Posts by tag: 851

Ducati September 12, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1,600-mile 1991 Ducati 851 Strada Biposta

Today's featured 1991 Ducati 851 Strada is an excellent specimen of the machine that pushed Ducati from the pages of history and far into the modern era. It was the first bike to rumble out of Bologna wearing Desmoquattro heads and fuel injection and it settled once and for all that Ducatis should be red.

1991 Ducati 851 on Nashville Craigslist

Added to its newfound technical prowess, the 851 was as adept at capturing imaginations as it was at collecting speeding tickets. A spate of race wins didn't hurt, but the bike's purposeful stance, impeccable color scheme, Guns of Navarone sound and dare-to-be-different attitude built an aura that wins alone cannot.

Mechanically, the 851 was at once innovative and regressive. The desmodromic heads on the Pantah-based 851cc v-twin, were from a time before cantilevers had given way to valve springs. But there were four valves per bank, and though it revved low, the engine made great use of electronic fuel injection and high compression to push out about 100 horses. Long after everyone else had moved on, Ducati was making good with rattly old-world technology.

That big, laconic mill was stuffed into the brand's signature steel trellis frame rails and hung with Ohlins suspension on each end, which meant that the 851 was light, flickable and fast, and offered totally different power characteristics to its Japanese competitors. Where the beasts from the East needed to be wrung out past 10,000 rpm to really scare you, the 851 did the job just shy of 10,000, with a rumble rather than a shriek.

This 851 has spent the majority of its 26 years with one owner, covering well under 2,000 miles before coming into our seller's hands. Blemishes on this bike are limited to a few pox on some of the aluminum pieces and some age marks in front of the rear tire. The seller claims it was stored inside its whole life and has never seen rain, and its condition backs that up.

If you plan to ride the bike, you would do well to replace its aged Pirellis. The seller doesn't mention them, but we'd be surprised if they are not the original set.

From the Craigslist post:

For Sale: Museum Quality 1991 Ducati 851 Strada Biposta Superbike but made for the road. It is a one-owner bike with approximately 1,605 miles on it (yes less than 2k miles) always stored inside and properly and meticulously maintained throughout its 26 year life. Bike has never seen or been ridden in the rain. You could search long and hard but you will not find one in this condition and with this few miles. I have all documentation from the original dealer invoice, ownership card, original owners manual, two original keys, full shop manual, original race stand, original brochure, and many other documents, articles, magazines featuring the bike as well as all of the maintenance records. Over $2k recently spent on full maintenance by Ducati Dealer. This is a bike that will only go up in value over the years. Current valuations on Hagerty's puts the value of the bike between $25k-$30k (see below)

Specifications:
Manufacturer Ducati
Production 1987-1992
Successor Ducati 888
Class Sport bike
Engine - 851 cc (52 cu in), 90° V-twin, fuel injected
Power - 93.00 hp (67.9 kW)) @ 9,600 rpm
Transmission - 6 speed, chain drive
Frame type -Tubular steel trellis frame
Brakes -Front: Dual disc - Rear: Single disc
Tires -Front: 120/70-17
Rear: 180/55-17
Weight ~430 lb (200 kg) (dry)
Fuel capacity 20 litres (5.3 US gal)

This bike is a dream to ride and will stand out from all of the other bikes. You rarely ever see these bikes. I purchased the bike to add to my collection and will keep it if it does not sell. Only willing to sell if the price is right. Again, this bike will only go up in value. No rides without cash in hand. Clean and clear title in hand. Bike is as-is with no written or implied warranties. The pictures do not do this bike justice. It is a rare find.

Feel free to call, email or text with questions. Due to the scammers out there, I will not respond to suspicious emails or text messages. If the ad is up then the bike is still for sale. I will delete upon selling the bike.

The seller's ask is between Hagerty's assessment for one of these in between #2 and #3 condition, according to the supplied value chart. If the pictures are anything to go on, we'd say that is right in line.

 

Featured Listing: 1,600-mile 1991 Ducati 851 Strada Biposta
Ducati July 18, 2017 posted by

“For Off Road Use Only”: 1992 Ducati 888 Corsa for Sale

Update 7.18.17: We originally saw this 888 Corsa last September and the seller was reportedly looking for $75k. This bike is back on eBay and has a buy-it-now of $60k. Links are updated. -dc

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This Ducati 888 Corsa isn't some roadbike that was stripped of lights and accessories. It is one of a claimed 30 built in 1992 explicitly for racing and came ready for battle, naked except for the parts both inside and out needed to make it go fast and be competitive in World Superbike racing.

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Powered by a liquid-cooled, four-valve development of Ducati's air and oil-cooled Desmo L-twin engine, the 851 and later 888 marked Ducati's return to relevance. The air-cooled bikes certainly handled well, but were significantly down on outright power and, as the Japanese Big Four continued the rapid development of their four-cylinder sportbikes, just couldn't compete in terms of outright performance.

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Hung in one of their tubular trellis-style frames, the new Desmoquattro featured fuel injection and generally made less peak horsepower than competing four-cylinders, but produced its torque-rich power across a wider range, allowing riders to get on the power sooner for better drive out of corners. That, in addition to the displacement advantage granted to them compared to the 750cc inline fours, gave the new four-valve Ducatis a significant advantage, and they were very successful in World Superbike with the 851, 888, and later with their 916.

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From the original eBay listing: 1992 Ducati 888 Corsa for Sale

This bike is one of 30.
Only 30 were produced in 1992 for Ducati race teams.
Don't know how many are left in the world.
The bike has Termignoni exhaust.
The front brakes are one carbon rotor and one conventional rotor.
Bike is titled as an off road track only but it is titled.
From 1989 to 1992 the frame was white and a red body.

Unfortunately, the listing doesn't include any information about the bike's history. As a race bike, there's likely been an evolving roster of components, unless the bike's been off the road for a long time, and I wonder what's going on under the skin. Witness the mismatched front discs that use two different materials and the modern radial front brake and clutch master cylinders. The bike is obviously clean and in excellent shape, and bidders don't seem put off by the spare listing: at almost $32,000 the reserve has not been met and there are still several days left on the auction.

-tad

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“For Off Road Use Only”: 1992 Ducati 888 Corsa for Sale
Ducati March 29, 2017 posted by

Museum Piece: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

For connoisseurs, the Ducati 851 is the Bolognese superbike to have: it's not as obvious or uncomfortable as a 916, and it was the first of the four-valve breed, the speartip of Ducati's new push to be relevant to the modern sportbike world. The air-cooled, two-valve Pantah may be a classic, charismatic engine, but it couldn't possibly hope to compete against liquid-cooled, sixteen-valve inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike series that was meant to showcase the very best production-based motorcycles in wheel-to-wheel competition. So Ducati added four-valve heads and liquid-cooling to their venerable L-Twin and quickly found success: a displacement advantage helped to offset the outright power gap compared to the four-cylinder bikes, and handling was excellent.

Styling is more "functionally elegant" than "dripping with sex," but that means humane ergonomics and less flash for Ducati fans more interested in performance than posing. And although the bike's 93hp isn't huge by today's standards, it has the famous Ducati torque that's gone missing from bikes like the 1199 as they've chased revs and horsepower to compete with the fours. The low-mount dual exhausts seem to sound much better than the 916's undertail system, for some reason, and they're also obviously much less likely to roast sensitive parts of your anatomy.

Early four-valve bikes like the 851 and 888 can get expensive to maintain if you don't do some of the work yourself: frequent regular belt changes and valve-adjustments don't require pricey parts, but are labor-intensive at standard shop rates. They can be fickle, but the slow evolution of these bikes' hard parts mean spares shouldn't be too difficult to track down. In general, the rule with Ducatis is: buy wisely or pay the price, as a "cheap" example can quickly become a very expensive proposition. Luckily, today's bike avoids that by being fastidiously maintained and enthusiast-owned.

From the original eBay listing: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

I purchased this bike in June of 1991 and have been the only owner since the bike was new.  I purchased the bike from Dunbar Motorsports in Brockton, Massachusetts.  The bike is currently located in Atlanta, Georgia.

The bike is in near-pristine condition, and is a desirable bike for a collection, or as a concours bike, or just as a daily rider.

Here is literally every flaw I could find, no matter how minor.  All of these minor bumps and bruises are shown in the photographs:

  • There is a very small chip in the fiberglass on the removable pillion cover that covers the passenger’s seat (see photo #8)
  • There is a very small area on the right muffler where it is rough (see photo #9).  I lent the bike to my brother soon after I got it, and he managed to drop the bike while just sitting on it (!).  The only things damaged were the right side fairing and right side mirror, a small area on the muffler and, of course, my brother’s pride.  He replaced the fairing and mirror with factory new parts (this was quite some time ago when it was still possible to get factory new parts), but the damage to the muffler was so minor that I couldn’t ask him to replace it.  Note that this was the only time in its life that the bike was dropped.
  • There is a VERY minor stress crack in the fiberglass on the front fairing (see photo #10).
  • There are 3 small parallel cracks in the paint on the frame near the right foot peg (see photo #11).
  • The rubber cover for the brake light switch is dry and starting to crack (see photo #12).

As I said, all very minor.  Other than these minor flaws, the bike is in pristine condition, and is exactly as it rolled off the showroom floor in 1991 -- down to the original Michelin Hi-Sport tires which are still in good shape (though I might recommend changing them out if you plan to take many tight corners, as they are 26 years old!).  There have been no aftermarket modifications whatsoever.

The bike was completely serviced last fall by Ducshop in Marietta, Georgia (http://ducshop.com), including belts, fluids, battery, etc.  The bike has a clear Georgia title, is registered and insured, and ridden periodically to keep its legs stretched.  The bike runs perfectly, and is a real thrill to ride.

The bike comes with all of its paperwork, including the service records, original Owner’s Identification Card, original Purchase and Warranty Registration, original Bill of Sale from the dealer (the bike cost $12,350 in 1991), and the original Owner’s Manual.  The bike also comes with a race stand that the dealer originally included with the sale of the bike (the bike has never been raced or has even been on a track).

The bike is the Strada (street) model of the 851 Superbike.  Like all Superbikes, it has the 8-valve (4 per cylinder), fuel injected “desmodromic” engine (the valves are both opened and closed by a cam to eliminate any possibility of valve float at high RPM).

The 851 Superbike model was first launched in 1987.  With its powerful liquid-cooled, fuel injected, 8-valve V-twin desmo engine, its signature steel tube trellis frame, Brembo brakes and Marzocchi suspension, it heralded the start of the modern era for Ducati.  Built for the fledgling World SuperBike series, Ducati quickly won three World SuperBike crowns in a row 1990-1992, with Frenchman Raymond Roche aboard the 1990 851, and Doug Polen riding an 851 bored out to 888cc.

The unfortunate thing about a bike like this is that part of the value is derived from the low miles and originality, a shame since these are great riders' bikes. In addition, that functional styling means a riding position that won't outright murder your spine, so the low mileage is doubly tragic. In such sharp condition, I have no doubt this one will find a very happy buyer: bidding is already up to $8,950 with several days left on the auction.

-tad

Museum Piece: Low-Mileage, One-Owner 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale
Ducati March 4, 2017 posted by

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

If you're looking to get close to your racing heroes, style yourself a Very Serious Motorcyclist™, or just like the idea of riding something with genuine links to legitimate race bikes, homologation specials offer their owners a taste of the trick parts and lightweight performance available to professional racers, all in a streetable package. This 851 Tricolore wears its Italian heritage proudly, and takes things a bit beyond what you'd normally expect in terms of road-legal performance: its about as close to a road-legal race bike as you're likely to find.

The 916 gets most of the fame and is more instantly recognizable, but it's really the earlier 851, introduced in 1987, that paved the way for Ducati's World Superbike success and the company's return to racing glory. The older Pantah-derived air-cooled L-twin engines were certainly high-performance motors in their day, but had been long-since eclipsed by the inline fours from Japan, and Ducati needed something new if they wanted to compete on relatively equal footing with 750cc inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike Championship.

Ducati kept the proven foundation of their v-twin, but added liquid cooling and brand new four-valve heads to create their "Desmoquattro" that pumped out 93hp along with plenty of fat midrange torque and gave the newly introduced 851 the performance to compete, factoring in a bit of a displacement bump that allowed the twins approximate parity with the smaller, revvier inline fours. Wrapped around that heavily updated engine was Ducati's distinctive trellis frame and chunky bodywork, along with ergonomics that were considered extreme at the time, but seem positively luxurious compared to the masochistic 916 that came later... For a while there, the 851 and the 888 that followed were less desirable than the gorgeous 916. But as they say, "familiarity breeds contempt" and with so many of Tamburini's masterpiece running around, it's hard not to be a bit blasé about them now. But the 916 would never have existed without the success of the 851 and that functional bodywork has a style all its own.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

One of 207 homologation "kit bikes"!
Frame Number: ZDM3HB6T6JB850034
Engine Number: HB6J850032

It was the Ducati 851 that first served notice that high-performance sportbikes and World Superbike racing would no longer be Japanese-only affairs. Where before Ducatis made do with simple air-cooled motors, the 851 had liquid-cooling, four-valve desmodromic cylinder heads and electronic fuel-injection. In 1990 Raymond Roche rode a factory 851 to the World Superbike championship, the first of 13 titles to date for Ducati.

World Superbike racers were required to be based on production streetbikes. One way to get the highest-specification base model possible was to build homologation specials – expensive, limited-edition versions that needed relatively minor modification to be track-ready. Ducati took this so-called "kit bike" approach with the 851 Superbike. Just 207 of these nominally street-legal machines were hand-built, enough to satisfy World Superbike rules, with an estimated 20 examples coming to the U.S.

 Differences from showroom stock include a braced swingarm, close-ratio gearbox, ventilated dry clutch and lightweight magnesium Marvic wheels. No speedometer, just a tachometer and temperature gauge. The motor was upgraded with race-grind camshafts, a hot-rodded electronic control unit, ram-air duct and free-breathing reverse-cone mufflers. It was good for about 120 horsepower.

One of the other differences is a round ring on the seat, which is explained by an amusing folk tale: the claim is that some Ducati employee placed a hot espresso maker on the mold before production, causing a slight deformation in the seat.

The Tri-Colore 851 kit bike on offer has been made fully street-legal, and is titled and registered. Globe-type turn signals mounted in the handlebar ends satisfy the DMV. The original owner was a local Southern California collector of some very interesting and important bikes, particularly Italian, low production machines. He mounted a bicycle speedometer with magnet on the front hub to further satisfy the DMV and clocked 2600 miles. The second owner kept the bike in his private museum of very exclusive Italian machinery and removed the speedo for display.

Mechanically, the bike is in excellent condition. The engine starts easily, idles smoothly and runs well. The bike shifts easily though all gears with a nice clutch action. Brakes, suspension and all electrical systems work perfectly. The new owner should be mindful of tire-pressure as the scuff-free magnesium wheels are notoriously porous. And it sounds fantastic!

Cosmetically, the bike is exquisite, showing light patina conducive with age and mileage. This is truly a Superbike for the street, with impeccable ownership history and is accompanied by a substantial document file, keys, and a clean, clear California title. A great opportunity to own a truly rare and exotic Italian icon.

So what does this piece of Ducati history cost? Well the asking price is $31,900 which is obviously very steep for an 851, but a bit of a bargain compared to the last one of these that was up for sale. This appears to be a different bike, considering that one had never had gas in it or been started, whereas this one has had a bit of use and a couple of concessions to road use added. The small bar-end mirrors are a modern addition, but aren't obtrusive and suit the bike's minimal-road-equipment style compared to the big, chunky, fairing-mounted original road-equipment parts or a more 80s set of "Napoleon" bar-end mirrors. The seller claims that just 207 of these homologation 851s were built in 1988 to meet World Superbike requirements and it looks to be in excellent shape, with just enough wear to suggest that it's in original, well-preserved condition. This is, as the seller says, literally a superbike for the street, with just enough road equipment to keep things legal-ish but not distract from your World Superbike fantasies. Hopefully, anyone that buys this will continue to put a few weekend miles on it from time-to-time!

-tad

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale
Ducati November 8, 2016 posted by

Signature Strada – 1990 Ducati 851

Built for the fledgling World SuperBike series, the Ducati 851 was the first in a long series of desmoquattros, and successful on the track and in the showroom.  At one time a commuter ( ! ) this 851 is lightly updated but is way ahead of the curve maintenance-wise.

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1990 Ducati 851 for sale on eBay

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20161107-1990-ducati-851-right-front-wheel  20161107-1990-ducati-851-binnacle

Cagiva's investment in Ducati allowed them to continue development of the 4-valve desmo engine, resulting in 105hp from the Weber-injected twin.  The white trellis-framed bike is quite true to concept with Marzocchi suspension front and rear, as well as big Brembo brakes and 17-inch Marvic wheels.  Stylists blacked out part of the fairing lowers, completing a very successful swoop of the seat fairing, which matches the mufflers and is capped by a removal pillion cover.

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Cleaning up real nice for its 42K miles, this 851 has been repainted, but in the factory RED and looks great.  Updates include Conti reverse-cone mufflers, Pro Italia +5 chip and 40-tooth rear sprocket.  Good maintenance history with recent clutch, master and slave cylinders, Samco hoses, and Öhlins monoshock in addition to belts and fluids.  The owner sums up in the eBay auction:

In the early '90s, a previous owner commuted from Sacramento to San Francisco (175 miles of highway) on this 851 and that’s where about 30k miles came from. This bike is in its prime and ready for years of continued use. It's reliable, well sorted and making excellent power.
Some highlights:
- Valve clearances were checked and all were in spec (shows stability) at 37,304 miles.
- Belts were again renewed during a major service at 40,111 miles.
- ProItalia +5 chip.
- 40 tooth rear sprocket (original is 39) helps a bit with acceleration and makes 6th gear usable at legal speeds (original gearing is very tall for noise regulations).
- Signed by Doug Polen (1991, 1992 World Superbike Champion - Ducati 851) at The Quail in 2014.
- “Flying D” vented clutch cover, period correct upgrade to keep clutch cool and let dust escape.
- BMW 12 V accessory outlet (near Ohlins reservoir) for charging your cell phone, powering your heated vest, etc. or charging the bike’s battery when being stored).
- No fork leaks and has neoprene protective wraps.

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Ducati won three WSBK crowns in a row 1990-1992, with Frenchman Raymond Roche aboard the 1990 851 and tailcone signatory Doug Polen riding an 851 bored out to 888cc.  The effect on the factory's health was exactly what the organizers had hoped, and crowds awaited the Monster in 1993.  Surprisingly nice for the odometer reading, the 851 presented here has been well-loved, especially recently as the maintenance history shows.  While it's not a more desirable SP or 888, this could be a great chance for a bargain hunter to get on a Ducati treasured for its sporting purity...

-donn

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Signature Strada – 1990 Ducati 851
Ducati October 28, 2016 posted by

851 with extra grunt: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO

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1993 Ducati 888 SPO for sale on eBay

Back in the late 1980's/early 1990's, Ducati was turning things around.  The bologna-based company had developed its 851 engine back in 1987 and the fuel injected L-twin engine was powerful, reliable and had brought Ducati something it had not had for many years; racing success.  But the Ducati bosses recognized that even though their 851 machines were doing well on the track, something more powerful was needed to keep pace with the competition, especially since the big Japanese firms had decided to focus development on not only power but also improved handling and light weight.   The simplest solution for Ducati was to increase the bore size to 888 while working on their next gen bike, the epic 916, hence the Ducati 888 series was born.    This post is for a SPO version, which was the 1993 edition (the 1994 edition was designed as the 888 Limited Edition).

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The 888SPO was a bit of a band-aid bike for Ducati. The company originally intended to bring its race replica SP5 bike into the US but couldn't get them past D.O.T requirements.  So for the US market Ducati took their European 888 Strada which was basically just an 851 with an 888cc engine in it and added some top shelf SP5 components such as a single seat, up-swept exhaust system and upgraded Ohlins shock system to create the 888 SPO for 1993.  According to the Ducatiforums, approximately 290 were built for the US market

NOTE: For 1994 the 888 got even more top shelf goodies and was named the 888 Limited.  According to the Ducati forums, only 100 888 Limited editions were imported for the US market.

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What was the 888 like to own/ride?  Here is a review by Visordown

"By far the best were the Öhlins-kitted SPs, culminating with the best-of-the-bunch SP5 in 1993. But like anything exotic and Italian, getting the best out of an 888 requires experience, knowledge, patience and money. The factory's base suspension settings were all over the shop making a good 888 class-leadingly stunning and a bad one worse than a poorly rebuilt write-off with flat tyres, square wheels and a chocolate frame.

But the key to the 888s celebrity status isn't the fact that it's drop-dead gorgeous, vastly fast, or rewarding to ride. It can indeed be all of those things, granted, but because the factory produced so few by today's mass-manufacturing standards, it's the 888's scarcity that adds volumes to its value and appeal. The 888 is the biking equivalent of a Ferrari 250GTO, and that dear reader, is why you want one."

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This particular 888 looks to be in great shape with the only non-OEM item I am seeing being the tank scratch/bump pad.  Also I think the rear license plate mount might have been cut down a bit/"profiled".

The seller includes good information regarding maintenance in the ebay listing, which is always a good sign.  Here are the highlights of what the seller has to say:

  • For sale is my beloved 1993 Ducati 888 Sport Production (h)Omologation (SPO).  Maintained to be a daily driver but only used when sunny and dry.
  • Factory original bodywork and never been dropped or repaired, every switch and lever works as intended from the factory.
  • Belts, timing and all fluids serviced within the last 1000 miles.
  • I believe I am the third owner after purchasing from a close friend who cared for her similarly. All original with the exception of the following:
    • Fast by Ferracci carbon fiber exhaust
    • Fast by Ferracci power chip
    • Fast by Ferracci carbon fiber front fender (identical to 1994 888 SPO LTD)
    • Fast by Ferracci fuel cap
    • Fuel tank lined and sealed
    • Fuel tank pad
    • Lithium battery (Feb2016)
    • Performance silicone blue brake and clutch lines
    • Profiled rear fender
    • European high power headlight
    • Battery tender quick release plug

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So what is this lovely redhead worth?   The entire 888 series is pretty rare, with slightly less than 400 brought into the USA over the two year run, so its going to be of interest to both investment-oriented collectors and fans of the period.  The near OEM condition of this will also likely impact the price.  The only concern would be that mileage is about 16,000 which can be an issue if the bike hasn't had proper maintenance but the info provided by the seller should make this one has been taken care of.

Prices for the Ducati 888 SPO's and Limiteds we have posted previously on RSBFS  seem to show a current market value of about $10,000 USD, more for bikes that have had some upgrades.  The current bid price on this one is at $7,300 USD and the reserve has been met so this one will definitely be moving on to a new owner after the auction ends.   Overall, this seems to be an opportunity for a relatively safe acquisition of a limited edition Ducati that will probably appreciate over time.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

851 with extra grunt:  1993 Ducati 888 SPO