Posts by tag: Daytona

Moto Guzzi September 20, 2017 posted by

Racy Goose: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale

Guzzi is generally thought of these days as a purveyor of weirdo touring rigs, butch nakeds, and alterna-Harley cruisers, all with their big v-twins turned 90° from the expected orientation and the cylinder heads sticking out by the rider's knees. But in the 1950s and 1970s, Moto Guzzi made genuine sportbikes and competed successfully in various racing series. They attempted a comeback in the early 1990s with this Daytona, the first Guzzi in decades to use something other than the Lino Tonti designed frame that was introduced on the original V7 Sport way back in 1971... Which tells you just how excellent that frame was to begin with, but also speaks to Guzzis very limited development budget.

When the time came to develop a new sports motorcycle, Guzzi actually turned to privateer Dr John Wittner for input, an American dentist who successfully campaigned a Guzzi in AMA Pro Twins racing during the 1980s. The new machine that resulted was built around a "spine" frame with distinctive side plates that featured holes where it was apparently joked that you could stash a sandwich... The powertrain featured Guzzi's familiar five-speed gearbox, automotive-style clutch, and shaft drive, but the engine featured a significant update in order to produce competitive power: four valve cylinder heads.

The updated 992cc engine was designed to squeak in under the 1000cc limit for various racing classes and is claimed to be overhead cam as well, but it's really more "high-cam" as the heads do each have a cam, but the valves are actuated via pushrods and rockers, and the bike lacks liquid-cooling. Power was a respectable 92hp and with high-quality WP suspension the bike did handle well, although significant weight compared to other sportbikes meant fast riding was hard work. That longitudinal engine layout means you do still get some torque reaction accelerating out of a corner, but it's relatively minor and something that you adapt to quickly.

 

 

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale

My understanding is Moto Guzzi Built 150 Daytona's in 1993. They imported 50 into the US.  Bike has been serviced & ready to ride. New tires, All fluids changed, valves adjusted, fuel tank was cleaned & sealed.

Significantly, this Daytona features the European-market trapezoidal headlight instead of the more common rectangular unit like the one seen on last week's Sport 1100. I'm a huge fan of these Guzzis in general, and the headlight makes a huge difference to me in terms of looks: a later 1100cc Daytona with the headlight seen here has a place in my dream garage. This bike also features a desirable pair of Termignoni exhausts that should liberate a glorious boom from the Italian twin. It's a bad sign when it's easier to do valve adjustments than oil changes on your motorcycle, but that's probably the case with Guzzi's longitudinally-mounted engine. Even as late as the V11 Sport, you had to drop the pan to change the filter, It appears that the bike has an aftermarket, external oil filter adapter fitted: you can see it at the front of the engine. It's not mentioned by the seller, so maybe it was added by a previous owner? In any event this is a practical addition, and suggests that maintenance has been a priority for this bike. Overall, the bike's condition is very good, and mileage is just 3,473 from new. There's been no interest so far at the $10,000 starting bid but, with just 1000 or so built and Italian good looks, these are definitely collectible.

-tad

Racy Goose: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale
Moto Guzzi September 15, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

Not too many motorcycles look good in screaming yellow, but I think the Guzzi 1100 Sport is definitely one of them. A two-valve version of the exotic Daytona that was developed by Dr John Wittner from his successful Battle of the Twins racer, the 1100 Sport was a very unconventional motorcycle. By the 1990s, sportbike convention dictated liquid-cooling, four valves per cylinder, six-speed gearboxes, full fairings, and chain final drive. Of course the 1100 Sport had none of these. Would it beat a CBR or GSX-R of the period on a racetrack? Of course not. But the Guzzi has charisma in spades, plenty of torque to punch you out of corners, and it makes up in stability what it lacks in agility.

The half-faired styling means that hulking engine and gearbox are proudly on display, with the two-valve cylinder heads sticking out into the breeze by the rider's knees, here fed by fuel injection, which replaced the Dell'Orto carburetors in 1996. In spite of the relatively low-specification suggested by the air-cooling, pushrods, and two valves per cylinder, the 1064cc engine put out an honest 90hp and 70ft-lbs of torque, with 82 ponies present-and-accounted-for at the rear wheel.

It seems like an odd choice for a powerplant, but the bike's long history goes some way towards explaining it. Some of the Guzzi's "agricultural" reputation comes from that honking big v-twin that rocks the bike to one side when you rev it, due to the longitudinal crankshaft arrangement, and the clunky five-speed gearbox. But it probably doesn't help that the package is often associated with an Italian military tractor that dates back to the 1960s, although even the earliest Guzzi V7 motorcycles apparently shared no mechanical parts whatsoever with that odd machine. Those origins may sound like an unlikely foundation for a fast, agile motorcycle, but Guzzi's V7 Sport and Le Mans were considered very capable sportbikes at the time.

Unfortunately, by the time of the 1100 Sport, the big Guzzi was probably more GT than actual sportbike, but that's just fine, considering that the majority of riders never actually use their bikes on track. And even then, most do so only occasionally. For weekend riding, the triple Brembo brakes can pull you up short to avoid errant deer in the roadway, while quality suspension means stable handling, but passenger accommodations aren't great, as no grab-rail is fitted.  Reviews of the 1100 Sport were generally very positive when the bike was tested in isolation, although the aforementioned gearbox and the bike's 490lb dry weight did come in for some criticism.

Unfortunately, this Goose never really had a chance when compared directly to rivals: the 916 was obviously lighter, more agile, and faster, as well as being the sexiest bike of the era. And Japanese machines were more powerful, cheaper, and user-friendly. But that's hardly the point here, and Guzzis have long been bikes you buy because you like Guzzis, not because they are quantifiably "better" than any other bike. And if you are a Guzzi fan, this particular 1100 Sport is in impeccable condition!

From the Seller: 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

For Sale: Rare and Low Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport in Excellent Condition. I am the 2nd owner and bike came from California. There were only 1,314 of these produced in 1997 and approximately 450 units in Yellow. It has always been stored inside and very well maintained. It also has been stored, when not ridden on a bike stand. All service recently completed including:

* All oil and filters
* Full Tune-up
* Valve adjustment
* New Tires
* New brake pads
* New Battery - Lithium

You will be hard pressed to find one this clean and with low mileage. Bike starts up easily and rides and drives very good. As you will see in the pictures the bike is extremely clean and comes with original manual, repair manual, original brochure, a couple of magazines from1997/1998 featuring this bike, original and spare keys.

Bike comes standard with Brembo Brakes, Marchesini Wheels and all of the expensive Italian upgrades. 

The seller is asking $9,500 for this low-mileage example. Just a few years ago, a decent 1100 Sport could be had for half that, but values have been steadily rising and it's hard to find one with anywhere near this mileage. With solid performance, good reliability, and easy maintenance, this Guzzi can tackle winding back roads, attracts tons of attention wherever you stop, can even do a bit of light sport-touring, and will generally put a big smile on your face. 1100 Sports are odd and quirky and ergonomically-challenged, yet owners often rack up big miles on them, owing to the platform's soundness and the engine's reliability. And clutch-replacements aside, basic maintenance is a snap: the unusual engine configuration may have some ergonomic drawbacks, but this may be the easiest bike you've ever adjusted the valves on, and pushrods mean no rubber cambelts to replace!

-tad

Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale
Triumph April 29, 2017 posted by

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

Motorcycling history is littered with storied nameplates undone by economic changes, and many have tried and failed to resurrect those brands, but one of the enduring success stories continues to be Triumph. Sunk by a changing economy, a changing market, and an inability to compete with the reliable, affordable, high-performance bikes from Japan, Triumph's long, slow slide into irrelevance was over by 1983. John Bloor originally purchased the defunct Triumph facility with an eye to razing it and building residences, but somewhere along the line, a bit of nationalistic inspiration struck him and he instead decided to revive the brand. Attempts to compete head-on with sportbikes from Japan a second time were always going to end in failure, so Triumph wisely chose to focus on quality and heritage instead of outright performance. That's not to say that bikes like today's Triumph Daytona 1200SE didn't have brawn to match their good looks, but that performance was never going be as focused or as inexpensive as it would be with something like a GSX-R1100. Instead, Triumph went for a different customer, one more concerned with quality and class than top-speed numbers or lap times.

The biggest limitation to ultimate performance was Triumph's decision to go with modular design based around a spine frame. That same basic frame and two engines, a triple or an inline four, could be wrapped in different bodywork to create an entire range of motorcycles and quickly add models to react to market changes, which gave versatility for a fairly low cost. Unfortunately, it meant a bit of a jack-of-all-trades quality, with too much weight carried too high for optimal handling. Nothing wrong in the engine room however: 147 horsepower may not sound all that impressive, considering the 1180cc engine, but it was one of the most powerful motorcycles available at the time and a claimed 85 lbs-ft of torque is BMW S1000RR territory. So the big Daytona can move out smartly and, most importantly, can sustain that 159mph top speed seemingly all day long, with plenty of wind protection from the big fairing and all-day ergonomics.

Styling is always subjective, but I think these look pretty cool, with that dual-round headlamp endurance racing style, but without the aggression or wild graphics of a 90s Japanese sportbike. The monochromatic color treatment, especially the black seen here, makes it look classy and elegant. I think they've aged well and prices mean you can have a classic road-burner with all-day comfort for relative peanuts. Personally, I'd prefer one of the hot-rod three-cylinder Super III models, but in either guise you're looking at a deceptively fast motorcycle.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

I purchased this bike three years ago to add it to the other two Daytona's I already have. The reason for the sale is that I have my hands full with my other D-12's and the other bikes we have. So... In the three years I have owned the bike I have put less than 400 miles on the it. I replaced the left and right fairings as well as the front fairing, windshield, with trim, clip-ons, fork seals, tires, and battery. I am the third owner, from what I was told. I have the bike stored in my climate controlled basement since I brought it home. The bike is completely stock. All parts used are Triumph parts. There is a very small ding on the tank. On the right side from previous owner. Also a small scratch/rub on the left side rear body work. The only thing missing is the Union Jack that gets mounted on the side fairing underneath "Special Edition". I have not located one yet. The last thing the bike needs is a carb tune. I have not done this because I wasn't riding it. I have a shop that has tuned my other D-12's that has the bikes producing 120hp and 80ft.lbs. at the rear wheel. I can have them do the work for around, $400.00, or we can discuss other options.

Full disclosure is something we all appreciate when shopping for a bike. When obvious stuff is wrong but not mentioned, we bike folks think, "Hmmm... if he's not being up front with that, what else isn't he telling us?" Being upfront about minor flaws suggests that, not only is the seller honest, but that they are a bit obsessive themselves. I'm not obsessive about minor flaws like the ones present here, but I sure want to buy a bike from someone who is. For a bike meant to cover big miles at big speeds, this one shows remarkably little wear and tear, although mileage is pretty low and the seller is asking $5,199.00 for what appears to be a very nice motorcycle. This is another bike like yesterday's VF1000R where most examples that show up for sale seem to have held up very well, considering the fact that they're 20 years old devices that go belting along highways and back roads at speed, which speaks not only to build quality, but to attentive ownership. But then again, that's exactly the kind of customer Triumph was shooting for in the first place.

-tad

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale
Moto Guzzi April 28, 2017 posted by

One Owner: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

There is something about big Guzzis that set them apart. It's not just one thing, either; it's the overall package that sets the mind wandering. Italian, long legged good looks, wonderful booming V-twin sounds, some degree of exclusivity due to relative rarity, and a reputation for longevity and long ownership. Moto Guzzis evoke class, elegance, a touch of danger, and total loyalty. In the hyperbike classes, loyalty lasts just long enough for something faster to come out - usually measured in tiny increments no longer than a year. In the Guzzi class, loyalty lasts as long as the bike - and the robustness of the transverse twin is the stuff of legends.

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for sale on eBay

Moto Guzzi considered the Daytona a Superbike - although by modern AMA/WSBK standards that is a bit of an overstatement. Still, this was a race-bred machine by design. Moto Guzzi, then under the ownership of Alejandro de Tomaso, tapped the brilliance of US-based Guzzi racer Dr. John Wittner - whose bikes won many prestigious BOTT, Pro Twin and Endurance races. Wittner was a dentist by trade, but when the call from Italy came, he answered. The outcome was a new 4-valve head attached to an updated big block motor with a reworked bore and stroke. Power was boosted up to 95 HP, thanks in part to the addition of fuel injection. All this hung in a frame that was based on Dr. John's race winning machines. This was the most powerful, fastest Moto Guzzi twin yet, and was named for the Florida track where Dr. John had enjoyed several victories.

From the seller:
1993 Moto Guzzi DAYTONA 1000
Less Than 9400 Actual Miles
All original, never raced, always garaged

Up for is the first and my favorite of all Moto Guzzi's produced. I'm no longer able to ride it, kept it for several years thinking my health would improve, it hasn't so I finally decided to part with it.

Description Of included Items:
Carbon Fiber Hugger
Heli Bars
Heated Grips ( never connected)
New Motobatt Battery
Single Seat cowling and seat never used with shelf ware (see photo 11)
Shop and Parts Manuals
Oil Change Parts
Special tools for Cam Belt Adjusting and Fork Oil Change
Stock Bars, Grips, Reflectors and other items

More Stuff
Low Mileage Tires, less than 300 miles on them
Spare Computer
Moto Guzzi Race Stand

Moto Guzzis are an acquired taste. Like a fine wine they age well, developing a complex flavor of the vintage year they were born. The Daytona 1000 is no different, showcasing a time when Guzzi was making an investment into the bikes, and a statement to the world. This example is a one-owner model, which is quite common in the M-G world, but less so for most 24 year old bikes. And with one-owner status, you gain all the eccentricities of this particular owner along with all the eccentricities of the bike itself. In this case, you gain what appear to be a considerable number of spares and maintenance items. The win here is not just in the parts; it's in knowing more about the history of the machine and its care.

If compared to a modern (or even period) Japanese sport bike, the big Guzzi Daytona would be trounced in terms of performance (lap time, quarter mile, etc). Yet years later, the Guzzi will hold its value while the Japanese machine (save for the homologation models) will depreciate as fast as the next model is introduced. Moto Guzzis are bikes you hold on to. They are keepers. This is why they are not commonly found for sale, and when they are they tend to command higher prices. This one is available with an opening ask of $7,800, and a BIN of $11,300. That is a bargain considering this was $15k when new, and the value will certainly appreciate over time. Lots of people are watching this one. If you need a Guzzi fix, this just might be your chance. Good Luck!!

MI

One Owner: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000
Triumph January 10, 2017 posted by

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Faced with the onslaught of powerful, dead-reliable motorcycles from Japan, many of the storied British and European motorcycle brands folded and Triumph was among them, although the story of their eventual resurrection is suitably British. These days, they’re famous for their characterful performance machines, but it took them years to earn that enviable reputation. This Daytona Super III represents ground-zero for this new generation of Triumph motorcycles and was their sportiest bike at the time.

John Bloor was actually looking at the defunct Triumph factory as a residential building site when he decided instead to relaunch the brand, which is about as much a change of heart as it’s possible to have. Building a wide variety of bikes to suit different markets and niches with entirely different frames and engines would have been prohibitively expensive, so the new range of motorcycles was built around a modular frame, with either a 900cc triple or 1200cc inline four for motivation: the 900cc triple in the Daytona was the same basic engine that also powered the Thunderbird, Trident, Sprint, Tiger, Trophy, and Speed Triple. Pretty impressive, considering how different those bikes appear at first glance.

The standard Daytona 900 made 98hp, but Cosworth tuning took the Super III to 115hp, with a near 140mph top speed, with upgraded, six-piston brakes up front to bring the whole thing to a halt quickly. Those numbers were healthy for the time, although they didn’t really compete with the fastest bikes of the era. But as you can see from the displacement, Triumph wasn’t looking at competing in racing for the most part, and the displacements reflect this roadgoing mission, an area in which the bike excelled.

Handling was very stable, although the spine frame carried weight high and the bike was fairly heavy overall so it couldn't really be considered nimble. But quality was a step up from the Japanese, comfort was good, and the look was much more classic and conservative to appeal to a different segment of the sportbike marketplace. These days, nice Daytonas and even Super IIIs can be had for relative peanuts, as you can see with today’s example, and offers up useable performance and distinctive looks.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

This is a good clean example of a rare 1996 Triumph Daytona Super 3.  The bike is in great shape with limited modifications and most of the original parts.  I do not have the original exhaust, but have seem them on e-bay for 100-$300.  This bike has just had a fresh tune-up, rebuilt carbs, plugs, all new rubber hoses, coolant flush, valve adjustment, and new Pilot 3 tires.  One of the side panels may have been repainted at some point, but I'm not sure, and one of the rear turn signals has a broken stalk.   Aftermarket parts  4 into 1 full race exhaust by Sebring K&N pod filters (original air box included) Available Parts 1 Brand new Penske fully adjustable remote resivore rear shock $1,000 (paid $1300).  If the bike buyer dose not want it, I'll list it in a separate auction. Additional Super 3 info: The Triumph Daytona Super III was a limited edition of the under-appreciated Daytona 900. Just 805 were sold worldwide and they featured engine work by Cosworth. In addition to Cosworth’s touch, this bike got bigger cams, flat slide carbs, 6 piston front brakes, and a whole lot of carbon fiber. The results of the engine work yielded a healthy 115 horsepower, though the bike was too heavy to be a true sports bike. It instead ended up being a fantastic sport-tourer, and a bike you had to muscle around to have a lot of fun with.

That "repainted side panel" does look a bit off in a couple of the photos, but the seller is asking a very reasonable $3,500 for what appears to be a clean, well-maintained and upgraded bit of Triumph's comeback story. The styling may be a bit dated, but the bike oozes class and while it may not be a "true sportbike" it has muscle where it counts: on the road. And let's be honest, that's where most motorcyclists spend their time. Track day junkies should probably look elsewhere,  although one of the coaches at the track-day organization I rode with on the East Coast had a Daytona like this one set up for track riding, so they can be made to handle if you're willing to expend a bit of time, money and effort.

-tad

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Moto Guzzi September 28, 2016 posted by

Getting the Shaft: 1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for Sale

1996-moto-guzzi-daytona-racing-r-side

Shaft drive has well-known advantages in terms of maintenance and reliability but is rarely seen in the sportbike world as it limits gearing choices and generally adds too much weight to a bike like this Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing. In a world where every ounce counts and bikes are pared to the bone, sacrificing durability for agility, a driveshaft seems a step backwards. But although they played around with a chain-drive, liquid-cooled, v-twin to rival Ducati prior to their purchase by the Piaggio Group, Moto Guzzi was generally happy to just stay afloat and were often forced to work with what they had. Given their financial limitations, they have managed to develop the system to a very high level.

1996-moto-guzzi-daytona-racing-r-side-front

Guzzi was stuck with the durable, but very clunky and outdated five-speed transmission but, in the Daytona, they curbed some of the more intrusive shaft-jacking by using a parallelogram rear suspension, although you’ll still feel the rotational forces of the longitudinal crankshaft as you power out of turns or rev the bike at a stoplight. Because of course you’ll rev the bike at stoplights: Moto Guzzi’s big v-twins are some of the very best-sounding twins on the planet, especially when fitted with a freer-flowing exhaust. The four-valve engine has "OHC" cast into those valve covers, but it’s not really “overhead” and more "high cam" as the cams operate the eight valves via a system of short pushrods and rockers, a system that offered the best of both worlds, with compact dimensions and good high-rpm breathing.

1996-moto-guzzi-daytona-racing-clocks

A bit of a bridge between the earlier Daytona 1000 and the later RS, the "Racing" uses the earlier, hump-backed bodywork with some of the factory available engine hop-up parts. It was never officially available in the USA, as evinced by the odometer reading in kilometers. The seller claims this is is fitted with an 1100cc engine, but I believe all of the Daytonas had the 992cc engine, built to make it eligible for various race classes that limited twins to 1,000cc or less. Production of the Daytona stretched from 1992 to 1995 and saw a bit more than 1,000 examples built, with just 100 of the "Racing" version at the tail end of production for 1996.

1996-moto-guzzi-daytona-racing-r-side-rear

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing for Sale

1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing, number 100 of 100 ever made 4 valve twin, mint condition. Rare Stay In Tune stainless steel exhaust system, new battery, recent fluid change and tune up, low mileage: 21,446km. Part of large collection that is being liquidated, 1100cc 4-valve twin, this bike is a joy to ride, we at buyer's expense can ship worldwide. Clean, lien-free title, this is a no-issue bike that is beautiful and rare.

Bidding is up to 7,600 with the Reserve Not Met. No surprise there as sellers are generally looking to get at least $10,000 for nice examples, with one recent low-mileage bike selling for over $14,000! But more often, these Daytonas are a hard sell: they don’t meet their reserve or receive little attention from bidders. Mileage on this example is pretty low, especially for a Guzzi, with a little more than 13,000 miles worth of kilometers rolling under the wheels. The Staintune exhaust may be a bit too shiny for your taste, but they are a quality brand and those… less restrictive pipes should help make the big v-twin sound great and add a little bit more oomph.

-tad

1996-moto-guzzi-daytona-racing-l-side-rear

Getting the Shaft: 1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for Sale