Posts by tag: Ducati

Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 3.16.2018: Recently serviced late last year at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $18,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email:

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 $18,500


Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05

The Ducati 888 filled the gap between the brand-redefining 851 and the legendary 916, bumping the 851's fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, four-valve L-twin to 888cc. The inbetweener status didn't phase the bike much, though, as it was enough for Doug Polen to net back-to-back World Superbike championships in '91 and '92. Production ended in '94 as the world geared up for the Tamburini-penned 916. Ducati sent fewer than 300 to the States.

1993 Ducati 888 SPO5 for sale on eBay

This 1993 Ducati 888 SP05 is number 270 of 500, and has covered just 125 miles since its original UK delivery. The SP versions of the 888 never made it to our roads, as they couldn't get past American DOT laws. Now that the bike has reached the magic 25-year mark, it might be possible to bring it in and secure registration, though it probably should be ridden sparingly.

From the eBay listing:


We are pleased to present the opportunity to own a very rare collectable Ducati 888 SP5. This example is number 270 of just 500 made. A beautiful 1993 model having covered just 125 miles from new. This is the ultimate concourse example and the best we have ever seen

This bike is supplied with the original handbook, and will have a full belt service and MOT prior to the new owner taking possession.

The 888 was a motorcycle manufactured as an upgrade to the 851. The earlier 851 had introduced liquid cooling, computerised fuel injection and four-valve heads to Ducati's two cylinder motors. After increasing the capacity of the 851 to 888 cc they then released the iconic 888 SP5 in 1993.

A small deposit will secure this Ducati and we offer finance packages to suit and can also arrange delivery both UK and worldwide.

The bike is listed with a classified ad, meaning that the price -- about $55,000 USD -- won't change over the course of the listing.

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05
Ducati March 9, 2018 posted by

Not The End? 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258

Touted as the end of the SuperSport era, the 900SS Final Edition of the venerable Ducati platform was both a beginning as well as an end. The last released model as designed by Massimo Tamburini, the FE was a numbered and exclusive marketing machine that represented the pinnacle of the air-cooled lineup. The next page of the new chapter of Ducati was written by a new character - the oft derided designer Pierre Terblanche - taking Ducati into new and interesting directions. The real sunset here is not the SuperSport lineup, but rather Tamburini's influence on the design... and ultimately Tamburini's effect on the platform. Today's example is #258 of the purported final 300 bikes targeting North America.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258 for sale on eBay

The second generation of the SuperSport platform rolled into the showrooms way back in 1988. With an updated Pantah-based motor, air cooled desmodue twin was a rough gem - it contained all of the basic DNA that you would want in a sport bike, with few of the amenities or polish found in Japanese contemporaries. The SS had style with a trellis frame, basic but good suspension, and a bit of Italian flair that made it unique. Ten years on the platform had aged relatively well, although performance would never be on par with 600s from the East. Carburetors fell by the wayside as fuel injection made an appearance (likely more for EPA reasons than for power or perceived performance). And while 10 years is a lifetime for a model, the bones of the SuperSport were so good that to this day these remain well-sorted motorcycles. Not the fastest, but characteristically Ducati.

From the seller:
have a 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258 for sale. Bike has 4180 miles on it. Had been in storage for last 11 years. New cam belts, valves checked, oil changed, new air filter, carbs completely rebuilt, new fuel filter, strainer and tank hoses, new Michelin power pilot tires, forks rebuilt with new oil and seals. New brake fluid and clutch slave cylinder rebuilt with new piston assembly. Inside of gas tank is rust free. No cracks in frame or aluminum swing arm. Bike starts and runs good up high but has a hesitation between 2000 and 4000 rpm that I can't figure out. A couple of hours with a Ducati mechanic and it should be good to go. Nearest one to me is 5 hours away so it's not an option otherwise it would be done. Bike did fall over in the garage on left side and has a small ding in front of tank, scuff on lower fairing and small crack in lower fairing where support bar holds it. Also has a section on bottom back of left fairing where battery leaked from the hose and removed the paint, which has been poorly touched up. I believe the fairings were repainted at some point as they appear to be a lighter shade of silver than the headlight surround.

Outside of unique silver paint and a limited edition number riveted to the headstock, there is not too much more to a FE than a one year earlier 900 SuperSport. Still, the Boys from Bologna executed well; the majority of limited edition models pull in higher dollars than standard models at auction. We have seen a few FE models past through these pages, and they always raise some interest. This particular example is not exactly a museum piece, but it looks to be an honest specimen with relatively few miles. It would appear that the owner has done a lot of work on this one, which could be a bonus if all checks out. This buyer is looking for $6,000 in a Buy It Now auction format, which could end up being fair money depending on the ultimate condition of the bike. Check it out here and relive the glory of Tamburini's classic design. Good Luck!!


Not The End? 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258
Ducati February 6, 2018 posted by

178 Miler: 2002 Ducati MH900e

I know it is early in the year, but I'm going to go out on a limb and proclaim this advert as one of the top 5 worst presentations of 2018. Fortunately, the bike is a MH900e - the Terblanche-designed internet wunderbike that put Ducati collectables on the map. Sold in limited numbers and online only, the Y2K re-interpretation of the Mike Hailwood replica classic is a little bit of eye candy artwork, a little bit of a modern torture rack and a little bit of a parts bin special. It is also a great investment vehicle for those who don't like to ride.

2002 Ducati MH900e with 178 miles on eBay

Based around the ubiquitous Ducati L-twin, the MH900e started life out as a 900 Supersport. With air cooling, two valve desmodue heads and dry clutch the MH900e exudes all the coarseness of the lower echelon Ducatis. The rest of the bike is pure Terblance, with stylish extremes at every angle. From the front the circular headlamp and fairing calls to mind the late 70s and early 80s Ducatis that were so successful on the track. At the rear the offset rear shock draws the eye to the unique swing arm, the shotgun exhausts and the wheel that seems to hang out in space. Even the splash of colors combine with the chrome accents to stand out. The presence of the bike is amazing, making the MH900e one of the most popular bikes NOT to ride.

From the seller:
Part of a collection. Rare 2002 Ducati MH900e. Well babied from day one. Never raced, abused or even wet for that matter.

Between the lousy pictures and the non-existent text, it does not appear that this advert was created by an enthusiast. It is listed as "Ducati Sport Touring" and the listing has no VIN number. How about one or two pics in focus? It is too hard to actually move the bike to a point where you can take a decent photo? What is the history of the bike? What collection is it part of? Why is the collection being sold off / liquidated? When was the last time this bike ran? A picture might be worth a thousand words, but a poor pic simply prompts a thousand questions.

According to the limited info in the advert, this particular example sports but 178 miles. That is closer to being new than many we have seen. However it is interesting in that mileage does not really seem to affect the MH900e values; perhaps it is because so few MH900e models actually accrue road yardage (rumor has it that they are too uncomfortable to ride much), or perhaps it is simply because these are rare bikes that always have a market. Regardless, this example appears to be a well-cared specimen that is looking for a new home. The starting ask is Canadian $18,000 (approx $14.5k USD), which is well-below market value. There is a reserve in place, and you can expect the seller to be looking for somewhere in the $20k USD neighborhood. Check it out here and then let us know if you would like one of these in your collection - and why. Good Luck!!


178 Miler: 2002 Ducati MH900e
Ducati January 21, 2018 posted by

All original: 1994 Ducati 916

When the 1994 Ducati 916 was unleashed, it caused the motorcycle world to stand up so fast it promptly fell right back down on its ass. When the industry press and its leather-clad readership had finally quit seeing stars, what they were staring at was a genre-definer the likes of which hadn't come along since the '80s.

1994 Ducati 916 for sale on eBay

The 916 platform went through myriad iterations and increases in displacement over the years, and there are plenty of 916 and 916 lookalikes available on every corner of the internet. Still, an unmolested first-year bike is a sweet find. With the exception of some dirt and grime, this 1994 Ducati 916 looks fully sorted and ready to go.

From the eBay listing:

Great condition survivor, not many left like this, never raced!
Italian model, registered in US
All stock, recently serviced by licensed Ducati shop, new tires, brake pads and lines. New timing chain done as a pre-maintanance.
Can help with crating and shipping at new owners expense.
Actual miles: 10,850

The ad goes easy on the particulars, but the asking price shows the seller knows what kind of lust these bikes inspire.

All original: 1994 Ducati 916
Ducati January 19, 2018 posted by

Dusty deal? 1982 Ducati MHR900

Collectable motorcycles - especially those from the late 1970s through 1980s - are on the rise. Values have been notching up to the point where many of us can remember when " could buy one for (insert paltry sum here)..." This is true of practically any desirable bike in recent memory; for every bike there is a bubble developing. This certainly holds for memorable Ducati models - on the ropes in the late 70s & early 80s, Ducati fought back with a replica model dripping with nostalgia. Hopelessly outgunned by the technology of the Japanese, the 1982 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica recalled a more successful time for the Bologna factory (specifically, the Isle of Man TT win in '78), and traded outright performance for repli-racer glorly. Today these are 5 figure collector models with a strong following.

1982 Ducati MHR900 for sale on eBay

Essentially an offshoot of the 900 Super Sport of the day, the air-cooled twin utilized a bevel drive to actuate the two-valve desmo heads. Claimed power was a reasonable 64 HP, which was decent in the day. Today this is a laughable sum achievable by entry level cycles, but there is nothing that can compete with the onslaught of time and tech. The pros of power delivery included usable torque throughout the rev range, and a very narrow profile. This was capitalized by the straight section trellis frame, enabling confident handling and impressive lean angles. Improved Marzocchi suspension and upgraded brakes elevated the original MHR from the standard SS. Additional chassi details included magnesium wheels and a model specific fuel tank feeding 40mm Dell'Ortos. Bespoke Conti mufflers completed the visual effect.

By 1982, the differences between the 900SS and the MHR shrunk down to all but bodywork and graphics. Magnesium wheels were replaced by more durable aluminum units. The model-specific gas tank survived, as did the larger carbs. But the real difference between the standard SS and the MHR was the bodywork; a large flowing fairing, tight talk section and new side panels all emblazoned with the star power of Mike Hailwood. Depending upon sources, an estimated 7,000 MHRs were built between 1979 and early 1986. Cagiva's takeover of Ducati in 1985 spelled the end of the bevel twin and the MHR model line.

From the seller:
Here is your chance to buy an extremely rare Ducati that simply does not come up for sale very often. I have owned this bike for over 25 years including back in Australia and brought it to the USA over 15 years ago. I never bothered to title it here as it was in my personal Ducati collection and I rode it very rarely, it had a noisy gearbox bearing on 5th gear so I gave it to a friend who was starting his own European bike repair shop and he was going to take his time and replace the bearing and freshen it up a bit...5 years later I had to take it back in the condition you see it here, I have all the parts safely stored in a plastic tote and it is complete, and the engine covers etc have all been polished. This motorcycle was invited to a special event of hailwoods held at daytona speedway where I got to meet nobby Clarke, Pauline and David hailwood and they all signed my tank, sadly those signatures have all faded but there is pics on the internet somewhere of the meeting and then signing my tank, I also got to ride this bike in the procession lap on the banked track where I got to open her up..I always swore I would never sell this bike and if I don’t get the money I’m asking I doubt I will.this is a matching numbers bike.. I have taken pics of the bike before I cleaned has been in my air conditioned warehouse for the last 10years and will need a good going over, new Tyres etc...cleans up extremely well..

Ducati specs vary greatly within a given model year - partly due to the relaxed attitude of the Italian manufacturer during this time frame, and partly due to the initial destination of the bike in question. For example, US-based bikes came devoid of the Conti pipes due to noise regs (thank you, Mr. EPA). Thus is it not uncommon to find some variances in bikes built in the same year - making collecting a bit more of a challenge. What is stock and original can change from region to region.

This particular seller has committed every sin that RSBFS preaches against when it comes to the advert: Pictures are few and poor, and show a bike that could use a bit of cleaning. Instead of telling us that it "...cleans up extremely well..." it would be of great help to show us - by cleaning it up and *then* taking pictures. Nobody knows what the fiberglass looks like, the condition of the paintwork, etc. It also doesn't help to see that this is not a running bike - and may not be complete. I won't even ask why the rear cylinder is missing when the stated issue was a bearing in the tranny (maybe a bevel expert can help us out there). These are all very important items considering the starting bid opens at a cool $22k USD. Now a clean MHR is will definitely top $20k in today's collector market, but this one feels a bit closer to basket case than concours. I'm not sure the rarity of the model warrants a piecemeal example at this price, and thus far the internet agrees with me at zero bids. Check it out here and share your thoughts. Good luck!!


Dusty deal? 1982 Ducati MHR900