Posts by tag: 1988

Suzuki March 21, 2017 posted by

Slingshot My Heart: 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki's original GSX-R750 is arguably one of the most influential sportbikes of all time. Other bikes may have incorporated some of its design and performance elements, but none were able to combine them all into such an affordable package, or were able to capture the public's imagination in the same way. Every iteration of the Gixxer was made by the bucketload, but the bike's reliability and ubiquity meant that they were used and abused, and then discarded, making pristine examples like this one both desirable and very hard to come by. The early "Slabbie" has already reached collector status,  but the second-generation "Slingshot" GSX-R750 models are steadily increasing in value as well and offer more modern performance and handling, compared to the slightly vintage original.

Looking at the slab-sided design, it's pretty easy to see where the Slabbie GSX-R got its nickname, but the Slingshot is named for the 38mm semi-flatslide Mikuni "Slingshot" carburetors that fed the 748cc inline four cylinder engine. Suzuki's original GSX-R was designed with simplicity and light weight in mind and, as a result, the bike was oil instead of water-cooled. But the significant cooling demands of a high-performance sportbike meant the Gixxer needed a sophisticated, high-capacity oil pump and associated cooling and filtration system known as Suzuki Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" to keep temperatures under control. SACS was used on the GSX-R750 and 1100 up until 1992 when Suzuki bowed to convention and switched to water cooling for subsequent generations of the bike.

This particular example appears to be in excellent condition and has obviously been enthusiast-owned and lovingly maintained. It isn't just some well-maintained survivor though: it includes some very tasty modifications like that Metmachex swingarm, a very desirable bit and the suspension has been more than just "overhauled," as the original bike didn't have upside-down forks until 1991. The LED signals are probably not to everyone's taste, but they're reliable, improve visibility, and are, as the seller mentions, easily changed.

 

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

You are bidding on a 1988 Suzuki GSXR-750 first year, 2nd Gen. model GSXR-J aka Slingshot in Suzuki's traditional blue & white paint scheme that is very sought after. This is one of the lightest and fastest oil cooled GSXR of its time. This particular bike is mostly original condition with the exception of a few upgrades which I'll list later on in the description. Some of the OEM parts  I still have (I'll notate) and can be sold with the bike, if you are interested in going back to stock.

The exhaust is a Yoshimura pipe ceramic coated and aluminium canister. The Mikuni 36mm flat slide carburetors has a Stage 3 jet kit, these both were ideal performance mods for this motor. The blinkers have been replaced with modern LEDs but you can easily go back to stock since all the wiring and connectors are intact. Also, the windscreen was switched out to a tinted by the previous owner. The suspension has had a major upgraded since the stock GSX-R were notoriously known to have a low ground clearance with only a slim margin of error. Both the front and rear have been completely rebuilt by Lindemann Engineering. The rear swingarm is ultra-rare Metmachex (equal to JMC) braced and with eccentric adjusters. This is the style of the endurance racers used back in the late 80's since the stock was shown to have flex. I do have the original OEM swing arm available upon request. The original speedo and tach have been replaced due to the needles falling off. I replaced them with an 1100 model of that year since it's was close to the miles but I do have the original for the new owner and I am basing the miles on the original speedo/tach cluster.  
 
All of the body panels are original and in good condition, no cracks or brittle spots. There are some scratches from general wear and tear which I'll try and capture in the photos. The wheels are in great shape, paint is excellent and no sizable chips. Cosmetically, I would claim this motorcycle is an 8 out of 10.  Mechanically it is flawless, runs perfect, shifts smooth, pulls hard and easy to ride. All of the electrics work as they should; blinkers, horn, lights, speedo, tach, are properly functioning. The bike just had a full detailed service and tune up, all fluids were flushed, and mechanically everything was inspected and replaced if necessary. The Battery and tires are less than a year old.  

This GSX-R750 was well-taken care of and adult own, and I am the 3rd owner. It was never abused or down to my knowledge.  Please feel free to ask any questions, do not hesitate to contact me. If you need any additional pictures or have any additional questions,  feel free to message me or call me here 424-225-2028. Also, I'm including with the sale, are the OEM passenger seat, and tank bra. Service manual and receipts for all maintenance and upgrades.

There is plenty of time left on this auction, but bidding is already pretty active. This particular version of the GSX-R was only produced for a couple of years and doesn't seem to have been particularly well-regarded when it was new but, with all due respect to the original "Slabbie" I think it's far and away the best-looking GSX-R ever made and if I had space in my garage, I'd really want to find a nice one.

-tad

Slingshot My Heart: 1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Ducati March 4, 2017 posted by

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

If you're looking to get close to your racing heroes, style yourself a Very Serious Motorcyclist™, or just like the idea of riding something with genuine links to legitimate race bikes, homologation specials offer their owners a taste of the trick parts and lightweight performance available to professional racers, all in a streetable package. This 851 Tricolore wears its Italian heritage proudly, and takes things a bit beyond what you'd normally expect in terms of road-legal performance: its about as close to a road-legal race bike as you're likely to find.

The 916 gets most of the fame and is more instantly recognizable, but it's really the earlier 851, introduced in 1987, that paved the way for Ducati's World Superbike success and the company's return to racing glory. The older Pantah-derived air-cooled L-twin engines were certainly high-performance motors in their day, but had been long-since eclipsed by the inline fours from Japan, and Ducati needed something new if they wanted to compete on relatively equal footing with 750cc inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike Championship.

Ducati kept the proven foundation of their v-twin, but added liquid cooling and brand new four-valve heads to create their "Desmoquattro" that pumped out 93hp along with plenty of fat midrange torque and gave the newly introduced 851 the performance to compete, factoring in a bit of a displacement bump that allowed the twins approximate parity with the smaller, revvier inline fours. Wrapped around that heavily updated engine was Ducati's distinctive trellis frame and chunky bodywork, along with ergonomics that were considered extreme at the time, but seem positively luxurious compared to the masochistic 916 that came later... For a while there, the 851 and the 888 that followed were less desirable than the gorgeous 916. But as they say, "familiarity breeds contempt" and with so many of Tamburini's masterpiece running around, it's hard not to be a bit blasé about them now. But the 916 would never have existed without the success of the 851 and that functional bodywork has a style all its own.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

One of 207 homologation "kit bikes"!
Frame Number: ZDM3HB6T6JB850034
Engine Number: HB6J850032

It was the Ducati 851 that first served notice that high-performance sportbikes and World Superbike racing would no longer be Japanese-only affairs. Where before Ducatis made do with simple air-cooled motors, the 851 had liquid-cooling, four-valve desmodromic cylinder heads and electronic fuel-injection. In 1990 Raymond Roche rode a factory 851 to the World Superbike championship, the first of 13 titles to date for Ducati.

World Superbike racers were required to be based on production streetbikes. One way to get the highest-specification base model possible was to build homologation specials – expensive, limited-edition versions that needed relatively minor modification to be track-ready. Ducati took this so-called "kit bike" approach with the 851 Superbike. Just 207 of these nominally street-legal machines were hand-built, enough to satisfy World Superbike rules, with an estimated 20 examples coming to the U.S.

 Differences from showroom stock include a braced swingarm, close-ratio gearbox, ventilated dry clutch and lightweight magnesium Marvic wheels. No speedometer, just a tachometer and temperature gauge. The motor was upgraded with race-grind camshafts, a hot-rodded electronic control unit, ram-air duct and free-breathing reverse-cone mufflers. It was good for about 120 horsepower.

One of the other differences is a round ring on the seat, which is explained by an amusing folk tale: the claim is that some Ducati employee placed a hot espresso maker on the mold before production, causing a slight deformation in the seat.

The Tri-Colore 851 kit bike on offer has been made fully street-legal, and is titled and registered. Globe-type turn signals mounted in the handlebar ends satisfy the DMV. The original owner was a local Southern California collector of some very interesting and important bikes, particularly Italian, low production machines. He mounted a bicycle speedometer with magnet on the front hub to further satisfy the DMV and clocked 2600 miles. The second owner kept the bike in his private museum of very exclusive Italian machinery and removed the speedo for display.

Mechanically, the bike is in excellent condition. The engine starts easily, idles smoothly and runs well. The bike shifts easily though all gears with a nice clutch action. Brakes, suspension and all electrical systems work perfectly. The new owner should be mindful of tire-pressure as the scuff-free magnesium wheels are notoriously porous. And it sounds fantastic!

Cosmetically, the bike is exquisite, showing light patina conducive with age and mileage. This is truly a Superbike for the street, with impeccable ownership history and is accompanied by a substantial document file, keys, and a clean, clear California title. A great opportunity to own a truly rare and exotic Italian icon.

So what does this piece of Ducati history cost? Well the asking price is $31,900 which is obviously very steep for an 851, but a bit of a bargain compared to the last one of these that was up for sale. This appears to be a different bike, considering that one had never had gas in it or been started, whereas this one has had a bit of use and a couple of concessions to road use added. The small bar-end mirrors are a modern addition, but aren't obtrusive and suit the bike's minimal-road-equipment style compared to the big, chunky, fairing-mounted original road-equipment parts or a more 80s set of "Napoleon" bar-end mirrors. The seller claims that just 207 of these homologation 851s were built in 1988 to meet World Superbike requirements and it looks to be in excellent shape, with just enough wear to suggest that it's in original, well-preserved condition. This is, as the seller says, literally a superbike for the street, with just enough road equipment to keep things legal-ish but not distract from your World Superbike fantasies. Hopefully, anyone that buys this will continue to put a few weekend miles on it from time-to-time!

-tad

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale
Honda December 20, 2016 posted by

Grey Market Rarity: 1988 Honda VFR400 NC24 for Sale

 

Built for 1987 and 1988, the NC24 version of Honda's VFR400 was powered by a 399cc V4 with a lofty 14k redline, although it used a more conventional 180° crank instead of the later bike’s 360° “big bang” unit, which should give the bike more of an inline-four sound but with the added bonus of a distinctive whine from the gear-driven cams. The engine was surprisingly flexible, and handling was considered excellent. It was the very first VFR400 to use Honda’s Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm, although the rear wheel on the NC24 was secured by four bolts, instead of the later bike’s single large nut: the part you see in the photos is actually a plastic cover designed to mimic a trick racing part.

The VFR400 was originally intended for the Japanese market, although the later NC30 was officially imported to the UK and others found their way abroad through various grey market and "parallel import" channels so they do show up for sale pretty regularly, even here in the USA. This is actually the first NC24 I can remember seeing for sale. Most of the attention goes to the NC30, with its “baby RC30” looks. But this is still a very cool and unusual motorcycle, and perhaps the dowdy looks will keep costs down for folks more interested in performance and heritage than sexy style. With somewhere in the neighborhood of 60 hp and around 350 lbs dry to push around, performance is respectable and these have always been popular bikes among

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda VFR400 for Sale

Here we have a Honda NC24 VFR400. It has just been imported into the States from the UK. I test rode this bike when I collected it in Lancaster, England. It started with some difficulty but after warming up it idled well. I suspect that the carbs are restricted by washers. This is a common practice in the UK to satisfy licensing requirements for novice riders. If I were going to ride it regularly, I'd have the carbs cleaned and the washers removed. The bike comes with the V5 document (English equivalent of a title) , copies of import papers, and a bill of sale. I offer competitively priced delivery in the lower 48 States with a right of refusal guarantee. Upon delivery if you are unsatisfied with the motorcycle you will only be responsible for the delivery fee.

Bidding is very active, but just up to about $1,600 so I imagine it will go a good bit higher before the auction ends. The bike certainly isn't perfect, with some flaking paint on the clutch lever, slight discoloration of the plastic "nut" that covers the rear hub, and the surface corrosion you'd expect on a bike that made it to the USA via the UK, where bikes see far more time being ridden in harsh weather and exposed to the elements. I'm also guessing that those aren't the original fairings: looking online, that red stripe on the tank should continue onto the side panels. Maybe just repaint the whole thing as a Rothmans replica? As the seller mentions, these smaller-displacement bikes were often modified to limit power and allow them to be used by new riders on restricted licenses. Instead of buying a little 125, you could buy a bigger bike with restrictions in place to limit power. Once you'd graduated to a full license, you could convert the bike to full power. The seller obviously isn't 100% sure they've been installed, but I'd expect anyone planning to buy a nearly 30 year old motorcycle would be prepared to do a bit of carburetor work if they plan to regularly ride their funky new purchase.

-tad

Grey Market Rarity: 1988 Honda VFR400 NC24 for Sale
Honda November 11, 2016 posted by

Rothmans Replica: 1988 Honda NSR250R SP for Sale

1988-honda-nsr250r-sp-l-side-front

All of the quarter-liter two-stroke sport bikes of the late 80s and early 90s are pretty desirable, but Honda's v-twin NSR250R is both one of the best-known and most popular. Power was a modest 45hp, but the NSR could be de-restricted for additional power safely, if not always easily, since that factory output was mandated by government decree and not because of any sort of mechanical limitations. This earlier MC18 version of the bike lacks the later MC21's cool asymmetric "gull arm" swing arm and the MC28's heavy, but very trick-looking single-sided unit, but I really like the slightly chunkier lines and that solid-looking aluminum box-section swingarm. It could also be that MC18s are a bit more affordable than those later bikes, and much easier to import and register than a late-model MC28...

1988-honda-nsr250r-sp-r-side

We've featured bikes from this seller in the past, and they appear to be one of the companies that's recently begun importing these little sportbikes on a regular basis, turning them from "rare sportbikes" into "uncommon sportbikes." But even though these two-stroke sportbikes aren't quite the unicorns they once were here in the USA, the NSR250 has a bit of cachet the TZR and RGV seem to lack, and that Rothmans design makes this one of the best-looking race replicas of all time.

1988-honda-nsr250r-sp-l-side-rear

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Honda NSR250SP MC18 for Sale

Up for sale is 1988 HONDA NSR250SP MC18 rare 2-stroke sports! The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. Very good running condition sharp response of 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are work fine. Electricals are all work but front brake switch is not working. Has an original key. According to frame# this bike is SP version.

Speedometer looks HONDA genuine parts and shows 24600km = about 15400miles, but actual mileage is unknown. Will needs new tires and fork seals. Has HONDA genuine fairings and MAGTECK wheel. But has hairline cracks and chips and scratches and under fairings are looks repaired by FRP and repainted. Have hairline cracks and chips on fairings, so look carefully all pictures and video. Used motorcycle with scratches and wear as 28 ages.

And then, feel free email me for more info on this bike!

1988-honda-nsr250r-sp-r-rear

More pictures are available for your viewing pleasure here. The seller also includes a video of the bike being started here. It's not in flawless condition, with some wear and a couple deep scratches on the fairings, so this one might be more of a rider than a display bike. Bidding is up just north of $3,000 with a few days left on the auction and active bidding so far.

-tad

1988-honda-nsr250r-sp-r-side-naked

Rothmans Replica: 1988 Honda NSR250R SP for Sale
Bimota September 7, 2016 posted by

Framing the Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike For Sale

1988 Bimota YB4 R Side

Although it's often the slinky bodywork that people remember about Bimotas, the frames are what really define them. The Bimota YB4 was designed around Bimota’s signature and unmistakable beam frame they used throughout the late 80s and 90s. No soft, moulded contours here: the spars look like girders that were extruded by some giant, industrial device, then cut and welded into place, with access to that five-valve Yamaha "Genesis" engine clearly an afterthought... The frame was amazingly stiff and, equipped with typically top-shelf suspension bits at both ends, the YB4 offered superlative handling.

1988 Bimota YB4 Front

Introduced in 1987, the YB4 started out as a pure racing machine, with no road-legal counterpart. But when rules were announced for the new World Superbike racing series, Bimota was forced to make a limited number of roadbikes for homologation purposes in order to compete. The bike was successful in both the earlier Formula 1 championship that predated the roadgoing YB4 as well as the later fledgling World Superbike series, where it successfully competed against Yamaha’s own highly-developed OW01, a testament to the YB4’s handling prowess.

1988 Bimota YB4 Dash

Of course, being a Bimota, the engine is far more pedestrian than the beautifully crafted frame and sleek bodywork. The YB4 was powered by a 749cc version of the five-valve Yamaha “Genesis” motor which, while not very exotic, packed plenty of performance, and that powerplant was backed by the standard Yamaha six-speed gearbox. The roadbike weighed in at a claimed 396lbs dry and used fuel injection, but the racing machines featured carburetors. Just over 300 were built and unusually, the YB4 is visually almost identical to the bigger-engined and more common YB6 that was stuffed full of 1000cc Genesis motor.

1988 Bimota YB4 Carbs

Today’s YB4 isn’t a road bike, or even a road bike converted into a track-only machine. This YB4 is actually the reason we have any roadgoing YB4s at all: it’s a genuine World Superbike racing bike as raced by Steve Parrish’s team with Keith Huewen at the controls.
From the original eBay listing: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike for Sale

Bimota YB4 Racing WSBK - ex-Huewen/Parrish Team Yamaha Loctite UK

M.Y. 1988 VIN 000037

It is the 1988 Bimota YB4 WSBK Team Yamaha Loctite Parrish/Heuwen The bike was raced in 1988, ridden by Keith Huewen who is now a Moto GP commentator. It was ridden in the British Championship and also some World Championship events like the Hungaroring.

It has all the genuine parts with special quick release pipes magnesium sump etc. and very important it is exactly as it was raced. There were originally only 4 imported to the UK Team Loctite had problems with the fuel injection and converted them all back to carburettors.

Iconic bike of an iconic race era. Ride, parade and collect! Bulletproof investment.

1988 Bimota YB4 L Side Unfaired

According to the seller, the bike is currently in the UK, but that shouldn’t pose much of a problem for the well-heeled or seriously dedicated collectors considering a purchase of this machine. What's it worth? Well, it's basically a successful racing machine from an exotic Italian manufacturer that was campaigned by a famous rider for a famous team, making it a one-of-a-kind piece of motorcycle history.

-tad

1988 Bimota YB4 L Side

Framing the Superbike: 1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike For Sale
Suzuki August 4, 2016 posted by

Stunning Gamma: 1988 Suzuki RG500Γ MK14 Race Bike for Sale

1988 Suzuki RG500 R Side

The road-going two-stroke fours from Suzuki and Yamaha normally tend to look a little awkward to my eye. The wheels and tires look too skinny, the brakes too small, the fairing bulbous and a little ungraceful. That all goes out the window with this 1988 Suzuki RG500Γ race bike, which seems better balanced all-around, and does away with pointless frippery like headlights, turn-signals, and rear-view mirrors...

1988 Suzuki RG500 L Tank

Motivated by a liquid-cooled square-four engine that was basically made up of a pair of parallel-twins geared together, the Suzuki was far more raw than the competing RZ500 from Yamaha. Many two-strokes of the period featured complicated technology designed to make them more practical for road use. While the RG500 had some of those as well, it seemed to revel in the very qualities that attract two-stroke fans, instead of masking them: light weight, narrow powerbands, and a generally unruly, experts-only handling.

1988 Suzuki RG500 Fairing

Power hovered right around 100hp for the road bike and, for a bike of the period that weighed under 400lbs, this represented state-of-the-art motorcycle performance. Even today, these are some of the most highly sought-after bikes of the 1980s and, although they don't offer cutting-edge power compared to modern machines, the level of involvement required to ride one quickly and the highly-strung, chainsaw-maniac shriek of the engine mean plenty of entertainment, all wreathed in heavy two-stroke smoke that drips from the four stingers.

1988 Suzuki RG500 Dry Clutch

This example is a pure racing machine that obviously doesn't even share a frame with the roadgoing model, and competed in the late 1980s in the UK, as described by the seller.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Suzuki RG500 Race Bike for Sale

Suzuki RG500 MK14 - 1988 British F1 Winning bike. Model year 1988 VIN RGB500-10511

For the 1985 season Suzuki adopted a new approach in respect to their hugely successful RG500 partly in response to changes being seen in domestic racing. National championships were moving towards production based, four stroke formulas resulting in less demand for over the counter Grand Prix 500's. Suzuki opted to stop producing complete RG500's, instead supplying Padgett's of Batley with up rated, magnesium cased, stepped RG500 engines and their associated power valves and expansion chambers. Padgett's would then supply complete machines using a steel frame built by Harris Performance and based on the Suzuki Mk VII/VIII frame. A total of twelve engines were supplied to the Yorkshire based company with machines being built between 1985 and 1988. The machine offered is number 11 of the 12 and was ridden by Darren Dixon, a Padgett's sponsored rider to victory in the 1988 British F1 Championship. It was subsequently sold to Brian Burgess in November 1988 for his son, John, to ride in the British Superbike Championship which, at that time still allowed machines such as the RG500 to compete. The ACU eventually banned two strokes form the British Superbike Championship at the start of the 1990's. The owners continued to run the RG500 in National and club events until 1996. Roger Keen prepared the engine during the period that the motorcycle was racing and recently the engine has been stripped and rebuilt with new parts by Phil Lovet. The machine was recently returned to the livery that it wore when being raced by Darren Dixon in 1988 with the paintwork being applied by Padgett's. It is in good condition in all respects following its restoration. This significant machine is offered with a letter from Clive Padgett confirming that it was Darren Dixon's Championship winning RG500 and that Padgett's sold the motorcycle to Mr Burgess in November 1988 together with a letter from Mr Burgess outlining the machines history during his ownership and a DVD showing Darren Dixon winning three races.

1988 Suzuki RG500 Rear Wheel

The seller indicates that the bike is currently in the UK but, given the bike's rarity and the fact that it's a pure racing bike, I don't think that will be any sort of issues for buyers here in the USA or anywhere else, for that matter. I honestly don't know enough about RG500 race bikes to vouch for this bike's authenticity, so I'm happy to defer to the experts in the comments section on this one. Real, or not, it's a stunning bike, with just enough wear to suggest that it actually gets used from time to time. Bidding is active, but currently sits just north of $10,000 which is well short of where I expect it to end up.

-tad

1988 Suzuki RG500 L Side

Stunning Gamma: 1988 Suzuki RG500Γ MK14 Race Bike for Sale