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Posts by tag: Featured Listing

Yamaha July 18, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale

Update 7.18.2018: Price reduced to $12,000. Thanks as always for supporting the site, Ted! -dc

Yamaha threw their hat into the Grand Prix race replica ring with the… Well what this bike was called depended on where the thing was being sold. In Canada and Australia, it was an RZ500, which fits since it was like a bigger, faster RZ350. In Europe, it was the RD500LC, which also makes plenty of sense considering the RD series’ history, but with added Liquid Cooling! And in Japan, it was the RZV500R as seen in today’s Featured Listing, which sounds the most exotic to me.

And like Honda’s NS400R and Suzuki’s RG500, the RZ/RD/RZV was powered by a racing-inspired, two-stroke multi that was shared with no other bike in Yamaha's lineup. That made the bikes very exclusive, but not really cost-effective to produce. But really, what other sort of motorcycle would you power with a liquid-cooled 50° two-stroke V4 that featured twin cranks and a balance shaft displacing nearly 500cc? The rest of the package was likewise geared towards sportbike domination: a six-speed gearbox, a pair of YPVS power valves, Autolube oil-injection system, an underslung rear shock that was very exotic at the time, anti-dive forks, and 16” front and 18” wheels shod with typically skinny period tires.

Unfortunately, in spite of the racy looks and the inclusion of magnesium parts, the RZ500 still weighed in at a period-appropriate 450lbs dry. The problem was that rival Suzuki’s RG500 weighed significantly less while making more power than the RZ’s 88 claimed ponies. The RZ was designed from the start to be a civilized race-replica, but at the time the RG stole Yamaha's thunder with their much wilder ride.

But today, neither bike would be considered particularly fast on a racetrack and the appeal is a combination of nostalgia and the singularly exciting character of a big two-stroke, something the RZ still has in abundance and at a lower cost than an equivalent RG.  The RG has always been "the one to have," and steadily increasing values mean it's been priced out of reach for many fans. But although RZ prices have climbed to keep pace with the general increase of all 80s two-stroke sportbikes, they still lag behind the Gamma, making them the affordable choice.

This example is the Japanese-market RZV500R and featured an aluminum frame instead of the steel units on the other versions. Unfortunately, the aluminum frame wasn't something added to enhance performance, it was to offset the damage done by home market regulations that limited output to 64hp. Luckily, this example has supposedly been de-restricted and features a very sharp set of custom spannies that look far more upswept than the stock parts and should liberate more of the famous two-stroke crackle, along with FZR wheels, brakes, and front forks to match.

From the seller: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale

VIN#: 51X002446

Entering the world of RZ500’s has introduced me to several collectors who have shared some of their incredible knowledge of the Yamaha model. RZ500’s were built by Yamaha in model years 1984 and 1985. They were never sold new in the US and any that are currently here were brought in as Grey Market Vehicles. Yamaha Canada imported the RZ500 model which was also sold in Australia. The United Kingdom model was named the RD500 and came with a different color scheme than the RZ.

All of these models had steel frames and were delivered in what was considered unrestricted versions with higher horsepower than the domestic Japanese version of the motorcycle. The Japanese bikes with restricted horse power had smaller carburetors and exhaust systems to that end. In an attempt to balance the lost of power, the Japanese bikes were equipped with aluminum frames which were considerably lighter, but again, only for Japanese domestic consumption. That model of the RZ was called the RZV500, is model of bike being offered here. Our bike has the aluminum frame, different mirrors and decals identifying it as the RZV, the most desirable version of the bike if unrestricted. In this case that has been done with a set of Tommy Crawford Expansion Chamber Exhausts. The pipes are said to work well, are rare to find and are no longer made. A perfect storm so to speak.

This bike has been modified additionally with what we assume are a period FZR Front Forks and a set of matching wheels. There is also an Ohlin’s rear Shock Absorber in the back.

The owner of the bike was a huge enthusiast of Road Race bikes and at the time was doing some club racing. Being in the Service, when it was time to be stationed at another post, the Service took care of moving his personal property including his motorcycles. As per regulations, vehicles that were transported with personal property were to have all of their fuel removed, which was done with a tag hanging from the handle bar noting this. Unfortunately, medical issues evolved that prevented the bike from being recommissioned and it been in this state for over ten years. Sadly for the owner, he never was able to ride again and his family is selling the bike as part of his estate.

Collectors with an interest in the bikes have warned us about trying to start the bike without a serious inspection and reconditioning. Crank seals, carburetors and possibly other work may be needed and we are not in a position or capable of any of it. The bike, in running order, would most likely bring over $20,000 and is now priced accordingly to accommodate the possible needed work. It has an Oregon clear and clean title of ownership.

So this should pretty much be the highest-performing version of the RZ: the lighter aluminum frame combined with the full-power engine. More power, less weight, what's not to like? That is, once the bike is reconditioned, of course... The Seller is asking $15,295 $12,000 for this one and, if you're handy with the wrenches and love to tune two-strokes, or have deep pockets and Lance Gamma's number on speed dial, this could be a good opportunity to pick up a clean RZV with more modern running gear that just needs some mechanical attention.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale
Suzuki July 12, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale

Today's Featured Listing 1991 Suzuki RGV250Γ has styling cues very much like the four-stroke GSX-R of the period, and help the bike stand out as a Suzuki among the other bikes in the very competitive 250cc two-stroke class, even without their traditional blue-and-white graphics. Of course, if you're missing out on shouty graphics, there's still the RGVΓ, SAPC, and Made with the Grand Prix Spirit logos. This is actually a VJ22, the second generation of the little Gamma, and features a number of changes from the earlier VJ21.

The RGV250Γ followed the 250 two-stroke class template: a light and stiff aluminum beam frame, with an asymmetrical "banana" swingarm that allowed clearance on the right side for the twin "shotgun" expansion chambers in the case of the later VJ22 version seen here. The engine was a liquid-cooled, 90° two-stroke v-twin that eventually found its way into the Aprilia RS250 as well, along with Suzuki's six-speed gearbox. The Suzuki version used "SAPC" or "Suzuki Advanced Power Control," an electronic power valve and ignition timing system to boost the Japanese-market RGV's out put from 45hp all the way to... 45hp. Yeah, these were restricted in their home market. Export models got more like 55-ish horsepower from the 249cc twin.

Combined with the bike's sub-300lb dry weight, the bike offered plenty of performance for anyone willing to put in the effort to extract it. But straight-line power isn't the point with any quarter-liter two-stroke: the RGV is all about corner speed and eats twisty roads for breakfast. The earlier VJ21 used a 17" front and 18" rear wheel like other bikes of the era, but the VJ22 used matched 17" wheels front and rear, making it easier to fit modern rubber. Overseas, the RGV was a very popular little thrasher and fairly common, but these can be difficult to find. It's ironic that, here in the USA anyway, the Suzuki-engined Aprilia RS250 seems much easier to find than the RGV250Γ that donated its engine.

From the Seller: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale

Very rare in North America the Suzuki RGV 250 is a close as you get to a street legal bike from the golden era of GP racing. This example was imported from Japan and has Utah street legal title. The bike is runs well and was recently serviced with all fluids changed. This bike is un-restored and has several scratches and scrapes but for a bike of its age its in good condition. All mechanical parts function well. The bike has 8837 miles on the gauges. Comes with a set of brand new Bridgestone tires that have never been mounted. $7,000 + buyer pays shipping.

Contact Stephen with your interest: stephen@stephenwclark.com

The bike seems honestly presented and is in good, if not perfectly original condition. The seller mentions the 8,837 miles on the odometer, but I think that's actually kilometers being displayed, so we're looking at about 5,491 miles. The levers, grips, rearstand spools, and brake lines aren't stock and the color choices aren't particularly subtle, but that's fine, since you'd end up replacing them anyway if you're going to ride it, or if you're restoring it. The minor cosmetic flaws should be easily rectified without having to tear the bike down, and it would make a great, usable example.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250Γ VJ22 for Sale
Honda June 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

I’ve always been a “slow bike [and car, for that matter] fast” kind of guy, mainly because I could never really afford the fast bikes I wanted, but also because I'm pretty sure I'd have gotten into trouble riding something powerful all the time. But some folks just prefer smaller-engined motorcycles: on the road especially, you can barely get a modern sportbike into third gear unless you’re on the freeway, and winding one to redline, even in second gear, is likely to land you in jail if you do it in or around civilization… But that’s never a problem with something like today’s pristine Featured Listing Honda CB-1.

The 400cc class came about because of regulations that heavily taxed and otherwise displacements over 400cc in some markets, not because everyone was clamoring for them. In Japan, the 400cc sportbike, and even 250cc four-stroke sportbike classes were hotly contested, with Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha all producing smaller, more sophisticated machines than we ever saw officially in the USA. But licensing and laws aside, there are also fans of smaller displacement bikes that have the experience and skill to handle a legitimate sportbike and don’t want to be stuck with one of the torquey, but fairly crude-feeling singles or parallel twins you normally find powering bikes in the class.

Enter the Honda CB-1. Powered by a slightly detuned version of the CBR400RR's engine, the 399cc inline-four had some serious mechanical specifications, including sixteen valves and gear-driven dual overhead cams. The result was 55hp and a 13,500rpm redline, plenty to motivate the 400lb machine and push it all the way to 118mph, assuming you were prepared to thrash the sewing-machine-smooth engine mercilessly.

The CB-1 was one of only a couple of 400cc, inline-four sportbikes that were ever available in the United States, and that sophisticated little screamer is the main appeal here, along with the simple, sporty styling that has aged very well. The CB-1 did lose the CBR's aluminum frame and made do with tubular steel unit instead, but saved weight by losing the fairing and the CBR's second front caliper and rotor. Smaller valves and different tuning meant slightly less outright power that the CBR, but lower gearing meant it was a better real-world bike as well.

Unfortunately, as polished as it was, the CB-1 didn't really sell very well here in the USA, where bigger is always better and 600cc supersports are considered "learner bikes." But its surprising sophistication had fans then and now, and has become a bit of a cult bike here in the States. But if you missed the boat the first time around and didn't get to buy one new from your local Honda dealer, here's your chance: this one has just 9 miles on the odometer and is amazingly clean.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

There isn't much to say other than this bike is literally a brand spank'n new bike. There are only "9" miles on the bike, as in "nine". These miles were put on at the factory. The tires are original and still have the injection nibs on them. I bought this bike out of a collection because I am a huge CB-1 fan. I own another CB-1 that I ride and use with my kids. They are amazing bikes and have a cult following. I bought this bike about three years ago simply because it was so cool and such a time capsule that I could not pass it up. I have never ridden it. It only sits covered in climate controlled storage. I never had the heart to ride it because it is so perfect. It is the curse of its newness. I spent some careful time and money prepping it for long term storage when I fist took delivery of the bike. The dealer did a full inspection, started the bike, and did a leak down prior to putting it into its cryogenic state. If you intend to do the sacrilegious act of riding it, then the battery will need to be re-installed and a few other minor checklist things, but easy to do. I can do this for you if needed. I have full records of what the dealer did to prep it for storage. You are welcome to check with the dealer and inquire what they did. The bike is PERFECT! Serious buyers are encouraged to look at it in person. Please feel free to ask me any questions. I'll do my best to reply quickly. I live in the North San Francisco area. I can help with organizing shipping if needed. I would prefer an in person inspection before it gets shipped. Buyer must pay for all shipping and crating if needed. Local pickup is of course preferred. I have "ALL" the paperwork... I mean everything down to the original pamphlets, certificate of origin, title, etc, etc. I also have both original keys. Payment must be completely cleared in my account before I will release the bike.

Update 6.14.2018:

There have been some questions about the long term storage of this bike so I feel I need to give some detail. When I received the bike it had no fuel or fuel residue in the tank, fuel lines or carbs. When I received the bike it had already been put into a long term storage state.

We I received the bike in order to test and run the engine we never put fuel in the tank. We did an external IV fuel drip to test the motor and it started immediately and ran perfect. After we were done the carbs were taken off and completely drained, dried and sprayed internally with an aerosol oil specific for storage. We sprayed the inside of the tank as well. The spark plugs were removed and the inside of the cylinders were sprayed.

Every single piece of rubber on this bike was generously coated with grease specific for long term storage of rubber and plastic. For example spark plug boots, all cables, hand controls etc. Much of this was wiped away for the photos but if you look at the chain that will give you an idea.

The forks were carefully inspected and treated but I need to look at the document to see what was done.

The engine was drained and then refilled with a specific oil to a higher level for long term storage to minimize any moisture buildup.

All of the exposed electrical was coated specifically for long term electrical storage. The battery was removed, I have a new battery ready to go.

The inside of the exhaust was treated to remove any moisture and the end of the exhaust was bagged and sealed. This seal was removed for the photos.

In summary this was a very expensive hibernation process that is fully documented over $2K. This was done at Marin Speed Shop as a labor of love by their master mechanic Max. Max took a great deal of time and care doing the research to ensure that this bike would stay in BRAND NEW condition for the next 30 years. Please call the shop to verify but only if you are a very serious buyer, respectfully please do not waste their time.

There are lots of small details I am leaving out but I'm almost certain that the shop still has the hibernation document if not I'm sure I do somewhere.

There is ZERO corrosion of any kind on this bike. If the buyer does the unthinkable and decides to ride it, I would suggest putting on new tires because tires do harden over time. That said the tires visually look perfect. I did not replace the tires because the tires are original to the bike as they were on the showroom floor and that's cool!

Hope this help, and good luck

My guess is that this could very well be the only brand new CB-1 in existence. If there is another one, it is probably in the Honda motorcycle museum in Japan.

Good luck on bidding and I look forward to meeting you.

Obviously, with basically just delivery miles, you'd likely need to go through the bike top-to-bottom before riding it. So perhaps the biggest question here is, "Does anyone really need a museum-quality Honda CB-1?" Well since the bike was originally a practical, affordable, and sophisticated do-it-all scoot, I doubt this will have the universal, drool-worthy appeal of something like an RC30, a bike that was sold in very limited numbers and had very exotic components. But somewhere, you just know there are a couple folks who've always loved this classy little machine or are looking to complete their extensive Honda collection. Regardless, it's obvious there is real interest in this bike: although nice, well-used CB-1s regularly change hands for around the $3,000 mark, bidding over at the eBay auction is already up north of $6,000 with several days left on the auction!

-tad

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale
Ducati May 31, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2007 Ducati 944 Race/Track Bike

Update 7.17.2018: Price reduced to $6,000 USD! Good luck to buyers and seller. -dc

RSBFS reader Tom caught a mean case of the track bug back in 2006, and embarked on an exciting custom project. He enlisted pro builders from south of his Canadian border and developed a 944cc desmodue with a titanium chassis. The result is faired in Sharkskinz 998, with 999 tank and seat fairing, all red of course.

 

Doug Cook at ARC Fabrication fabricated the chassis from titanium.  The resulting frame is bizarre and beautiful, but the geometry, suspension and brakes are all reworked 900SS so handling is a known quantity.  Bruce Meyers at BCM Motorsports in Laconia rebuilt Tom's 900SS into a ported and polished race engine, with oversize cylinders resulting in 944cc, fed by 41mm Keihin flat-slide carburetors.  Tom enlisted BlackStone Tek to make a set of carbon fiber wheels for the project, and ARC supplied two underseat exhausts, one muffled to usual racetrack requirements, and the other open for unrestricted events.

 

Real life stepped back in the picture after the build was complete and Tom could only claim a few track events in the each of the next few years, on display since then.  The bike has been run but has low hours and is undamaged.  Pictures show the artful fabrication and sanitary presentation, from polished swingarm to tidy cockpit.  Tom's own thoughts on the bike:

This is truly a unique and amazing track bike ridden only occasionally for two or three seasons.  The full race motor (including STR cams, 41 mm FCR's, over-sized race pistons, ported and polished heads, blueprinted, etc.) was built by BCM Motorsports in New Hampshire.  The titanium frame, stainless exhaust pipes and red carbon fiber cans were built by Doug Cook.  The welds on the ti-frame, exhaust and the cans are pure art.  The bike has new front and rear Michelin slicks, 916 triple clamps, Rizoma brake fluid reservoirs, straight-through megaphones (they're wild!), cast iron rotors, Brembo levers, Shorai lithium battery, etc.  The bike weighs approximately 320 pounds and, it really flies, brakes fantastically (one finger) and turns like crazy.

Hard to fathom the number hours that went into this build, but the quality shows that a pro builder starts from a different plane than a shade-tree race mechanic.  The desmodue is a nice choice for a club racer, without liquid cooling and readily available.  Probably not the right mount for a novice track rider, but for someone ready to step up to a purpose-built lightweight, this is a singular opportunity.  Tom asks $6,000 and can be reached - here -.

-donn

 

 

Featured Listing – 2007 Ducati 944 Race/Track Bike
Aprilia May 30, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2000 Aprilia RS250 Cup Challenge for Sale

"A man's got to know his limitations," Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry famously deadpans in Magnum Force, a film which happens to feature several Italian motorcycles, none of which are an Aprilia RS250 like this Cup Challenge bike. The decision-makers at Aprilia must have been fans of Clint Eastwood though, as they took that advice to heart: when they were planning the RS250, they stuck with what they knew and kept the frame design and styling in-house, while leaving the engine and transmission to an established manufacturer with vastly greater resources and expertise.

Instead, they used the 249cc v-twin from Suzuki's RGV250. Power for the RGV was listed at just 45hp, so the RS250's claimed 70 horses made it seem like the Aprilia version must have been outrageously modified, tuned to the absolute hilt. The reality was that Japanese restrictions meant all the home-market two-strokes were officially limited to 45hp, and were all capable of similar outputs when properly tuned and de-restricted. In fact, those in-the-know claim that Aprilia's modifications  pretty much amounted to a set of engine cases with "Aprilia" cast into them, and that 55hp at the rear wheel is a much more realistic expectation.

No problem: the Suzuki twin was plenty powerful and tuneable, with good parts availability and a high-strung character that complimented Aprilia's masterpiece of a frame, an aluminum beam unit that looked great and worked even better: reviewers then and now often refer to the RS250 as being one of the best-handling motorcycles of all time. Weight was pared to the bone and the bike was kick-start only. With about 300 pounds to stop, the triple Goldline Brembos were almost overkill, considering the same setup was used to effectively halt the much heavier Ducati 916 and the massive Moto Guzzi Sport 1100...

So the bike fit the standard quarter-liter mold: aluminum frame, asymmetrical "banana" swingarm to clear the expansion chambers, kick-start, and agility instead of brute strength. But where the Japanese bikes were often decorated with wild graphics and bold colors, the Aprilia kept things classy in elegant, basic black. Some of the earlier models featured race-replica graphics and colors, but even those were pretty understated, compared to other bikes in the class.

The Aprilia RS250 Cup Challenge version was created to compete in a one-make race series late in the model's life. It was never really intended to be a roadbike, but did come with an actual VIN so some have been converted, as you can see here: this example does the bare minimum to make it road-legal and looks that much cooler for it.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Aprilia RS250 Cup Challenge for Sale

2000 Aprilia RS250 Cup Challenge Edition. Original owner. Titled and registered here in AZ since new. Street legal and plated. 2 stroke twin. 6 Speed. Never damaged or raced. Some track days over the last 18 years. 5400 miles since new. RS50 taillight and rear turn signals. Small Piaa headlight with switch and brake light switch to keep the DMV happy. New battery, oil service and fork service. Fresh coolant and brake fluid as well. Carburetors and power valves were also cleaned and synched. Factory service manual and some gearing go with. If you want to show up at bike night and be a bit different here’s your ride. The smell of castor smells like victory. Mechanically and aesthetically in excellent condition.

Well, this might have a couple nods to streetability that will "keep the DMV happy" but your mileage, as they say, may vary, depending on where you live. Honestly, all RS250s here in the US are "grey market" bikes and only quasi-legal at best here in California. That's part of what makes CA titles so valuable for bikes like these: if your RS250 doesn't already have one, it's unlikely you'll be able to get one. Then you're forced to register your bike in your Arizona-living buddy's name, and end up riding around hoping the CHP doesn't give you a hard time when they pull you over... This one has clearly been enthusiast-owned and miles are very low. Although it's really a converted race bike, the "road legal" equipment installation is pretty slick and unobtrusive. And reversible! Bidding is pretty active over on eBay and there's plenty of time left to get a bid in, so head on over and take a look!

-tad
Featured Listing: 2000 Aprilia RS250 Cup Challenge for Sale
Ducati May 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2001 Ducati MH900e #413

The singular MH900e has made regular appearances here at RSBFS, the Terblanche design and sparkling execution combined for a quick sell-out of the run of 2,000. This collector has been nicely personalized with an unusual eye toward usability.

2001 Ducati MH900e #413 for sale on eBay

The red and polish MH900e has such a distinctive design that discussion of its specs is secondary, but the fuel injected desmodue pulls its weight.  The air-cooled 904cc is tuned for 75 hp and a wider torque band, making the long, low piece of art more rideable.  Outdoing their usual trellis fretwork, Ducati made the chassis show off the engine and its systems.  Beside being a fabricator's showcase, the sculpted single-sided swingarm works well with the Paioli reservoir shock and eases rear wheel cleaning.  The fairing / tank combination flows, and the separate exhausts wind their way out to the long underseat mufflers.

The owner of this MH900e wanted to ride it more than most, and his modifications are good-looking and practical.  Foremost, a neat mod replaces the battery / tank internals and  increases fuel capacity to a realistic 4.6 gallons.  Updates to the levers and belt covers are well chosen, and the stainless exhaust looks great compared to the factory black.  More detail from the eBay auction:

Super, super clean, with tasteful upgrades, runs with no issues, sounds awesome, and is not a garage queen, but actually ridden, yet lives in my living room most of the time. I'm moving, and no room for several bikes, so here's your chance.

Rizoma cam belt covers, Rizoma Urlo grips and levers, now Brembo master cylinders, fresh oils and Pro-One billet finned oil cooler/filter, California Cycleworks tank/battery conversion which increases fuel tank capacity almost twice as much and rids the ugly and heavy dual battery. Has Lithium single battery, open pod filters, high voltage Dyna ignition, belly pan eliminator (have original), fully polished and chromed stainless exhaust is a beauty, yet not loud and great sound. Luimoto cross stiched suede seat cover, good tires, 3D show chain, etc.

Ducati made the low volume special work well enough to impress reviewers, though long ergonomics and compromised dash and mirrors reinforced its showy roots.  While it looks too cool for most owners to let it outside, this one has amassed enough miles for an oil change, but not so many that the next owner couldn't bring it into the hall.  Bidding on the auction is quite active and there is a reasonable buy-it-now of $22,000.

At the other end of the spectrum, the owner also has a fully restored 1938 BMW R66 on offer - here -.  Questions about either machine can be addressed through the eBay auctions...

-donn

Featured Listing – 2001 Ducati MH900e #413