Posts by tag: Desmo

Ducati March 29, 2017 posted by

Museum Piece: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

For connoisseurs, the Ducati 851 is the Bolognese superbike to have: it's not as obvious or uncomfortable as a 916, and it was the first of the four-valve breed, the speartip of Ducati's new push to be relevant to the modern sportbike world. The air-cooled, two-valve Pantah may be a classic, charismatic engine, but it couldn't possibly hope to compete against liquid-cooled, sixteen-valve inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike series that was meant to showcase the very best production-based motorcycles in wheel-to-wheel competition. So Ducati added four-valve heads and liquid-cooling to their venerable L-Twin and quickly found success: a displacement advantage helped to offset the outright power gap compared to the four-cylinder bikes, and handling was excellent.

Styling is more "functionally elegant" than "dripping with sex," but that means humane ergonomics and less flash for Ducati fans more interested in performance than posing. And although the bike's 93hp isn't huge by today's standards, it has the famous Ducati torque that's gone missing from bikes like the 1199 as they've chased revs and horsepower to compete with the fours. The low-mount dual exhausts seem to sound much better than the 916's undertail system, for some reason, and they're also obviously much less likely to roast sensitive parts of your anatomy.

Early four-valve bikes like the 851 and 888 can get expensive to maintain if you don't do some of the work yourself: frequent regular belt changes and valve-adjustments don't require pricey parts, but are labor-intensive at standard shop rates. They can be fickle, but the slow evolution of these bikes' hard parts mean spares shouldn't be too difficult to track down. In general, the rule with Ducatis is: buy wisely or pay the price, as a "cheap" example can quickly become a very expensive proposition. Luckily, today's bike avoids that by being fastidiously maintained and enthusiast-owned.

From the original eBay listing: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

I purchased this bike in June of 1991 and have been the only owner since the bike was new.  I purchased the bike from Dunbar Motorsports in Brockton, Massachusetts.  The bike is currently located in Atlanta, Georgia.

The bike is in near-pristine condition, and is a desirable bike for a collection, or as a concours bike, or just as a daily rider.

Here is literally every flaw I could find, no matter how minor.  All of these minor bumps and bruises are shown in the photographs:

  • There is a very small chip in the fiberglass on the removable pillion cover that covers the passenger’s seat (see photo #8)
  • There is a very small area on the right muffler where it is rough (see photo #9).  I lent the bike to my brother soon after I got it, and he managed to drop the bike while just sitting on it (!).  The only things damaged were the right side fairing and right side mirror, a small area on the muffler and, of course, my brother’s pride.  He replaced the fairing and mirror with factory new parts (this was quite some time ago when it was still possible to get factory new parts), but the damage to the muffler was so minor that I couldn’t ask him to replace it.  Note that this was the only time in its life that the bike was dropped.
  • There is a VERY minor stress crack in the fiberglass on the front fairing (see photo #10).
  • There are 3 small parallel cracks in the paint on the frame near the right foot peg (see photo #11).
  • The rubber cover for the brake light switch is dry and starting to crack (see photo #12).

As I said, all very minor.  Other than these minor flaws, the bike is in pristine condition, and is exactly as it rolled off the showroom floor in 1991 -- down to the original Michelin Hi-Sport tires which are still in good shape (though I might recommend changing them out if you plan to take many tight corners, as they are 26 years old!).  There have been no aftermarket modifications whatsoever.

The bike was completely serviced last fall by Ducshop in Marietta, Georgia (http://ducshop.com), including belts, fluids, battery, etc.  The bike has a clear Georgia title, is registered and insured, and ridden periodically to keep its legs stretched.  The bike runs perfectly, and is a real thrill to ride.

The bike comes with all of its paperwork, including the service records, original Owner’s Identification Card, original Purchase and Warranty Registration, original Bill of Sale from the dealer (the bike cost $12,350 in 1991), and the original Owner’s Manual.  The bike also comes with a race stand that the dealer originally included with the sale of the bike (the bike has never been raced or has even been on a track).

The bike is the Strada (street) model of the 851 Superbike.  Like all Superbikes, it has the 8-valve (4 per cylinder), fuel injected “desmodromic” engine (the valves are both opened and closed by a cam to eliminate any possibility of valve float at high RPM).

The 851 Superbike model was first launched in 1987.  With its powerful liquid-cooled, fuel injected, 8-valve V-twin desmo engine, its signature steel tube trellis frame, Brembo brakes and Marzocchi suspension, it heralded the start of the modern era for Ducati.  Built for the fledgling World SuperBike series, Ducati quickly won three World SuperBike crowns in a row 1990-1992, with Frenchman Raymond Roche aboard the 1990 851, and Doug Polen riding an 851 bored out to 888cc.

The unfortunate thing about a bike like this is that part of the value is derived from the low miles and originality, a shame since these are great riders' bikes. In addition, that functional styling means a riding position that won't outright murder your spine, so the low mileage is doubly tragic. In such sharp condition, I have no doubt this one will find a very happy buyer: bidding is already up to $8,950 with several days left on the auction.

-tad

Museum Piece: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale
Ducati February 19, 2017 posted by

Ride it like Mike: 1980 Ducati 900 MHR

The history of Ducati racing is long and storied. And while many riders have tasted success on the booming twins from Bologna, perhaps none have matched the exploits of Mike "The Bike" Hailwood. In honor of their legendary rider and his comeback success in the 1978 TT (Tourist Trophy), Ducati created the 900 MHR (Mike Hailwood replica) in 1979 - and continued the model through the mid 1980s. Meant to replicate the racer, the 900 MHR edition had everything it needed to go fast, and nothing else. As a prime example of weight savings, Ducati omitted the electric starter and went with the lighter, old-school method of kick starting. Given the TT background, the occasional bump start would likely also be OK.

1980 Ducati 900 MHR for sale on eBay

The MHR series of bikes was the last major evolution of the bevel drive desmo twin before the introduction of the "rubber band" Pantah. It exudes all of the wonderful charismatic noises and idiosyncrasies of these early Ducatis, while offering up a rare and unique ownership experience. These bikes are not exactly plentiful as far as this era of Ducati goes, as Ducati were simply not moving many bikes period. Nor are they particularly powerful; Ducati rated the L-twin desmo at a mere 72 horsepower back in 1980. That is not a lot by today's standards, nor was it a lot by the Japanese four-cylinder standards of the early 1980s. What the Ducati did have to offer was torque - significant amounts of lower RPM grunt, fed through a dry clutch and 5-speed gearbox. Easier to ride fast through changing conditions than the hyper-strung Japanese multis, it's no wonder that Ducati dominated the TT (Mike Hailwood might have had something to do with that as well).

From the seller:
Ducati 900 SS MHR original 13700 KM (8600mile).
Motorcycle not Mint condition, Very good Running !.
Has crack original screen.
chips and scratch on original paint.
some surface rust.
Brake good working.
Electric works,
Please see more picture for detail.
Kick only Model.
Very rare to find Vintage Bevel Desmo Twin.

The seller has offered some good pictures on this bike, but not too much by way of information. One little bit of info that is definitely missing is the whereabouts of the factory lowers and side panels. The MHR model came with a full envelope of fiberglass, yet this bike is only listed with the upper fairing and windscreen. I do not believe the original lowers are still available from the factory, meaning that 3rd party lowers would need to be sourced to truly complete the bike. Otherwise, this Southern California-based machine looks to be in pretty good condition for a 37 year old import.

We have seen Ducati prices fluctuate wildly over the years on RSBFS. This bike has been bid to up over $13,000 USD and it looks like it will sell. It would be well-bought at the current figure, but I would expect it to go up as we get closer to the close of auction. We have seen these models listed for double this amount in years past - albeit in more complete condition. Fun Fact: These Mike Hailwood Replica machines are not exactly the Holy Grail of rarity when it comes to Ducatis; and estimated 7,000 MHRs were built between 1979 and 1986, making the MHR model the the most numerous of all the bevel-drive twin models made. Still, owning a Ducati from this period does place you in an exclusive group. It is a fantastic looking machine, and likely to fare well in the future. And it is eminently enjoyable today as something you can ride. What more can you ask for? Check it out here, and let us know what you think!

MI

Ride it like Mike: 1980 Ducati 900 MHR
Ducati February 1, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Ducati 748RS

Update 3.1.2017: Relisted due an overseas buyer that backed out. Links updated with new listing links. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

If you are looking for the ultimate variant of the iconic Ducati 748, look no further. The RS model - intended strictly for competition - is the baddest of the baby 916s. With more power thanks to RS-specific engine internals (approx 124 HP out of the box) and less weight thanks to a different chassis, thinner bodywork made fully in carbon, and the omission of all street legal equipment whatsoever, the RS model was sold to privateer racers. And in the right hands, the 748RS was a winner. From a visual perspective, the gorgeous 748/916 silhouette originally penned by famed designer Massimo Tamburini looks even cleaner in full-race mode. And did I mention that these RS models are RARE? The voluminous pages of RSBFS have only listed a handful over the years.

2001 Ducati 748RS for sale on eBay!

This particular 748RS has a nifty trick up its sleeve. Instead of being a track day only bike, this one is actually registered for street use, in California. I'll give that a moment to sink in. Registered. In Cali, no less. That is a massively Big Deal, as rather than have a race replica based off a street machine, here you have a street bike built from the racer. Hard to get more hard-edged than that. Looks like the original Magnetti Marelli digital dash has been retained, and the add-ons are very, very subtle. If you went into this article thinking that the RS is a rare beast, this example just took it up another level.

From the seller:
Up for Sale is my 2001 Ducati 748RS. This bike is crazy clean. It looks brand new. This bike was the backup bike for a Ducati Race team. The Bike is California Street Legal with some hidden lights you can't see. This bike has little to no time on it. It has never been raced and has very little hours on it. Its in really really nice condition. I do not know a too much about this bike other than what I have said above. I can't find anything wrong with it and looks like a brand new bike. There is a small crack on the tail section in the white of the number plate. Its very hard to see and you can't take a picture of it. No other starches or chips or anything that I can find but will let you know if I find any. This was a display bike for me but was run often to keep it in running condition. If you are looking for a 748RS you know how hard they are to find.

When it came to placement on the 748RS, only race proven, top-shelf equipment need apply. The front of the RS model is held up by a beefy 43mm fork with Ohlins internals, with the rear also supported by Ohlins; both full adjustable, naturally. Brembo brakes are the order of the day all around (320mm front, 220mm rear) as well as the requisite Marchesini lighweight 5-spoke wheels. The full exhaust system with carbon canisters could have come from nobody but Termi. Magnetti Marelli provided the race dash and electronics, just like one would expect from a factory race bike.

If you want to look like a boy racer, there are many potential options. If you want to BE a boy racer, you need a proper motor scooter. And this, my good reader, is a proper scoot. I won't get into the potential comfort factor here; racers aren't built for the cush factor. The full race exhaust may be a bit overwhelming at times, considering that even the base models sound louder than the DOT & EPA regulatory approvals would suggest. I don't know how high-strung the bike is, although I would assume the internal mods made by the Ducati factory wizards give some serious bite to go with the bark. Bring it on, say I!

This California street legal RS model Ducati 748 (that is a combination of words you don't hear every day!) is available right now on eBay. The opening ask is just shy of $12k, which seems to be smack in the ballpark for other RS models we have seen more recently - and a bargain considering the CA status and street legal nature of the bike. It's clean enough to eat off of, and rare enough to solicit a Pavlovian response among collectors. Check it out here (you know you want to), and step up into MAN-racer league!

MI

Featured Listing: 2001 Ducati 748RS
Ducati January 1, 2017 posted by

Holiday Blues: 1993 Ducati 888

I know what you're thinking: Ducati Triple Eights never came from the factory in blue. In fact, they never came in any color other than "check me out, I'm hot and I'm Italian" red. Therefore, we are obviously looking at a repaint. And repaints tend to scare me simply because you don't know what caused the respray in the first place. So shields up, my friends; where we go there may be dragons.

1993 Ducati 888 for sale on eBay

Despite the potential warning signs, I can't help but like the way this bike looks. It has a striking, vivid appeal to it - from a distance. Closer in, I question the quick-release fasteners in place of the traditional cap head screws. And is that a zip tie holding down the lower-most right side bodywork? The pictures don't seem to do the spray job any favors either, with some pretty apparent orange peel. And why go through all the work of a repaint and not address some of the damage that may have instigated the project in the first place (such as on the cans)? Still, I'm intrigued. After all, 888s don't come around every day.

From the seller:
Available for sale is this 1993 Ducati 888 which is damaged as shown in the attached pictures. Please review the pictures and feel free to ask questions. New bodywork and paint, runs great.

In the end, this is a bit of a pound puppy - great DNA and ready for anything, but may take a bit of work. Then again, it may be fully sorted with only minor cosmetics to deal with. Given the mileage, it has clearly been ridden. The asking price for this one is a cool $9k USD, which may be a bit high for its non-standard appearance. What do you think? Is this one something you can work with, or would you let it pass in favor of a more stock machine? Share your thoughts here. You've got to admit it catches the eye! Check it out here and good luck!

MI

Holiday Blues: 1993 Ducati 888
Ducati June 22, 2016 posted by

Sweet Sixteen: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR for Sale

2008 Ducati Desmo R Side

As is always the case with exotic machinery, a simple truth-in-advertising name sounds so much better in Italian… Oooooh. A Maserati Quattroporte… That sounds so sexy. Wait, it just means "four doors"? You’re saying that the name of that four-door Maserati is “Maserati four-door”? The same thing is true for Ducati’s GP6-based Desmosedici D16RR road bike: the name literally means “desmodromic sixteen” and refers to the number of valves in the V4 engine’s Desmo heads… maybe not as sexy as naming your motorcycle after a famous race victory, but it has a pragmatic quality that suits a detuned race bike, with the bonus that most folks just think it sounds cool.

2008 Ducati Desmo L Side Rear

Race-replicas clog up eBay every day, but most are just graphics jobs on the fairing of an ordinary roadbike, or homologation specials designed to allow certain bikes or just specific parts to be used in various race classes. But the D16RR is something else entirely, a one-of-a-kind machine that shares almost no parts with any production Ducati, a detuned MotoGP prototype, fitted with lights. Technically, that’s a bit of an exaggeration, as it’s not like the road bike's engine parts are actually interchangeable with the race bike’s…  And there are plenty of other changes as well. For example, it’s not a dry-sump engine like the race bikes, but it does have gear-driven cams and a “Twin-Pulse” firing order that gave the bike something closer to the Ducati’s signature v-twin growl…

2008 Ducati Desmo R Side Front

But honestly, the fact that it’s not really a detuned racebike almost makes it more impressive considering the mere 1,500 built, since the design brief for this engine was basically “make a brand new engine that is as much like the race engine as is practical, but shares no parts with it.”  It is an utterly impractical motorcycle, a barely-tamed 989cc V4 monster that cranks out nearly 200hp at the crank, with absolutely top-shelf suspension at the front and rear. A Desmosedici cost over $70,000 new and, although they’re currently trading for much less, you’d better be prepared for very expensive maintenance costs down the line. Does your local shop even stock tires to fit that 16" rear wheel?

2008 Ducati Desmo Belly Pan

This example has been used a bit, although miles are still extremely low, and it is fitted with one of the accessory Ducati Performance exhausts that were available for the bike and gave it a more authentic style than the stock part, increased noise, and a nice hole in the bellypan.

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici for Sale

This is a pre-owned 2008 Ducati Desmosedici. This bike has 4300 miles and has the GP Exhaust installed. Overall condition of the bike is good, it has been ridden so it has some rock chips in the lower fairing, small scratch in the swingarm and a few minor small cosmetic imperfections. Nothing wrong mechanically and nothing bad cosmetically, normal 4300 mile condition, it has never been down. Tires still have some life but the bike will come with a brand new set. This bike comes with: bike stand, cover, 2 keys, owners manual, new set of OEM tires. It does not have the complete owners manual, just the main one. It does not have the plaque, stock or race exhaust. Only the parts that are listed.

2008 Ducati Desmo Tank

Bidding is very active and up north of $35,000.00, a bargain price for a Desmo. The missing bits might put off collectors but, if the price stays low, someone’s getting a good deal. Personally, I’d be happy with the very cool GP exhaust, since the original configuration always seemed weird to me: why does it need to exit out the top of the tail section? Okay, I get it: you want to keep the brake light and signals looking conventional. But wouldn’t it make more sense for a straight shot out the tail, and build some sort of LED bit around it or suspended beneath it, like on the Benelli TnT? Especially since that would look even more racebike-y?

2008 Ducati Desmo Tail

In any event, until the Honda RCV213 came along, this was the closest bike fans could get to a road-legal GP bike and that always seems to get the attention of collectors. They sound hellacious, look like nothing else on the road even ten years on, and offer up repair and maintenance bills that will definitely remind you that you own a thoroughbred exotic…

-tad

2008 Ducati Desmo L Side

Sweet Sixteen: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR for Sale
Bimota April 3, 2016 posted by

Classic Italian Performance: 1986 Ducati Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1 R Front

The DB1 was the quintessential Bimota, packaging a reliable Italian powerplant into a lightweight package with excellent handling... Wait, what? Actually, in spite of what you might expect, the belt-driven, SOHC Pantah engine is very reliable when properly maintained, and can be tuned to make good power. Sure, the 75 claimed horses don't sound like much, but the twin is very flexible and the noise, oh the noise!

1986 Bimota DB1 L Rear2

Although Bimota made its name building lightweight, nimble bikes around reliable Japanese powerplants, it's no surprise that, time and again, they've gone back to Ducati to supply engines for some of their best-selling and most popular machines. Ducati haven't always made the most powerful engines, but they're a great match for Bimota's lightweight ethos and the bikes that result are beautiful.

1986 Bimota DB1 Dash

The seller indicates that this was originally a Japanese bike, but currently has a California title, which should allay fears of its legality, as California's DMV is notoriously strict.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

Up for action is early 1986 Bimota DB1 This is a original clean motorcycle that I am selling my collection bike. The Bike is only 21000 KM (about 13000 mile). There is little scratch but never been drop or any accident.

This bike have been currently service and maintained (spend $900). All functions on the bike work properly. No oil leaks! Run perfect as new bike and It is stable at 240Km high speed. You will not be disappointed. 

The Bike was imported form Japan currently has California Title. It is a 1986 model but has been titled as a 1980 Bimota DB1. I purchased this bike in 2006 from a good friend who own Famous Bike shop in CA. The bike was stored at his bike shop and taken care of.

And this bike is for not a beginner, only for those who know the value of a Bimota and what it is capable of... I have a clear CA title in hand and I will be happy to answer any questions you have. The bike is sold “as is.”

1986 Bimota DB1 Front Wheel

Built between 1985 and 1990, the DB1 was one of the best-selling Bimotas, with almost 700 produced. There's plenty of time left on the listing, and bidding is up to just $11,000 with the reserve not yet met. I'd expect this one has a long way to go before it finds a buyer.

-tad

1986 Bimota DB1 R Side

 

Classic Italian Performance: 1986 Ducati Bimota DB1 for Sale