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Posts by tag: Dieci

Bimota May 1, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

I've mentioned this before, but everything just sounds cooler in Italian. If you want to intimidate someone, just shout gibberish at them in German: anything you say sounds clipped and military and very, very serious. But yell at someone in Italian, and it just sounds like you're trying to very emphatically seduce them. I mean, Italian car and motorcycle manufacturers don't even have to try, they just basically describe the thing, and it still sounds cool, exotic, and expensive. A Maserati Quatroporte? You mean a Maserati "Four-Door"? And bikes are even lazier: Testastretta is just "Narrow Head" and Desmosedici sounds plenty exotic, but it's just "Desmo Sixteen [Valves]." Today's Featured Listing Bimota YB10 Dieci might be the worst offender though. In English, it's just the "Yamaha-Bimota #10 Ten."

While giving your bike a simple, two-digit number for a name may not be all that creative, it suits Bimota's pragmatic approach to making impractical motorcycles. Seeing the potential in the powerful, efficient, and reliable engines being churned out by the Japanese manufacturers packaged into overweight, overbuilt, and under-suspended roadbikes, they took that performance and stuffed it into machines as much as a hundred pounds lighter. Spared any need to be affordable or practical, Bimota was free to experiment with exotic, weight-saving materials, the newest ideas in frame design, and the best suspension components available at both ends. Bimota's creations might not have been very versatile, but they were pretty good at the one thing they were supposed to be good at, which was going fast and looking cool. Okay, I guess that's really two things...

Of course, the fact that they were freed from any need to be practical also means that they can be a real pain to service. The stiff, light aluminum beam frame that was Bimota's signature during this period was wrapped tightly around the engine to keep weight down and centralize mass, so many of their bikes need to be pretty much completely disassembled before you can perform basic maintenance. Thankfully, they were also designed with body panels that are easily removed with a minimum of fuss. Seriously: look closely at those plastics and note how few seams and mounting points are visible: the tank cover, seat, and tail section are all one piece.

Of course, there's a downside to that simplicity as well: drop a modern sportbike and you might just have to replace a couple sections of fairing or a side panel or two. But when your bodywork consists of just four or five separate pieces and only 224 machines were ever produced... Well let's just say that if I owned a Bimota Dieci and planned to ride it regularly, I'd order a set of Airtech fairings and have them painted up to look like the original parts, then hang the stock bodywork on my livingroom wall.

I'm not sure exactly what changes were made between the 1987 YB4 and the 1991 YB10, but the bodywork and frame look suspiciously similar. That's no bad thing, as Italian vehicles always do seem to get better with each successive generation as the kinks are worked out, right up until they finally get it right and then promptly discontinue the model. Similar-looking Yamaha-engined Bimotas were powered by 750 and 400cc versions of their five-valve Genesis liquid-cooled inline four, but this is the big daddy, motivated by a nearly stock 1002cc engine and five-speed gearbox from the FZR1000 that produced 145hp. With a claimed weight of 407lbs, nearly 70 less than the donor bike, the slippery superbike could hit a tested top speed of 172mph, with stability provided by the fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back, which the seller has helpfully photographed for prospective buyers.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

VIN: ZESS8YA23MRZES041 In 1991 the first of 224 (total production) YB10 Dieci machines were produced with many of the best bits from previous models. Named Dieci (ten) in recognition of the 10th collaboration between Bimota and Yamaha, the YB10 represents the evolution of the series YB6 and YB8 with a 4 cylinder 1000cc Bimota tuned Yamaha engine. Pierluigi Marconi used inverted Marzocchi forks, super strong lightweight aluminum beam frame, redesigned aero, larger high-flow carbureted intake and more comfortable riding position. Dieci is the perfect name for the final development of the YB line. Weighing in at 407lbs (65lbs down on the stock Yamaha FZR) with 145BHP on tap, gives the rider power with a comfortable and balanced ride. Great brakes were a must so Marconi used a pair of 320mm front discs plus a single rear 230, combined with Brembo calipers. Whilst this Dieci is 25 years old and shows just over 12000 miles it doesn’t appear tired or dated. It has been well preserved and restored where necessary. The bodywork is less rounded than current trends but the ‘stealth’ look still works well, especially with its silver over red combination. Overall the body panels are well preserved and in very good condition. Recent performance and service includes Ohlin rear shock, new Pirelli Corsa tires, Termignoni carbon muffler, new chain and sprocket, new braided lines and new battery. The Dieci was originally sold and serviced by Bob Steinbugler at Bimota Spirit. Needs nothing, ready to ride. $10,500. Contact Matt with your interest: mattshaw@comcast.net

The $10,500 the seller is asking is right in line with the asking prices we've seen for similar Bimotas recently, and is pretty much chump change for such a rare, exotic, and good looking machine that can still show many modern sportbikes a clean pair of heels. You might have to work a bit harder, and avoid pissing matches with modern literbikes, but your buddy on an R6 or GSX-R is going to be very shocked to see those two big, round, endurance-style headlamps in his rear-view mirrors on a brisk Sunday morning ride...

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota August 24, 2017 posted by

Big Ten: 1993 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Considering that Bimota is still... in business [was going to type something else, but had second thoughts as maybe "thriving" is a bit too strong a word] it's a little surprising that some of their older offerings are so affordable, considering their exotic looks, extreme rarity, high specification, and performance that will at least keep modern bikes in sight. Powered by the Yamaha FZR1000's inline four and five-speed gearbox, today's Bimota YB10 is a surprisingly affordable proposition, considering parts for the drivetrain at least shouldn't be too hard to come by...

With just 224 built between 1991 and 1994, the YB10 "Dieci" or "Ten" in Italian was the tenth Bimota powered by a Yamaha engine. Have you stumbled across and unfamiliar Bimota? You can tell a bit about it just from the name, which basically reads as "Yamaha, Bimota, Number 10." Modifications to that EXUP-valved 1002cc Yamaha Genesis engine were minimal, up to 149hp from Yamaha's 145hp claim, owing to better breathing from an improved intake that also smoothed out some dips in the donor bike's powerband. Slipperier bodywork meant a slightly higher top speed as well: 172mph as tested.

1970s Bimotas typically featured gorgeous tubular steel frames, but by the 1990s Bimota had moved on to beefy aluminum frames as seen here, with fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back. The main performance advantage of the YB10 over the FZR1000 is a result of weight lost: the Bimota had a claimed dry weight of 407lbs, nearly 70lbs less than the Yamaha. Period tests praised the handling and seemingly unlimited cornering-clearance of the YB10, along with unexpectedly improved ergonomics over the preceding YB8 and YB9.

Unfortunately, there's not much information over on eBay about this bike, as it's a dealer listing, although there are some nice pictures!

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota YB10 for Sale

Specialized is offering this gorgeous, Italian-designed Bimota YB10 , this motorcycle comes out of our Museum collection. 1000 cc inline 4 cylinder Yamaha engine in a hand built Italian chassis, except for rear turn signals this is a Original YB10 correct as produced.

The Buy It Now price for this bit of exotic kit is $8,900. To me, 1990s Bimotas represent a real steal if you're looking for something incredibly rare, fast enough to keep up with modern bikes, and relatively easy keep on the road. Of course, "easy to keep on the road" assumes you don't drop it and need difficult-to-obtain bodywork or end up trying to track down nearly impossible-to-obtain suspension components: I know a guy who was waiting many months on a set of fork seals for a YB11. Although, if that becomes a problem, I'm sure you could track down a set of modern Öhlins forks and have someone make you up a set of adapters...

-tad

Big Ten: 1993 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota May 19, 2012 posted by

1991 Bimota YB10 in San Diego

For Sale: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci

Update 5.19.2012: Buy-it-now has been dropped again and is now at $6k. Good luck with the sale Chris! Links updated, -dc

Update 3.14.2012: Originally listed in February, this YB10 is back and the buy-it-now has dropped from $8k to $7k. -dc

From a noted collector in San Diego comes this 1991 Bimota YB10. Known as the "Dieci" when released (Dieci means 10 in Italian), this model was an extension of the Bimota-Yamaha relationship with the FZ family of powerplants that brought such amazing machines as the YB4, YB6, YB6-Exup, Tuatara, YB8, and YB9 Bellaria. The YB10 was a carbureted YB8 motor in a modified Tuatara chassis (the Tuatara was a very rare, fuel injected beast). Ergos were also adressed, with higher handlebars and a more comfortable seat welcoming the rider. In many ways, the YB10 was a bike that moved Bimota from "art and performance with no compromises" to "artful performance with polish."

This particular Dieci has over 10,000 miles on the odometer. That is not a lot of miles for a Yamaha FZR1000, but hand-built bikes from Rimini rarely rack up that high of a score. This really speaks to the rideability of the YB10 - great performance (145 HP), fantastic presence, and relative rarity with a reported 224 produced from 1991-1994. As the result of the mileage there is some minor damage reported, as noted by the seller in the photos.

From the seller:
1991 Bimota YB 10.
Bimota factory uses Yamaha FZR 1000 motor in this model.
Looks good, some paint chips, strong runner.
Orig Paint.
Minor paint chips on bike as shown in pictures.
Still, pretty good shape for a 20 year old unrestored sport bike.

Back in 1991 a new YB10 Dieci would set you back approximately $24,000. That price has dropped considerably over the years, and nowadays a Dieci fetches between $6k-$10k depending on condition. This particular bike, with higher mileage and some damage is not likely to top out that scale, but the seller is realistic and has set the BIN number at a reasonable $8,000.

The bidding is currently up to $6,400 on this bike, with a fairly high number of interested parties. The bike appears to be in honest condition (apart from the zip tie hanging off the rear brake master), but as always we recommend that readers contact the seller for more information about any rare and collectable bike. There is no reason to believe that over time this bike will not hold its value - if not go up slightly - and with easily sourced FZR1000 parts the maintenance on the non-Bimota pieces should not scare anyone away. To check out all of the details or get in on the action, click the link and jump over to the auction!

MI

Bimota April 21, 2011 posted by

Perfect 10: 1991 BIMOTA DIECI

For Sale: 1991 BIMOTA YB10 DIECI

Rejoice RSBFS readers - April is Bimota month! No matter your engine preference, be it Suzuki, Ducati, Kawasaki or this Yamaha right here - there is a Bimota out there for you! Today's bike, the 10th in a series of Bimota rockets to utilize Yamaha power, is best known as the YB10 or "Dieci," which is the number 10 in Italian.

The Dieci follows the same frame layout as earlier YB series bikes, which started with the 750cc YB4. Twin aluminum spars wrap the engine (in this case, the 145 hp FZR1000 mill), with top-grade componentry sprinkled throughout: Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes, and innovative Bimota wizardry like the eccentric chain adjuster.

From the seller:
RARE BIMOTA YB10 DECI ,BIKE HAS YAMAHA FZR ENGINE PRODUCING 145 HP WITH STOCK EXHAUST ,THIS BIKE HAS 4 INTO 1 YOSHIMURA SYSTEM ,BIKE RUNS STRONG ,EVERYTHING WORKS ,NEW BATTERY ,FLOAT ON RIGHT CARB STICKS ,WHINDSHIELD HAS CRACK , NEVER LAID DOWN ,10K ORIGINAL MILES , 230 PRODUCED , FRONT CARBON FIBER FENDER HAS SMALL SCRATCH

Despite the pretty appearance in pictures, all is not completely kosher with this bike. As the saying in Latin goes, caveat emptor - or let the buyer beware. Ignore the fact the seller listed this as a "Deci" as opposed to Dieci. Rather, compare today's YB10 with this post from over a year ago. There are some subtle differences. Today's bike is missing a rear mudguard - I assume to give it that "clean" deleted fender look. It is also missing the rear turn signals, which normally mount to the now-missing mudguard.

The big warning signs are up front, however. This appears to be a repaint as the leading edges of the lowers should be sliver and contain the word "Dieci." The front turn signals, integrated into the fairing above and outside of the headlights, are also missing. The mirrors are missing. The Bimota logo, normally central on the windscreen just above the headlights is missing. To my knowledge these bikes also did not come with a carbon fiber front fender, so the fact that it is scratched is not as worrisome as the fact it is there at all. All these minor points indicate potential accident damage to me, but that is only speculation from the pictures. As always when dealing with these rare models, best ask the seller for more details.

This auction started with a price of $200, and has quickly climbed into the high $5k territory. The reserve has not yet been met, so there is still something to play for here. Expect a good example to fetch about $9,000. The YB series Bimotas are really wonderful bikes - great handling and fantastic power - but spare parts can be expensive and hard to find. Time will tell if this is really a deal, but

MI





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