970s superbikes have been steadily climbing for years now, and with plenty of folks who owned these when they were new looking to relive a lost youth, I don't see that changing anytime soon. Plus, if you do need to sell the significant other on your intended purchase, keep in mind that long, flat 1970s seat should make it a viable date-night ride, compared to a more modern sportbike!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale
Bimota December 2, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing – 2001 Bimota V-Due Evoluzione Corsa with Zero Miles !

1.15.2018: The owner has informed me that this bike has sold! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

What could have been the Bimota BB-2 was called the V-Due and had Bimota's own engine, a modern two-stroke, fuel-injected 500cc twin.  However the army of engineers Bimota didn't have allowed the project to proceed with a faulty crankcase and caused a recall which virtually bankrupted the company.  In the throes of it the factory developed a race series and released a number of machines in racing trim, as the Trofeo, and then as customer Evoluzione Corsa machines, of which this example is presented with zero miles.

Bimota originally envisioned the V-Due as a GP racer, but sold road-ready machines to keep the lights on or homologate the design.  Powered like a liter-bike but weighing in like an F2, the new-technology 500 could have been a game changer.  Behind the upper edges of the endurance fairing were the oval aluminum tubes of the perimeter frame, suspended in front with 46mm Paoli forks, and in the rear by Ohlins monoshock.  The slippery monoposto was brought to a halt by 320mm Gold Line Brembo brakes.

The V-Due Evoluzione Corsa was delivered without signals or mirrors and with lights faired over, and carbon used liberally to keep the weight well under 400 lbs.  Twin Dell-Orto carburetors replaced the fuel injection, decals declared Evoluzione on the fairing.  The expansion chambers wind their way under the seat fairing and circle back to the twin carbon mufflers.  Antera designed and produced 17-inch alloys especially for the build.

Having never been fueled or started, this Evoluzione is in a display-ready class by itself.  While many have been ridden and worked on to address running issues, careful storage and preservation has resulted in a virtually perfect example.  Here are the owner's comments:

2001 Bimota Vdue 500 Racing (Evoluzione Corsa), as new and never been run. Complete with original stand, cover, mirrors, spare keys (still joined as from factory), owners handbooks and import/delivery literature. This bike has been carefully stored in climate controlled surroundings since import to South Africa in 2004. Before taking delivery, the seller sent her Ducati South Africa for a full run-through, hand turn, and check of everything. She has been prepared for storage, and remained in this state since. This is the Vdue to own, the 135hp version without the FI engine issues/peaky power delivery, numbered tags/vin (can be registered), and in my opinion the prettiest livery in motoGP guise – with the headlight blank, those race pipes and that digital dash - Rare, pure 90’s exotica.

Bimota suffered a short shutdown after the V-Due saga but regained their stature as a developer of exotic sports and racing motorcycles.  The company is currently focused on Ducati engines, and offers their Tesi frame as well as a more conventional sportbike and a city-sport.  With reports earlier this fall of another plant closure, Bimota's amazing story may need to be continued by a new investor.  The V-Due holds an interesting spot as Bimota's only bike with their own powerplant.

Justin's V-Due continues to be stored in South Africa, and he asks $39,000. 

Featured Listing – 2001 Bimota V-Due Evoluzione Corsa with Zero Miles !
Ducati November 28, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Very Clean 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale

Update 11.27.2017: The seller has renewed the Feature Listing for this very clean 748S and has dropped the price to $4,950. Thanks for helping to support the site Brett and good luck to potential buyers! -dc

2001 Ducati 748S R Side Glamour

America is the land of Golden Corral, the endless buffet, a place where "more is better" and we often shop by the pound. Do we really need an endless pizza buffet? Of course not, but wow, what a deal! And in that world, a bike like the Ducati 748 makes little sense. I mean, for just a couple grand more, wouldn't you rather have the 916? If you finance it, it's just like $40 more per month. But people who subscribe to that reasoning really will never understand the 748.

2001 Ducati 748S R Naked

It’s a situation where less really is more. Sure, the 916 came first, and the 996/998 are definitely more powerful. But the frame and suspension were identical, and the 748 came with a narrower rear tire that gave the bike sharper handling and better turn-in while that smaller engine was sweeter, revvier, and still made a solid 95hp. The bike needed to be worked just that much harder to get the most from it and, since the entire 916 series was a complete disaster when not being properly caned, it’s not like you’re really missing out on a relaxed experience the package never provided anyway.

2001 Ducati 748S Engine

Today’s featured listing isn’t some zero-mileage garage queen, and about 13,000 miles have rolled under the wheels since 2001. But while there may be examples out there with fewer miles on them, there aren’t too many that are cleaner. And even better, this one is yellow.  I realize that many purists will disagree, but I actually prefer yellow to the more traditional red. There aren’t too many motorcycles that look good in yellow, but this is one of them.

2001 Ducati 748 Rear Clutch

From the seller: 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale

While it may not be as collectable as a 748 ‘RS,’ or ‘R,’ - it is in excellent shape.  And the 748 S, while not sporting a number badge, is a series of Ducati that can be hard to find nowadays,  if you’re looking for a lower mileage, supremely clean, professionally maintained, and nearly OEM example.  There are plenty of monopostos out there, but not as many actual ‘S’ series – with the proper TiN Showa suspension, adjustable steering head, grey frame, and grey 5 spoke Marchesini wheel upgrades. 

The Termignoni exhaust is a professional repack and has under 500 miles – the canister carbon is in amazing shape.  A lot of the carbon on the Termis turned amber from years of heat.  Not this set.  These are now very hard to find in good shape.

Also: Carbon fiber clutch cover, cowl, and rear wheel hugger. 

Like the 749R that you provided the featured listing for, this cycle has been ridden constantly, about 850 miles per season. Never in the rain, never on a track. Dedicated mechanic. Kept in a heated garage. 

Timing belt replacement and complete tune and safety inspection less than 1000 miles ago by ECS in Middletown, NY.  Less than 500 miles on Michelin Power Pilots.  Cover and Pit Bull stand would go with the cycle.

2001 – 13,200 miles.

Asking price is $4,950 and the owner can be contacted by email: Brett.Demello@kregtool.com.

2001 Ducati 748 Exhausts

As the seller mentions, the S model isn’t as collectible as the more desirable R, but you do get the very nice Showa suspension front and rear, including the titanium-nitride forks, along with very stylish five-spoke Marchesini wheels that I prefer to the earlier three-spoke items. And you can’t go wrong with the glorious noise generated by a classic set of carbon Termignoni cans.

Certainly, you can find a 748 for less than the seller is asking, but you probably won't find one better and I think this represents a very good opportunity for fans of the Tamburini superbikes.

-tad

2001 Ducati 748S R Side

Featured Listing: Very Clean 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale
Suzuki October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Like Ducati’s MotoGP inspired Desmosedici, the square four in the Suzuki RG500Γ "Gamma" in today's Featured Listing wasn’t actually a detuned version of the race bike's engine. Race bikes engines are built for power, not longevity, and simply “de-tuning” is probably not going be enough to make one work in a road bike. So in both cases, the engines shared the configuration and general specifications with their MotoGP racebike counterparts, but few or no actual parts. Which almost makes them cooler in my mind: in both cases, the one-off engines were built to be installed in a very limited run of exotic motorcycles, with no intention that they be mass-produced or turn much of a profit. These engines and bikes exist seemingly only for a very small group of enthusiasts, and there's something inherently cool about that. Also, I love using the Greek alphabet typing up these posts.

The "configuration and general specifications" we're talking about in this case refers to the two-stroke, twin-crank, disc-valve square four that displaced 498cc. Four very compact Mikuni flat-slides fed fuel and air into the engine, and the gearbox was a quick-change cassette six-speed. Of course it featured a power valve system, in this case Suzuki's AEC or Automatic Exhaust Control that helped smooth out the two-stroke's abrupt powerband. The result? The Gamma put just a bit less than 100hp worth of stinky, heavy exhaust smoke out of its four tiny stinger exhaust pipes.

The rest of the bike was more familiar, with an aluminum frame not all that different from the GSX-R, with hydraulic anti-dive forks in the front and Suzuki's "Full-Floater" system out back. Skinny period 16" front and 17" rear wheels mean terrifyingly skinny tires that look like they'd be more at home on a beach-cruiser bicycle today, but were par for the course in 1986. With 340lbs worth of dry weight to push around and less than 100 horses to do it with, performance seems like it would be unimpressive. But it's the very nature of that spiky power delivery, the all-or-nothing acceleration that requires constant use of the gearbox to make fast progress, the challenge that seems to get two-stroke fans excited.

Unless you're "of a certain age" or younger and a bit of a bike nerd, the appeal of the whole two-stroke thing may fly over your head. They're smoky, buzzy, and generally pretty high-maintenance. They also have famously narrow and fairly abrupt powerbands, making them challenging to ride quickly. But even though they do require more regular maintenance than a four-stroke motorcycle, the upside is that they're relatively simple to work on, lacking traditional intake valves, and therefore cams, cam chains, cam belts, pushrods, or any of the other bits typically associated with "normal" motorcycles.

This particular bike is claimed to have seen the attention of the famous Rick Lance during its refresh and appears to be in extremely nice condition, ready to become the showcase of the next owner's collection and hopefully be the talk of every motorcycle gathering when the new owner takes it out for a spin and stretches its legs.

 

From the Seller: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for Sale

Located in Greater Chicagoland Area 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

This 1986 RG500 Gamma with 17,769 km (approximately 11,041 miles) is in near mint original condition.  It comes out of the famous BAC car and motorcycle collection. It was extremely well cared for by the previous owner and the current owner.  BAC has owned this bike for almost ten years.  The current owner searched for almost two years to find the best one that could be found.  After purchasing the bike, he had Mike the Chicagoland expert on Gammas along with Rick Lance, a Gamma guru, to supply necessary technical information to bring this bike back to its original factory condition and near mint condition.  The bike runs just as you would expect an original factory bike to run.  And looks exactly like an original factory bike would look after only a few thousand miles were put on it.

Over the years many of these bikes have either been raced into the ground or had the engines pulled out to put in a smaller bike leaving the close to mint original bikes very few and far between.  The current elderly owner has collected cars and motorcycles and says that these Gammas have a long way to go in terms of appreciation and wants to be sure that the next owner is going to preserve the intrinsic and cosmetic value as he has invested so much time, energy and money to bring this bike to its highest level.

Mike the master Gamma mechanic and Rick spent two long years getting this bike and all its necessary parts together to make this bike one of the finest original Gamma’s that exists.

Great bike for those who want only the finest and priced accordingly.

Asking price is $18,500 negotiable.

Other two-stroke GP replicas of the period compromised: the RD500LC famously added a balance shaft to make the bike more civilized, while Honda's NS400R went with a smaller displacement to help home-market sales. Both offered a much more refined experience, and both have a far less rabid cult following than the RG500 as a result. Prices have been steadily rising, although the RD and NS have increased in value as well, perhaps simply because RGs have been nearly unobtainable for a while now. If you've been looking for an RG and have the cash to spend, this one is worth a look.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale
Ducati October 3, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 10.3.2017: Recently serviced at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $19,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email: adam_chovanak@yahoo.com

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 $19,500 which seems fair, considering what regular F1s have been going for of late. As you may have guessed, this Featured Listing is being offered by the same seller as yesterday's RG400Γ and it is also a Japanese import, with paperwork that should allow the bike to be legally titled, depending on your local DMV.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale