Posts by tag: Daytona

Moto Guzzi March 19, 2018 posted by

Alternate Italian: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

If asked to picture a red, Italian vee twin sportbike, the majority of the world would come up with a single marque: Ducati. But in truth the Italians have been rather prolific with their sporty scoots across dozens of manufacturers, even though some brands may not be household names here in the United States. And some, while once well known, have fallen to the march of progress and the downfall of insolvency. One of those surviving iconic Italian brands is Moto Guzzi - holding the title of the oldest motorcycle manufacturer in Europe still in continuous production. Now owned by Piaggio but allowed to operate quasi-independently, Moto Guzzi soldiers on with a handful of cruisers and V7 nostalgia bikes. However Guzzi once was known for sport bikes, and none highlight the brand better than today's Daytona RS.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS for sale on eBay

Based on the very (for Moto Guzzi) successful 1100 Sport model, the RS contained a few extra goodies in the horsepower and handling department. Like many other successful brands, Moto Guzzi marketed the RS as a premium model, selling the extra performance. Unlike the 1100 Sport, the RS featured new 4-valve cylinder heads and a bigger cam to help with higher RPM breathing. Modern EFI provided the fueling. Down below, a new lightened crankshaft was connected to a lighter flywheel, carillo rods and forged (rather than cast) pistons. Moto Guzzis have always been known to be robust motorcycles, and the venerable transverse vee arrangement readily accepted these updates without complaint. On the chassis side, the RS received uprated WP dampers front and rear along with 17" rubber front and rear. Tipping the scales at the same rate as the 1100 Sport (approx 488 lbs), the RS offered 12 HP and nearly 1,000 RPM more motive power along with handling refinements and a 240 KM/h top speed.

From the seller:
Daytona RS, very rare, only 34 to North America. I have had the bike for ~3 yrs in southern Arizona. Runs very strong, great looking with everything working. Mileage ~9000 as I continue to ride it on occasions. New cam belts, forks rebuilt, valves checked, tires good (Pirelli angel gt). Aftermarket exhaust, handlebars and Creedon chip.

From a performance standpoint, the big Guzzis were largely outclassed by Japanese precision. From a local perspective, Moto Guzzi found itself losing ground to the group from Bologna - to the point where Ducati dominated the Italian vee twin sporting scene. Ultimately grouped into the Battle of the Twins class against Beemers and Harleys, Moto Guzzi never quite made the transition to the modern sportbike era. But to damn the brand because it refused to enter the hyperactive world of "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" would be missing the point of this Dayton beast. With long legs, great sounds and fantastic looks, this Daytona RS is timeless and offers so much more than a fleeting performance benchmark. This is a classic steed that performs well enough to hold its head up high while enveloping the rider in a cloak of quality and mystique. This is a bike that riders look at knowingly and longingly; this is ultimate cool, personified.

This particular Daytona RS looks to be in pretty good shape. There is some wear evident in the rash on the triple clamps - it is minor and does not affect functionality, but somehow marks in this area always aggrivate me - and some slight damage to the left side rear tail section. Otherwise this appears to be an honest bike, and presents well. The mileage is sub 9,000, and from the seller's text maintenance and care was performed as one would expect. There are some extras in the form of upgraded Termi exhaust as well as a tuner chip controlling the EFI, enhancing power delivery as well as rideability. These RS models are rare and in demand in the small circle of Guzzi fans, so this one may not last long. The opening bid started out at a rock-bottom $1,000 (with reserve), and the BIN is a reasonable $11,500. Check it out here, and revel in the artistry of Italian chic. Good Luck!!


Alternate Italian: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS
Yamaha March 18, 2018 posted by

Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750

No less a rider than Giacomo Agostini abdicated his dynasty at MV Agusta when Yamaha introduced the 4-cylinder 2-stroke 700cc racebike. He won the 1974 Daytona 200 with it, and its 750cc progeny went on to a 12-year run on the beach.  This newly restored example has matching numbers and a nicely documented race history.

1974 Yamaha TZ750 for sale on eBay

As ever, specs for a race machine are a liar's poker affair.  The engine had a nasty tone even at idle and was good for 140hp at full song.  The frame was a twin downtube arrangement and the swingarm was all new, spread at the rear wheel but converging at the bottom pivot and top where the shock mounted, the Monocross went on to bigger and better.  Initially a pair of RD350 race engines joined at the hip, the TZ750 was more purpose-built, water cooled though the crankcase bristles with fins.  Expansion chambers mostly taking the path of least resistance - except for the left which wound around and through the frame.  Triple hydraulic disk brakes provided the retro-force.

The owner has treated this TZ750 to a rare level of restoration, both mechanically and cosmetically.  Just part of the eBay auction's comments :

This bike has The Holy Trinity for the most discerning collectors and enthusiasts: Provenance, Rarity and Condition! What you see here is the culmination of a 10 year, no cost spared, meticulous frame-off restoration. The resto was done on a complete, running, period correct, and 'as raced' TZ from the 1970's. Amazingly, during the bike's campaign both here and abroad, it appears to have never been crashed or blown-up. The exact Factory paint scheme and colors were precisely replicated from Factory original. The Shipping Invoice (see pic, courtesy of NATS Forum) shows #159 being a genuine 1st batch racer. There were a total of 219 TZ750A's built;  few remain today.

Rather too specialized for a hobbyist, exercising the TZ-750 will take commitment.  Maintenance hours will be more numerous than "flight" hours.  But this race veteran is sorted and shouldn't bring too many surprises.  As the owner states:

The bike was built to run, but assembled primarily for display and ease of cleaning.

Successful to the point of domination, the TZ-750 will likely be invited back to any event it attends.  The fairing's well-drawn lines are sure easy on the eyes.  Mechanically, it's better than new - improvements to the exhaust system made and impossibly light brake disks, with blank livery as shipped.  Likely never to turn another hot lap, the velvet ropes beckon.  But once photographed, the years of racing history are in the books, and the soundtrack from a demonstration lap or two is all that's missing...


Wild Kingdom – 1974 Yamaha TZ750
Moto Guzzi September 20, 2017 posted by

Racy Goose: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale

Guzzi is generally thought of these days as a purveyor of weirdo touring rigs, butch nakeds, and alterna-Harley cruisers, all with their big v-twins turned 90° from the expected orientation and the cylinder heads sticking out by the rider's knees. But in the 1950s and 1970s, Moto Guzzi made genuine sportbikes and competed successfully in various racing series. They attempted a comeback in the early 1990s with this Daytona, the first Guzzi in decades to use something other than the Lino Tonti designed frame that was introduced on the original V7 Sport way back in 1971... Which tells you just how excellent that frame was to begin with, but also speaks to Guzzis very limited development budget.

When the time came to develop a new sports motorcycle, Guzzi actually turned to privateer Dr John Wittner for input, an American dentist who successfully campaigned a Guzzi in AMA Pro Twins racing during the 1980s. The new machine that resulted was built around a "spine" frame with distinctive side plates that featured holes where it was apparently joked that you could stash a sandwich... The powertrain featured Guzzi's familiar five-speed gearbox, automotive-style clutch, and shaft drive, but the engine featured a significant update in order to produce competitive power: four valve cylinder heads.

The updated 992cc engine was designed to squeak in under the 1000cc limit for various racing classes and is claimed to be overhead cam as well, but it's really more "high-cam" as the heads do each have a cam, but the valves are actuated via pushrods and rockers, and the bike lacks liquid-cooling. Power was a respectable 92hp and with high-quality WP suspension the bike did handle well, although significant weight compared to other sportbikes meant fast riding was hard work. That longitudinal engine layout means you do still get some torque reaction accelerating out of a corner, but it's relatively minor and something that you adapt to quickly.



From the original eBay listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale

My understanding is Moto Guzzi Built 150 Daytona's in 1993. They imported 50 into the US.  Bike has been serviced & ready to ride. New tires, All fluids changed, valves adjusted, fuel tank was cleaned & sealed.

Significantly, this Daytona features the European-market trapezoidal headlight instead of the more common rectangular unit like the one seen on last week's Sport 1100. I'm a huge fan of these Guzzis in general, and the headlight makes a huge difference to me in terms of looks: a later 1100cc Daytona with the headlight seen here has a place in my dream garage. This bike also features a desirable pair of Termignoni exhausts that should liberate a glorious boom from the Italian twin. It's a bad sign when it's easier to do valve adjustments than oil changes on your motorcycle, but that's probably the case with Guzzi's longitudinally-mounted engine. Even as late as the V11 Sport, you had to drop the pan to change the filter, It appears that the bike has an aftermarket, external oil filter adapter fitted: you can see it at the front of the engine. It's not mentioned by the seller, so maybe it was added by a previous owner? In any event this is a practical addition, and suggests that maintenance has been a priority for this bike. Overall, the bike's condition is very good, and mileage is just 3,473 from new. There's been no interest so far at the $10,000 starting bid but, with just 1000 or so built and Italian good looks, these are definitely collectible.


Racy Goose: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale
Moto Guzzi September 15, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

Not too many motorcycles look good in screaming yellow, but I think the Guzzi 1100 Sport is definitely one of them. A two-valve version of the exotic Daytona that was developed by Dr John Wittner from his successful Battle of the Twins racer, the 1100 Sport was a very unconventional motorcycle. By the 1990s, sportbike convention dictated liquid-cooling, four valves per cylinder, six-speed gearboxes, full fairings, and chain final drive. Of course the 1100 Sport had none of these. Would it beat a CBR or GSX-R of the period on a racetrack? Of course not. But the Guzzi has charisma in spades, plenty of torque to punch you out of corners, and it makes up in stability what it lacks in agility.

The half-faired styling means that hulking engine and gearbox are proudly on display, with the two-valve cylinder heads sticking out into the breeze by the rider's knees, here fed by fuel injection, which replaced the Dell'Orto carburetors in 1996. In spite of the relatively low-specification suggested by the air-cooling, pushrods, and two valves per cylinder, the 1064cc engine put out an honest 90hp and 70ft-lbs of torque, with 82 ponies present-and-accounted-for at the rear wheel.

It seems like an odd choice for a powerplant, but the bike's long history goes some way towards explaining it. Some of the Guzzi's "agricultural" reputation comes from that honking big v-twin that rocks the bike to one side when you rev it, due to the longitudinal crankshaft arrangement, and the clunky five-speed gearbox. But it probably doesn't help that the package is often associated with an Italian military tractor that dates back to the 1960s, although even the earliest Guzzi V7 motorcycles apparently shared no mechanical parts whatsoever with that odd machine. Those origins may sound like an unlikely foundation for a fast, agile motorcycle, but Guzzi's V7 Sport and Le Mans were considered very capable sportbikes at the time.

Unfortunately, by the time of the 1100 Sport, the big Guzzi was probably more GT than actual sportbike, but that's just fine, considering that the majority of riders never actually use their bikes on track. And even then, most do so only occasionally. For weekend riding, the triple Brembo brakes can pull you up short to avoid errant deer in the roadway, while quality suspension means stable handling, but passenger accommodations aren't great, as no grab-rail is fitted.  Reviews of the 1100 Sport were generally very positive when the bike was tested in isolation, although the aforementioned gearbox and the bike's 490lb dry weight did come in for some criticism.

Unfortunately, this Goose never really had a chance when compared directly to rivals: the 916 was obviously lighter, more agile, and faster, as well as being the sexiest bike of the era. And Japanese machines were more powerful, cheaper, and user-friendly. But that's hardly the point here, and Guzzis have long been bikes you buy because you like Guzzis, not because they are quantifiably "better" than any other bike. And if you are a Guzzi fan, this particular 1100 Sport is in impeccable condition!

From the Seller: 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

For Sale: Rare and Low Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport in Excellent Condition. I am the 2nd owner and bike came from California. There were only 1,314 of these produced in 1997 and approximately 450 units in Yellow. It has always been stored inside and very well maintained. It also has been stored, when not ridden on a bike stand. All service recently completed including:

* All oil and filters
* Full Tune-up
* Valve adjustment
* New Tires
* New brake pads
* New Battery - Lithium

You will be hard pressed to find one this clean and with low mileage. Bike starts up easily and rides and drives very good. As you will see in the pictures the bike is extremely clean and comes with original manual, repair manual, original brochure, a couple of magazines from1997/1998 featuring this bike, original and spare keys.

Bike comes standard with Brembo Brakes, Marchesini Wheels and all of the expensive Italian upgrades. 

The seller is asking $9,500 for this low-mileage example. Just a few years ago, a decent 1100 Sport could be had for half that, but values have been steadily rising and it's hard to find one with anywhere near this mileage. With solid performance, good reliability, and easy maintenance, this Guzzi can tackle winding back roads, attracts tons of attention wherever you stop, can even do a bit of light sport-touring, and will generally put a big smile on your face. 1100 Sports are odd and quirky and ergonomically-challenged, yet owners often rack up big miles on them, owing to the platform's soundness and the engine's reliability. And clutch-replacements aside, basic maintenance is a snap: the unusual engine configuration may have some ergonomic drawbacks, but this may be the easiest bike you've ever adjusted the valves on, and pushrods mean no rubber cambelts to replace!


Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale
Triumph April 29, 2017 posted by

Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

Motorcycling history is littered with storied nameplates undone by economic changes, and many have tried and failed to resurrect those brands, but one of the enduring success stories continues to be Triumph. Sunk by a changing economy, a changing market, and an inability to compete with the reliable, affordable, high-performance bikes from Japan, Triumph's long, slow slide into irrelevance was over by 1983. John Bloor originally purchased the defunct Triumph facility with an eye to razing it and building residences, but somewhere along the line, a bit of nationalistic inspiration struck him and he instead decided to revive the brand. Attempts to compete head-on with sportbikes from Japan a second time were always going to end in failure, so Triumph wisely chose to focus on quality and heritage instead of outright performance. That's not to say that bikes like today's Triumph Daytona 1200SE didn't have brawn to match their good looks, but that performance was never going be as focused or as inexpensive as it would be with something like a GSX-R1100. Instead, Triumph went for a different customer, one more concerned with quality and class than top-speed numbers or lap times.

The biggest limitation to ultimate performance was Triumph's decision to go with modular design based around a spine frame. That same basic frame and two engines, a triple or an inline four, could be wrapped in different bodywork to create an entire range of motorcycles and quickly add models to react to market changes, which gave versatility for a fairly low cost. Unfortunately, it meant a bit of a jack-of-all-trades quality, with too much weight carried too high for optimal handling. Nothing wrong in the engine room however: 147 horsepower may not sound all that impressive, considering the 1180cc engine, but it was one of the most powerful motorcycles available at the time and a claimed 85 lbs-ft of torque is BMW S1000RR territory. So the big Daytona can move out smartly and, most importantly, can sustain that 159mph top speed seemingly all day long, with plenty of wind protection from the big fairing and all-day ergonomics.

Styling is always subjective, but I think these look pretty cool, with that dual-round headlamp endurance racing style, but without the aggression or wild graphics of a 90s Japanese sportbike. The monochromatic color treatment, especially the black seen here, makes it look classy and elegant. I think they've aged well and prices mean you can have a classic road-burner with all-day comfort for relative peanuts. Personally, I'd prefer one of the hot-rod three-cylinder Super III models, but in either guise you're looking at a deceptively fast motorcycle.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

I purchased this bike three years ago to add it to the other two Daytona's I already have. The reason for the sale is that I have my hands full with my other D-12's and the other bikes we have. So... In the three years I have owned the bike I have put less than 400 miles on the it. I replaced the left and right fairings as well as the front fairing, windshield, with trim, clip-ons, fork seals, tires, and battery. I am the third owner, from what I was told. I have the bike stored in my climate controlled basement since I brought it home. The bike is completely stock. All parts used are Triumph parts. There is a very small ding on the tank. On the right side from previous owner. Also a small scratch/rub on the left side rear body work. The only thing missing is the Union Jack that gets mounted on the side fairing underneath "Special Edition". I have not located one yet. The last thing the bike needs is a carb tune. I have not done this because I wasn't riding it. I have a shop that has tuned my other D-12's that has the bikes producing 120hp and 80ft.lbs. at the rear wheel. I can have them do the work for around, $400.00, or we can discuss other options.

Full disclosure is something we all appreciate when shopping for a bike. When obvious stuff is wrong but not mentioned, we bike folks think, "Hmmm... if he's not being up front with that, what else isn't he telling us?" Being upfront about minor flaws suggests that, not only is the seller honest, but that they are a bit obsessive themselves. I'm not obsessive about minor flaws like the ones present here, but I sure want to buy a bike from someone who is. For a bike meant to cover big miles at big speeds, this one shows remarkably little wear and tear, although mileage is pretty low and the seller is asking $5,199.00 for what appears to be a very nice motorcycle. This is another bike like yesterday's VF1000R where most examples that show up for sale seem to have held up very well, considering the fact that they're 20 years old devices that go belting along highways and back roads at speed, which speaks not only to build quality, but to attentive ownership. But then again, that's exactly the kind of customer Triumph was shooting for in the first place.


Grand Touring: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale
Moto Guzzi April 28, 2017 posted by

One Owner: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

There is something about big Guzzis that set them apart. It's not just one thing, either; it's the overall package that sets the mind wandering. Italian, long legged good looks, wonderful booming V-twin sounds, some degree of exclusivity due to relative rarity, and a reputation for longevity and long ownership. Moto Guzzis evoke class, elegance, a touch of danger, and total loyalty. In the hyperbike classes, loyalty lasts just long enough for something faster to come out - usually measured in tiny increments no longer than a year. In the Guzzi class, loyalty lasts as long as the bike - and the robustness of the transverse twin is the stuff of legends.

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for sale on eBay

Moto Guzzi considered the Daytona a Superbike - although by modern AMA/WSBK standards that is a bit of an overstatement. Still, this was a race-bred machine by design. Moto Guzzi, then under the ownership of Alejandro de Tomaso, tapped the brilliance of US-based Guzzi racer Dr. John Wittner - whose bikes won many prestigious BOTT, Pro Twin and Endurance races. Wittner was a dentist by trade, but when the call from Italy came, he answered. The outcome was a new 4-valve head attached to an updated big block motor with a reworked bore and stroke. Power was boosted up to 95 HP, thanks in part to the addition of fuel injection. All this hung in a frame that was based on Dr. John's race winning machines. This was the most powerful, fastest Moto Guzzi twin yet, and was named for the Florida track where Dr. John had enjoyed several victories.

From the seller:
1993 Moto Guzzi DAYTONA 1000
Less Than 9400 Actual Miles
All original, never raced, always garaged

Up for is the first and my favorite of all Moto Guzzi's produced. I'm no longer able to ride it, kept it for several years thinking my health would improve, it hasn't so I finally decided to part with it.

Description Of included Items:
Carbon Fiber Hugger
Heli Bars
Heated Grips ( never connected)
New Motobatt Battery
Single Seat cowling and seat never used with shelf ware (see photo 11)
Shop and Parts Manuals
Oil Change Parts
Special tools for Cam Belt Adjusting and Fork Oil Change
Stock Bars, Grips, Reflectors and other items

More Stuff
Low Mileage Tires, less than 300 miles on them
Spare Computer
Moto Guzzi Race Stand

Moto Guzzis are an acquired taste. Like a fine wine they age well, developing a complex flavor of the vintage year they were born. The Daytona 1000 is no different, showcasing a time when Guzzi was making an investment into the bikes, and a statement to the world. This example is a one-owner model, which is quite common in the M-G world, but less so for most 24 year old bikes. And with one-owner status, you gain all the eccentricities of this particular owner along with all the eccentricities of the bike itself. In this case, you gain what appear to be a considerable number of spares and maintenance items. The win here is not just in the parts; it's in knowing more about the history of the machine and its care.

If compared to a modern (or even period) Japanese sport bike, the big Guzzi Daytona would be trounced in terms of performance (lap time, quarter mile, etc). Yet years later, the Guzzi will hold its value while the Japanese machine (save for the homologation models) will depreciate as fast as the next model is introduced. Moto Guzzis are bikes you hold on to. They are keepers. This is why they are not commonly found for sale, and when they are they tend to command higher prices. This one is available with an opening ask of $7,800, and a BIN of $11,300. That is a bargain considering this was $15k when new, and the value will certainly appreciate over time. Lots of people are watching this one. If you need a Guzzi fix, this just might be your chance. Good Luck!!


One Owner: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000