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Posts by tag: EXUP

Yamaha July 6, 2018 posted by

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Over in the comments sections of another post, we've been debating the relative merits and values of some of the priciest motorcycles, but it's still possible to find something cool, collectible, and very competent if you're on a limited budget. It's not one of Yamaha's fastest sportbikes, but this first-generation FZR1000 might be their most historically significant. At the moment, it's also one of the most unappreciated machines of the modern era: if the GSX-R was the first sportbike of the modern age, it can be argued that the FZR1000 actually codified the formula.

The original version of the FZR1000 built from 1987 through 1988 seen here was powered by a 989cc version of Yamaha's inline four. It did not feature their signature EXhaust Ultimate Power or "EXUP" valve in the exhaust system, but did use their "Genesis" heads with three intake and two exhaust valves. Five-valve technology proved more useful in theory than in practice, in spite of the fact that Yamaha stuck with it for a pretty long time. But, perhaps more importantly, the Genesis engine's characteristic steeply forward-canted cylinder head allowed the airbox to be located under the fuel tank instead of between the rider's knees.

However, the bike's defining feature was the aluminum beam "Deltabox" frame, the first time one had been used in a big bike like this. The contemporary GSX-R used an aluminum frame, but the square-tube construction was more of a cradle-type that looked backward towards past designs, while Yamaha's beefy Deltabox was a much more forward-thinking concept. The frame spars were positively massive for the time, but the thin-walls meant the structure was as light as it was strong, and while five-valve heads proved to be a bit of a fad, thick beam frames have stood the test of time.

Looking at the spec sheet, all you'd need to do is add a sixth gear to the box and you could be looking at something from just a few years ago: the aluminum beam frame, liquid cooling, under-tank airbox, and 17" wheels all sound very modern. It's obviously from a different generation and is both heavier and less powerful by far than current literbikes. But it was very much the complete package when new, and the five-speed gearbox speaks to the bike's seemingly bottomless well of torque and flexible midrange, qualities shared with the GSX-R1100, a bike that also lacked a sixth cog.

Ideally, if you're looking at an FZR1000 you'd probably want something just a little bit newer, as the thorough redesign for 1989 featured a slight bump in displacement and the addition of the EXUP valve, but this is the original, and looks very sophisticated in blue and white speedblock graphics.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Up for auction is my 1988 FZR1000.  It is titled in my name and is currently registered in  the state of California til October 2018.  It is a nice survivor.  It has various scratches and some cracks here and there but overall in very clean condition.  It has good tires, a new fuel pump, fuel filter, various fuel lines, carb cleaning and synchronization done Dec of last year, rebuilt fuel valves, battery new last year, new windshield, front brake master cylinder rebuilt and a couple other things I can't remember  now.  It comes with a tank bag, some spare parts and a service manual. It handles, runs, starts, brakes fine....although maybe it could use another carb cleaning as it has been sitting.  Still you could ride it right now.....it has  good  power.

Some things it would need is a new headlight.  Choke doesn't work but it still starts easy when cold. Return throttle cable not hooked on.  Fuel pump is controlled by a switch in the back  so you may want to hook up correctly.....and I'm sure a few other things I can't remember right now.

If anyone is interested but not local...PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE ask questions and request photos of any area of the bike you would like.  I REALLY PREFER SOMEONE LOCAL WHO COULD COME BY AND KICK THE TIRES AND INSPECT IN PERSON but if not please ask all the questions you want before bidding.  Although this bike is clean and a survivor it has not been in a box the last 30 years ridden only 50 miles so keep that in mind.  It currently has 20950 miles. I may make a couple trips up the mountain before it's gone so there may be a few more miles on it.

Here is a video of it running.  

I am selling because  with my back condition I cannot use it like I thought I could.  

If you have any questions please ask.  If you think I left something out please ask.  If you need better pictures please ask.  I want to be as honest and accurate as possible so please ask anything.  If the winning buyer comes to pick it up and dosent want to go through with the deal for any reason no worries.....I will cancel the transaction....no problem.  The previous owner named this bike Noah. I want to see this go to a good home.

The Yoshimura tri-oval exhaust obviously isn't stock, and isn't even trying to look period-correct, but I actually like it: stock exhausts of the era are often pretty heavy and very ugly. Overall, the bike has some usual chips and wear you'd expect on a bike this old, but it seems honest. And the seller includes a nice video of the bike starting and running, with some closeups. Slingshot Gixxers and other late 1980s sportbikes have been rising in value, but the Yamahas seem to have been lagging behind a bit, and while the later EXUP models will probably be a bit more desirable, this early machine is historically significant. And also pretty cool. There are several days left on the auction and no takers yet at the $2,150 opening bid. It may not be original, but this could be a hell of a do-it-all machine with style if you're on a budget and looking for something out of the ordinary.

-tad

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Yamaha June 2, 2018 posted by

Saved Not Spent – 1989 Yamaha FZR-400 with only 1,200 Miles !

The four stroke small-sports are definitely whipping up on the stock market this year, and this barely used 1989 will likely continue the trend.  It's a cornering machine with 60 hp and ready-to-ride weight well under 400 lbs.  New repro bodywork to preserve the excellent factory set can only help.

1989 Yamaha FZR-400 for sale on eBay

The progressive-license wars had been going on for several years overseas, and all of the big four had four valve inline fours available with racey lookalike styling.  The Yamaha won the refinement award with the EXUP exhaust valve tailoring the torque curve, and build quality was just shy of the red benchmark.  Except for the fields with numbers, the specs read like its big brother OW-01 - Deltabox frame, Genesis top end, quad Mikunis, dual front disks, and staggered alloy wheels.

The owner's not saying much about the history or whether this example is an import, but despite the nearly three decades it shows no corrosion and has Colorado paperwork.  Some 1989's have updated seat console and fairing while this one has more details from a few years before, perhaps an aficionado could comment.  From the eBay auction:

Never raced.

This bike comes with two sets of plastics.

The plastics on the bike currently are Japanese racing repro's.

The bike comes with the original plastics in fantastic condition.

In addition the bike comes with original manual, rear footpegs, back seat,
spare perfect condition radiator and hoses and a new red front fender.

The bike does not smoke or drip.

Tires are older and should probably be changed before serious riding.

There is a hairline crack in the original front fender not noticeable unless you look for it.

The original pipe has a couple of scratches that have been touched up but there are no
dents or damage of any kind.

Though the FZR-400 was imported for a few years, the displacement arms race and premium MSRP curtailed its long term success.  Riders with a track day habit or easy access to some twisty bits have re-discovered the segment, and the bikes can be maintained at home. This one looks too nice to track, but could certainly take in some turns on the way to a bike night...

-donn

Saved Not Spent – 1989 Yamaha FZR-400 with only 1,200 Miles !
Bimota May 1, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

I've mentioned this before, but everything just sounds cooler in Italian. If you want to intimidate someone, just shout gibberish at them in German: anything you say sounds clipped and military and very, very serious. But yell at someone in Italian, and it just sounds like you're trying to very emphatically seduce them. I mean, Italian car and motorcycle manufacturers don't even have to try, they just basically describe the thing, and it still sounds cool, exotic, and expensive. A Maserati Quatroporte? You mean a Maserati "Four-Door"? And bikes are even lazier: Testastretta is just "Narrow Head" and Desmosedici sounds plenty exotic, but it's just "Desmo Sixteen [Valves]." Today's Featured Listing Bimota YB10 Dieci might be the worst offender though. In English, it's just the "Yamaha-Bimota #10 Ten."

While giving your bike a simple, two-digit number for a name may not be all that creative, it suits Bimota's pragmatic approach to making impractical motorcycles. Seeing the potential in the powerful, efficient, and reliable engines being churned out by the Japanese manufacturers packaged into overweight, overbuilt, and under-suspended roadbikes, they took that performance and stuffed it into machines as much as a hundred pounds lighter. Spared any need to be affordable or practical, Bimota was free to experiment with exotic, weight-saving materials, the newest ideas in frame design, and the best suspension components available at both ends. Bimota's creations might not have been very versatile, but they were pretty good at the one thing they were supposed to be good at, which was going fast and looking cool. Okay, I guess that's really two things...

Of course, the fact that they were freed from any need to be practical also means that they can be a real pain to service. The stiff, light aluminum beam frame that was Bimota's signature during this period was wrapped tightly around the engine to keep weight down and centralize mass, so many of their bikes need to be pretty much completely disassembled before you can perform basic maintenance. Thankfully, they were also designed with body panels that are easily removed with a minimum of fuss. Seriously: look closely at those plastics and note how few seams and mounting points are visible: the tank cover, seat, and tail section are all one piece.

Of course, there's a downside to that simplicity as well: drop a modern sportbike and you might just have to replace a couple sections of fairing or a side panel or two. But when your bodywork consists of just four or five separate pieces and only 224 machines were ever produced... Well let's just say that if I owned a Bimota Dieci and planned to ride it regularly, I'd order a set of Airtech fairings and have them painted up to look like the original parts, then hang the stock bodywork on my livingroom wall.

I'm not sure exactly what changes were made between the 1987 YB4 and the 1991 YB10, but the bodywork and frame look suspiciously similar. That's no bad thing, as Italian vehicles always do seem to get better with each successive generation as the kinks are worked out, right up until they finally get it right and then promptly discontinue the model. Similar-looking Yamaha-engined Bimotas were powered by 750 and 400cc versions of their five-valve Genesis liquid-cooled inline four, but this is the big daddy, motivated by a nearly stock 1002cc engine and five-speed gearbox from the FZR1000 that produced 145hp. With a claimed weight of 407lbs, nearly 70 less than the donor bike, the slippery superbike could hit a tested top speed of 172mph, with stability provided by the fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back, which the seller has helpfully photographed for prospective buyers.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

VIN: ZESS8YA23MRZES041 In 1991 the first of 224 (total production) YB10 Dieci machines were produced with many of the best bits from previous models. Named Dieci (ten) in recognition of the 10th collaboration between Bimota and Yamaha, the YB10 represents the evolution of the series YB6 and YB8 with a 4 cylinder 1000cc Bimota tuned Yamaha engine. Pierluigi Marconi used inverted Marzocchi forks, super strong lightweight aluminum beam frame, redesigned aero, larger high-flow carbureted intake and more comfortable riding position. Dieci is the perfect name for the final development of the YB line. Weighing in at 407lbs (65lbs down on the stock Yamaha FZR) with 145BHP on tap, gives the rider power with a comfortable and balanced ride. Great brakes were a must so Marconi used a pair of 320mm front discs plus a single rear 230, combined with Brembo calipers. Whilst this Dieci is 25 years old and shows just over 12000 miles it doesn’t appear tired or dated. It has been well preserved and restored where necessary. The bodywork is less rounded than current trends but the ‘stealth’ look still works well, especially with its silver over red combination. Overall the body panels are well preserved and in very good condition. Recent performance and service includes Ohlin rear shock, new Pirelli Corsa tires, Termignoni carbon muffler, new chain and sprocket, new braided lines and new battery. The Dieci was originally sold and serviced by Bob Steinbugler at Bimota Spirit. Needs nothing, ready to ride. $10,500. Contact Matt with your interest: mattshaw@comcast.net

The $10,500 the seller is asking is right in line with the asking prices we've seen for similar Bimotas recently, and is pretty much chump change for such a rare, exotic, and good looking machine that can still show many modern sportbikes a clean pair of heels. You might have to work a bit harder, and avoid pissing matches with modern literbikes, but your buddy on an R6 or GSX-R is going to be very shocked to see those two big, round, endurance-style headlamps in his rear-view mirrors on a brisk Sunday morning ride...

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Yamaha March 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Update 3.14.2018: Turns out this one sold faster than we could post it. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

A modern literbike is a relatively peaky beast: chasing horsepower without increasing displacement means ever-higher revs are required, and a six-speed box makes sense. It's telling that bikes like today's Featured Listing Yamaha's FZR1000, one of the cutting-edgy-ist sportbikes of its day, made do with just five and could still be considered fast now. Six-speed gearboxes had become the norm for motorcycles by the late 1980s, unless you were looking at cruisers, touring machines, or big-bore sportbikes. Why? Well, narrow, peaky powerbands require more gears to effectively exploit and the big-inch engines of the aforementioned six-speed exceptions had enough flexibility and torque to make them window-dressing: an extra gear just wasn't needed.

Considering that Yamaha's FZR1000 makes just 20 more claimed horses and weighs nearly 40 pounds more than a modern R6, you might think that these old-school machines would be no match for even a much smaller machine from today. But it's the 79 ft-lbs of torque from the FZR that makes it so effective: a modern literbike like the BMW S1000RR makes just a few more foot-pounds. So how did they do it? Well the GSX-R1100 obviously benefited from a few more cubes, but the smaller 1002cc FZR1000 combined Yamaha's five-valve Genesis head with their EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve to provide both low-end torque and high-end power.

Five-valve heads have pretty much disappeared these days, the theoretical advantages proving insufficient to outweigh the additional complexity required, but EXUP-style exhaust valves are ubiquitous, now that Yamaha's patents have expired, allowing other manufacturers to take advantage. By the late 1980s, servo-operated "power valves" were common on two-strokes, but this was the very first use of the technology in a four-stroke, and the result was a very flexible engine with a 170mph top speed.

Introduced in 1987, the 1989 redesign seen here looked similar, but included updates to the frame and engine: the original had a 989cc engine bumped to 1002cc and rotated backwards in the Deltabox frame for a shorter wheelbase. Later, the bike adopted a single headlight design to help modernize it, but you can't go wrong with a pair of big, round lamps. As you'd expect, performance and in particular handling improved throughout the bike's lifespan, but this particular model strikes a nice balance between classic superbike styling and the better performance and handling of the redesigned bike. I happen to prefer the looks of the earlier machines: the single-headlight version does look pretty sharp, but it just doesn't have the old-school round-lamp charm.

From the Seller: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

For being 28 years old the bike looks and runs awesome! It has less than 18k original miles, has never been dropped and has only a few minor cracks around the fairing mounting areas from the tightening of the bolts, which is normal for these older more brittle plastics (see near bolts in pics attached).

The 1989 version, crowned the "Bike of the Decade" by Cycle World, had 0-60 acceleration of 2.9 seconds, and a top speed of over 167 mph. I purchased one of these brand new in Miami Fl in 1989. I got on it and rode that bike all the way the Newline Vermont, 1460 miles in two days. It was a amazing adventure and the bike never missed a beat ripping off 700+ mile days with ease. This is truly a sports cruiser rather than a rep-racer R1. This particular dual headlight model was only produced one year, Yamaha went to the single (ugly) headlight in 1990. Anyway buy this unit, gas it up and head to for the opposite coast! We can deliver this bike anywhere in the United States for $500 enclosed and insured.

A few notes about the bike:

  • The bike was owned by 1 famous owner from new until when I bought it three years ago. It was a famous biker from the publishing world who collects bikes (Forbes magazine) and the bike was in Palm Beach all of its life until I got it. I have a copy of the title with his info on it that I can provide.
  • The bike was purchased from him for $4,500 and needed some TLC.
  • The bike had extensive work done to get the bike all up to modern running equipment. I spent over $4,500... All well documented (will provide) at Fast by Ferracci.
  • I also had a GPR slip-on imported from Italy (over $500) and it sounds awesome!
  • The carbs were also completely rebuilt, last summer 2016, and has all new gaskets - the engine runs amazingly well!
  • We over $9,500 invested in the bike. Went way overboard in its preparation. My loss, your happy smiles!

This does seem to be the version collectors will want, and in just a few years you may be kicking yourself for not taking advantage of the seller's $5,500 asking price. There are some minor cosmetic imperfections, small cracks and the like, but these are clearly documented and not unexpected on a Japanese bike from the 1980s: paint and finish were generally of a lower standard than on European bikes and they often age poorly, even when well-maintained and sparingly used. Luckily, the major servicing headaches have been taken care of and the bike is reportedly mechanically sound, meaning that this should be a great candidate for a rolling restoration, since collectors will likely want to replace that lighter, but non-original exhaust can and take care of the blemishes.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Yamaha February 23, 2018 posted by

Urban Camo – 1994 Yamaha YZF750R

Descendant of Yamaha's OW01 homologation special, the YZF-750R was a vaunted endurance racer in race trim, and a two-time Bike of the Year winner in the mid-90's.  A victim of the displacement arms race and an aging platform, the Yamaha 750 lasted only a few years.  This YZF might be a little rough around the edges but has great potential.

1994 Yamaha YZF750R for sale on eBay

The five-valve Genesis head was used on the YZF-750R, pushing 125 hp, with the EXUP exhaust valve helping broaden the curve for the 59 ft-lbs. torque.  The quick-handling chassis was complemented by 41mm upside-down forks and slowed with six-piston calipers over 320mm disks.  Full bodywork has an aggressive stance and room for a co-rider.

Resident of sunny California, this YZF appears to be complete, with mandatory rear fender-ectomy, turn signal change and smaller muffler.  Pictures need more resolution but this bike may be Öhlins equipped, and only minor scuffs are apparent.  From the eBay auction:

29,000 miles
carbs recently rebuilt, may need to be adjusted
starts and runs

a few other items of interest:
MSRP of $10,500 back in 1994.
inverted forks
6 piston calipers
26,000 mile valve adjustment intervals
Genesis 5 valve head
1995 bike of the year for SportRider
1994 bike of the year for Cycle World
only real contender against the Ducati 916 in those years

The Yamaha had a great combination of handling, power, torque, and brakes, and a number are seen with significant miles.  Build quality was second only to Honda and got demerits for just the 432 lbs. dry weight and notchy transmission.  Though better photos and history would help a serious bidder, it's a no reserve auction and might be right for a knowledgeable fan of the model...

-donn

Urban Camo – 1994 Yamaha YZF750R
Bimota October 17, 2017 posted by

Why Be Ordinary? 1992 Bimota YB8 for Sale

By the end of the 1990s, it could be argued that Bimota was basically irrelevant. After all, the whole point of a Bimota was simple: take a powerful, reliable engine from a bike from an established manufacturer, then slip it into a stiff, lightweight frame with the best suspension money could buy at both ends, and wrap it all in simple, lightweight bodywork. The resulting bikes were free from practical considerations, expensive, and very fast. Sure, they often weren't quite finished as delivered, but a bit of time setting one up to your personal preferences meant you had the ultimate exotic racebike for the road. Unfortunately, the relentless pace of the Japanese manufacturers meant that their powerful, reliable engines were soon housed in bikes that were lighter than past efforts and handled much better than ever before, erasing any real advantage the Rimini machines had over their stock counterparts. But before that happened, bikes like this Bimota YB8 showed just how spectacular the results could be.

The YB8 was an evolutionary design, and used same basic frame as the YB4 and YB6, but used the larger, more powerful FZR1000 engine, complete with the famed EXUP system. 149 claimed horses doesn't sound like much in this era of superbikes making more than 200hp at the rear wheel, but keep in mind that Yamaha felt that the FZR only needed five gears for its literbike instead of the six found on 600s and 750s, and the 1002cc engine has a spread of torque that would make a modern machine jealous. Bimota claimed their alloy-framed confection was a claimed 64lbs lighter than a donor bike that no one would call slow even today. In the YB8, it meant a tested top speed of 173mph to match the race-bred handling.

One of the things that stands out on the YB8 and Bimotas in general is something that's missing: bodywork fasteners. If you've ever serviced your own sportbike, you know that, in most cases, removing the bodywork is a nightmare of tiny, sometimes inaccessible fasteners, screws, and plastic clips, that require all manner of wiggling and cursing to remove. Not here. Just a few bolts attach the bodywork, helped by the fact that the panels themselves are made up of just a few pieces. Great for simplicity, but possibly very expensive if your pride and joy tips over in the garage...

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Bimota YB8 for Sale

1992 Bimota YB8
1,900 original miles (3,200 kilometers)
Original / Unrestored
A+ condition
Clean title in hand
VIN: ZESS8YA23NRANS003

Here is a quick video with walk around etc... Sorry for my terrible mic on my camera. Also may seem like I'm winding it out a little at the end of the video, was just trying to show that it runs good on power, was no where near red line. Also switched to open source music so my apologies if it is annoying.

Bought the bike from a guy who had it sitting in his living room for several years. I love the early 90s carbed full fairing sport bikes so I had to have this when I saw it. The only reason I am selling is to fund another purchase that I have been given exclusive opportunity for. I was given a folder full of paperwork, with full service history, manuals, brochures etc... from what I see in there this bike stickered for $23,000 in 1992. I am also under the impression that this was one of only a handful of these imported into the U.S. for sale.

A bike like this is really only going to go up in value as the full fairing bikes of the early 90s are just getting rarer by the day, this one was rare in the first place with only 252 being manufactured there is probably only a handful left, and maybe none in this condition with this low of miles... please only bid if you are serious about owning and IF YOU HAVE 0 FEEDBACK YOU MUST CONTACT ME PRIOR TO BIDDING

THE ODO IS AT 3200... I AM OF THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THIS IS IN KILOMETERS... which would translate to ~1,900 miles...PLEASE UNDERSTAND I AM NOT 100% CERTAIN OF THAT, IF YOU KNOW HOW I CAN FIND OUT FOR SURE LET ME KNOW, WORST CASE SCENARIO IT HAS 3200 MILES.

Bike is for sale locally for $18,500 obo although I did not know exactly what to ask as the bike very well could be one of a kind in this condition, with this low of miles. I am definitely negotiable. If bike does not sell prior to auction end it will sell to highest bidder. Local buyers encouraged to come see the bike in person, all others I can send pictures or video of whatever you would like to see.

SHIPPING: I am happy to assist your shipper in any way I can, I can also provide a shipped to your door price where I arrange all of the shipping. Shipping motorcycles these days is very reasonable usually costing 200-600$ depending on how far you are from Reno, NV.

If you have ANY questions please feel free to contact me call or text at 775 742 8807 or message through eBay.

In case you missed it in the excerpt above, the seller does include a video of the bike, including a walk-around, start-up, rev, and even a ride. I recommend you turn the volume way down, or skip forward to the 2:20 mark to avoid the really horrible music that's even worse than the seller suggests. It's not the greatest video but it does give you a pretty good idea of what to expect. The seller is very honest about the fact that he wasn't sure how to price this, which is refreshing. Unfortunately, that $18,500 asking price seems optimistic, considering what 90s Bimotas have been selling, or not selling for recently. These Bimotas have a bit of a kit-bike feel to them, but with a bit of patience and, in some cases, even a bit of re-engineering, they can be made into very fast machines, since the fundamentals are all there: the trademark frame, powerful engine, high quality, if slightly dated suspension, and lightweight bodywork. This does look like a very nice example, a sharp, low-mileage bike that should need nothing, whether you plan to display it or to use it on the road.

-tad

Why Be Ordinary? 1992 Bimota YB8 for Sale