Posts by tag: Featured Listing

Ducati April 20, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca 'Lucky' Lucchinelli Replica for Sale

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 which seems fair, considering what regular F1s have been going for of late. As you may have guessed, this Featured Listing is being offered by the same seller as yesterday's RG400Γ and it is also a Japanese import, with paperwork that should allow the bike to be legally titled, depending on your local DMV.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Suzuki April 19, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Suzuki RG400Γ for Sale

With prices of Suzuki's RG500Γ "Gamma" through the roof right now, fans of 80s two-stroke exotica have had to look elsewhere for their smoky thrills, and today's Featured Listing RG400Γ might be just the ticket for collectors seeking two-stroke performance on a less extravagant budget. Certainly, values of the Japanese-market RG400Γ have been below those of the bigger bike, in spite of it being less common, owing to a significant power deficit: claimed weight is nearly identical at 340lbs dry, but claimed power is down significantly from 93hp to 59. That'd still make for a pretty fun package in a road bike, and you're still looking at better straight-line performance than the 250cc machines of the same period.

1985 Suzuki RG400 for sale on eBay

The Gamma was introduced in 1985 and lasted until 1987, although none of the bigger two-stroke machines lasted very long on the market. Suzuki's race-replica two-stroke was powered by an unusual liquid-cooled, square four engine that was configured like a siamesed pair of parallel twins, with two crankshafts and the "rear twin" slightly higher than the front for a sort of stepped design. The firing order helped to cancel out vibrations and the Gamma was designed without a heavy, power-consuming balance shaft as a result. The smaller RG400 was intended specifically for the Japanese market and was powered by a version of the engine that used the same 50.6mm stroke, but a smaller bore of 50mm versus 56mm to arrive at the reduced 397cc displacement.

Two-stroke engines are simple and very light weight, making them perfect for off-road and commuter machines. But that same incredible simplicity and a relatively high power-to-weight ratio also make them ideal for road-racing motorcycles and, once Walter Kaaden's two-stroke tuning secrets were "acquired" by Suzuki, they dominated Grand Prix motorcycle racing into the modern era. Riders familiar with performance two-stroke motorcycles love their incredible agility and savage power delivery, characteristics that defined the Gamma when it was new. As has been pointed out ad nauseam in the comments sections, even the RG500 isn't really all that fast by today's standards, although it's still a challenging ride: handling was superior for a 1980s motorcycle, but suspension has come a long way since then and the 59hp of the RG400 is being channeled through a 120-section rear tire that you'd be more likely to find on the front of a sportbike these days... But fans of the Gamma love the rawness, the purity of the bike. Or are just high on sweet, sweet two-stroke exhaust fumes.

This particular example features Walter Wolf graphics, which could be a plus or a minus, depending on your tastes. Suzuki fans might prefer the iconic blue-and-white colors, but I think Gammas are a little bit bulbous in the traditional Suzuki colors, and the Walter Wolf graphics slim the bike down nicely.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Suzuki RG400Γ for Sale

This early RG400 Walter Wolf is in good original condition with ~19,500km  / 12,100 miles. Recently purchased out of Japanese collection with 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca also listed on eBay. The mid to late 1980's was a great time to be a motorcyclist. Technology was evolving rapidly with the Japanese and European manufactures innovating at a tremendous pace. There were a myriad of engine layouts, number of cylinders, 2-stroke and 4-stroke vying for top honors and in the case of the NR500 - oval pistons! Technology proven on the race-track inevitably made it's way to the showroom to the great benefit of the riding public.  For a couple years in the later 1/2 of the 1980's enthusiasts in the rest of the world could go to their local dealer and buy an honest-to-goodness 2-stroke 4-cylinder F1 race-replica! The RG400/500 Gamma - along with the Yamaha RZ500 and Honda NS400 - brought the sound, the smell, and the looks of the GP circuit within reach of the knowledgeable motorcycle enthusiast.

The RG's square-4, twin-crank, rotary disk-valve RG400 is durable and reliable and easy to service and and readily modified for more power.

I've owned about a dozen RG500 as well as RZ500 in the early 1990's and this really takes me back. This one is a great 'rider' that draws a crowd and thumbs-up. It starts right up, idles well with and runs like 'back in the day' (a little smokey). Still has original oil-injection, airbox, and the original paint and bodywork. The aluminum frame is clean and bright with no sign of damage. Chassis and brakes are original and work like they should. Riding down the road, it's well-composed. A couple points worth noting 1) no belly-pan; 2) crack in upper fairing near windscreen at right rear-view mirror; 3) a couple touch-up on seat-section plastic; 4) turn-signal button missing (signals still work).

Ride it as it is, restore, or modify to suit your preference - whichever way you go, it'll bring a smile on your face and make a fabulous addition to your collection.
Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

Happy to work with your shipper. In the past year I have shipped to/from Japan / Germany / England / Australia / Chicago / Georgia  / Arizona / California / Oregon / etc.i. I have been happy with Haul Bikes and would expect shipping to be in the $500 range to California and maybe $600-700 to the East Coast.

This looks like a pretty nice bike, considering the $9,250 asking price. There are a couple of cosmetic issues clearly disclosed by the seller and, although you might have to go with some aftermarket bodywork to replace that bellypan if you're on a budget, the bike is obviously usable without it. As always, it's important to do your homework if you plan to use this on the road: it sounds like the seller has all the paperwork needed to register this RG400, but whether or not that's even possible will vary, depending on your home state. Hm. I wonder what a Washington State PO Box runs per year...

-tad

Featured Listing: 1985 Suzuki RG400Γ for Sale
Honda April 12, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Honda VFR400R

Update 4.12.2017: Sale confirmed with seller. 3 hours from published to sold! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

If you have a rare sportbike for sale, model years 1980ish to 2004ish, consider our Featured Listing service for $59. Email me to see to get started: dan@motoringblogs.com

People often tend to think great visual design is the exclusive domain of the Italians. But that is not so, as witnessed by this beautiful VFR400R. This NC30 - along with its big brother, the RC30 - have flowing lines and a purposeful stance. Visually, these models are as striking as a 916 or F4. This is no accident, as the NC30 was patterned with endurance racing elements; what is there needs to be there, and little more. Not merely a design exercise, the NC30 stands out as a fantastic working machine; form follows function, and these bikes function as good as they look.

The NC30 follows all the right rules in motorcycle design. It is incredibly compact, despite an aluminum perimeter frame wrapped around the V-4 powerplant. The motor is a real gem, making noises that only Honda fours and gear-driven cams can make. If the soundtrack doesn't put a smile on your face, the power delivery and rev range on this 400cc turbine certainly will. The single sided swingarm is there to facilitate tire changes on the endurance racing model, but the aesthetics on the street version really make it stand out. So too, the twin headlamps really define the front of the bike and give another nod to it's racing heritage.

From the seller:
1989 VFR400R $6,500

I purchased this bike a few years ago and have enjoyed having it in my garage both as a project and as something unique to look at.

The list below details what I have done to recommission the bike. Oddly, I have never ridden it (the pleasure for me was spending time in my garage).

Included with the sale is the OEM body work, rear foot pegs, mirrors, front turn signals, and some other bits along with a shop manual.

Bike was brought to the US by a serviceman who was able to title it in NM. I bought it with that NM title and was able to transfer to AZ though I wouldn’t assume that your state will be as accommodating as mine.

What's been done:
New bodywork with new fasteners
Seats re-covered
Rims powder coated
New Shinko Podium tires front and rear
New fork seals and oil
New Galfer brake pads front and rear
New brake lines front and rear
Caliper seals replaced front and rear
Master cylinder rebuilt front and rear
New throttle, choke, clutch cables, (forgot to order a speedometer cable)
New stator, regulator / rectifier
Carburetors rebuilt with new o-rings, bowl gaskets, and intake boots
New radiators and hoses
Rebuilt water pump
New exhaust gaskets
Suspension linkage greased
New chain (never found a chain guard)

This appears to be a well-loved and oft drooled over VFR. The seller clearly took care of the machine and the list of new parts is impressive (check out the pile of receipts). Although I'd rather ride than wrench, I have a lot of respect for those that like to immerse themselves in a project such as this one. The win-win is a uber-clean, refurbed VFR without a whole lot of additional miles. This one shows approximately 18k (about 11,000 miles) on the KM clocks. As the VFR400R was never officially imported into the US, there was no need for Honda to federalize it (i.e. 17 digit VIN, speedo in MPH, US-specific emissions, etc). This may create issues for you when it comes time to register the bike, although this one has a history of US titles in both New Mexico (previous owner) and Arizona (current). If you live in a more restrictive state (i.e. CA), you may need to do more homework unless you "know a guy."

This Featured Listing 1989 Honda VFR400R is available directly from the seller. Contact Jason if you are serious about this striking grey market import. At $6,500 the price is very competitive - and given that these NC30 Hondas are pretty rare in the US, you might want to act quickly. Rare collector bikes in this condition do not hang around long. Give Jason a call and add one of Honda's finest models to your collection!

MI

Honda February 9, 2017 posted by

Featured Hot Rod: 1993 Honda CBR900RR / 954RR Hybrid!

Since the dawn of internal combustion there have always been those independent spirits with a vision of speed. The recipe is age old and time worn; take a small vehicle and stuff a big motor into it. The engine swap shuffle has been played many, many times, to vehicles too countless to note. The quest is always the same: start with something good, add more power, and make it better. Manufacturers are not ignorant of this magic spell either - the original Honda CBR900RR is the perfect example of what happens when you take a CBR600 and stuff a 900 into it. Bingo! A factory hot rod is born. What happens when someone takes that hot rod and ups the ante? You get an even hotter hot rod, such as this CBR900RR with motivation from a 954RR mill.

Featured Listing: 1993 Honda 900RR/954RR Hybrid!

Countless engine swap projects end in a pile of parts. Fewer actually make it to running status, despite looking rather Frankenstein. Fewer still manage to pull off the swap with good looking results. Chris Perkins - the man with the vision and the 900RR - wanted to reach this rare level and beyond. Chris wanted it to look factory - a true sleeper. Look closely at the photos, as "sleeper" is exactly what this builder pulled off. Integrating the best of the 1993 900RR qualities while taking advantage of the performance and electronic enhancements of the 2003 954RR model, this hybrid spans ten years of engine development without changing the overall stance of the original 900RR.

From the seller:
1993 Honda CBR900RR Chassis with a 2003 CBR954RR Fuel injected engine and electronics.
Custom built, one off bike featured on Superstreetbike.com
The bike was built with the intent to make a "Pro-Touring" style bike that sheds old technology and be ridden like a modern sport bike, sans the carburetors and jetting issues usually associated with older bikes.

Top quality products were used in the build, such as:

Ohlins rear shock
Two Brothers Carbon canister on a stock CBR954RR exhaust header
Dunlop D208 Qualifiers front and rear
RK chain
Supersprox Chain wheels
EBC HH brake pads
Servo Buddy to eliminate the exhaust valve
NGK plugs
K&N filter
PPG DCU 2 stage paint buried with liberal amounts of PPG 2021 clear
Ballistic lithium battery

Bike presents as new, and has been started then drained of all fuel.
Fresh oil and filter. Thermostat and coolant have been changed..

Asking $9800

Leafing through the swap info reads like a never-ending set of challenges and innovative solutions (you can read the article at SuperStreetBike.com). The 900RR frame needed to be modified due to the changes in how the 954RR motor was mounted. Solution: A CBR1000 front mount fabricated onto the chassis, with older tabs and mounts removed. The 954RR motor is fuel injected, requiring a change to the fuel tank. Solution: Graft the bottom a 954RR tank into a 900RR tank. Similar challenges were presented with the electrics (a lithium battery makes room for the 954RR ECU), gauges (custom mount to make the 954RR cluster fit in the stock location) and exhaust (modified 954RR pieces). What sounds so simple - stuff a big motor in a small bike chassis - can be tremendously complicated. Chris methodically worked his way through each of these issues with ingenuity and innovation. The resultant machine looks absolutely stock, yet is unique unto itself.

This fantastic melding of old performance into a new hot rod is available directly from the builder. With stock looks and a healthy bump in power, it is sure to be a screamer. So roll with the old-school cool that is the original double R, knowing that beneath the skin you have what it takes to hang with much newer machinery. Your sleeper awaits you - just contact Chris for details!

MI

Featured Hot Rod: 1993 Honda CBR900RR / 954RR Hybrid!
Yamaha January 20, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

Update 1.30.2017: The seller has notified me that this sale is now final on this bike after receiving serious interest just a day after listing. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Are you looking for an '80s two-stroke to tear up the back roads in a cloud of blue smoke? Just move along: nothing to see here. Are you searching for a museum-quality Yamaha TZR250 2MA/1KT? Well we may just have what you're looking for with today's Featured Listing, a zero-mile example that may never have seen a tank of fuel in its life.

The very first TZR was a development of Yamaha's RD series of motorcycles, and it helped to define the rapidly-evolving class: lightweight aluminum beam frame, fully-faired bodywork, and a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel-twin backed by a six-speed gearbox and a set of 17" wheels. Every bike in the quarter-liter class featured some sort of proprietary powervalve technology, and the TZR naturally used the Yamaha Power Valve System or "YPVS." Triple discs quickly became the class standard, although early TZRs like this one made do with just a single disc and caliper at the front. With a good set of pads, this should still pull you up quickly, considering the sub-300 lb dry weight.

First-generation TZRs and NSRs generally seem to command less money than their later counterparts and I'm not really sure exactly why. I'm assuming it's because early 250 two-strokes are nice, fun little sportbikes, while bikes like Honda's NSR250 MC28 from the end of the line pack cutting-edge tech and some trick parts... But as far as historical significance and style go, these early bikes have both in spades.

From the Seller: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

0 miles

Two stroke, not available in the United States, purchased in Canada. Extremely clean, near perfect condition. As far as I can tell, it's never had gas through the gas tank. New battery, original keys. Metric and US speedometer. A great addition to someone's collection.

The bike is located in Michigan to view and pick up. Not willing to ship but willing to assist with your shipper.

Price is $11,500.

As you can see from the photos, the seller even has the original service manual and a tool kit that obviously has seen minimal use. With zero miles on the odometer, it'd be a shame to put it on the road and wreck the pristine status, but if you're looking for an early TZR to complete your Yamaha sportbike collection, you're obviously very unlikely to find one in better cosmetic condition.

-tad

 

Featured Listing: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Suzuki January 18, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Update 1.18.2017: Sold in 11 days! Congratulations to buyer and seller! If you have an outstanding Rare Sportbike for sale, email us about a $59 Featured Listing for exposure like this this GSX-R 750 received! -dc

Today's Featured Listing is the grandaddy of modern sportbiking, the Suzuki GSX-R750. Sure, you could probably argue that other bikes like Kawasaki's GPz or pretty much every Bimota were also significant, but Suzuki's original "Gixxer" had all of the pieces in place: a fully-faired, bug-eyed endurance-racer aesthetic to match the performance available from the inline four and the lightweight, aluminum-framed monoshock chassis to put that power to the ground. Bimota may have perfected the formula, but Suzuki made it affordable to the masses and, in the process, created an icon. Obviously, boatloads of these were made, but boatloads were also crashed and thrashed and neglected, meaning these have suddenly become very collectible and not easy to find in this kind of condition.

Introduced in 1985, the first-generation bikes like this one are sometimes known as "Slabbies" due to the large, slab-sided fairings. Early bikes eschewed liquid-cooling for their 750cc inline four in favor of a high-capacity oil system known as SACS: Suzuki Advanced Cooling System. The system used a sophisticated oil pump to direct jets of oil at critical components and was used up until 1992, when the GSX-R received more modern liquid-cooling. Why SACS? It was felt that the addition of a radiator and associated plumbing would add unnecessary and undesirable weight and complexity to the new sportbike. Colin Chapman would have been proud, although he probably would also have drilled a bunch of holes into that aluminum frame...

The bike arrived in the US in 1986 and was virtually identical to the 1985 model, excepting some updates to lighting, slightly revised bodywork, and a longer swingarm for improved handling. This particular example looks very clean and appears ready to ride, with fresh plugs and tires!

From the seller: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

One owner, expertly maintained, synthetic oil used entire life, never been crashed, garaged all its life, all original parts with the following upgrades: Progressive fork springs, Works rear mono shock, advanced ignition rotor, K & N filter and front braided metal brake lines. Old parts are available along with a Suzuki shop manual. Bike has new Metzler Z-rated tires, Iridium spark plugs and a one-year-old AGM battery. 

With almost 60,000 miles on the bike, it is mechanically top notch; the plastic does show some wear with three minor cracks that have been repaired and stop-drilled. Close-up photos are available. The tank and frame are flawless. Most of the plastic is in great condition. Regular oil/filter changes have been made at 5,000 to 6,000 miles or once a year when not ridden often. Brake and clutch fluids were regularly changed, and fork oil was changed every five years. The valves have been recently adjusted. Other than new fork seals--replaced twice--there have been no mechanical failures in the bike's history.

The bike is in excellent mechanical condition with 60,000 miles on it. Cosmetically the bike is in original and very good condition. I am asking $5,800.00 for it. The bike is currently in Ventura County, CA. The bike, while a collectible, is regularly ridden. It runs and handles great!

 

With some pretty outrageously-priced Slabbies out there, the $5,800 this seller is asking seems very reasonable. The miles are pretty high but, as with most collector vehicles, condition is far more important, and this example appears to have been very sympathetically owned. Upgrades are practical and, in my mind very appropriate. Few compromises are needed to own this classic sportbike: no basic maintenance that requires engine-out servicing and no unobtainable parts or esoteric knowledge are required, making these pretty practical collectibles, assuming you find a good one. In fact, probably the biggest limitation will be finding modern rubber for those skinny, 18" hoops.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale