Posts by tag: 750

MV Agusta March 25, 2017 posted by

Y2K: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750

From the VERY talented pen of Massimo Tamburini - co-founder and chief designer of Bimota (including the DB1), father of the Cagiva Mito, author of the Ducati 916/748 design language and more - comes a swan song. Tamburini closed out his storied motorcycle design career with the passion to bring MV Agusta back to life. And what he created was considered by many to be the most beautiful motorcycle ever designed: the MV Agusta F4. He passed in 2014, but left behind a legacy of evocative, brilliant designs that beg to be stared at, drooled over and appreciated for decades to come.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 S for sale on eBay

This particular F4 appears to be a standard 750 model, which is officially known as the F4 750 S. It contains all of the great visual elements of the F4 lineup (save for the gold magnesium castings of the Oro model), but lacks the super-exclusive, limited numbers of some of the other MV Agusta models of this time. Still, it shares the fabulous inline four cylinder engine with fabled 4-valve hemi chambers, good for approximately 124 HP. Novel intake runners - dubbed the Torque Shift System (or TSS) - allow for varying lengths in the intake duct work. This high-tech solution maximizes the intake runner length for a given RPM, flattening the power curve. This is a bike that performs as well as it looks.

From the seller:
F4 MV Agusta in very good condition garage kept with good tyre

This is the type of advert that infuriates a RSBFS writer. This is a wonderful machine that looks decent. But there is so little information presented it begs several questions. The bike apparently has a touch over 9k miles on the odo, but no mention of service history, mods or other. Good to know the garage is kept with good tires, though. The seller is looking for $8,800 OBO. So stare at the pics, enjoy the apex of Tamburini's career and talent, and ask questions. This could be a fantastic bike... but some detail is lacking.

Check out the full description here, and then jump back to the Comments and share your thoughts on the F4 lineup. Which is your favorite amid the plethora of limited edition 750 models offered (Oro, Senna, SPR, Neiman Marcus, SR...)?

MI

Kawasaki March 18, 2017 posted by

Nearly New: 1984 Kawasaki GPz750

From the 30-something files comes the epitome of the quintessential 1980s sport bike: the Kawasaki GPz. Conceived during what was to become the eve of the classic sporting motorcyle, the GPz led the way right up to the next real era of technology and died out with the introduction of the hyper bike. Making the ultimate use of air cooling, two valves per cylinder, carburetors and a steel backbone frame, the GPz soldiered on in the face of advancements from Yamaha, Suzuki, and especially Honda. Successful on the track as well as the showroom, the GPz is a classic memory today. But for those that remember the glory, finding one worth shelling out cash for is a rare proposition. Hence today's RSBFS find: a cherry GPz750 with just over 1,000 miles on the clock.

From the seller:
1984 KAWASAKI GPz 750 1,058 original miles!

I am the 3rd owner of this bike. The first owner put the miles on the bike and the second owner purchased the bike in 1998 and never drove it.

During my ownership, I cleaned it up, rebuilt carbs and got it running (It had not run since 1st owner in the late 80's) I took it out and put 2 miles on it to verify operation. (I own 2 other GPz's). The factory exhaust is long gone & I just installed a fresh out of the box Supertrapp system and installed all the discs to keep it quiet. It sounds awesome!

More from the seller:
The carbs were rebuilt with new jets, pilot & mains, new needle & seats & new float bowl gaskets.
All gauges, lights, gas gauge, blinkers and horn works!
New battery last September.
New plugs and spark plug boots.
Original chain & sprockets, original tires! (You will be the first person to change the tires that Kawasaki put on 33 yrs ago!)

Do I know the front fender is mounted backwards in the pictures? Yes (See it the other way in the picture with the saddle bags!)

What is wrong with bike?
Right side mirror glass is missing, was when I purchased it... I have 7 bikes and did not get that far on this one. Very small nick on gas tank graphic and some nicks on left side upper fairing graphic, these graphics are available from RD Decals in Canada. Tank is rust free on inside but does have about a 10mm ding that you can barely make out in picture that shows the nick in tank! It is missing the factory center windscreen attachment bolt so I have a mismatched one in there (factory one is available for a couple of $'s).

Lastly, the outside carb on left side was dripping a little while the bike was running the other day... To cold to drive it outside to get some cobwebs out and may go away but just want to make sure it is in listing as I'm swamped at work and will not have time to look at it!

What is right with bike?

It is absolutely stunning! It looks better in person than it does in these pictures. All the finishes are wonderfully preserved. How many of these bikes do you see with just over 1K miles???

Lastly, I was going to list the matching Bagmann saddle bags separately but really want them to go with the bike... I have been a ebay member for 17 years and never once saw a set of these come up for auction, they go with bike and the 4 GPz test issues you see in picture!

It is always difficult to find a time-period piece in the type of condition that makes it worth your while. This is especially true when the bike in question was not especially rare to begin with. But time has a way of making certain things better, and in this case time has all but erased the supply side of the equation. Had this been a bottle of wine, it would likely have turned to vinegar long ago - but the vintage becomes rare for simply existing in excellent shape. The best part of a well-aged machine is the price: Few bids have been cast, and this retro icon sits at a mere $3,550 (no reserve). It may not be a smoker or some mega dollar collectible, but the knowing nods when you show up to bike night on this earlier generation super bike makes it well worth the price of admission. Only a couple of days left on this auction - check it out here and share your thoughts! Do you GPz?

MI

Ducati March 13, 2017 posted by

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Ducati's 750 F1 was the redheaded stepchild of the Ducati family: it wasn't a bevel-drive and so wasn't really considered worthy of being considered a "classic" Ducati, didn't have the reliability [cough, cough] of the modern two-valve twin, or the performance credentials of the liquid-cooled four-valve superbikes. But values have been rising rapidly in recent years, and the F1 represents an important bridge between two eras of Ducati sportbikes.

The 750 F1 was built around their proven trellis frame and a 749cc version of the Pantah two-valve L-twin, tuned to produce 76hp and was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble the successful TT1 racing machines. Wheels were the height of 80s fashion, with a tiny 16" hoop up front and 18" at the rear. This was the very last Ducati produced before Cagiva took over and it uses a pair of carburetors configured like the older bevel-drive bikes instead of the later machines that nestled both units in the engine's vee. Not the most efficient from a packaging standpoint, with those air cleaners jutting out bodywork.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Original surviving example with 3850 original miles. Runs very well indeed. Its tight and everything works. Toolkit and owners manual included. Will need tires if ridden aggressively. An uncompromising street legal Italian thoroughbred.

Bidding is up above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction. These are the very last Ducatis before the modern era that was ushered in by Cagiva, and that gives them a special place in Ducati's history, and the uptick in values reflects that. This example looks very clean and is in excellent condition, with low miles and the seller even includes a short video of the bike roaring up the street!

-tad

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Suzuki February 18, 2017 posted by

Unloved Kat: 1997 Suzuki Katana 750 with 1,300 miles

If we were to ask RSBFS readers what 750cc sportbike of the 1990's they would most like to own now, I would bet most would choose a Suzuki GSX-750R Limited Edition or maybe a Yamaha OW01 or perhaps a Kawasaki ZX7R/ ZX7RR.  A few intrepid souls might throw a Honda VFR750 or Ducati 748 into the mix but would anyone have the Suzuki Katana 750 on their list?

1997 Suzuki Katana 750 with 1300 miles

The 2nd generation Katana 750 (also known as the GSX-S) was produced at a time when Suzuki couldn't seem to figure out where to focus its efforts.  Suzuki's lineup included race oriented machines such as the 4 cylinder powered GSX-750R and a new V-Twin powered TL1000 series.  These were offered along with several more two other street-oriented models; the Katana 750 and the "dramatically styled!" RF900.  And to make matters more complex, new models such as the GSX-600R, TL1000R, RF600R and Katana 600 were already in the pipeline and would be introduced within the next year.  This wide variety of offerings was great for potential buyers who could find a bike exactly suited for their particular needs and price range but it also meant intense competition for development and marketing monies.  The result was the Katana lineup (and to a large extent, the RF lineup too) didn't received the attention/development monies to keep up with the competition and regularly came in last in model comparisons.

Even though it never got much development support from the Hamamatsu home office, the 2nd generation Katana wasn't a bad bike.  Based on the same long-stroke 750 engine as the GSX-R750 but tuned to focus more on lower and mid-range torque delivery than top speed, the Katana was perfectly adept as a street oriented sportbike with light touring aspirations.  While the competition were all moving towards pressed aluminum featherweight frames and fuel injection, the Katana frame was still steel and 36mm carbs were used to preserve low and mid-range torque while not sacrificing too much top end, and suspension/forks were standard for the time 41mm.  Styling was contemporary for the period and build quality was good (although not a match of Honda of the period).

Its important to note the Katana did have one "ace" over the competition; price.  The wide lineup meant all the major components were already available to Suzuki.  The result was that while many other 750 sport bikes were bumping the $8,000 USD price barrier, the Katana 750 was offered for barely over $7000.

Overall the 750cc Katana sold well but not spectacularly.  A revision in 1998 (the year after this bike)  with updated bodywork and improved mechanicals did help make the Katana a bit more popular but it seems like the entire model line was never a priority for Suzuki.   The 2nd gen Katana/GSX-S seems to fall into the same category as the Kawasaki ZX6/ZZR600 or maybe the Yamaha FZR's of the same period; a sportbike not really intended for track use, bikes with a focus more on price/value than pure performance.

This particular Katana 750cc has obviously been parked for quite a while and the seller freely admits it will need servicing.  Pictures are limited but everyone looks to be OEM and intact.  Mileage is only 1300 miles since new so its really not even been broken in.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • Only 1,300 miles.
  • Has been stored since 2004.
  • Has a small dent in the gas tank where I dropped my helmet on it and a broken mirror.
  • There are a couple minor scratches. Otherwise in excellent condition.
  • Will need a new battery.

Overall it seems like it was a bike that was bought, ridden for maybe a season or two and then tucked away with "I'll get back into riding next year".  Obviously any new owner would need to plan for fresh fluids and rubber as well as a possible shock rebuild and maybe front fork fluids being done.  Also the seller indicates some pending registration fees in California so this one might be best suited to someone intending to take it out of state?

Okay so now the question - why should you consider this 750cc Katana? Given its lack of breakthrough technology and historical reputation against the competition of the time it seems highly unlikely that it will appreciate much in value.  I only found one other post on RSBFS for a 2nd generation Katana and that was back in 2011 for a 1990 edition so the market value of this one can't really be known.

Essentially this is a 20 years old bike that was never broken in.   Yes it needs a full refresh  so it will take some monies to enjoy it but the stupid low price of $1200 USD and ultra low mileage makes me think you really can't go wrong on this one - its probably worth that price in parts alone given Suzuki's interchangeable component philosophy of the times.  This really seems like a good opportunity for someone to pick up a 750cc sportbike that can easily be brought back into daily use, especially if they are looking for a daily driver with some light touring capabilities.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Unloved Kat:  1997 Suzuki Katana 750 with 1,300 miles
Yamaha July 12, 2016 posted by

The Real Thing Redux: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale

1999 Yamaha R7 L Front

A pure homologation special never intended for mass-production, the Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 was a spiritual successor to the storied OW01 that took the fight to the famous Honda RC30 and the Ducati 851 Corsa featured this past weekend. But where the Honda used a different engine configuration than their more common mass production sportbikes and introduced a host of other parts that looked as trick as their specs would suggest, Yamaha’s superbike special appeared, at a glance, to be just a hopped-up YZF-750R. In reality, it was every bit as exotic as Honda’s V4 machine. By the time the R7 rolled around, Yamaha didn’t even have a 750 sportbike in production, which gave the R7 at least a little bit more exotic cachet when new. Looking very much like a slightly bulkier R6 or an R1 with smaller headlights, the familial resemblance is unmistakable, at least on examples that actually have headlights…

1999 Yamaha R7 L Rear

Sold for just two years, the R7 was discontinued after the disappointing performance of Yamaha’s WSBK team. To keep the racing competitive and encourage different manufacturers to participate, twins like Ducati’s 916 were allowed a displacement advantage to overcome their relative lack of power compared to four-cylinder machines. But parity is a moving target in racing and, by the late 1990s, the rules started to favor the v-twin bikes so even Honda switched to a new, two-cylinder engine configuration in order to compete.

1999 Yamaha R7 Engine

Equally disappointing was the R7 road bike’s tested performance: by 1999, emissions laws had evolved far past a point where it was possible to ride your racebike to the track, pull off the lights, win a race, then ride it home. The result? A dead stock, the R7 made just 106hp, on-par for 750cc sportbikes of the era, but very disappointing for a pricey exotic. That problem could easily be fixed by activating the second set of injectors sleeping within the motor and fitting a revised airbox that gave a ram-air effect, but the full 162hp also shortened service life of the engine. None of which was an issue if you planned to race your R7, but a bit of an issue if you wanted to use it on the road.

1999 Yamaha R7 Dash

I’m not sure the bike was ever officially sold for road use here in the USA, although I’m sure there are a few kicking around in states with looser regulations. That’s hardly a problem here, since this is a racebike.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale

Don't miss Your chance to become an owner of very rare Yamaha YZF-R7. Only 500 was made. All documents in order, customs clearance. Very good condition. Can be delivered anywhere in Europe.

In 2001, the Russian company PANAVTO became the general sponsor of the Spanish racing team, taking on board the highly positioned at the time the Spaniard Juan Bautista Borja. It has at its disposal one of the most famous in the world, but same time very rare bike - Yamaha R7 (OW02). It was most advanced racing motorcycle for the World Superbike that time. It was the first and not the most successful attempt to join the Russians in WSBK, as the costs of participation in the series proved to be much more serious than it was then assumed management of the company, and Juan Borge managed to earn 12 points for the season, becoming the 33rd on its results (out of 44 pilots, published at the start at least once).

1999 Yamaha R7 ClutchThe R7 is a very exotic and desirable motorcycle, and this genuine World Superbike-prepped machine offers up tons of legitimate race-track performance, along with that eye-watering $29,000 Buy It Now price. So far there hasn't been much interest, but is that because of the price, this bike's undistinguished racing history, or because the bike currently resides in far-flung Latvia? Is someone out there brave enough to drop nearly $30k on a very exotic track-day toy? Let's hope so.

-tad

1999 Yamaha R7 R Front

The Real Thing Redux: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale
Honda June 10, 2016 posted by

VFR=Very F’n Reliable: 1993 Honda VFR750 in white

The first generation VFR 750F was only offered with the uber-cool white bodywork in 1993 and it still looks quite good, especially in comparison to the other sportbike designs of the 1990's (cough-cough-I'm-looking-at-you-1993 Suzuki GSX-750R).  Fairly cheap just a few years ago, trying to find a 1993 VFR with the OEM white bodywork in good condition is now getting to be quite hard. Values have been increasing recently, as shown by this under 10,000 mile edition we listed last year went that for about $5,500 USD, well above its book value.

This one has a significantly higher number of miles than the one from last year but condition looks to be excellent and more importantly, mostly OEM.

nr7501

1993 Honda VFR 750 on ebay

Back in the early 1990's the 600cc class really started to upset the previously dominant 750cc class both in terms of performance and in sales. New 600cc bikes like the Honda 600 F2 and Kawasaki ZX6R were suddenly close performance rivals to the previously dominant 750cc class and while some companies such as Kawasaki and Yamaha responded by making their 750cc offerings even more track tech oriented, Honda decided to go a different route.

Instead of a single pure track oriented 750cc offering like the Yamaha OW01 or Kawasaki ZX7RR, Honda instead took a two-pronged approach.  Honda put their considerable technological efforts towards what would become the mind bending oval piston equipped NR750 while at the same time allowing their 750 street effort to take a more balanced approach.  The result were two epic bikes; a technological tour de force in the NR750 and possibly the best all around sportbike of the 1990's, the VFR750.

nr7502

When the VFR750 debuted Honda had just come through a debacle with the bikes predecessor, the VF700.  Flaws in the camshaft casting process had produced a reputation for "chocolate camshafts...they melt when they get hot!" and Honda was determined to restore their engineering reputation.  Rumor is that the focus on reliability was so intense that Honda lost money on the VFR750 for several years just to restore its reputation.

While reliability was a focus, the performance side of the VFR750 was nothing to sneeze at.  The VFR’s handling was on a par with the best superbikes of the day. A stock VFR finished eighth at the Suzuka 8-Hour race and another nearly stock version finished in 3rd place at the Donnington park Trophy race against competition that included the legenday Kevin Schwantz.    The Honda VFR 750 offerred bulletproof reliability and performance that measured up to all but the most performance-oriented bikes of the time.   It should come as no surprise that the VFR would in later years become a big sales success, win bike of year numerous times in the mid to late 1990's and was even crowned sportbike of the decade by numerous motorcycling publications.

nr7503

This particular VFR has a good chunk of miles on it; the seller indicates over 45,000.  Even so condition of the bike looks to be truly excellent, with no blemishes on the triple tree or gauges.   The only items that seem of note are the tailpiece and exhaust which appear to be non stock, there seem to be extra/non-stock reflectors on the front forks and perhaps a bit of paint bubbling or road rash on the lower mid fairing.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • New brakes, grips, oil & filter
  • Good tires
  • Good chain and sprockets
  • Perfect seat
  • No leaks or other issues, Everything works, starts on first push
  • Yoshimura Pipe - subtle but noticeable
  • Needs 1 fork seal, plastics not perfect.

nr7504

So now the question - what is this lovely VFR in the cool white worth?  Well let me put it this way...when I saw that the Buy-It-Now price was only $2,350 USD I almost bought it myself.  The condition of this one looks to be very good, its the rare white bodywork scheme, maintenance history looks reasonable and while the mileage is kind of high, given the VFR's build quality reputation I don't think there will be major issues once any initial issues are resolved.

This may be one of those rare occasions when a seller has underestimated the value of his bike.    I expect this one to sell pretty quickly so if you missed out on the one from last year you might want to act fast.

Marty/Dallaslavowner

VFR=Very F’n Reliable:  1993 Honda VFR750 in white