Posts by tag: 1996

Bimota April 21, 2017 posted by

Screaming Deal: 1996 Bimota YB9SR for Sale

This is the first Bimota YB9SR I can remember seeing for sale and the seller unfortunately includes very little information, although the photos are of decent quality. The one detail you might want to keep in mind? The $5,500 asking price which, assuming the bike is mechanically sound, makes it an absolute steal. You probably won't find the YB9 on a short list of classic Bimotas, but bascially every Bimota is rare, fast, and collectible, although "fast" might be pushing things a bit here. The "9" has nothing to do with the bike's displacement and simply indicates that it's the ninth Bimota powered by a Yamaha engine. It's a bit down on power compared to its stablemates the SB6 and the YB11, which feature the GSX-R1100 and YZF1000R "Thunderace," respectively, since the YB9 actually uses the liquid-cooled inline four and transmission from the YZF600R "Thundercat" [Ho!] with around 100hp and it even uses that bike's stock gauge cluster, nestled in between the carbon air-intake tubes.

Bimota obviously made its reputation wrapping lightweight frames and sexy bodywork around reliable powerplants from Japan, sexy powerplants from Ducati, and even the occasional German powerplant from BMW... Their early offerings used tube-style frames like the Verlicchi part from yesterday's Ducati 750 F1, but by the 1990s they'd moved on to aluminum beam frames as seen here. Access on some beam-frame models for maintenance and repair can be a bit iffy: the massive-looking part used on the SB6 and SB6R is designed to connect the steering head and swingarm pivot directly, but makes access to some parts difficult, like the front sprocket that supposedly requires the engine to be dropped when it needs changing... I've heard no such complaints about the YB11 that uses a very similar frame to the one seen here, which makes a certain amount of sense considering the fact that both use Yamaha engines.

This appears to be the carbureted SR model, not the fuel-injected SRi introduced in 1996: the metal knob at the top of the triple clamp looks like it could be the choke. That's probably no bad thing, as the fuel injection system was exclusive to the Bimota and will probably make maintaining the bike more problematic: with just 651 YB9s built, anything exclusive to the model might be tricky to source. The system did add a few claimed ponies but, like all Bimotas of the period, reviews of the fueling "improvements" varied a bit and I've read both rants and raves. And as easy as it should be to maintain the YZF600 engine and transmission, be aware that bits and seals for those forks and the Paioli rear shock might not be so easy and the bodywork... Let's just say if it were mine, I'd be regularly trolling eBay for panels "just in case."

From the original Craigslist post: 1996 Bimota YB9SR for Sale

2,653 original miles. 2nd owner. All stock, 1 of 3 imported to the US. Email for more info. Available April 19-26 only.

So the listing contains very little information, but mileage is extremely low, and it looks to be in pristine condition from the few photos provided. And the price? A screaming deal at $5,500. I'm under the impression that the seller needs to sell quickly, which might explain a price more in line with a decent used 600cc supersport. Of course the YB9's 600cc engine means a modern 600cc supersport would probably destroy it in any straight-line competition, but handling should still be impressive. Maintenance should be affordable, but bodywork might be very difficult to obtain if you push a bit too hard... I'm not the biggest fan of the yellow color with blue graphics, but this is a great-looking bike and possibly the cheapest way to get into Bimota ownership outside the questionably-styled Mantra.

-tad

Screaming Deal: 1996 Bimota YB9SR for Sale
Triumph January 10, 2017 posted by

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Faced with the onslaught of powerful, dead-reliable motorcycles from Japan, many of the storied British and European motorcycle brands folded and Triumph was among them, although the story of their eventual resurrection is suitably British. These days, they’re famous for their characterful performance machines, but it took them years to earn that enviable reputation. This Daytona Super III represents ground-zero for this new generation of Triumph motorcycles and was their sportiest bike at the time.

John Bloor was actually looking at the defunct Triumph factory as a residential building site when he decided instead to relaunch the brand, which is about as much a change of heart as it’s possible to have. Building a wide variety of bikes to suit different markets and niches with entirely different frames and engines would have been prohibitively expensive, so the new range of motorcycles was built around a modular frame, with either a 900cc triple or 1200cc inline four for motivation: the 900cc triple in the Daytona was the same basic engine that also powered the Thunderbird, Trident, Sprint, Tiger, Trophy, and Speed Triple. Pretty impressive, considering how different those bikes appear at first glance.

The standard Daytona 900 made 98hp, but Cosworth tuning took the Super III to 115hp, with a near 140mph top speed, with upgraded, six-piston brakes up front to bring the whole thing to a halt quickly. Those numbers were healthy for the time, although they didn’t really compete with the fastest bikes of the era. But as you can see from the displacement, Triumph wasn’t looking at competing in racing for the most part, and the displacements reflect this roadgoing mission, an area in which the bike excelled.

Handling was very stable, although the spine frame carried weight high and the bike was fairly heavy overall so it couldn't really be considered nimble. But quality was a step up from the Japanese, comfort was good, and the look was much more classic and conservative to appeal to a different segment of the sportbike marketplace. These days, nice Daytonas and even Super IIIs can be had for relative peanuts, as you can see with today’s example, and offers up useable performance and distinctive looks.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

This is a good clean example of a rare 1996 Triumph Daytona Super 3.  The bike is in great shape with limited modifications and most of the original parts.  I do not have the original exhaust, but have seem them on e-bay for 100-$300.  This bike has just had a fresh tune-up, rebuilt carbs, plugs, all new rubber hoses, coolant flush, valve adjustment, and new Pilot 3 tires.  One of the side panels may have been repainted at some point, but I'm not sure, and one of the rear turn signals has a broken stalk.   Aftermarket parts  4 into 1 full race exhaust by Sebring K&N pod filters (original air box included) Available Parts 1 Brand new Penske fully adjustable remote resivore rear shock $1,000 (paid $1300).  If the bike buyer dose not want it, I'll list it in a separate auction. Additional Super 3 info: The Triumph Daytona Super III was a limited edition of the under-appreciated Daytona 900. Just 805 were sold worldwide and they featured engine work by Cosworth. In addition to Cosworth’s touch, this bike got bigger cams, flat slide carbs, 6 piston front brakes, and a whole lot of carbon fiber. The results of the engine work yielded a healthy 115 horsepower, though the bike was too heavy to be a true sports bike. It instead ended up being a fantastic sport-tourer, and a bike you had to muscle around to have a lot of fun with.

That "repainted side panel" does look a bit off in a couple of the photos, but the seller is asking a very reasonable $3,500 for what appears to be a clean, well-maintained and upgraded bit of Triumph's comeback story. The styling may be a bit dated, but the bike oozes class and while it may not be a "true sportbike" it has muscle where it counts: on the road. And let's be honest, that's where most motorcyclists spend their time. Track day junkies should probably look elsewhere,  although one of the coaches at the track-day organization I rode with on the East Coast had a Daytona like this one set up for track riding, so they can be made to handle if you're willing to expend a bit of time, money and effort.

-tad

British Beef: 1996 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Honda December 21, 2016 posted by

High-Tech Two-Stroke: 1996 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

From the “jeez, if you’re going to post your bike for sale, couldn’t you at least wash it” files comes this Honda NSR250R MC28. Early NSRs have become relatively common on this site recently, with containers full of them coming over from Japan, now that they’ve become relatively easy to register in some parts of the US. But the MC28 version is still pretty rare here, as it isn’t yet 25 years old and is pretty much the ultimate development of the successful NSR formula. The MC28 features many trick parts, like the single-sided swingarm and Honda's PGM-IV electronic ignition that interpreted throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and to adjust their RC "Revolutionary Controlled" Valve for improved power and midrange response.

All that technology served a 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin backed up with a six-speed cassette gearbox. As has been discussed at length, these were restricted to 45hp in their home market and, depending on the model, it can be a real pain to release their full potential. Especially in the case of the MC28: that very cool PGM-IV ignition system uses swappable ignition maps stored on "smart cards" and, unless you can track down a nearly unobtainable HRC card with "race" maps, you're kind of stuck. Supposedly, work-arounds do exist for this issue, but be sure to consult with an expert and proceed at your own risk...

It may be hard to see under that layer of dust, but this is a pretty nice bike, a few superficial scratches aside. The seller indicates that quite a bit of work has gone into it.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

I won’t start by saying that is a GP replica and is a fast bike for a 250cc. If you are interested in the bike you know about it....

  • The bike has a complete engine rebuilt
  • all Honda parts
  • rebuilt complete crank (all the bearings)
  • all seals
  • all gaskets
  • clutch
  • tires
  • chain & sprockets
  • the rims are powder coated
  • all electrical working
  • PGM4 on the bike with one card

Fairings are OEM Honda not after market and they are in great shape no cracks at all

I have the bike for 3 years and I have done only 1500km on the engine. The bike is stored indoors all year and I start the bike every 5-6 weeks. I am just changing the fork seals this week (the one tube has a very small leak). The bike needs nothing just a rider to enjoy the ride. I have rebuilt the bike myself I have register and plate it here in Canada ON. The bike come complete from japan in boxes and I assembled it here. With the bike I have some parts that they come with it. 1 set of complete exhaust (you have the option Dog Fight or Ethos) The bike comes with stock.

1 set of front forks USD from a VFR400 NC35. You need to get the upper and lower fork clams and you install them on the bike. The bike comes with stock forks. As you see on some of the pics the forks and the exhaust I had them on the bike but the bike is complete stock now. The bike is located in Toronto Canada.

Bidding is up north of $6,000 with the Reserve Not Met, which is no surprise, considering what earlier NSRs go for these days. Even more so than usual, be sure you know what you're doing before you buy this if you plan to register it for road use. It's still a few years away from that magical 25-year mark, but maybe now's the time to scoop one up for your collection, with an eye to registering it down the road.

-tad

High-Tech Two-Stroke: 1996 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale
Aprilia December 6, 2016 posted by

Cali Plate: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

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A mix of sleek styling and proven Japanese power, the Aprilia RS250 was the Italian company's entry into the hotly-contested quarter-liter sportbike class battles and intended to take the fight to Honda's NSR250, Yamaha's TZR250, and Suzuki's RGV250. The monochromatic style was a far cry from the vivid speedblock and tiger-stripe designs of the Japanese competition and has aged very well, and I bet plenty of folks would think this is a new, or nearly new machine.

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The RS250 borrowed its 249cc liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin from Suzuki's high-strung RGV250, retuned for more power. Weight was competitive, at around 300lbs dry so the claimed 60hp made the bike plenty quick, with typical two-stroke power-delivery and serious agility. A sculpted beam frame provided a stiff foundation and the asymmetrical "banana" swingarm kept the bike's expansion chambers tucked in close to the bike for maximum cornering clearance. If those brakes look familiar, they're the very same Brembo units that stopped just about every other Italian sportbike of the period and are plenty powerful, considering those bikes were at least 30% heavier than the little Aprilia...

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I happen to prefer the earlier bodywork seen here, but later bikes have plenty of style as well, although their very 80s-looking dash is an acquired taste... Unfortunately, it's a little hard to see in the low-resolution photos that accompany the listing. The bike does include something that's a bit of a Holy Grail for RS250 fans though: a California license plate.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

Starts and runs may need some minor tuning. Have a sticker kit not perfect a few of the stickers are wrinkled thanks to FedEx. Have a rear seat cover that is purple. Arrows pipes, Toby steering damper.  

CA PLATE !!

Bidding is up to $5,000 with the reserve met and just 24 hours left on the listing. The photos are pretty poor, which is a real shame since miles are low and, aside from a couple of minor scuffs, it appears to be in good cosmetic condition. I wonder how much more interest there would be in the bike if the seller had bothered to include a few decent pics and maybe a short video of the bike, along with a better idea of what "may need some minor tuning" might mean.

-tad

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Cali Plate: 1996 Aprilia RS250 for Sale
Honda October 26, 2016 posted by

Flyweight Racer Redux: 1996 Honda RS125R for Sale

1996-honda-rs125r-r-front2As I've mentioned before, it's weird how some bikes seem to show up in waves, and this is the third Honda RS125R I've seen this week. The previous example I posted was in very good condition and came with a nice stash of spares, but was more functional than this particular bike, which also has "TONS" of spare parts along with a very slick paint job.

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Hiding behind those red, white, and blue fairings and nestled in between those beautiful aluminum frame rails is the compact, slightly undersquare 54mm x 54.5mm two-stroke single and a six-speed gearbox. It can be tuned to produce over 40hp and, with a dry weight of under 160 pounds, it's very possible that the new owner will weigh more than the bike itself. The single Brembo caliper and disc up front should be plenty to haul the bike down from speed, given the bike's incredibly low weight.

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The only downside to this bike? It'd be a shame to abuse that nice paint rubbing fenders with other racebikes on tracks, but it'd be a shame to let a machine this focused sit as a static display piece...

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Honda RS125R for Sale

Super rare and unique. I restored this bike from the ground up 6 years ago when I purchased it in 2010. Custom designed paint and graphics, it looks insane. Pearlescent clear coat over the paint - spent way too much money and many many hours to create. It is a piece of art. Riders like Loris Capirossi, Dani Pedrosa and Nicky Hayden got their starts racing RS125Rs... here's your chance to own one. 

Carbon fiber pipe and paint matched carbon fiber rear tire hugger, color matched rear stand. It has rare Hjelm Motorsports rear sets, carbon fiber handlebars, working tach and temp gauge. New slicks (from 2010). Price includes TONS of spare parts, extra cylinder head, rebuild kit parts, carb jets for altitude adjustment, many sprockets... way too much to list.

Bike has been on display in my foyer and detailed with plexus monthly. Tank is dry (no corrosion) Everything on the bike has been restored, rebuilt or replaced. Should start right up with some fresh premix. Will need a brake fluid flush from sitting as well. 

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With the seller asking $5,700 this RS125R seems to far more reasonably priced than last week's example, and also includes a wide range of spare parts to keep it running. I'm not sure if the graphics correspond with any race team's colors, but I'm pretty sure these all came with bare white fairings originally anyway, ready for sponsor decals and whatever wild look your up-and-coming racer wanted.

-tad

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Flyweight Racer Redux: 1996 Honda RS125R for Sale
Moto Guzzi September 28, 2016 posted by

Getting the Shaft: 1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for Sale

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Shaft drive has well-known advantages in terms of maintenance and reliability but is rarely seen in the sportbike world as it limits gearing choices and generally adds too much weight to a bike like this Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing. In a world where every ounce counts and bikes are pared to the bone, sacrificing durability for agility, a driveshaft seems a step backwards. But although they played around with a chain-drive, liquid-cooled, v-twin to rival Ducati prior to their purchase by the Piaggio Group, Moto Guzzi was generally happy to just stay afloat and were often forced to work with what they had. Given their financial limitations, they have managed to develop the system to a very high level.

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Guzzi was stuck with the durable, but very clunky and outdated five-speed transmission but, in the Daytona, they curbed some of the more intrusive shaft-jacking by using a parallelogram rear suspension, although you’ll still feel the rotational forces of the longitudinal crankshaft as you power out of turns or rev the bike at a stoplight. Because of course you’ll rev the bike at stoplights: Moto Guzzi’s big v-twins are some of the very best-sounding twins on the planet, especially when fitted with a freer-flowing exhaust. The four-valve engine has "OHC" cast into those valve covers, but it’s not really “overhead” and more "high cam" as the cams operate the eight valves via a system of short pushrods and rockers, a system that offered the best of both worlds, with compact dimensions and good high-rpm breathing.

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A bit of a bridge between the earlier Daytona 1000 and the later RS, the "Racing" uses the earlier, hump-backed bodywork with some of the factory available engine hop-up parts. It was never officially available in the USA, as evinced by the odometer reading in kilometers. The seller claims this is is fitted with an 1100cc engine, but I believe all of the Daytonas had the 992cc engine, built to make it eligible for various race classes that limited twins to 1,000cc or less. Production of the Daytona stretched from 1992 to 1995 and saw a bit more than 1,000 examples built, with just 100 of the "Racing" version at the tail end of production for 1996.

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From the original eBay listing: 1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing for Sale

1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona Racing, number 100 of 100 ever made 4 valve twin, mint condition. Rare Stay In Tune stainless steel exhaust system, new battery, recent fluid change and tune up, low mileage: 21,446km. Part of large collection that is being liquidated, 1100cc 4-valve twin, this bike is a joy to ride, we at buyer's expense can ship worldwide. Clean, lien-free title, this is a no-issue bike that is beautiful and rare.

Bidding is up to 7,600 with the Reserve Not Met. No surprise there as sellers are generally looking to get at least $10,000 for nice examples, with one recent low-mileage bike selling for over $14,000! But more often, these Daytonas are a hard sell: they don’t meet their reserve or receive little attention from bidders. Mileage on this example is pretty low, especially for a Guzzi, with a little more than 13,000 miles worth of kilometers rolling under the wheels. The Staintune exhaust may be a bit too shiny for your taste, but they are a quality brand and those… less restrictive pipes should help make the big v-twin sound great and add a little bit more oomph.

-tad

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Getting the Shaft: 1996 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for Sale