Classified features and exclusions:

  • No RSBFS staff editorial, your content only
  • Vendors are welcome to list items for sale.
    Contact us for advertising your business.
  • 3 high resolution images
  • Up to 150 words
  • 1 month listing
  • 1 edit per month
  • $10 per month

Classified ads return to RSBFS!

While we focus on the very best SportBike for sale listings on the main page of the site, this area is to cater to everything else that our audience may find of interest:

  • Bikes that aren’t perfect
  • Bikes that aren’t SportBikes
  • Projects
  • Memoriabilia
  • Parts
  • Pretty much anything!

We handle every classified in the same manner we do our Featured Listings:  by hand and working with you via email.

Email us to get started!

Posts by tag: Dry Clutch

Honda May 2, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1996 Honda NSR250R SE for Sale

Update 5.2.2018: SOLD in just over 12 hours! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

For the most part, we try to post up the very best, most unmolested examples of rare and interesting sportbikes for sale. But once in a while, we color outside the lines a bit and share something more personal, something customized to very specific taste. This Featured Listing Honda NSR250R SE obviously isn't completely original, a kind of Frankensteinian build that could have been a mess, but for the incredible attention to detail and quality componentry that's gone into it. This resto-mod starts with the basic bones of the last of the breed, the MC28, complete with a stylish single-sided swingarm and electronic ignition, then uses later suspension components and more modern bodywork to create a what if kind of machine.

Honda's NSR250R MC28 was one of the most technologically-advanced two-strokes ever built. Sure, it ran carburetors in an era where injection was the fueling method of choice for top-shelf sportbikes, but Honda didn't skimp on the gadgetry elsewhere: ignition was via the aforementioned PGM-IV ignition system that created different, three-dimensional maps for each individual cylinder based on the throttle position, engine rpm, and gear selection. The MC28 also used "smart cards" instead of a key to start the bike. These cards included preloaded ignition maps, and you could exchange the standard card for a race-only unit to bump the power up from the government-mandated 45hp. The downside? The HRC cards with the race maps are nearly impossible to come by now if you don't already have one.

The aluminum beam frame and 249cc liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin were pretty much standard for the class, but the NSR added a cassette-style six-speed gearbox and their own variation of the class' de rigueur power valve, here called the RC Valve, for more user-friendly power delivery. The SE version used as the foundation of this bike featured a rattly dry clutch for additional racebike credibility. Per the description, the engine in this example been built to a very high standard using quality parts and the included dyno sheet backs up the seller's claim of 61hp at the rear wheel. The suspension is new, with an Öhlins shock out back and a revalved CBR600RR fork up front, complete with much more modern brakes. Those radial front calipers might even be overkill, considering this probably weighs more than 100lbs less than the donor bike, which would already have had superlative stopping power.

And then there's the styling. If you're a purist, you've probably already scrolled past this one, having noticed the comments section disabled. But for everyone else, the results are pretty stunning, a bit of the old and a bit of the new. I'm not generally a fan of rolling billboards, but it's hard not to love the Rothmans graphics seen here. I'm particularly glad that the builder was selective in terms of applying aftermarket bodywork to this build: I love the sleeker tail section, but Tyga's squinty headlight arrangement looks contrived, so the traditional single lamp seen here looks more NSR-y and a great bridge between the two styles.

From the Seller: 1996 Honda NSR250R SE Edition (Dry Clutch)

Bike is complete restoration with HRC 030 card derestriction tuned to 61HP, stock air box with oil injection still intact. Engine was completely rebuilt with dynamic balanced crankshaft from Falicon, new Koyo OEM crankshaft bearings. Engine has all new gaskets, bearings, and seals, top end is fresh with 140 PSI compression in both cylinders. Lower cylinder has upper cylinder head for centralized spark plug location for more efficient burn, similar to HRC style head. Jetting HRC style jet kit from T2 racing with carbon fiber reeds and HRC reed stuffers, Tyga air box lid for more air volume with new OEM air filter. Over 10 hours of dyno time, tuned perfect and runs amazing with 61HP, bike runs and drives flawlessly, no flat spots with crisp acceleration. Tyga stainless exhaust chambers with carbon fiber short silencers. Has new EBC clutch and heavy duty EBC clutch springs.

Has SPAL electric fan setup wired to toggle switch for additional cooling. Tyga carbon fiber Frame and Swingarm covers, frame and swingarm are in excellent shape with no damage. Has Tyga similar type of rear sets. New Dunlop 120/70/17 & 160/60/17 Q3 tires. Comes with all OEM original parts included in sale with OEM original fairings.  HRC 030 derestriction PGM IV with wire splice to run HRC 030 card. 

2009 Honda CBR 600RR front end, radial mount calipers, with Tyga Triple tees, steering geometry stays the same with this setup, front forks rebuilt with new valving and springs set up for NSR.  Rear shock is Ohlins, suspension is amazing, bike handles perfect, much better than stock configuration. Wheels are OEM NSR wheels powder coated white, front calipers are stock OEM 2009 Honda CBR 600RR with HH sintered pads with Galfer brake rotors, OEM 2009 Honda CBR 600RR radial pull front brake master cylinder. Rear brake is 84mm Brembo caliper, new Brembo matching pads with Tyga rear brake mount system with braided steel brake line. New DID gold chain and Tyga sprockets, 16/41 gearing. After market body work with Tyga rear tail section and subframe, all painted to match Rothman paint scheme. Has LED head/tail/turn signal lights included. 

Bike comes with Tennessee title with matching VIN number. I promise you will not find another better built NSR in the world,  I spared no expense on this build, I have already sold one on this site and customer loves it, you may contact him for reference, I will provide information if needed. $21,000 or best offer .

If you're searching for a museum-quality collectible NSR, you should look elsewhere. If you're in the market for an affordable daily rider, this isn't the bike for you. But if you want something that answers the question "what if Honda kept building the NSR into the next decade?" A bike that combines the best of the old and the new with optimized two-stroke character and performance, updated suspension, and a more modern style, you'd be hard-pressed to build something like this for the $21,000 being asked.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1996 Honda NSR250R SE for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale April 11, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE for Sale

Update 7.3.2018: These bikes are sold and headed to their new owner. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Writing for this site, it's very rare I come across a bike that has me completely at a loss. I've got a great memory for weird motorcycles: Swallower-built Moto Guzzi with a girder front end and chain drive? Oh yeah, familiar with those. Wow, that's a Morbidelli V8? You mean with the original Pininfarina style, or the redesigned bodywork? Hey, look: a Dan Gurney Alligator in the flesh! I've only ever read about them... I'm generally at least passingly familiar with a pretty wide range of weirdo machines, even if I couldn't write a post about all of them without doing some research. But today's Featured Listing Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE? That's a new one on me.

Digging around the interwebs, there's not much out there about the bike that doesn't require Google Translate. No surprise, since just ten were supposedly made, and this listing includes two of them! The overall look of the Quattro 750 is "Japanese Bimota": the bodywork has a very late 80s YB7 vibe, and the hybrid trellis frame with machined aluminum side plates has hints of both the early SB and later YB models. No real surprise, since the bike was styled by Roberto Ugolini, who had a hand in several famous Bimota designs, including the Tesi 1D.

So who was Gallina Hayashi? Well the better question is, "Who were Gallina and Hayashi?" Roberto Gallina was a motorcycle racer who rode for several different Italian brands and went on to manage teams in Grand Prix and endurance racing, before moving into boutique road and race bike design. He was the brains of the project. The financial brawn came from Yoshiyuki Hayashi, a well-heeled and very passionate car and motorcycle enthusiast who wanted to fulfill every gearhead's ultimate dream: built their own vision of the perfect motorcycle.

The engine appears to be based on, or is at least inspired by, the Suzuki GSX-R750 as it uses a very similar cooling philosophy. The bike eschews water-cooling to save weight: the cylinders are air-cooled and the head is oil-cooled, although the fins on the Quattro appear to be more pronounced than on the GSX-R. Cases were magnesium to further reduce weight, and the Gallina Hayashi Quattro replaced the conventional timing chain with more precise gears to drive the camshafts. A dry clutch and six-speed gearbox from Suzuki put the claimed 130hp to the ground.

The initial production run of ten bikes proved to be the only production run, and all were hand-built, with slight variations between individual examples. Some were fitted with carburetors, although probably not the Keihin FCRs seen here. Other bikes were supposed to be equipped with fuel injection, but I'm not sure if any actually were actually built that way.

Honestly, there's more information in the customer's original post than I could find digging around the internet.

From the seller: 1990 Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE for Sale

VIN#: A00007

Amongst all of Mike Canepa’s motorcycles, the most exotic and best storied bikes are the two Hayashi Gallina’s that he purchased from Rob Iannucci 20 years ago.

A brief back story of Roberto Gallina includes him as a team rider in the day for Benelli, Ducati and Laverda followed by team management in GP and Endurance Racing and onto design and production of numerous one off Superbikes and Race bikes out of his factory in La Spezia, Italy.

Yoshiyuki Hayashi was a Japanese well funded investor, owner of the Fuji Track, with deep support of different Japanese motorcycle and car teams and his own Grand Prix Motorcycle Collection. His dream became designing and producing his own motorcycle, turning to Gallina in Italy to express his vision. A quote of his was,

“Everyone is free to have a dream, however big it can be. How can a man without a dream be attractive? Once you, however, speak of it in the presence of others, you must make it come true with your efforts”

His is a fascinating story and for another time. This is about the ten motorcycles they created together, two of which sit in our shop for sale, the Hayashi Gallina Quattro 750 L.E. . Their mission, to create a motorcycle that ‘must be faster than the Japanese bikes and more fascinating than Italian motorcycles in old days’. Things were humming along very well when the Japanese economy collapsed in the “Great Recession” of 1990. Hayashi was deeply affected and was forced to withdraw his financial backing immediately, leaving only the ten motorcycles completed before the program imploded.

It is a pretty involved story about the creation the design and technical aspects of the bike and to be frank, I am not up to the task. There is a very well written article by Alan Cathcart in the November, 1990 issue of what I assume is Cycle that covers all of this in detail. We have a copy of the article that will go along with the bikes. To be frank, we are selling the bikes and in that context, history and details are too beyond my capacities to be correct or accurate. Buy the bikes, get the articles for free, become the expert!

So, the bikes ended up with Rob Iannucci of Team Obsolesce back in the early 1990’s. I have a bill of sale hand written on a scrap of paper showing frame number A00002 being sold for $60,000 in 1994. I do not know if that is when Mike got that bike and frame # A00007. It is not reflected anywhere in any of the paperwork that we have. What I was told by Mike was that he took A00007 to Carey Andrews in California and had Carey install the Gallina design dry clutch and flat slides. The odometer shows 18,064 kilometers. The A00002 bike shows 178 miles. There is no way to be certain either figure is accurate or actual.

What I can see and know about the bikes is that the engine was based on an air cooled Suzuki 750 with chain driven camshafts. Gallina recast the cases, the cylinders and the head, converting the camshaft drive to gear drive instead. The Trellis frame is obvious but the low mount rear shock with rising rate spring has to be seen by looking under the motorcycle. Looking over the images you can see all of the billet, machined components on the frame and steering assembly. After all, these were hand made, one off motorcycles. The best way to know what the bike is about is to look over the images.

And now they are for sale. A brief history since Mike owned them. They were not carefully stored. Nothing Mike had was carefully stored. The body work is scared and chipped from being moved around his shops over the decades. We spent some time cleaning A00007 but did not touch A00002. A00002 is missing the throttle control and front master brake cylinder and the body work is in rougher shape then A00007. Also, the ECM is held to the rear sub frame by electrical tape. Neither bike has a battery nor have we made an effort to start them. The fuel tanks smell terrible and we have no idea of the oil’s condition. What also comes with the bikes is a spare set of cases, cylinders and head as can be seen in the images. Everything that is included with the bike is shown, nothing more is available that we are aware of.

Each bike has an Oregon title of ownership reflecting the VIN number stamped in the frame by Gallina. A00002 and A00007. We do not know the mechanical condition or if all of the parts that made up these motorcycles are here. What is being sold is what is being shown. Stated mileage is what is being read off of the gauges mounted to the bikes and we are not stating that to be actual or accurate. What we are stating for a fact is that we have two of the ten bikes built for sale. You be the judge of what is here. But what an opportunity, a once in a life time chance to own something this special, this rare and this beautiful. The task is not for everyone, only for the individual who knows what he is looking at, knows what has to be done and has the same dream as Hayashi-san to make it happen.

The selling price for both bikes and the spare parts is $30,0000. Oregon titles of ownership will be supplied. For other interesting bikes and collectible vehicles, visit our web site http://www.automaniagp.com 541-479- 8888 or come by and see us at 895 SE Gladiola Drive, Grants Pass, Oregon, 97526. Oregon Dealer DA1287.

So neither bike is perfect, and both will require a mechanical refresh before they'd be ready to ride. But aside from the bodywork, I'd expect the rest can be repaired or replicated, and $30,000 for the pair sounds like a pretty fair price, considering the rarity. Sure, neither have any sort of legitimate racing history or proud factory lineage. But the Quattro's creators certainly had credibility to spare and, if you ever had the nerve to actually use one in anger, I expect they would perform as well as any of the homologation specials that grace our pages.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1990 Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE for Sale
Yamaha December 22, 2017 posted by

Racing Sport: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

Update: A reader reached out to note that, "The forks are missing the compression and rebound clickers, those are R forks." Seller replied back to us, "I pulled out the books and it looks like the first year for the RS model was a 3XV8 which had the same forks as the standard R model. The next year, 3XV9 and 3XVA came with adjusters." Thanks to SmokinJoe B for the note and Gary for the response. -dc

Yamaha's two-stroke TZR250 was always a bit of an odd duck in the quarter-liter sportbike class. The first-generation TZR was the much more sophisticated follow up to the RD series of bikes and was pretty widely available everywhere but in the US, while later examples like the 3MA and 3XV seen here were only available outside Japan as grey-market or parallel imports and are considered exotic, even in markets where two-stroke sportbikes were common.

Early 1KT and 3MA TZRs used parallel twins, but the final 3XV version finally adopted an "if you can't beat them" philosophy and changed to a small 90° v-twin to match the competition from Honda and Suzuki. The new v-twin displaced 249cc and was backed by a six-speed gearbox. Like the NSR, it featured computer-controlled ignition and Yamaha's YPVS power valve system. In spite of all the trickery, it produced the usual 45hp, limited by the expected Japanese governmental regulations.

The rest of the specification was pretty similar to the rest of the class as well: a 278lbs dry weight with a stiff aluminum beam frame like other bikes in the class, in this case an evolution of Yamaha's Deltabox, with a banana swingarm to allow the bike's distinctive asymmetrical exhaust to tuck in close to the bike's centerline.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS Racing Sport for Sale

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS with 16,709 kilometers (10,382 miles). This is the dry clutch Racing Sport model that everybody wants. Bike is in beautiful condition with a few scrapes and scratches. Tank is in perfect condition. All fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha OEM. Upper fairing appears to have been professionally re-sprayed. Bike has a tremendous amount of curb appeal. This RS is a solid rider and is ready to go. Full service just performed with new battery and fluids. Bike runs flawless. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use.

Merry Christmas!

Bidding is up to just $6,100 with a couple days left and the reserve has been met! As rare as all of these two strokes have been up until recently, I've seen quite a few Hondas and even a few Suzukis, but the various iterations of the Yamaha TZR are still uncommon here in the US, especially in clean condition with OEM bodywork. I'm not clear what "beautiful condition with scratches and scrapes throughout" means exactly, but I'm assuming it means it's been well cared-for and the paint looks good, but has the usual minor blemishes a bike picks up through normal use: a scratch on the tank from a belt buckle, a scuff on the tail from a boot while swinging a leg over, a scrape where another bike parked too close at a bike meetup.

-tad

Racing Sport: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale
Suzuki September 26, 2017 posted by

JDM Gixxer: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition

Honda's famed RC30 was basically designed from the ground up for competition, and seemingly only sold to the public to satisfy production-based racing requirements. That's one way to go about it, but if you don't have Honda's practically endless resources, how do you create a machine that will help your racers to compete at the top levels of production-based racing? You build something like this Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition. In recent years, "Limited Edition" has come to refer to things like luxury trim packages for Toyota Corollas, somewhat watering down the cachet of the term. But in this case, it was truth in advertising, with just a few hundred made to satisfy the regulations.

The regular GSX-R was already a pretty impressive machine and, considering that the Limited Edition was the most expensive Japanese sportbike of 1986, you'd be forgiven for thinking that the performance of this rare and exotic version is underwhelming. But the changes were designed to allow their inclusion on race machines, not make for a better roadbike. The LE was just six pounds lighter than the standard bike, most likely a result of the fiberglass solo-seat tail section. Power was very similar as well, since the engine internals were virtually identical to the stock GSX-R750, and flat-slide carburetors are great for producing maximum power, but they're not really suited to everyday use. Fortunately, the LE's lightweight vented dry clutch should produce enough rattle to drown out the supposedly noisy carburetor slides... Aside from those notable and very expensive upgrades, the bike also featured a revised swingarm for improved stability and the electronic, anti-dive forks from the GSX-R1100, although I wonder if many race teams actually used those. Photos of our recent GSX-R AMA Superbike suggest that at least some of them did...

So out of the box it didn't necessarily perform any better than a stock bike, and was hideously expensive. But honestly, most manufacturers of homologation specials probably weren't too concerned about selling them: I'm pretty sure the rules only required that they build the required machines, so if they sat in showrooms for a few years, manufacturers wouldn't lose any sleep over it. Collectors and enthusiasts with the money to buy them still did so, regardless of cost, but the main goal was to get the right parts legalized for the racers.

From the original Craigslist Post: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

1986 GSXR-750 Limited Edition in Japanese Domestic Model Specification
Suzuki only produced 500 units world wide of the GSXR750 Limited Edition

The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE)

Start engine! Runs well
Flat slide carburetors
Dry clutch
Original FRP rear seat cowl

24,374 km (15,145 miles)
Engine Number R705-125561

$13,800

The last Limited Edition GSX-R750 we featured on the site was also a Japanese import in similar colors that were intended to celebrate Suzuki's success at the 8 Hours of Suzuka, but this appears to be a different bike entirely. First-generation "Slabbie" Gixxers are already increasing in value, and nice Limited Editions are starting to command premium dollars. The lack of a title could prove to be a hassle, but many people considering a purchase will be looking to collect or display, not actually ride it, so that may not be all that much a problem. The $13,800 asking price seems in line with recent LE prices, but I wonder if the lack of title will have any impact on its value.

-tad

Honda September 16, 2017 posted by

Rothmans Replica: 1993 Honda NSR250R SE for Sale in Cali!

The gearhead culture in Southern California never ceases to amaze me. Sure, all kinds of weird and wonderful cars and bikes and the folks that love them can be found all over the country, and all over the world. But the intensity of it here is something else: you almost get blasé about it, since any weekend drive in the Los Angeles area will expose you to a veritable parade of exotic cars, vintage bikes, rat-rods, and all manner of weird, is-that-even-legal-here machinery. Oh look, was that Jay Leno driving a pre-war, aero-engined race car? Yes, yes it was... The irony is that the CA DMV is among the most draconian in the country, largely a result of a famously bad smog problem caused by vehicle emissions during the 60s, 70s, and early 80s. Which is why something like this Honda NSR250R SP Rothmans Replica with a clean California title is something of a unicorn!

The NSR250R was the definitive quarter-liter sportbike of the period, and featured Honda's 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin with a six-speed cassette gearbox that allowed gearsets to be quickly and easily swapped to suit different race tracks. Fuel was delivered via carburetors, but the ignition system was Honda's sophisticated PGM-III that controlled the bike's ignition based on throttle-position, revs, and gear selection. Note that the seller refers to this as an "SE" but the fairing proclaims it an "SP." I'm assuming it's the former, and the SP is there to match the Rothmans livery. The SE generally didn't come with the Magtek wheels, but this one has them, bringing it up to SP spec, since both the SE and SP had the dry clutch, versus the regular NSR250R's wet clutch.

I have seen a few late 80s and early 90s grey market two-strokes running around the Malibu canyons on the weekend, but still an MC21 done up in Rothmans livery is something to celebrate, especially in such sharp condition. From the description, it looks like the bike has undergone a cosmetic restoration, and looking at some of the photos, that restoration appears to have been more than just skin-deep. Appropriate maintenance has been taken care of for the new owner as well, and the bike appears to be ready to roll.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Honda NSR250R SE Rothmans Replica for Sale

This is a beautifully restored 1993 Honda NSR250 SE Rothmans Replica MC21. This bike has the factory dry-clutch and adjustable suspension along with the Magtek wheels. This low 4490 mile (7226 Klm's) NSR has just undergone a cosmetic restoration, as in: new bodywork, new wave-rotors, brake pads. 

Add-on's include, a Tyga, GP style rear brake caliper hanger and a Brembo billet rear brake caliper, along with clear turn-indicators and tail light (adds a nice modern touch along w/the wave-rotors).

Also, freshly powder-coated Magtek wheels, with new Pirelli Diablo SuperCorsa tires. All hardware  has been re-zinc or re-chromed. Other items refinished include, the mufflers, fork bottoms, top triple clamp, etc..

Forks rebuilt with new oil and seals. All other fluids changed or flushed. Recent tune-up with new plugs, air-cleaner. De-restricted ECU. (Full power). Small scratch and chip on gas tank, (no dents). Comes with clean transferable (in your name) California title and street registered. (lic. plate off now for photos) Can help with shipping, but up to buyer to make all arrangements. 
There's plenty of time left on the listing, but all my two-stroke LA peeps should pounce on this before it gets away! $11,500 seems a very fair price, considering the California title and the exceptional cosmetic and mechanical condition: many of the two strokes that populate the US eBay listings these days are recent arrivals from Japan where they've been affordable, thrashable, and often left out in the salty sea air for years, so surface corrosion and wear-and-tear are common, even on low-mileage examples. Obviously, the turn signals and tail light lenses seen here aren't actually the original bits, but those shouldn't be too hard to source if you're after something completely stock. Whatever shenanigans are normally required to register an NSR in California should be largely mitigated here, and this bike should quickly be ready to draw stares and thrash canyons for the new owner!
-tad
Rothmans Replica: 1993 Honda NSR250R SE for Sale in Cali!
Honda June 10, 2017 posted by

On the fence: 1990 Honda NSR250R SE

In the hardcore world of RSBFS, two strokes rule and four strokes drool (oil). The simple reason is power to weight: Take this 1990 NSR250R as an example: a 250cc v-twin producing approximately 45 HP in Japanese restricted configuration, has only only 290 lbs of bike to move. Similar four strokes have 10-15 less HP (even without home market restrictions) and are heavier by at least the same amount. An unrestricted 250cc smoker is a 60+ HP machine, tilting the numbers even more in favor of the two stroke. When it comes to ultimate performance, it is very hard to beat the sounds, smells and snot of a popcorn popper.

1990 Honda NSR250R SE MC21 for sale on eBay

The MC21 edition of the NSR was a considerable step forward for the NSR line. Featuring a 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin with a trick, six-speed cassette gearbox (making ratio changes possible without pulling the motor and gearbox), asymmetrical "gull-arm" swingarm for maximum cornering clearance (tucks the right side pipe up in tighter) and adjustable suspension, the MC21 is a proper sporting motorcycle. The dry clutch with its "race rattle" is another nod to the intentions of this NSR. An estimated 16,000 were produced for Japanese home markets and as exports to the Pacific Rim and Europe, but sadly America was never a recipient.

From the seller:
1990 HONDA NSR250R SE MC21 DRY CLUTCH
The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE)
We don't know how to get a titile. Please ask DMV
Start engine.
Aftermarket Cowl but Tank is original.
Not original color
Race Foot pegs.
Some scratches So look carefully all pictures and video.
Turn signals don't work.
This motorcycle is 27years ago .Sold as is.
24150km (15006mile)
Engine Number MC16E-1222422
Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return.

This is one of those listings that gives a RSBFS staff writer pause for thought. One one hand, this is a freaking MC21 edition of Honda's acclaimed NSR250 series. The fact that it is an import, reasonably rare in the US, a two stroke and undoubtedly a sport bike ticks most of the right boxes on our checklist. On the other hand, the lack of seller knowledge with regards to title (i.e. it currently sits in CA where you cannot get one for this bike) and the overall condition (i.e. not stock, less than pristine with unknown history) make for a bike to avoid posting. In the end the candor from the seller and the rattle of the dry clutch in the video won me over. It may not be perfect, but throw in some elbow grease and you may have a winner (provided you don't live in CA).

Which brings us to the bottom line: the opening ask for this auction is a fairly unrealistic $4,200. I think that the initial bid is high enough to scare most bidders away, even though it may be in the pricing ballpark. While the bike is rare, there are certainly other NSRs available. A really good MC21 can fetch $7,500 - $9,000 (just check out some of our past Featured Listings), but I think this one will end up in more conservative territory. Check it out here, and then be sure and jump to the Comments section to share your thoughts. Does this bike belong on RSBFS, or should Mike be lashed with a wet noodle soaked in castor oil for the post? Good Luck!!

MI

On the fence: 1990 Honda NSR250R SE