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Posts by tag: 750ss

Ducati July 10, 2018 posted by

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

The original listing for this 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica includes some good general information, but I'd love more specific details about the components. The seller mentions the frame was supplied by Roy Thersby, but did he build the frame, modify the frame, or just paint it? At a glance, it appears to be from a 90s SuperSport, which makes sense, considering the rest of the running gear. So it appears that what we're dealing with here is a fully-built 90s 750SS with brilliant retro-bodywork and paint. And headlamps. Those massive, retina-burning headlamps.

The original TT2 that inspired this build was a lightweight, Pantah-powered racebike displacing 597cc with a Verlicchi frame and Marzocchi suspension. Built between 1980 and 1984 the bike was very successful in competition and ultimately spawned the Ducati F1 road bike.

The engine in this replica is a 750, but it's looks to be the 90s version, since both carburetors live in the engine's vee: the 80s Pantah-engined bikes had both facing rearward, with the vertical cylinder's jutting out awkwardly towards the rider's knee. And the wheels are clearly 17" parts, in keeping with the 90s theme. Great for finding modern, sticky rubber, but not the most authentic-looking, if that's the goal, since the original used 18" hoops. And why choose non-adjustable front forks on this bike? Even set up properly, I'm surprised the builder didn't at least use the adjustable units available on certain 900SS models, since the upside-down forks give the game away anyway that this isn't really an 80s race bike.

Not doubting the craftsmanship, but there are some other choices I'm not big on, starting with the Koso instruments. I'm sure they're reliable and legible, but I don't really like them on recent Bimotas and I really don't like them on a retro-looking special. Something classic from MotoGadget would have given similar function with a much more appropriate look. The bar-end signals are a cool touch, but a bit too shiny for my taste and the grips and Union Jack tank pad are way too modern. And the M4 exhaust is perfectly fine on a GSX-R750 but a "classic" Ducati? But all that is relatively easy to change to suit the new owner's preferences anyway.

If it sounds like I don't like this bike, you'd be wrong: I'm really just picking nits and all of these minor issues are easily forgotten, looking at the red-and-yellow bodywork and those awesome endurance-racing headlamps. And although the listing doesn't go into too much detail regarding the engine, the Pantah engine can be tuned to make good power and, in a lightweight package, should make for a very entertaining bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

For the Ducati connoisseur, this beauty will enhance any collection. Frame came from British Ducati legend Roy Thersby. The bike was built by vintage Ducati guru Scot Wilson as his personal ride. Scot is the owner of Italian Iron Classics in Tucson, AZ. I've had the pleasure of owning a couple of Scot Wilson's builds and they are very carefully planned and meticulously executed.

The 750 engine was built by Tom Hull of Phoenix to "Pro-Thunder" standards with Carrillo rods, dual spark, lightened internals and all the special bits you'd expect. The engine was moth-balled after a rule change, acquired for this build and has about 1,000 miles on it. 40mm Del Ortos, fork set by Computrack. GP shift but could be changed. The bike was just serviced, all fluids changed, fuel tank cleaned, carbs cleaned and carefully checked over. It's ready to go.

The bike is street legal, has a clear Massachusetts title and goes like crazy. Headlights are Hella style as used for endurance racing. Bar-end turn signals are installed so the bike will pass my state registration inspection. The paint is as good as it gets and looks as fresh as the day it came from the painter's shop. If you are looking at this bike I don't have to tell you about Ducati F1-R's or TT2's. I've had the opportunity to do a (very careful) track day at a Ducati event and the bikes gets lots of attention. If the track's not your thing you could proudly show it at any event and it would draw a crowd.

While undeniably cool, bikes like this are always tricky when it comes to determining value. They're not collectible in the conventional sense, in that they're not real race bikes or limited-production factory machines: they've been built using high-quality components, but they're basically really nice lash-ups, "bitsas" made from the very best bits. Of course, a real TT2 would likely sell for far more than the $22,500 the seller is asking, and considering the quality and names attached, I'm thinking this is a pretty damn good deal as long as the lack of originality doesn't bother you, and you're ready for the snobs to give you static when they ask you "is it real?" But honestly, if anyone gives you a problem, you should just blind them with those massive Hella lamps.

-tad

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale
Ducati September 22, 2017 posted by

Less Popular Duck: 1992 Ducati 750SS

The 1990s were good for Ducati and Ducatsi alike. On the Superbike side, the 851 paved the way for the 888 and the amazing 916. But it was the offerings across the Super Sport line that really broadened the marque's appeal. Consider the original 900SS, augmented by the Super Light (SL), the Sport Production (SP), and the Cafe Racer (CR) in both full and half fairing versions. The CR model was further bifurcated into the 900SS and the 750SS. The latter is one of the most under rated motorcycles from Bologna - and quite limited in numbers (i.e. rare) in its own right.

1992 Ducati 750SS for sale on eBay

Essentially a 900SS CR model on a diet, the 750 SS offers the same visceral motoring experience as its bigger brother. Sure, it makes due with a few less cubic centimeters and a couple of fewer ponies (66 vs 84 HP), but the ride is essentially the same. It utilizes the same air cooled L-twin, spins its cams by rubber belts, and opens the valves in the same Desmo manner. By the numbers, the 750SS is nearly 20 pounds lighter with the remainder of the running gear and chassis being identical. The 750 model, as a result of its lighter weight and lower power numbers, achieves braking performance via a single disk up front. What you give up is approximately 3-4 tenths down the quarter mile, and about 10-12 mph of top speed. The rest is pure Ducati goodness in a more rare format.

From the seller:
1992 Ducati 750SS Great Shape, runs great just had carbs cleaned and new fork seals. Left side fairing has been repaired no decals have been replaced, right side fairing has some spiedering around bolt hole, scratches on left side exhaust a couple of small scratches where seat is rubbing see photos. over all bike is in great shape.

The Ducati Super Sport lineup is a popular one. Parts are plentiful, as is knowledge of how to service and maintain these machines. Because the 750SS is based on the 900, many parts are interchangeable. So popular was this model that in European markets there is also a 350cc, 400cc and 600cc model - which are all patterned after this 750SS. The Super Sport is the kind of motorcycle that has the bones to last; it may not be the fastest in a straight line, but with gobs of torque, a stiff chassis and willing suspension, a 750SS can motor very swiftly indeed.

Today's bike is the rare 750cc variant. The seller claims that it has a new left side fairing, and the exhaust has some scratches on the same side. That is pretty convincing evidence of a tip over - but does not necessarily mean a high speed off. This era Ducati has a spring-loaded kickstand that retracts as soon as the bike is picked up. Many bikes suffer inadvertent cosmetic damage in this manner, always on the left. It would not shock me to discover that this damage is minor and the result of the infamous self-retracting stand. Otherwise it looks to be in good shape, has reasonable miles (these bikes beg to be ridden), and is available for what feels like a song. You might wish to inquire as to the whereabouts of the original mirrors, however. This bike is not likely to appreciate any time soon, but it will always be appreciated; you would be hard pressed to find a more solid, long-term bike for your stable. Check it out here, and be sure and jump back to the Comments to share your thoughts. Have you ever been bitten by the wretched Ducati self-retracting stand? Let us know. Good Luck!!

MI

Less Popular Duck: 1992 Ducati 750SS
Ducati July 25, 2017 posted by

Big Green: 1974 Ducati 750 Supersport

When it comes to really famous, really collectable Ducatis, it is hard not to imagine the image of a green frame 750ss. Created by Ducati to celebrate the dominance of the 750cc race bikes, the Supersport has become THE streetable icon of a bygone era of brute mechanical setup and rider bravery. Devoid of electronics, slipper clutches, big brakes, sophisticated suspension or even modern tire technology, bikes of this time relied upon the skill of the rider to adjust to conditions - exactly what Paul Smart did to triumph at the 1972 Imola 200. The green frame 750 Supersport was intended as a tribute, but grew to be a tremendous success on its own. Today more people know about the street 750ss than the Italian race (and racer) that inspired it's creation.

1974 Ducati 750 Supersport for sale on eBay

In the early 1970s, Ducati really wanted to win - which is what the likes of Norton and MV Agusta were doing. In what is now familiar Ducati fashion, they did what any manufacturer would do: they threw piles of money at it (although much of this was sweat equity and ingenuity, as Ducati was still a small manufacturer). The 500cc racer's frame was developed by UK frame maker and famed GP racer designer Colin Seeley. Ducati developled the engines in-house, and shipped Seeley early prototype cases to help finalize the bike design. By 1971 - with test rider Mike Hailwood - it was determined that the Seeley frame was too light for the 750cc class. Fabio Taglioni, chief designer and technical director of Ducati, had already incorporated some of Seeley's design elements into a heavier, street bike frame. That was modified to become the legendary racer; yet victory was initially elusive. With mechanical failures having been sorted out in 1971 season (best finish was Phil Read's second to yet another Agostini win), Ducati pulled out all the stops. They fielded a total of EIGHT bikes for the 1972 Imola 200 race, and managed to pull off first and second against the likes of MV Agusta, Norton and Honda factory efforts. It was this victory that cemented Ducati's racing reputation - and the foundation for the street machine.

From the seller:
Genuine Greenframe . Exceptional condition . Currently in Great Britain . I will airfreight to Australia for the successful bidder . Prices are going nuts on these . Buy now or be priced out of the market forever .
Engine number 075318 DM750.1
Frame number DM750SS 075061

Note : Bike is for sale in Great Britain . Will sell to however meets my price .

It's the real thing and 99% correct, sold new in Germany and been there all its life until now, restored some years back and in a private collection for the past 20 years.
It’s very original with a few small details that aren’t correct but all the major components are in very good shape and correct like the rims, cases, frame and yes I think the glasswork is original but its difficult to be 100% sure on this as it could also be 30 year old repro stuff, but whatever it is it's certainly not new or fresh.

It's been re painted in the past. The parts that are non- original as far as I can tell are:
Later Tomaselli Daytona throttle.
Lefthand hi/lo/horn switch
Malossi inlet manifolds and later PHM 40mm Dell’Ortos
> I have bought one original carb so far .
Alloy mesh on original bellmouths
Drilled front brake discs
Later Marzocchi rear shock absorbers < I have a set of original shocks . Headlamp bracket painted green instead of satin black Both front fairing brackets cut down to take one bolt instead of two There is also a broken fin on the rear cylinder. Easy to repair . A front Brembo master cylinder fitted but the original Scarab comes with it. Mechanically its excellent and runs and rides superbly, the condition is very nice but you can see it's not a fresh restoration.

The 1974 Ducati 750 Supersport has often been referred to as one of the most beautiful motorcycles ever produced. The Gugenheim museum highlighted the green frame prominently in their exhibit "The Art of Motorcycle." And collector value for these bikes has soared - to what many consider unreasonable levels. Built by Ducati's race shop in limited numbers (401 is the generally accepted number), this was a true race replica. Sporting triple disk brakes (claimed to be the first street bike to offer this feature), and the cases right out of the racer, the 750ss street bike made concessions for the road; a strengthened crankshaft, provisions for an oil cooler (although none was originally fitted), and different carburetors. The green frame Ducati is said to be the only round case, bevel drive desmo bike produced for the street. The bike even retains the racer's semi-transparent stripe on the tank; a no-need-for-a-gauge solution to determining fuel levels.

This is collector-grade machinery, and with it comes a collector-grade price tag. The opening ask for this auction is a cool $190,000 USD - with a reserve in place. The bike was originally sold in Germany, however it now resides in the UK. At this price, only museums, small countries, or heirs to the Microsoft fortune need apply. But it is good to dream, right? To find a nearly original 1974 Ducati 750ss in this type of condition is a mega-rare event, and you can be assured it will not repeat any time soon. Check it out here and good luck!!

MI

Big Green: 1974 Ducati 750 Supersport
Ducati June 23, 2016 posted by

SuperSleeper – 1993 Ducati 750 SuperSport

In the Ducati line-up from 1974-2007, the SuperSport has often been the sportiest Ducati, but more lately the second-sportiest.  Using the air-cooled Desmodue when the SuperBikes had radiators and four valve heads, and often available in smaller displacements, the SuperSports often had half-fairings and a corner of the showroom away from the window.  This SS has been studiously upgraded and looks like a great combination of factory design and up-market parts.

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss left

1993 Ducati 750 SuperSport for sale on eBay

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss right

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss right front

Easy on the eyes and maintenance, this 750SS has been taken into a new realm with a 855 cc engine kit.  Around the light trellis frame, the 851-ish factory fairing looks great and has been augmented with carbon fenders, harmonizing with the black engine cases.  Dual exhaust has been lightened with a two-into-one system.  Brakes aren't always an area of strength on SuperSports, but here the triple discs from a 996 have been mounted.

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss left front

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss right rear

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss left engine

Offered by an Alabama motorsports specialty shop, who gives more details in the eBay auction:

A Desmodue Ducati which has 844 big bore kit (Fast by Ferrraci), Keihin flat slide carburetors to match the big bore kit, Two-in-to One carbon fiber exhaust, new clutch, Penske adjustable rear shock, 996 brakes, Carbon fiber front and rear fenders, Michelin Pilot tires, Regina chain, Renthal aluminum sprocket designed for more low end grunt, new seals in forks.  The bike has 29,467 miles. The timing belts were changed just last year with only 500 miles since service. This is a very cool classic bike that handles great, is fast and has a deep throaty sound. It is reliable and ready to enjoy.

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss dash

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss right front wheel

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss right rear wheel

Reviewed as a budget-conscious 900SS look-alike, the 750 SuperSport was light and handled well with basic components, and had fairly relaxed ergonomics.  This SS has been treated to a lot of recent wear parts in addition to the upgrades, and in addition to providing a lot of riding for the buck, might surprise fellow riders...

-donn

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss left rear

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss left tank

20160622 1993 ducati 750ss left seat20160622 1993 ducati 750ss cockpit

 

SuperSleeper – 1993 Ducati 750 SuperSport
Ducati May 18, 2016 posted by

LastGen – 1999 Ducati 750 Supersport

Ducati's long history of a 750 Supersport continued from 1973 into the early 21st century but finally relinquished the entry-level side of the showroom to the Monster.  Presented here is a near-perfect example of   the last generation of 750SS, simple, lightweight, beautiful, and promising fun.

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right

1999 Ducati 750 Supersport for sale on eBay

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss left front

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right front

The tried and true 748cc desmodue was under the gold trellis frame, and put forth 64 hp.  Certainly serviceable, the Showa forks and Sachs monoshock are ripe for an upgrade.  Not so the excellent Brembo brakes, 320mm semi-floating front discs under 4-pot calipers, with single 245 mm rear.  The very sculptural styling was done by Pierre Terblanche for the 1999 model year, and though controversial at the time, seems to be back in vogue.

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss binnacle

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss left grip

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right peg

Evidently hidden away by the previous and current owners, this 750SS is immaculate.  Except for the adjustable levers it looks factory original.  From the eBay auction:

New condition 750 SuperSport. Not a mark on the bike, is absolutely beautiful, showroom condition. Averaged 400 miles per year. 

I am the 2nd owner and purchased from an older gentleman who just did not ride the bike due to the seat/handlebar racing position. I have placed less than 25 miles on the bike since owning, 10/2015. 

Has been garage kept, covered and on trickle charger. The bike is faster than I want to ride and handles beyond amazing. Images speak for the condition but glad to answer any questions by email or phone. 
Shifts perfect, clutch and brakes perform like new. Bike is in perfect condition. 

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right front wheel

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss left seat

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right shock

While the upper-only fairing is a hallmark of the Supersport, this one has the full complement of lowers, and the yellow paint which had recently been re-introduced.  Though some engine updates were still to come for the Supersports, the styling and overall vibe remained the same until the end in 2007.  Maybe there's room for a little compromise in the next owner's life - not quite superbike performance, but a little simpler engine.  A few years on, but no payments.  This bike's outstanding condition and supermodel fairing are a win-win though...

-donn

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right grip

20160517 1999 ducati 750 ss right

LastGen – 1999 Ducati 750 Supersport
Ducati January 31, 2015 posted by

Winning Ways: 1974 Ducati 750SS Daytona Superbike

1977 Ducati 750SS Daytona R side2

Well here's a one-of-a-kind opportunity, if ever there was one: for sale is the actual Ducati motorcycle that won at Daytona in 1977 and helped to cement Ducati's reputation in America. These days, Ducati has their hand in virtually every style and at every level of motorcycle racing, although their Moto GP efforts have been only sporadically successful. With such a strong presence at the highest level of production-based and prototype competition, it's easy to forget that, prior to the 750SS in the early 1970's, Ducati’s racing efforts centered around smaller classes and, until the advent of the L-twin, they only produced single-cylinder models.

1977 Ducati 750SS Daytona L side Track

Even the famous win at Imola 1972 that launched generations of Super Sports was most notable for being so unlikely and untested. What would have been an amusing footnote for a company like Honda became the cornerstone of Ducati's reputation, a sort of “remember the Alamo” rallying cry. And even this bike was almost a privateer, an under-funded effort that was basically a hot-rod 750 Sport.

1977 Ducati 750SS Daytona Track Front

The original 400 or so 750SS built are among the most valuable Ducatis of all time because of their obvious rarity and the fact that they embody the plucky spirit and love of racing that still shows through in the far more calculating corporate world of today. This bike is quite literally a piece of Ducati history, a continuation of the same spirit that led to the Imola win, transported across the pond to US roadracing.

1977 Ducati 750SS Daytona L Magazine

This is the actual motorcycle that won at Daytona in 1977 and helped to cement Ducati's reputation in America. Based on a production 1974 750SS, and built without factory support by a couple of very talented motorcycle journalists, this bike represents one of the most important motorcycles in Ducati's racing history. The original listing includes plenty of detailed history and is worth a read if you're not familiar with this one-of-a-kind machine.

From the original eBay listing: 1977 Ducati 750SS Daytona-Winning California Hot-Rod

This important racing Ducati has been in a private collection for around twenty years and is located in New Jersey. It is still in perfect condition and comes with the Goodyear slicks from the 1977 Daytona Superbike race and Cook Neilson's original California registration and license plate. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to secure a piece of American motorcycling history. I am happy to answer all questions and for more information here is an edited extract from my "Book of the Ducati 750 Super Sport 1974."

The road-going 750SS was built to commemorate [or capitalize] on Ducati's underdog victory at Imola and was the first street Ducati twin to feature their now ubiquitous desmodromic valve-actuation. Bidding is almost to $130,000 with several days left on the auction and active bidding. No surprise there: this is one for race fans, Ducati fans, and motorcycle fans of all types, a bike that's sure to appreciate in years to come, a piece of living history.

-tad

1977 Ducati 750SS Daytona R side Rear

Winning Ways: 1974 Ducati 750SS Daytona Superbike




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