Posts by tag: Featured Listing

Kawasaki June 27, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale

Sometimes, bikes are meant to be accessible, and offer real-world riding fun and performance. Sometimes, they're just meant to showcase potential, to flaunt a manufacturer's capability, to kick sand in the face of competitors. The H2 and H2R fall into this category. Does anyone actually need a nearly 300hp track-only motorcycle? Of course not. Reviews of the bike regularly use phrases like "mind-blowing" and "I needed to change my shorts." Sure, it's really too heavy for a track bike, doesn't fit into any race-legal category, makes too much power to be practical, and will probably cause nearby dB meters to melt but, as a statement of what's possible, you can't beat the Kawasaki H2R.


Named after the fabled two-stroke triple of the 1970s, the new H2 is a much more well-rounded beast: it's got actual brakes and a frame that doesn't hinge in the middle, for example. It's heavy, at 475lbs full of fuel, but that just helps add a bit of stability to keep the supercharged engine's power from looping it over backward at every opportunity. That's certainly something it has in common with the old two-stroke: shocking performance. And striking looks: the older bike was fairly conventional-looking but came in some wild, 70s colors. The new machine is seriously evil-looking with a bright green trellis frame and mirrored bodywork that looks stunning in person.

To clarify, if you've seen one of these on the road, you were most likely looking at the road-legal H2 version of the bike. That makes do with around 200hp and comes with a headlight, taillight, and  rear-view mirrors. The H2R ditches all of the DOT-required frippery and replaces the mirrors with a set of evil, mantis-forelimb-looking winglets made of carbon-fiber that will set you back a cool $1,500 a piece if you tip the bike over... The slick-shod R also comes with 35psi of boost and somewhere near 300hp that's accompanied by an ear-splittingly loud exhaust. Seriously, you won't be able to ride this track-only bike at any race track that has a dB limit, and British journalists weren't even able to test the bike on their home turf because it is too loud for most tracks there.

So what is the H2R? It's an indulgent track day toy, a living room showpiece, a collectible motorcycle that's likely to appreciate in the future. Today's featured listing is several years old but is basically a brand new motorcycle, and comes with all the factory goodies.

From the seller: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale

H2R! Yes! For sale, real! You can buy it today! Not wait for 8 month from the factory just has 99 miles on it without any issues, the bike looks like brand new. (May ride it more until time of sale.) I can  modify this bike for street legal also, the headlight, mirrors, turn signals, number plate holder, tires, must change. I can do it for $1500 for you. But as I heard it is not able to register in CA still. Registration will be by you. I do just technical job. 

It comes with:
Great 400 page service manual, owner's manual 
OEM tools
Great NiNJA coffee table book (Value $800)
Front and rear OEM H2R Kawasaki Stands (value $1800)
Tire warmer (value $900)
The bike imported and ready to register in your name 
Can ship all over the world for just $3000 (include insurance) in 3-5 days.
As the custom Tax in importing countries may be high, we can make the bike as CKD (remove fairings, wheels, forks, tank and pack in as parts) for free!
H2R made just 20 in 2015 and 20 for 2016. no 2017 production anymore.  

you may find more pictures and movie in this link: https://www.cycletrader.com/listing/2015-Kawasaki-NINJA-H2R-121673996

The H2R sold for $53,000 when it was new. This one is basically new, with barely 100 miles on the odometer, and the seller is asking $49,000. For the second year, the frame was changed from the lurid, metallic green seen here to a silver to match the bodywork. It's classier and more subtle for sure, but I think that sort of misses the point. This bike exists to be outrageous, to shatter eardrums, to overwhelm, to offend. The "regular" H2 might have been at least on the same planet as more familiar machines, but the H2R is on another level altogether.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale
Ducati June 19, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

Unlike some retro-styled motorcycles that sacrifice performance for style, Ducati's SportClassics really allow you to have your cake and eat it too: they look great, with a nice blend of classic and modern styling cues, excellent handling, and enough power to satisfy the more mature riders that might have remembered the original bikes that inspired these modern interpretations. After a great deal of initial buzz, demand fell off pretty quickly and the SportClassics were discontinued after just a few years, but demand on the used market remains high, especially for the original Sport 1000 and Paul Smart 1000LE as seen in today's Featured Listing.

The blue and silver colors and half-fairing are obviously meant to evoke the machine that won the Imola 200 in 1972 and basically put Ducati's v-twin motorcycles on the map and the 1000DS that powered the Paul Smart and the larger, 1100 version that followed represent the pinnacle of Ducati's oil and air-cooled v-twin. Faced with tightening emissions controls and increased demands for power, Ducati decided to create a twin-plug version of their two-valve engine: those big pistons mean that for efficient combustion, two spark plugs are better than one, and the performance increase required a less comprehensive overhaul of the engine than a change from two to four valves would have. Power claims of 92hp are modest but, coupled with very respectable torque and a flexible midrange, it makes an ideal road bike engine.

Quality suspension and geometry of the SportClassic line made that power easy to exploit, although the wire wheels are much more a fashion statement, as they're obviously heavier than is necessary, and the Pirelli Phantoms originally fitted were grippy enough, but fitted mainly for style as well as their tread pattern was designed specifically to mimic older tires. This bike has had a replacement set of Diablos fitted, which should be much more in line with the suspension's sporting capabilities. It's largely stock, except from some bolt-on dress up items that are of generally high quality. I personally prefer Zard's slightly wilder exhaust option for the solo-seat Sport 1000 and Paul Smart, but you can't go wrong with a classic set of Termis!

From the Seller: 2006 Paul Smart Limited Edition #1668 of 2000 for Sale

US Bike located in Vancouver Canada.

9,300 miles

Absolutely mint with all OEM parts included with a few tastefully installed aftermarket parts including:
-Termignoni Shotgun Exhaust
-HDESA Clutch Spring Cap
-Speedymoto Open Clutch Cover
-Speedymoto Frame Sliders
-Sato Rearsets
-Luimoto Suede Seat and Tank Belt
-Regulator rectifier relocation

All maintenance done. New battery. New Pirelli Diablo tires.

$23,000 USD
Jacky Wang
jacky_wang99@hotmail.com
Will not accept Paypal. The bike can easily be exported to USA as it is a US bike with the speedometer in miles. Can help to arrange shipping but you need to visit in person and pay in cash.

So the seller is asking $23,000 for this very nice example. That might seem like a ton of money for a ten year old, 92hp motorcycle but it's in line with what we've seen lately for the Paul Smarts, and the very nice images give a good idea of the attention that appears to have been lavished on the bike. These have, unfortunately, rapidly escalated to the point where owners might be afraid to ride their investment. Which is a shame because, uncomfortable ergos aside, the 1000DS engine makes for a great ride. Hopefully, the new owner will take this one out for regular exercise!

-tad

Ducati June 6, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Ducati 996 SPS for Sale

6.6.2017: Price drop to $12,495! Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

It's sometimes hard to get excited about the bike often referred to as "Tamburini's Masterpiece" these days: the 916 and its derivatives have appeared in countless forms in popular culture, everything from big-budget feature films to bedroom wall posters, where they're often depicted straddled by young ladies in outfits that would provide shockingly little crash protection. It doesn't help that Ducati made them for nearly a decade, in different displacements and levels of specification, from affordable road-going exotica like the base model 748 all the way up to over-the-counter race bikes designed to be competitive right out of the crate. But they all had the same DNA, and in most cases are just a few simple, but possibly very expensive, changes away from being real track and back-road weapons. Of course, some of them were just a bit more gifted from the factory in that regard, like today's Featured Listing, a Ducati 996 SPS.

2001 Ducati 996 SPS for sale AutoMania GP

Ducati have racing in their blood, and for many years it seemed like they were only selling their roadbikes as a way to pay for racing. Surely there can be no other justification for the inhumane ergonomics of Tamburini's creations. It's pretty clear they were designed from the off as competition motorcycles: the entire tail of the 916 flips up easily for access to the electronics, quick-release Dzus fasteners attach the bodywork, and early bikes didn't even have a provision for a passenger. The 851/888 that preceded it might have been slightly more practical roadbikes and were successful in World Superbike competition, but there's no denying that the 916 is a gorgeous machine that still looks incredible twenty years later. The 916 and the 996 and 998 that followed appear virtually identical at first, but represent a gradual evolution under the skin: frames were revised to allow different airboxes and adjustable steering heads, injection systems were improved, heads were revised, and deeper sumps were added.

The SPS or Sport Production Special as seen here was originally the top-of-the-line roadgoing 996, with lightweight Marchesini wheels, an adjustable steering head, and an uprated engine, although straight-line performance wasn't all that much improved. Cornering was a different story, as the year 2000 saw the addition of Öhlins suspension at the front and rear. 124hp might not sound that impressive compared to many of today's superbikes, but keep in mind that they are only really rideable because of sophisticated traction control systems that keep 200hp missiles like the Panigale from high-siding you into the treeline the first time you exit a corner and whack open the throttle to the stop. When new, the SPS was state-of-the-art Italian exotica, one of the fastest, best-handling bikes available at any price.

From the Seller: 2001 Ducati 996SPS for Sale

Mileage: 4,330 U.S. miles
VIN#: ZDM3H99S51B003808

One of the joys and dangers of being a motorcycle dealer is that you can buy and own anything that is offered by your franchise factory line to which they throw in stupefying financing with decades to pay it off. It becomes one of those almost addictive behaviors that for the most part society frowns upon except when it is for really nice stuff. Like a rare and exclusive motorcycle such as the 2001 Ducati 996SPS you see here. Not only that, because you have access to all of the trick goodies and parts that are offered for the model, you can add them to the package, making your bike even more ultimate and personal.

As part of the homologation process to race World Super Bike, the motorcycle was designed by Tamburini (also of MV fame) as the latest evolution of the 916SPS range of the water cooled, 4V 90 degree twins. Suspension was upgraded with full Ohlin’s front and rear along with thinner and larger tube diameters used in the frame for this track only motorcycle The engine was treated to titanium connecting rods, carbon fiber air box, P8 ECU, specific cam, higher compression heads, all hand assembled by Ducati putting out an additional 14 horse power over the same engine sized 916 SPS.

Hansen’s BMW Ducati was a dyed in the wool Ducati fanatic dealership, loved the bikes, loved the customers, loved everything about the bikes, the passion they exuded, the Italian design, everything about the line. This 996SPS, #1714, was the ultimate expression of Ducati in 2001 and the owners of the shop decided that they deserved to experience the bike as their own. Darn right! Being a fairly accomplished rider and ex-racer, the owner knew what parts could be added to enhance the performance and handling, especially where there were no irritating limits such as a budget.

First off, body work was ordered to allow street legal lighting including the nose cone holding the head light buckets. ASR runners allowing turn signal mounts and a larger, stronger front fender installed. Cycle Cat supplied the Side Stand, Rear Sets, Handle Bars, Triple Clamp and Frame sliders. Billet Mirrors, Turn Signals, Clutch Cover, Gas Cap and Sprocket Cover were added for their go fast values. Radial Adapters were placed between the upgraded Road and Track Öhlins front forks and the Brembo Calipers sliding past Brembo Floating Rotors. At the rear, a Titanium Rear Spring was added to the Öhlins Shock along with the Öhlins Steering Damper. At both ends, BST Carbon Fiber Wheels were spooled on along with a STM Slipper Clutch to control rear wheel hop during deceleration. The front brake is operated by a Brembo Radial Master Brake Cylinder matched by a Brembo Radial Master Clutch Cylinder on the other handle bar.

There was an early issue when the bikes were new with the rocker arms flaking off bits of material. As a preventive measure that only a dealer could pull off, all of the arms were replaced with the corrected part when the issue was first announced.

Within the past twelve months, the valves were checked, belts replaced and all fluids refreshed including engine, brakes and clutch. Internal Fuel Lines along with O-Rings were also replaced (we have a copy of the work order). The battery is almost new. Unfortunately many of the stock parts a have been misplaced. Among the parts that will come with the bike are the stock exhaust system and the upper triple plate number which has the “1714” number on it.

The selling price is $14,995 $12,495. Contact Ted for further details: ted@automaniagp.com

$14,995 is a big number for a Ducati 996. But for an SPS with some of the very best parts and tuning thrown at it? You'd obviously not be able to duplicate this machine for anywhere near that, so the price seems very reasonable. Some might bemoan the compromise in collectiblity that comes with the changes, but all the replacement parts are of high quality and are designed to improve the bike's performance and handling. The cosmetic changes might not be to everyone's taste, but are easy to change with original parts or different aftermarket bits to suit the new owner's preferences.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2001 Ducati 996 SPS for Sale
Ducati June 6, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 6.6.2017: Back on eBay and with fresh pictures. Links are updated. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca 'Lucky' Lucchinelli Replica for Sale

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 which seems fair, considering what regular F1s have been going for of late. As you may have guessed, this Featured Listing is being offered by the same seller as yesterday's RG400Γ and it is also a Japanese import, with paperwork that should allow the bike to be legally titled, depending on your local DMV.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Yamaha June 1, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale in California!

Update 6.2.2017: Sold in just 12 hours! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

If you have a rare sportbike for sale, model years 1980ish to 2004ish, consider our Featured Listing service for $59. Email me to see to get started: dan@motoringblogs.com

When you think of Yamaha's homologation specials, you probably picture their extremely exotic OW01, but this very nice FZR750RU fulfilled a similar purpose: to homologate the 750cc FZR for racing, in this case the American AMA Superbike series. Spec is far lower than the OW01, but so are current prices and if you're looking to get into a collectible Yamaha, this would be a far more affordable proposition, and one you could actually ride.

The FZR750RU weighed in at around 460lbs dry, had the typical 17" front and 18" rear wheels of the era, used a close-ratio six-speed gearbox, and was powered by a 749cc version of Yamaha's five-valve "Genesis" inline four. Interestingly, the very limited-production RU was the only 750cc Yamaha imported during this era: there was no "normal" version, at least here in the USA. Of course, if you wanted a Yamaha sportbike during the late 1980s, you had plenty of other options to choose from: the light and nimble FZR400, the everyman steel-framed FZR600, even the big-bore FZR1000.

Five-valve engines are pretty rare and, although Volkswagen and Ferrari have dabbled in the technology, it was Yamaha's calling card for years. Typically, you're looking at three intake and two exhaust valves, and although complexity is increased, there are multiple theoretical benefits. The three smaller valves flow fuel and air more effectively and fill the cylinder faster than two larger valves that would fit into the same space, and the configuration creates a compact combustion chamber so the mixture can burn more efficiently. In addition, the smaller, lighter intake valves have less inertia and put less stress on the springs that close them.

This particular example of the FZR750RU looks very clean and well cared-for, with original parts, owner's manuals, and lots of quality photographs. It's especially nice that the seller includes several pictures of the bike without its bodywork, showing off the aluminum Deltabox frame and other bits that can accumulate grime and significant wear. What is the price for this bit of Yamaha history? The seller is asking $7,500 and can be contacted here: Bike is SOLD

It should also be noted that Jay has been an RSBFS regular for years, buying and selling nearly 10 bikes through the site in that time.

From the Seller: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale

One owner 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU limited edition homologation motorcycle.  One of 200 imported into the US, only  4420 original miles, a rare bike that will continually rise in value.  The single owner took great care of this bike, it was a weekend rider for the for the first few years then it was parked and stored, last registered in 1995.  I have most of the original paperwork and documentation, including the original owners manual, service manual, warranty manual and I have the original title.  The owner is a retired engineer, he documented and cared for the bike as you would expect.  I have a stack of index cards filled with notes about the care and service of the bike. The factory service manual has signs of use and a few hand written notes. 

I have serviced the bike and ridden it about 50 miles.  The service included replacing all fluids (brake/clutch fluid, coolant, fuel and oil), ultrasonically cleaned and rebuilt carbs, drained and replaced the fuel.  I put a lot of time into cleaning the brake caliper pistons and seals.  I also replaced the rear brake pads, a few pieces of factory hardware and re-installed the stock screen.  The bike includes a few oil filters, a NOS set of tires, a aftermarket screen, a rear stand and some other small bits.  This bike is ready to ride except for the potentially original tires currently fitted.  Everything felt good when I rode it around but I haven't pushed it very hard. 

Targeted for the American market, the FZR750RU is not especially valuable yet and may never achieve the desirability of the OW01 but, with just 200 examples of the 1988 model built to exactly meet AMA minimum production numbers, it certainly has the potential to appreciate significantly, and it's a very handsome example of 80s sportbike style.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR750RU for Sale in California!
Suzuki May 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A for Sale

 

Today's Featured Listing Suzuki RGV250 is part of the rare and weird collection that the seller has been liquidating over the past few weeks. It may not be museum-quality, but it has obviously been well cared-for and would make a great weekend rider, assuming you live somewhere it can be titled. Rare and desirable here in the USA, Suzuki's RGV250Γ was basically the GSX-R of two-stroke sportbikes: it was fast, a bit wild, and ubiquitous in markets where it was sold new.

But here in the USA, these little Gammas are extremely difficult to find. Go looking for a Honda NSR250 at any given time, and you'll likely come up with at least something. But RGVs are pretty few and far between, in any condition. In fact, here in the US, the closest many of us may have come to the RGV is the Aprilia RS250 that is much more common and uses the same engine, with some minor tuning and cosmetic differences. 

The 250cc two-stroke sportbikes of the period seemed cut from the same cloth, although each managed to have its own character: light and stiff aluminum beam frame, liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel or v-twin engine, some form of power valve technology, a six-speed gearbox, sub-300lb dry weight, and lots of proprietary acronyms plastered across the fairings. In this VJ22's case you'll note "SAPC" or "Suzuki Advanced Power Control," an electronic power valve and ignition timing system to boost the 55-ish horsepower 90° twin's meager midrange. Earlier VJ21s had 17" front and 18" wheels, updated here in the VJ22 to a pair of 17" hoops that should give a wider choice of modern rubber. Weight for the VJ22 was up a bit over previous models, largely owing to that beautiful but complex and heavy asymmetrical "banana" swingarm that left space on the right-hand side of the bike for the bulging expansion chambers that fed those sexy shotgun exhausts.

From the seller: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A for Sale

Saved the best for last! This will be the last Suzuki RGV250 up for auction. The honey hole is drying up quickly.

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A with only 8,780 kilometers (5,455 miles) on the odometer. This RGV runs like the day it was new. I don't know the service history but it sure pulls like its been de restricted. Speedometer has been changed to a 300KPH clock so actual mileage is unknown. We see lots of these 250's with speedo's changed from the stock 180kph clocks to 300kph. This RGV has scratches throughout the bike. Tank looks like new. Mirrors and front fender show sun fade. The lower center V-fairing behind the front wheel has a broken tab and has a crack that needs to be fixed. Bike has great curb appeal and looks very nice. Bike comes tastefully upgraded with after market pipes and stingers, aftermarket levers and grips and steel braided brake lines. All fairings are 100% OEM Suzuki factory.

Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a Bstreet motorcycle for road use.

Scratches and scrapes throughout. Now there's an honest assessment from the seller, and should give potential buyers a good idea of what to expect here: it's clean, but definitely a used motorcycle. Those Brembo front brakes don't look original but should be a worthwhile upgrade. The levers and grips maybe not so much, but those are easily changed to suit your taste. It isn't perfect but, as stated earlier, might make a great weekend rider or a rolling restoration. You'll have to source parts from overseas, but the internet is a wonderful thing and most of what you need should be available to keep an RGV running.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22A for Sale