Posts by tag: air cooled

Ducati September 22, 2017 posted by

Less Popular Duck: 1992 Ducati 750SS

The 1990s were good for Ducati and Ducatsi alike. On the Superbike side, the 851 paved the way for the 888 and the amazing 916. But it was the offerings across the Super Sport line that really broadened the marque's appeal. Consider the original 900SS, augmented by the Super Light (SL), the Sport Production (SP), and the Cafe Racer (CR) in both full and half fairing versions. The CR model was further bifurcated into the 900SS and the 750SS. The latter is one of the most under rated motorcycles from Bologna - and quite limited in numbers (i.e. rare) in its own right.

1992 Ducati 750SS for sale on eBay

Essentially a 900SS CR model on a diet, the 750 SS offers the same visceral motoring experience as its bigger brother. Sure, it makes due with a few less cubic centimeters and a couple of fewer ponies (66 vs 84 HP), but the ride is essentially the same. It utilizes the same air cooled L-twin, spins its cams by rubber belts, and opens the valves in the same Desmo manner. By the numbers, the 750SS is nearly 20 pounds lighter with the remainder of the running gear and chassis being identical. The 750 model, as a result of its lighter weight and lower power numbers, achieves braking performance via a single disk up front. What you give up is approximately 3-4 tenths down the quarter mile, and about 10-12 mph of top speed. The rest is pure Ducati goodness in a more rare format.

From the seller:
1992 Ducati 750SS Great Shape, runs great just had carbs cleaned and new fork seals. Left side fairing has been repaired no decals have been replaced, right side fairing has some spiedering around bolt hole, scratches on left side exhaust a couple of small scratches where seat is rubbing see photos. over all bike is in great shape.

The Ducati Super Sport lineup is a popular one. Parts are plentiful, as is knowledge of how to service and maintain these machines. Because the 750SS is based on the 900, many parts are interchangeable. So popular was this model that in European markets there is also a 350cc, 400cc and 600cc model - which are all patterned after this 750SS. The Super Sport is the kind of motorcycle that has the bones to last; it may not be the fastest in a straight line, but with gobs of torque, a stiff chassis and willing suspension, a 750SS can motor very swiftly indeed.

Today's bike is the rare 750cc variant. The seller claims that it has a new left side fairing, and the exhaust has some scratches on the same side. That is pretty convincing evidence of a tip over - but does not necessarily mean a high speed off. This era Ducati has a spring-loaded kickstand that retracts as soon as the bike is picked up. Many bikes suffer inadvertent cosmetic damage in this manner, always on the left. It would not shock me to discover that this damage is minor and the result of the infamous self-retracting stand. Otherwise it looks to be in good shape, has reasonable miles (these bikes beg to be ridden), and is available for what feels like a song. You might wish to inquire as to the whereabouts of the original mirrors, however. This bike is not likely to appreciate any time soon, but it will always be appreciated; you would be hard pressed to find a more solid, long-term bike for your stable. Check it out here, and be sure and jump back to the Comments to share your thoughts. Have you ever been bitten by the wretched Ducati self-retracting stand? Let us know. Good Luck!!

MI

Less Popular Duck: 1992 Ducati 750SS
Honda September 19, 2017 posted by

Classic 80s: 1983 Honda CB 1100F

For riders of a certain age, the CB1100F represents a significant moment in time. The last serious Honda sport bike to utilize air cooling, the CB1100F was part standard, part sport bike, and part sport touring machine. And while today each of those segments represents a different motorcycle, the CB1100F was the jack-of-all-trades bike to get them all done. It won AMA races. It beat Honda sales records. It did it all. And today, despite the fact that these were mass produced in a "stamp out as many as you can make while people are buyin' 'em" sort of way, 34 years later it is hard to find one that looks presentable, let alone in riding condition.

1983 Honda CB1100F Survivor for sale on eBay

The CB1100F owes it's roots to the CB900F. It's easy to tell them apart thanks to the bikini fairing on the bigger bike. But somehow the CB1100F was more than the mere sum of its parts - it was more than minor bodywork tweaks and a punch up above the liter mark. The CB1100F could hold its own against the big bikes of the day, yet had the requisite Honda quality of that time; here was a big sport bike that was reliable enough to commute on, comfortable enough to take for a weekend, and potent enough for Saturday morning rides in the canyons. This is a bike that stood out because it did everything well enough.

From the seller:
This is a reluctant sale of my 1983 Honda CB 1100F. A stunning collectable motorcycle that is going up in value. Most of the ones I have noticed have been modified or neglected. This has been garage kept all of it's life. I am the second owner. Title is clear in my name.

Color is a Maui Red and Pearl white. Carbs were recently done by Jack Wagner of Old School Carbs in San Jose, Ca. (Jay Leno uses hid service). He also rejetted with a Stage 1 Dynojet kit. The Tank is an OEM new tank I acquired that was still in the box. All the rest of the paint is excellent as well. New Avon Road Rider tires. The stock (junk) OEM starter clutch drive has been replace with a better unit. NEW Works performance shocks. The Black Chrome is in excellent condition throughout. This stock "Race Bred" version of the CB1100F was inspired by the likes of Superbike road racers like Freddie Spencer and Mike Baldwin. Think Laguna Seca, Seattle International Raceway, Sears Point, Willows!! How many summers do we have left?

16 valve smooth engine with 108 horse power. Fastest super bike in it's day and still surprises a few of the newer modern sport bikes. Over $2000 in receipts to make it turn key. Come with tool kit. Manual. Original Brochure. I have not seen a better version of the red and white CB1100F

When it comes to the massive production numbers of UJMs, there is relatively little value in collecting unless you can find a near-pristine example. Otherwise the cost to restore a ratty example back to new (or near new) condition can easily eclipse the value of the bike. Still, the prices for iconic machines from the 1980s are rising. The pretty CB1100F will continue to appreciate over time, but expect lower appreciation over a longer period of time than you would with a more popular and/or more rare model.

The seller has this listed in auction format with a Buy It Now. The opening ask for the auction is $4,900 with reserve in place. It is likely that the opening number will scare off many potential bidders. The BIN for this bike is a lofty $6,900. That is big money for a not very rare model, although as we have noted the condition does aide in the rarity consideration. Still, it is nice to see a preserved piece of history - especially when the model in question highlighted Honda's dominance of the period. Much would change in the following year, but for 1983 the Honda CB1100F was a key bike. Check it out here - and then be sure and jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on this beautiful F model. Did you have one? Good Luck!

MI

Suzuki September 13, 2017 posted by

Mr T: 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo

Given the title, I'm sure you're looking for some "I pity the fool..." type of comments here, but you will get none from me. Although looking back some 34 years from the future - in a world where nearly every car (from econo box to sports car) is either turbocharged, supercharged or both - it feels like we have not come very far at all. And while every one of the Big Four offered a puffer-enhanced model in the early 1980s, each was a dismal failure in the showroom, despite the investment and technology. Take the 1983 Suzuki XN85: this 650cc sport bike was labeled as the best handling motorcycle of that year. But nothing ages faster than last year's model, and the heavy, expensive, complicated XN85 was quickly left behind.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo for sale on eBay

Looking back, the XN85 paved the way for more successful Suzuki models, such as the original GSX-R series. In fact, the air/oil cooling technology that enabled the GSX-R's light weight was pioneered on the XN85. What about the GP-inspired 16" front wheel? Today this is seen as an antiquated attempt to lessen gyroscopic forces and improve transition maneuverability, but given the chassis technology at the time it was effective. So, too, was the adjustable anti-dive fork and the single shock rear suspension - which was carried onto other sporting models. Computerized fuel injection was a necessity for the turbo application, but represented a giant leap forward in the day (despite the computer being roughly the size of a toaster). Today this technology is a given, but the DNA has deep roots and a long memory.

From the seller:
For sale is a 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo. Bike is original an survivor with only 07772.1 miles. Read item condition for specifics, look over the photos or email for any questions. Thanks for looking.

This one year only model looks to be in decent condition; no obvious missing pieces or major damage. It would have been nice for the seller to take a minute to wipe the bike down (or, gasp!, wash it) before taking pictures, but this is not the worst we have ever seen. The corrosion is pretty typical of the age; most of these models have some rash on the brake master and the aluminum forks. While it does detract from the aesthetics, it should not prevent the bike from being ridden. And Turbo bikes need to be ridden regularly. Otherwise critical seals become old and crack, waste gate actuators stick, and myriad other problems can develop.

The Suzuki XN85 is perhaps the rarest of the US-imported Turbo bikes. Suzuki did everything they could to deny its existence, and buyers boycotted the extreme price differential between the XN and a performance-comparable GS750. Today these are interesting milestones along the racetrack of development. They are unique, rare, and relatively affordable. Prices are on a very slow ascending curve, making this a collectable you can afford - and afford to ride. Parts are difficult to find (especially the computerized bits and the bodywork), but if you locate a good one there are few weaknesses in the overall package. Boost is slow to hit - and doesn't hit nearly as hard as say a CX650T or Turbo GPz - but the handling is sublime by 1980s standards. This particular bike is a true survivor. Check it out here, and get boosted. Good luck!!

MI

Mr T:  1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
Honda September 12, 2017 posted by

Trophy Bike: 1986 Honda GB400

The cafe racer craze makes an appearance on a regular, cyclical basis. From the original cafe bikes "doing the ton" through sanctioned TT events such as the Isle of Man, the cafe racer evokes a rebel streak with a distinctly English flair. Sporting, brash, forward and yet somehow very basic, the cafe racer stirs your inner Mike Hailwood to life. And while authentic cafe racers are custom affairs, manufacturers such as Norton, Triumph, Royal Enfield, BSA and Vincent have all had a hand in producing models in this image. Honda, too, tried their hand at the cafe scene. The result was the "GB" series of Tourist Trophy-inspired bikes, including today's rare GB400.

Rare 1986 Honda GB400 for sale on eBay

The Honda GB was born from humble beginnings. Utilizing a necked-down XL600 thumper motor, the GB was made available in both 400cc and 500cc configurations. The stone-simple and reliable air-cooled single was augmented by a a solo seat (a dual-seat model was available), a TT-style fairing, and clip-on bars. Wire wheels and a requisite megaphone-style muffler gives it some element of English authenticity. Those sidecovers? Made of metal, just like back in the day. Technology intervened in the manner of electric start (a kickstarter is attached to be period correct) and a single disk brake up front. The rest is basic but effective. Like the SRX models from Yamaha, the GB was a throwback to the past, a nod to lightness and simplicity and a relative failure.

From the seller:
It took me forever to find one of these and due to something coming up I have to sell it. I'd planned to keep it for the rest of my life so this is truly a regretful sale.

I bought it with 5600km. It currently has less than 11,000km. I have meticulously looked after it. This is the work I've done to it:

Three oil and filter changes up to now. It is important to change the oil on these often.
New front and rear brakes
Cleaned carburetor
New Bridgestone Battlax BT45 tyres put on at 6000km - great tyres in the rain
Installed gold DID525 X-ring Chain and aftermarket rear sprocket at 6000km
the guy at the shop said the front sprocket was good enough to not need changing.
Aftermarket foot pegs (still have the original pegs that you can have)
Shaken valid until 2019 (only important if you are buying in Japan)

I also have an extra carburetor kit that can come with it if you ever need to clean the carb further down the line.

More from the seller:
I never use the electric start but it works fine. This is my daily driver, it kick starts every morning literally on the first kick, every time. Exceptionally reliable. It's really light, really forgiving, and fantastic for Japanese roads.

Never dropped, crashed or anything like that.

I think it had been sitting for a long time before I picked it up. There is some pitting on the engine block, handlebars and some faded paint behind the rocket cowl. Cosmetically I would say it is about 7/10.

Mechanically, it's a excellent. I don't know how to polish metal but I've always kept it clean. I have always parked it with a cover everyday and overnight. It also comes with the factory installed centre stand.

I have seen some online sell overseas for a lot more. These are rare and the value will only increase over time, especially ones like this with such low miles.

Available in Japan and export markets from 1985 - 1990 (and the US as a 500cc model in 1988-1990), the GB is a relatively rare machine. Sales were stronger in home markets and European pockets, but the US turned up its collective nose at this faux Brit bike. Today these are coveted machines for what they represent. This particular 400cc example was never seen in the US, and today resides in Japan where it was born. Check it out here if you are hankering for a reliable throwback - grab your pudding bowl and goggles and try for the ton. Good Luck!!

MI

Trophy Bike:  1986 Honda GB400
Ducati September 6, 2017 posted by

Limited Edition: 1992 Ducati Superlight

The world of collectable Ducatis is a diverse universe. In it you will find some truly iconic motorcycles, some groundbreaking models, some unique and interesting offerings, and a whole lot of "Limited Edition" badges. The 900 Superlight, a derivation of the 900 Supersport lineup, seems to fall into the latter two categories. It is, after all, a limited-in-numbers model - and one that is fairly coveted by riders and wanna-be owners. But it also suffers from the "me too" badging exercises played by Ducati. As such, you are looking at a rare model, but not one that differs terrifically from other examples of the breed.

1992 Ducati Superlight for sale on eBay

The basis of the SL is the 900SS: motive power via a wonderfully charismatic air-cooled L-twin, two valve desmo heads and the requisite dry clutch. Chassis duties are managed by a stout trellis frame, beefy forks up front and a conventional single shock setup (both by Showa). No single-sided swingarm trickery here; the SS models are basic motorcycles, eschewing liquid cooling, four valve heads, or even fuel injection. A basic ride that pretty much works - and works well. The Superlight takes those basics and adds two-piece composite (aluminum hoop / magnesium spokes) Mavic wheels, single seat rear bodywork, a carbon front fender and high pipes. That is pretty much it. Same everything else, with the exception of the numbered plate attached to the head stock. And a much bigger price tag.

From the seller:
- One of the last '92/'93 MK I models manufactured from the VERY few imported to the USA.
- Featuring the Rare OEM Marvic/Ankront Two Piece Magnesium Hub Wheels
- Manufactured in 1992

[Check the prices for 1970's 900ss and 750ss models - This bike is certain to appreciate]

The last of the great, air cooled, limited production Ducati’s! This rare and desirable 1992/'93 Ducati Superlight is likely among the best in existence.

IF YOU LONG TO OWN THIS RARE DUCATI, AN EXAMPLE LIKE THIS WILL NOT COME ALONG AGAIN.

More from the seller:
I purchased this bike new and am the original (and only) owner.

It is number plate # 942, indicates it was among the very last ten units made from the total limited production. I purchased the bike new, and it has been ridden less than 2650 original miles. It has never been down, raced, wrecked or abused. It has never been in the rain, and it's been properly stored and covered indoors since new. The pictures above show the bike after it was lightly washed.

It is in excellent physical and mechanical condition. It has been recently serviced by a certified motorcycle mechanic / service manager, with 40 years experience.

Everything works and operates as it should. I would advise the buyer that the model-specific, 320mm Brembo, iron front disc rotors have not been used for hard braking in some time. However, all brakes work properly.

- All the original parts seen in the pictures will be included. I will also include the original tires if the buyer wishes.

- I will work with the buyer to accommodate their choice for shipping and/or crating/preparation.

- The buyer will be responsible for the costs of : shipping, crating, taxes, tariffs, VAT, insurance, customs fees, or ANY other expenses beyond the agreed purchase price.

More from the seller:
The bike currently has the following modifications :

- 11.5:1 compression ratio pistons from Fast By Ferracci - installed by MCC Motor Cycle Center,West of Chicago, Illinois. MCC is a highly regarded, Ducati sales and service provider.

- Ceriani Steering Damper by Storz Performance.

- Braided Stainless Steel Brake Lines.

- New tires ( although new in 1994-ish )

- Chromoly, high level exhaust hangers from Pro Italia Motors - California

- Staintune Exhaust Silencers from Australia

- K&N Air Filter and Jet Kit.

- The airbox cover has been drilled out for better flow - as was the norm of the time.

- Ferodo Brake pads.

- Up-rated Rear Sprocket

As far as flaws, they are few and very minor, due to the low mileage, careful storage and maintenance. However, it IS a used motorcycle, and it HAS been "used" (albeit very little).

There are some small nicks in the paint on either side of the fairing at it's widest point. I attribute this to when the panels were removed, and set aside when serviced.
Also, the fiberglass seat pan , unique to the model, has a fine hairline stress crack at one fastening point. This is common to all Superlights. The seat pan fiberglass was manufactured to be very light and thin. Other than that, the bike looks and rides like a well-preserved machine.

Today's example is a bit of a conundrum. The seller claims this is likely the best SL in existence. I am willing to cut the seller some poetic license slack because this is a very limited and desirable machine, but for a collectable example this one has a few too many mods (they are mostly period correct, if that softens the blow). It is certain to appreciate, but will never be a green frame 750SS or MHe. And while I don't want to nitpick (but seem to be doing so anyway), new tires put on in 1994 are simply old tires. And yet I really like this bike, the condition it is in, and it's current state. And I would ride the snot out of it because the Ducati Supersport is a fantastic platform. The opening bid on this one is a cool $10k. That would be in the range of fair money for a good SL today, but starting the bidding that high might be why there have been no takers. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and let us know your thoughts. Did you ever lust after a Superlight? Good Luck!!

MI

Limited Edition: 1992 Ducati Superlight
Bimota August 30, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1993/1994 Bimota DB2 for Sale

Update 9.18.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! Email information removed. -dc

Update 9.14.2017: Price drop to $9,000! -dc

Update 9.7.2017: Price dropped again for our readers to $9,900! -dc

Update 8.30.2017: Now on eBay with a major price drop to $10,500! Good luck to buyers and seller. -dc

The Bimota DB2 isn't the fastest or even the rarest bike to wear the Bimota name, but it is among the most successful and helped pave the way for the raft of DB models that followed: we're currently up to the DB13 or something. By their nature, Bimotas are mutts, with proprietary frames and bodywork, but outsourced engines and that may be why used 1990s Bimotas are relatively affordable, considering how exotic they are. It also might be their unreliable reputation: light and fast they may be, but the 90s models especially have a reputation for kit-bike quality. Somehow, the air-cooled Ducati-engined models have managed to avoid that notoriety, so perhaps the Italian electrical gremlins of both marques cancel each other out?

The original DB1, the first Bimota to be powered by an Italian engine, sold well enough [approximately 600 units] that it basically saved the company from ruin. For the DB2, Ducati supplied their six-speed-backed, 904cc air and oil-cooled v-twin. Any bike powered by the two-valve Pantah engine needs to be light if it's going to be fast, and the DB2 is very light. At a claimed 373lbs dry and with beefy Paioli RWU forks and adjustable Öhlins suspension at the rear, the svelte Bimota can make the most of its 86 claimed horses.

It's the perfect canyon-carver with nimble handling and a punchy motor tuned for midrange. The fact that it's one of Bimota's best-looking efforts doesn't hurt either, with swoopy, fully-enclosed or half-faired bodywork, a tubular trellis frame similar to the original Ducati part in terms of looks but not geometry, and a tubular swingarm to match. Period reviewers complained about the Yamaha-sourced headlight but it's less obvious now and fits the lines of the bike perfectly.

Some DB2 graphics are a bit too close to some sort of "urban camouflage" for comfort, but this simple white and red design look great, while also being very 90s in the best possible way. Confused about why this one is listed as a 1993/1994 model? The seller explains in more detail but basically: the VIN indicates a 1993 bike but the title lists it as a 1994.

From the Seller: 1993/1994 Bimota DB2 for Sale

The VIN of this bike ZES1DB214PRZES001 shows it being the first US bike of the first year of production.  The VIN's 10th character is a "P" which means it's a 1993, the VIN sticker says it was made 6/93.  But for some reason the title states 1994.  It is one of 408 in the world.  I tried to contact Bimota to get and understanding of what being number 1 really means, they didn't reply. I doubt it's the FIRST DB2.  But whatever it is cool.  Currently the bike has 1921 miles.  I've had the bike about a year, I bought it from a collector in San Diego.  While I've owned it I've gone over the bike from top to bottom, I've listed the work and the parts out below.  I've ridden her about 300 miles and she goes as good as she looks.  This bike really needs nothing except maybe some lines to replace the unsightly (but functioning) blue Kevlar lines.  I have more pictures of the bike if you have questions about something or a certain area I can send them to you. 

Work:

  • Cleaned carbs
  • Replaced belts
  • Check valves (in spec)
  • Replace tires (still have originals)
  • Replaced windshield (still have crack original)
  • Changed all fluids (brake, clutch, engine)
  • Repaired minor scuff on tail
  • Serviced battery
  • Re-powder coated wheels
  • Replaced brake and clutch levers
  • Replaced some minor bits of hardware with matching zinc plated parts

Asking price is $12,500 $10,500 $9,900.

Around 400 DB2s were built, which is pretty much volume production for Bimota. They don't come up for sale often, but are typically in immaculate condition as they were always collectible. The question is: how do folks own these bikes and only put 300 miles on them?! At least the seller has taken exceptionally good care of the bike while it's been in his possession, and the low mileage means the next owner can put a few more on without adversely impacting its value!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1993/1994 Bimota DB2 for Sale