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Posts by tag: F1

Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn't there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16" wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati's victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner's estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell'Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn't want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16" rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet - if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca
Ducati May 9, 2018 posted by

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Designed to resemble their race-winning TT1 machines and the very last bike built before a buyout by Cagiva, the Ducati F1 was a bit rough around the edges but, in spite of a kit-bike feel and build quality, was a true thoroughbred. The F1 and its variants languished in obscurity for a while, since it wasn't quite a classic and didn't offer a more modern Ducati's refinement or parts availability.

The F1 used a version 749cc Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve Pantah motor, tuned to produce 76hp. With just over 400lbs to push around, performance wouldn't give the inline fours from Japan much trouble in a straight line, but it could handle with the best of them.

The two-valve engine was caged by a trellis frame by Verlicchi and wrapped in bodywork that was decidedly old-school, compared to more modern machines like Suzuki's "Slingshot" GSX-R. Ergonomics were clearly an afterthought, with even the air-cleaners sticking out from the bodywork, waiting  to foul the rider's knees.

It's not the most collectible version of the F1, but comes with some very nice extras. F1s had a 16" front and 18" rear wheel combination, but the Oscam parts fitted to this example both appear to be 16". They definitely look trick, with the polished rim and modular construction. The seller includes plenty of information about this bike, as you can see below, and it looks like the bike is ready to go.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

1988 Ducati 750 F1, only 19,411 miles, many Monjuich upgrades, great condition

Details:

  • 1988 Ducati 750 F1 (ZDM750R/2)
  • only 19,411 miles, Monjuich upgrades
  • very rare in this condition
  • selling for senior friend who is second owner
  • never raced but has taken part in a few track days
  • V2, 4-stroke, 70HP, Desmo
  • air cooled, 5-speed, chain drive
  • dual front disc brakes, single rear disc
  • only 416 lbs, very quick, not a beginner bike!
  • one key, factory owners manual and 750 Montjuich shop manual
  • fully street legal once you remount the turn signals (all wiring there)

Upgrades and extras:

  • 2-into one Ducati Montjuich pipe
  • Second Ducati Montjuich tailpiece with seat reworked by Sargent
  • Montjuich fender
  • Oscam wheels (very rare)
  • Throttlemeister-style throttle lock
  • rear paddock stand

OEM parts included:

  • Stock front and rear wheels
  • Factory F1 pipes, very solid with minor surface ticking, great candidate for blasting and repainting
  • Factory centerstand and OEM swingarm
  • Factory chainguard
  • four turn signals and pigtails, all need new stalks

Cosmetic:

  • Overall cosmetics are very nice, paint glossy, no rash on panels
  • small garf in belly pan, top edge of fairing, and spot where tailpiece meets seat
  • few rubs on rear subfender
  • few jacket scratches on tank 
  • seat in very good shape
  • no dents in tank
  • few oxidized spots on Oscam wheels but nice shape overall

Mechanical:

  • tires have zero miles: Michelin A59X and M59X
  • tires are 2004 and 2005 build date but were properly stored in heated shop so still soft
  • bike starts easily, runs, rides and brakes well
  • fresh oil and K&N filter, brake fluid flush, clutch fluid flush
  • front calipers and master cylinder put thru ultrasonic and rebuilt
  • carbs ultrasonic treated and rebuilt with kits installed
  • new brake pads
  • new timing belts
  • valves set
  • new fuel taps (Bevel Heaven) and fuel lines
  • new engine cover seals
  • repacked steering head bearings
  • lubed cables
  • horn feeble at times and not working others
  • turn signal circuits all there and work but no signals mounted
  • tripmeter reset works but not hard mounted
  • sidestand has been shortened

Well, 19,000 miles on a well-maintained Ducati Pantah isn't anything to be scared of, but sure isn't museum-piece low or anything to brag about... But it does appear to have been sympathetically owned, very well maintained, and sensibly updated. The seller also includes a short clip of the bike idling and revving, along with plenty of additional pics. Bidding is very active and up to $9,000 with a few days left on the auction. Folks are asking for north of $20,000 for Laguna Secas and Montjuichs, although basic F1s seem to be much more modestly valued. Given the upgrades and the amount of time left on the auction, I expect this one to go a good bit higher before the auction ends.

-tad

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Ducati April 26, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 5.2.2018: Price reduced to $16,750! Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Update 3.16.2018: Recently serviced late last year at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $18,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email: adam_chovanak@yahoo.com

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $16,750

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati March 7, 2018 posted by

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Ducati's mid to late-80s bikes existed in a kind of limbo: the modern sportbike was taking shape, and the Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca was birthed during this transitional period. The 750 F1 and its variations weren't quite the refined-ish, modern-ish, mass-produced-ish machines of the Cagiva era, but they weren't the nearly hand-crafted bikes of the Fabio Taglioni era either. The Laguna Seca was named after the famous California race track where Marco Lucchinelli found success in 1986, and just 200 examples were built.

The 750 F1 used a Verlicchi-designed steel trellis frame that gave it a look familiar to fans of later Ducatis, and the bike was powered by a 749cc version of their air and oil-cooled engine, here producing a claimed 76hp. Notably, the F1 still has the rear cylinder in its original configuration: later SS models had the rear cylinder rotated 180° to place both carburetors in the vee of the engine for much more elegant packaging. The bike was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble Ducati's successful TT1 race bikes, with 16" wheels front and rear, while a dry weight of just 385lbs meant the now-familiar two-valve Pantah engine didn't have much mass to push around, giving the bike a 136mph top speed.

Quality was a bit kit-bike and the bikes were relatively crude as delivered, but the potential was there for a seriously fast motorcycle, if one took some time to develop it. Almost as if Ducati didn't bother finishing the bikes, knowing that most owners would modify them to suit their needs anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

The only changes to this bike upon delivery was the installation of the proper directionals, rear brake light switch and horn for street use. I installed a proper muffler in the place of the very loud Verlicchi megaphone. The bike also received an upgrade to the wheels and discs although retaining the 16"size. Magnesium Marvic/Akront rims as on the Monjuich and full floating discs replaced the original cast F1 style wheels and semi floating discs. All original parts are included in the sale. The bike is in excellent condition with only 2830 miles and has never been raced. Mileage as shown in photo is in kilometers.

The F1 and its variants spent years undervalued, but at this point, values have increased significantly, and the opening bid for this example is a cool $20,000. The bike is, as the seller indicates, not completely original, but the changes made are period correct and the parts needed to return it to stock are included. The original machine was basically a race bike with lights, so the addition of some small, folding bar-end mirrors is probably a wise concession to road safety: "First rule of Italian driving: what's behind me is not important..." I'd probably see about adding some low-restriction foam pods to those carburetors as well, since plenty of grit and sand can get past the mesh screens currently serving as "air filters."

-tad

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati March 13, 2017 posted by

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Ducati's 750 F1 was the redheaded stepchild of the Ducati family: it wasn't a bevel-drive and so wasn't really considered worthy of being considered a "classic" Ducati, didn't have the reliability [cough, cough] of the modern two-valve twin, or the performance credentials of the liquid-cooled four-valve superbikes. But values have been rising rapidly in recent years, and the F1 represents an important bridge between two eras of Ducati sportbikes.

The 750 F1 was built around their proven trellis frame and a 749cc version of the Pantah two-valve L-twin, tuned to produce 76hp and was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble the successful TT1 racing machines. Wheels were the height of 80s fashion, with a tiny 16" hoop up front and 18" at the rear. This was the very last Ducati produced before Cagiva took over and it uses a pair of carburetors configured like the older bevel-drive bikes instead of the later machines that nestled both units in the engine's vee. Not the most efficient from a packaging standpoint, with those air cleaners jutting out bodywork.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Original surviving example with 3850 original miles. Runs very well indeed. Its tight and everything works. Toolkit and owners manual included. Will need tires if ridden aggressively. An uncompromising street legal Italian thoroughbred.

Bidding is up above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction. These are the very last Ducatis before the modern era that was ushered in by Cagiva, and that gives them a special place in Ducati's history, and the uptick in values reflects that. This example looks very clean and is in excellent condition, with low miles and the seller even includes a short video of the bike roaring up the street!

-tad

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Ducati June 10, 2016 posted by

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front2

Although the mid-1980s 750 F1 may not have represented the very best from Ducati, the TT2 and later TT1 race bikes that inspired them certainly did. Lightweight, perfectly formed, and highly effective, they epitomize Ducati’s racing ethos of the period. The original TT2 displaced 587cc and used the belt-drive Pantah motor, with the later TT1 punched out to something closer to 750cc. Both bikes did well in competition, although the earlier 600 was far more successful.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side

The beautiful and very lightweight [at a claimed 16lbs] frame by Verlicchi and the bodywork with perforations to allow airflow to a front-mounted oil-cooler are distinctive characteristics of the TT, and those huge headlights speak to the bike’s obvious endurance-racing intent. The front three-quarter view also highlights the 16” front and 18” rear wheel/tire combo that contributed to the bike’s agility.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side Engine
Although this one may have racing provenance and should probably be on display somewhere in a collection or museum, but it’s battle-ready and scuffed appearance almost demand that it be put into track-ready condition and campaigned in vintage events.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

Ducati TT2/TT1 750, model year 1984, VIN 22

This is a GENUINE TT2 factory bike, VIN 22 upgraded to TT1 750cc specs to compete in that class in the Endurance series. Jean Moto Team was a small but very “aggressive” team competing in endurance racing and TT’s during the 1980's

A real piece of mid 80's Ducati history this bike finished 6th overall at the 1984 Bol d’Or, first of all Ducatis so in front of works Ducati machines! It's totally preserved as it finished the last race but the engine was completely overhauled by factory ex-mechanic Giorgio Grimandi.

Forget stocks and shares invest in a true piece of motorcycling history! It comes with documentation (original period magazine etc). Race, parade and collect! Bulletproof investment.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Side

Bidding is up to around $6,500 with the reserve not met and several days left on the auction. That’s no surprise, considering that real TT race bike should be at least a $30,000 machine. I’m not sure why there hasn’t been more interest. Perhaps the bike’s mongrel TT1/TT2 history? That seems very much in keeping with a racebike’s mission, and only bikes that have spent their lives on display would be lacking period upgrades to keep them competitive…

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale




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