Posts by tag: db2

Bimota July 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993/1994 Bimota DB2 for Sale

The Bimota DB2 isn't the fastest or even the rarest bike to wear the Bimota name, but it is among the most successful and helped pave the way for the raft of DB models that followed: we're currently up to the DB13 or something. By their nature, Bimotas are mutts, with proprietary frames and bodywork, but outsourced engines and that may be why used 1990s Bimotas are relatively affordable, considering how exotic they are. It also might be their unreliable reputation: light and fast they may be, but the 90s models especially have a reputation for kit-bike quality. Somehow, the air-cooled Ducati-engined models have managed to avoid that notoriety, so perhaps the Italian electrical gremlins of both marques cancel each other out?

The original DB1, the first Bimota to be powered by an Italian engine, sold well enough [approximately 600 units] that it basically saved the company from ruin. For the DB2, Ducati supplied their six-speed-backed, 904cc air and oil-cooled v-twin. Any bike powered by the two-valve Pantah engine needs to be light if it's going to be fast, and the DB2 is very light. At a claimed 373lbs dry and with beefy Paioli RWU forks and adjustable Öhlins suspension at the rear, the svelte Bimota can make the most of its 86 claimed horses.

It's the perfect canyon-carver with nimble handling and a punchy motor tuned for midrange. The fact that it's one of Bimota's best-looking efforts doesn't hurt either, with swoopy, fully-enclosed or half-faired bodywork, a tubular trellis frame similar to the original Ducati part in terms of looks but not geometry, and a tubular swingarm to match. Period reviewers complained about the Yamaha-sourced headlight but it's less obvious now and fits the lines of the bike perfectly.

Some DB2 graphics are a bit too close to some sort of "urban camouflage" for comfort, but this simple white and red design look great, while also being very 90s in the best possible way. Confused about why this one is listed as a 1993/1994 model? The seller explains in more detail but basically: the VIN indicates a 1993 bike but the title lists it as a 1994.

From the Seller: 1993/1994 Bimota DB2 for Sale

The VIN of this bike ZES1DB214PRZES001 shows it being the first US bike of the first year of production.  The VIN's 10th character is a "P" which means it's a 1993, the VIN sticker says it was made 6/93.  But for some reason the title states 1994.  It is one of 408 in the world.  I tried to contact Bimota to get and understanding of what being number 1 really means, they didn't reply. I doubt it's the FIRST DB2.  But whatever it is cool.  Currently the bike has 1921 miles.  I've had the bike about a year, I bought it from a collector in San Diego.  While I've owned it I've gone over the bike from top to bottom, I've listed the work and the parts out below.  I've ridden her about 300 miles and she goes as good as she looks.  This bike really needs nothing except maybe some lines to replace the unsightly (but functioning) blue Kevlar lines.  I have more pictures of the bike if you have questions about something or a certain area I can send them to you. 

Work:

  • Cleaned carbs
  • Replaced belts
  • Check valves (in spec)
  • Replace tires (still have originals)
  • Replaced windshield (still have crack original)
  • Changed all fluids (brake, clutch, engine)
  • Repaired minor scuff on tail
  • Serviced battery
  • Re-powder coated wheels
  • Replaced brake and clutch levers
  • Replaced some minor bits of hardware with matching zinc plated parts

Asking price is $12,500. Contact Jay by email.

Around 400 DB2s were built, which is pretty much volume production for Bimota. They don't come up for sale often, but are typically in immaculate condition as they were always collectible. The question is: how do folks own these bikes and only put 300 miles on them?! At least the seller has taken exceptionally good care of the bike while it's been in his possession, and the low mileage means the next owner can put a few more on without adversely impacting its value!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1993/1994 Bimota DB2 for Sale
Bimota April 11, 2016 posted by

1994 Bimota DB2 #001

It took Bimota 10 years to come home to Ducati for an engine, and after the DB1, nearly ten more for the DB2.  Worth waiting for, the 904cc desmodue was a great powerplant, good power and torque from a not overly complicated engine.  This 1994 model is a totally collectible serial number 001.

20160410 1994 bimota db2 left

1994 Bimota DB2 for sale on eBay

20160410 1994 bimota db2 right

20160410 1994 bimota db2 left front

The DB2 was penned by Pierluigi Marconi, who used chrome-moly tubing for the trellis frame and fabricated swingarm.  Handling was the strong suit, the 86 hp Ducati's doing except for improvements in the exhaust.  41mm Paoli forks and Ohlins monoshock were specified.  Brakes are great for the time, dual 320mm disks with single 230mm rear.   The very well-resolved fairing uses a Yamaha headlight, monoposto seat, and beautiful maroon livery.

20160410 1994 bimota db2 right rear

20160410 1994 bimota db2 odometer

Beckoning collectors with its first serial number and original tires, this DB2 has only 1,600 miles.  Already christened, it has a scrape on the left seat fairing, but looks fabulous otherwise.  From the eBay auction:

For serious collectors, the chance to get a sn # 001 bike.

Very low mileage, original tires.

You may want to replace tires if it's to be ridden much,

or keep on for display and just maintenance runs.

Larger pictures can be e-mailed, direct if closer look for blemishes is desired.

Bike always stored indoors , and run every couple of months to keep healthy.

Have very large bike collection being thinned down to make more space.

Numerous pictures to show the good and the bad of it.

Overall, a pretty well preserved bike.

64 year old owner, former bike wrench and former shop owner.

Every effort has been made to show condition of bike with pictures and video.

Bike in good cond, though no warranty expressed or implied. Sold AS - IS .

20160410 1994 bimota db2 right front

20160410 1994 bimota db2 left grip

Reviewed with praise, the DB2 puts its handling out front but the years have proved the air-cooled Ducati powerplant to be willing and reliable.  Rarity assured with only a few hundred total production, this lovely DB2 being wheeled into a collector's gallery and ridden only occasionally won't be cause for celebration, unless it's yours...

-donn

20160410 1994 bimota db2 left rear

1994 Bimota DB2 #001
Bimota April 14, 2015 posted by

Ultra Rare From Rimini: 1994 Bimota DB2 400cc Junior

DB2_Jr_2

The Bimota DB2 is one of the more rare Bimotas. Not built in the same numbers as the YB or SB model series, the DB2 evolved from the magnificent DB1 racer and homologated road bike. Small and nimble, but packing serious desmo-twin grunt, the DB2 is a rider's dream. However what we are looking at is a DB2 Junior - essentially a 400cc version of the DB2.

1994 Bimota DB2 400cc for sale on eBay

DB2_Jr_8

Ducati was the first to try to crack the Japanese market with a 400cc version of the venerable Supersport (check out Ian's discovery of the model here). Bimota capitalized on the effort and utilized the same engine and transmission, but wrapped it in a classic birdcage frame and beautiful bodywork, just like the bigger DB2. The result is the Junior model DB2 - all the wonderful artistic trappings of a classic Bimota in a smaller package. This is a rare bird indeed, and a first for the pages of RSBFS.

DB2_Jr_3

From the seller:
The Bimota DB2 is in our opinion one of the nicest looking sport bikes to come out of the 90s. With Ducati power they all sound great and perform well. All components are top shelf including Brembo brakes and the Ohlins rear suspension.

For the Japanese market a 400cc version was produced, to take advantage of the lower tax regime for small capacity sport bikes. Just 101 examples of the DB2 were produced with this power plant. The only differences to the larger bike being the engine, single front disc (twin discs optional) and slightly narrower rear wheel.

This example has traveled 17,800 miles and is immaculate, having clearly been well cared for by its former owner.

DB2_Jr_17

Bimota's later attempt to break into the Japanese market brought us the YB7 evolution (with aluminum frame and Yamaha power), however it was the DB2 Junior with Ducati 2-valve, air-cooled power that lead the way. This particular bike is NOT local to the US (unfortunately), but the seller is willing to ship. Currently parked in the hobbit-friendly country of New Zealand, this DB2 Junior is looking for a new home. Check it out here, as you won't see another for quite a while, if ever!

MI

Ultra Rare From Rimini: 1994 Bimota DB2 400cc Junior
Bimota July 22, 2014 posted by

Simplify, and Then Add Lightness: 1993 Bimota DB2

Until very recently, Bimota’s exotic, Ducati-powered offerings like this DB2 featured the air/oil-cooled two-valve engines, instead of the more powerful four-valve water-cooled engines from the 851/916 models. This meant that, although the bikes weren’t the fastest straight-line performers, they were light and lithe, enabling riders to make good use of every horse available.

1993 Bimota DB2 L Side Front

This was originally, and perhaps ironically given that we’re talking about Italian exotica, a financial decision. The DB bikes have always been intended to sell well, and helped to keep the company afloat at different points in their history: with over 600 made, the original DB1 was about as mass-market as Bimota ever got. A little more than 400 of the later DB2 models were made, with production split between half and full-fairing styles, although I very much prefer the full-fairing on this particular example.

1993 Bimota DB2 Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

Perhaps Massimo Tamburini's finest design, the Bimota DB2 is the consumate combination of exotic componentry, exhilarating performance, exclusivity and style. Bimota made only 408 DB2's, of which 285 had complete fairing.

This motorcycle was completely restored in 2001 when it had approximately 3000 miles and donated to the Larz Anderson Transportation Museum in Boston, who elected to auction it to focus on their older collection of pre-war cars. The odometer currently shows 1003 miles, the amount ridden after the resoration and replacement of the speedo and tach.

Enhancements performed in 2001:

944cc Big bore kit; Stainless steel engine studs; Carburetor jet kit; New timing belts; Carbon fibre belt covers; Braided brake lines; Polished wheels, mufflers, intake manifolds; New chain and sprocket; Adjustable brake and clutch levers; Tinted windscreen, Euro headlight; New speedometer and tachometer; Painted frame.

Since I purchased the bike in 2002, it has lived in a heated, air conditioned garage, and has been ridden less than 20 miles. After sitting so long, I decided to "re-commission" it in 2010 to make it roadworhty again. This involved new tires, new battery, new timing belts, rebuilding the carbs with new floats and jets, all new fluids, etc. It has not been ridden since.

This bike is absolutely stunning, and is virtually new. It deserves to escape from my garage, and be ridden!!

Period reviews suggest that this bike does exactly as intended, putting the flexible, evocative, mid-range strong motor from a bike already well-known for stability into a chassis even lighter, with improved suspension front and rear. Given the relatively simple underpinnings, these are phenomenally responsive bikes, clearly benefiting from Colin Chapman’s “simplify and then add lightness” ideology.

This is a bike for people with enough skill to appreciate the qualities this bike embodies: lightness over power, finesse over brute strength. Or just people with an eye for striking Italian design.

1993 Bimota DB2 L Side Rear

One of the nice things about bikes like this is that, unlike Suzuki’s GSX-R models, these appealed to well-heeled collectors from the start, and many have been painstakingly maintained. This example has seen very few miles roll under the wheels, but was recently brought back to road-worthy condition after a lengthy spell sitting in a museum: no hideous paint jobs to undo, no extended swingarm to replace, or crash damage.

It does feature a big-bore 944 kit [up from 904cc], which is great for power but reputedly can run a bit hot in traffic. The listing doesn’t mention if cooling has been improved, but it’s unlikely to be used for commuting, so I’d imagine this should be great for the back-road sorties this bike was made for.

-tad

1993 Bimota DB2 R Side Front

Simplify, and Then Add Lightness: 1993 Bimota DB2
Bimota February 7, 2014 posted by

Italiano Classico: 1994 Bimota DB2

DB2_2

RSBFS just missed this auction the first time around, but fortunately for all of us this beautiful and rare Bimota DB2 is back. The eBay longevity might have something to do with the asking price (starting bid of $14k USD), but it is hard to argue with a bike that shows as well as this one. If you are in the mood for a sporty twin with lots of torque and plenty of good looks, this is a good place to start. Located in Pennsylvania (well that explains the heated grips), this bike is looking for a new home.

1994 Bimota DB2 for sale on eBay

DB2_1

From the seller:
One of 50 SHOW CONDITION
6000 Miles
Never Wet
Just Serviced
New Tires
Custom Made Ajustable Handle Bars
Also stock Bars
Heated Grips
Extra Wind Screen
Counter Shaft and Rear Sprockets
Chain Adjusting tool
Work Stand
Battery Tender
Factory Shop and Owners manuals
tool kit
Like new
No Dissapointments

DB2_3

MI

Italiano Classico: 1994 Bimota DB2
Aprilia June 20, 2013 posted by

Month in Review: May 2013 Sales Report

mayreport

Welcome back to our latest sales report, where savvy buyers and sellers keep an eye on market values. We blogged a record 85 bikes in May and witnessed an all-time high of 29 of our picks getting sold. In fact our readers bought 23 bikes in May! Here is a review of 29 of the 85 posted, most having sold.

Lowest sale price: $1380
Highest sale price: $25099

Congratulations to May’s buyers and sellers!

dc

In no particular order, we start with this 1995 Ducati 900 SS/SP with 2000 miles that sold for $3650:

Ducati 900 SS/SP


A highlight last month is this 1986 GSX-R 750 Limited Edition with less than 900 miles that sold for $22,400!

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited


This 2001 Ducati 996SPS failed to sell after being bid to nearly $12k.

Ducati 996SPS


This very tidy but tiny Aprilia RS50 sold for a pint sized $2700 to one of our readers.

Aprilia RS50


This stock 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma sold for $12,400.

1985 Suzuki RG500


This heavily modified 1986 Suzuki RG500 in Lucky Strike livery failed to sell the first time at $10,500 but sold after one relist for $16,000!

1986 Suzuki RG500 Lucky Strike


This 1990 BMW K1 with just 4200 miles sold for $13450, McDonalds colors be damned!

BMW K1


This very clean 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 sold for $7000, even with 30k miles!

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750


This 1996 Suzuki GSX-R 750 might have been the bargain of the month selling at just $2550.

1996 Suzuki GSX-R 750


This amazing low mileage and stunning 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 sold for $13100.

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 1100


Someone scored on this 1986 Kawasaki ZX1000R Ninja that saw just 7400 miles. Sold for only $3750!

1986 Kawasaki ZX1000R


This 1991 Yamaha TZ 250 B racebike sold for $17500 but was relisted and sold again for $15500. Hopefully for good!


This well looked after 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 sold for $8200.

Moto Guzzi Daytona


This later 1997 Daytona 1100 with less than 7k miles failed to sell with bids reaching $9100.

Moto Guzzi Daytona 1100


Another great buy was this 1982 Honda CB 900F with 205 miles for only $6655. This won't be depreciating any time soon.

1982 Honda CB900F


Here's a nearly new 999R with less than 1k miles that failed to sell at $16100.

Ducati 999R


This restored 1988 Suzuki GSX-R sold for a mere $6100 to one of our readers.


This 1996 Suzuki RGV250 Lucky Strike was no reserve and sold for $7500.

Suzuki RGV250 Lucky Strike


Here's a Yamaha RZ500 that sold for a scant $6500.

Yamaha RZ500 RD500LC


This 1998 Yamaha R1 failed to sell at $8500 and has been relisted for $7500.

Yamaha YZF-R1 For Sale


This cool 1985 Yamaha FZ750 survivor sold for $3850.

1985 Yamaha FZ750


Here's a 1987 Suzuki GSX-R50 that sold to one of the RSBFS superfans for $1380.

1987 Suzuki GSX-R50


This 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo is one of several we posted recently and it sold for $5451.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo


This 1994 Yamaha YZF-750R was also well bought at just $2200.

1994 Yamaha YZF-750R


This 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 Limited sold for $12721.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 Limited


A very striking 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE sold for $17000.

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE


This spotless 1998 Aprilia RS250 set a new record selling for $9950.

1998 Aprilia RS250


This 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR failed to sell the first time at $8500 buy-it-now, but was relisted twice and sold for $6500.

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR


The top seller this month was this 1979 Kawasaki Z1R TC2 Turbo for $25099.

1979 Kawasaki Z1R TC2 Turbo


This 1994 Bimota DB2 appears to have sold for good this time at $7400.

1994 Bimota DB2


The great pumpkin 1982 Laverda Jota sold for $20255!

1982 Laverda Jota


This 1993 Ducati Superlight failed to sell at $9499.

Ducati Superlight


This XN85 Turbo sold for just $4000.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo


While we were having a little fun with this CBR1000RR trike, it did find a new home for $9900.

CBR1000RR Trike


This 1985 RZ500 failed to sell when bid to $9100 while wearing a $11800 buy-it-now.

Yamaha RZ500