Search Results for “yzf r1”

Bimota October 27, 2016 posted by

Super and Leggera: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

1998-bimota-yb11-l-front

1990s Bimotas currently represent an amazing value, and this 1998 YB11 Superleggera has superbike performance, Yamaha reliability, and is very rare, all for under $10,000. “Superleggera” or "super light" is a style of construction that stresses lightweight materials and construction: Ducati’s Superleggera is so super and leggera that it actually weighs less than the British Superbike Championship Panigale including ballast... So while 400lbs dry may not be considered the absolute lightest bike out there by today’s standards, it’s still in the hunt and was a solid 30lbs lighter than the YZF1000 that donated its engine and gearbox.

1998-bimota-yb11-r-side

Plenty of superbikes these days weigh the same and make far more than the YB11’s 145 peak horsepower, but without their electronics and sophisticated traction control systems, they’d likely be wrapped around a tree in short order. The five-valve Yamaha engine that powers the YB11 should be far less peaky than something like an MV Agusta F4 or even a BMW S1000RR, as evidenced by the 5-speed gearbox, which suggests a reduced need to chase narrow powerbands. It says much about the original bike that it’s nearly 20 years old and, with 170mph top speed, can at least keep modern superbikes in sight, especially on the road.

1998-bimota-yb11-gauges

The only catch with that “Yamaha reliability” thing could be actual access to the Yamaha parts on the YB11. That beam frame may be light and strong, but Bimota didn’t worry about things like “servicing” when they designed this beast, and other bikes they've built aren't easy to service: for the similar, Suzuki GSX-R1100-powered SB6R, you actually need to drop the engine to change the front sprocket. The clutch slave? Drop the engine. And the alternator drive on the SB6R tends to fail due to overheating. Guess what you have to do to work on that?

1998-bimota-yb11-l-rear

Those beefy 51mm Paioli forks provide excellent roadholding but could be difficult to source parts for. And when I say “could” I mean, “I know one that was sidelined for a couple years with leaky seals because the parts were unavailable.” Although I'm sure it'd be possible to swap in the front end from a modern superbike, if you're friendly with someone who can knock up a set of custom triple-trees...

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

A Unique and Rare Super Bike On Display in the New England Motorcycle Museum!

Extremely rare! Only 650 made! Not many opportunities to buy unmolested, low mileage Bimotas present themselves! Act now!

Borderline savage power-to-weight ratio! There was nothing in its class that could touch it in sheer acceleration

This bike features an engine based off the Yamaha YZF1000 and featured a larger air box, reworked carburetors & a 4 into 1 pipe that turned the Yamaha engine into a rocket ship without comprising its superb reliability!

Immense handling capabilities! Extremely light weight makes for easy input and lean angle limits that are most likely well beyond the rider’s capabilities.

This hand crafted, Italian made motorcycle is gorgeous and the photos speak for themselves! Here’s your chance to own this Italian Stallion!

Ready for your exotic collection

1998-bimota-yb11-tank

The seller does include a video of the bike with a walk-around, but doesn't fire the bike up. It's pretty clear from the photos that this bike is in superlative condition and has just 3,000 on it. I’m not sure if the YB11 has similar servicing issues as Bimota's SB6, but I’d consult with a specialist shop or spend some time on the forums before assuming these will be cheap or easy to maintain. Plus, bodywork might prove a little difficult to replace if you take a tumble. That being said, I’d buy one in a heartbeat: with a Buy It Now price of just $9,500 it’s rare, fast, and Italian. It even has passenger accommodations, something of a rarity for Bimotas in general.

-tad

1998-bimota-yb11-r-side

Super and Leggera: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Yamaha July 12, 2016 posted by

The Real Thing Redux: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale

1999 Yamaha R7 L Front

A pure homologation special never intended for mass-production, the Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 was a spiritual successor to the storied OW01 that took the fight to the famous Honda RC30 and the Ducati 851 Corsa featured this past weekend. But where the Honda used a different engine configuration than their more common mass production sportbikes and introduced a host of other parts that looked as trick as their specs would suggest, Yamaha’s superbike special appeared, at a glance, to be just a hopped-up YZF-750R. In reality, it was every bit as exotic as Honda’s V4 machine. By the time the R7 rolled around, Yamaha didn’t even have a 750 sportbike in production, which gave the R7 at least a little bit more exotic cachet when new. Looking very much like a slightly bulkier R6 or an R1 with smaller headlights, the familial resemblance is unmistakable, at least on examples that actually have headlights…

1999 Yamaha R7 L Rear

Sold for just two years, the R7 was discontinued after the disappointing performance of Yamaha’s WSBK team. To keep the racing competitive and encourage different manufacturers to participate, twins like Ducati’s 916 were allowed a displacement advantage to overcome their relative lack of power compared to four-cylinder machines. But parity is a moving target in racing and, by the late 1990s, the rules started to favor the v-twin bikes so even Honda switched to a new, two-cylinder engine configuration in order to compete.

1999 Yamaha R7 Engine

Equally disappointing was the R7 road bike’s tested performance: by 1999, emissions laws had evolved far past a point where it was possible to ride your racebike to the track, pull off the lights, win a race, then ride it home. The result? A dead stock, the R7 made just 106hp, on-par for 750cc sportbikes of the era, but very disappointing for a pricey exotic. That problem could easily be fixed by activating the second set of injectors sleeping within the motor and fitting a revised airbox that gave a ram-air effect, but the full 162hp also shortened service life of the engine. None of which was an issue if you planned to race your R7, but a bit of an issue if you wanted to use it on the road.

1999 Yamaha R7 Dash

I’m not sure the bike was ever officially sold for road use here in the USA, although I’m sure there are a few kicking around in states with looser regulations. That’s hardly a problem here, since this is a racebike.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale

Don't miss Your chance to become an owner of very rare Yamaha YZF-R7. Only 500 was made. All documents in order, customs clearance. Very good condition. Can be delivered anywhere in Europe.

In 2001, the Russian company PANAVTO became the general sponsor of the Spanish racing team, taking on board the highly positioned at the time the Spaniard Juan Bautista Borja. It has at its disposal one of the most famous in the world, but same time very rare bike - Yamaha R7 (OW02). It was most advanced racing motorcycle for the World Superbike that time. It was the first and not the most successful attempt to join the Russians in WSBK, as the costs of participation in the series proved to be much more serious than it was then assumed management of the company, and Juan Borge managed to earn 12 points for the season, becoming the 33rd on its results (out of 44 pilots, published at the start at least once).

1999 Yamaha R7 ClutchThe R7 is a very exotic and desirable motorcycle, and this genuine World Superbike-prepped machine offers up tons of legitimate race-track performance, along with that eye-watering $29,000 Buy It Now price. So far there hasn't been much interest, but is that because of the price, this bike's undistinguished racing history, or because the bike currently resides in far-flung Latvia? Is someone out there brave enough to drop nearly $30k on a very exotic track-day toy? Let's hope so.

-tad

1999 Yamaha R7 R Front

The Real Thing Redux: 1999 Yamaha R7 for Sale
Bimota August 29, 2015 posted by

Bimötaheads: 1986 Bimota DB1 and 1998 Bimota YB11

"Like any habit that becomes a vice, you think you can handle it.  Just the one.  That's what you tell yourself.  As a man of fortitude and strong character, you can take it or leave it.  But before too long you've crossed a line.  You don't even know where that line was and now you're hooked, unsure of how you got here not sure you even want to go back.   No one ever stops at just one Bimota". - Alan Seeley, Practical Sportbikes, August 2015

binota111

Call it common sense or logic or whatever you want, there is a legitimate argument that says pre-bankruptcy Bimotas aren't worth the money, that modern day sportbikes are better at everything the Rimini factory produced back in the day, and that the company has more misses than hits.  It is true the Rimini firm's pre-bankruptcy operations resulted in some goods bikes (YB4, S8R) and some not-so-great (Mantra, VDue, Tesi 1D) but Bimotas still seem to appeal to a lot of collectors.

For this post, we have a Bimota collector located in Norwalk, Connecticut with a large collection of Bimotas who has decided to let two go; a 1986 Bimota DB1 and a 1998 Bimota YB11.

Note:  The collector indicates that the rest of the collection will be up for sale shortly so I suggest you favorite the seller if a Bimtoa is something you have on your wish list - Marty/Dallaslavowner

db11

1986 Bimota DB1 for sale on ebay

The DB1 was notable as the first "all-Italian" Bimota as it was the first effort with a Ducati engine.  While the DB1 came with a 750 cc Ducati powerplant, it was the frame that was a big improvement over the Ducati it was based on. Made of special steel tubing and using a triangulated "Birdcage" design, the frame used the engine as a stressed member.  The DB1 also had trick parts such as a triple-tree/fork top, clip-ons, rear-sets made of aluminum.

Several DB1 models were produced, this one appears to be the standard version with 36 mm carburetors and the quieter exhaust.

Here is a summary of the bike:

  • One of only 400 DB1's produced
  • 13,000 miles/19,000 kilometers
  • Custom two-in-one exhaust system
  • Belt service,and all fluids a few years ago
  • Special two piece custom wheels.
  • Few small stress cracks but nothing that would cause me to get the body refinished.
  • Bike will be sold with a bill of sale, but I believe it can be titled because its over 25 years oldv(never titled).

Opening Bid of $20,000 USD has already been met but reserve is not met.  Previous listings on RSBFS seem to show a price ranging between $35,000 for a used race bike to $45,000 USD for a new-in-the-crate edition.   This DB1 looks to be pristine, so expect the upper end of the range to be required to take this one home.

Now here is the second offering, a 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera.

yb11

1998 Bimota YB11 for sale on ebay

While the the YB 11 had the same engine as the Yahama YZF1000R, the Bimota was 33 pounds (15kg) lighter than the Yamaha, hence the name Superleggera/"Superlight".  The reduced weight gave the YB11 neck cracking acceleration, with a flick of the throttle sending the YB11 ripping towards a top speed of 170mph.  The YB11 also came with a sophisticated Paioli rear shock and a new aluminium rear swingarm.  Overall, the Bimota was more race oriented than the YZR1000R it was based on, with a stretched-out riding position, flat seat and firmer suspension. Only 650 were reported to have been built.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • Has just over 3,000 miles.
  • Totally stock, includes the single seat cowl and passenger seat.
  • Only flaw is a crack in the windshield which I repaired with a high strength epoxy.

The opening bid price of $10,000 USD for this YB11 has not been met.  Previous YB11 listings on RSBFS seem to show a price ranging between $8,000 and $10,000 USD so this one might be priced a bit high but the YB11 is certainly one of the best looking pre-bankruptcy Bimota models.  Also Bimotas tend to depreciate very slowly but I have to say I don't think it will increase in value as a collectors item ala the VDue or Tesi editions.

yb112

One last note - while these two Bimotas will likely appeal more to someone already experience with Bimotas,  the seller indicates that the rest of his Bimota collection will be up for sale shortly,   If a pre-bankruptcy Bimtoa is something you have on your wish list, I suggest you favorite the eBay auction seller id.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Writers Notation/shameless plug for which I will receive no type of compensation: The title of this post and some of the content are based on an article in the latest edition of my favorite magazine, Practical Sportbikes which is published out of the UK.   If you don't have a subscription and are a fan of late 1980's/1990's sportbikes, then you are missing out.   I urge you to get a subscription, you won't regret it - Marty/Dallaslavowner

Bimötaheads:  1986 Bimota DB1 and 1998 Bimota YB11
Yamaha December 30, 2014 posted by

Exotic Yammie: 1989 FZR750R OW01 in New Zealand

Update 12.30.2014: This OW01 is back on eBay with a buy-it-now of $20k. If you missed it the first time, this is a very reasonable buy! -dc

Because the specs and overall silhouette for the Yamaha FZR750R are misleadingly similar to the regular FZR750 and don't feature an exotic engine configuration like the Honda's RC30's gear-driven V4, it might be easy to overlook the OW01 as simply a warmed-over FZR. But it's every bit as exotic as its rivals, boasting pure racing guts and high-spec bits throughout.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 L Side

In fact, with only 500 made between 1989 and 1991, it’s fair to say that the OW01 is even more rare and desirable than the RC30, although it was not nearly successful in racing as the Honda.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Frame Plate

Because while it might look like a fairly standard FZR, everything about the OW01 is “bespoke”: castings of magnesium, internals of titanium, bore x stroke not shared with any other production Yamaha, flat-slide carbs to fed fuel, and even the frame, while looking stock, was made from higher-quality aluminum. The bike featured Yamaha’s signature five-valve heads and midrange-fattening EXUP valve that gave the motor a surprisingly street-friendly drivability, assuming you kept in mind that the flat-slide carbs couldn’t just be whacked open at low revs…

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Rear Wheel

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

The OW01 was Yamaha’s answer to the Honda VFR750R RC30 and is much rarer and exotic. When launched for 1989 in the UK the OW01 cost a staggering £12,700, more than twice as much as an FZR1000, with the optional race kit adding £2,415 to the price. Just 197 made their way to the UK, and only 88 were road registered, many of which went straight into collections. By way of comparison, the Honda RC30 cost £8,499 but its race kit was considerably more extensive and expensive. (Yamaha included much more race-orientated trickery as standard, hence the difference). To put all that into perspective, the 2014 list price of a Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike is just £12,399 .

We bought this example in Tokyo and it is frame #648. It is in excellent condition and has travelled just 4,700 miles or 7,600 kilometers. The OW01 is super collectible, we have another example on display in our Auckland showroom which has travelled just 2,800 kilometers. The OW01 is better than stocks or money in the bank we think.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Tank

The 119hp output seems pretty lukewarm by today’s standards, but this was state-of-the-art in 1989, a barely-tamed animal for the road that existed only to enable Yamaha's World Superbike racing efforts, although the EXUP valve did make it reasonably usable on the street. Just keep in mind: like most homologation specials, these require much more maintenance to keep them running than the everyday FZR on which it was based.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Dash

It is designed for the track, although tragically, most have ended up in living rooms. They didn’t have the winning record of Honda’s RC30, but sheer rarity and exotic specifications make this a blue-chip collectable of the first order. Bidding is up to $15,000 US with just one day to go. Keep in mind that this bike is in New Zealand if you're looking to bid!

-tad

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Shock

Exotic Yammie: 1989 FZR750R OW01 in New Zealand
Yamaha April 28, 2014 posted by

Ludicrous Speed: 1989 Yamaha FZR 1000 for sale in Georgia

1989 Yamaha FZR 1000 for sale

While today's liter bikes are measured by an even higher standard of speed, in the late 80's the 5 valve Yamaha Genesis motor was the top dog in the speed race amongst manufacturers. While the OW01 was certainly more exotic, the FZR 1000 provided even more punch in a straight line and still held it's own when dipped into a corner. This example while not totally stock, has some period correct upgrades that the seller details, and appears in genuinely good condition with only 6700 miles on the clock. It's already met reserve and is currently bid at just under $7k with 4 days remaining.

dc

1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for sale on eBay

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from the seller:

This bike is 9 out of a 10runs perfect . Has the popular mod of the time of updating the forks with yzf750r upside forks. You would be hard pressed to find a cleaner one. I can't believe how good it runs. The bike needs nothing title in hand . I have the original tool kit as well and bike come with rare seat cowl.

zzxvwe

Ludicrous Speed:  1989 Yamaha FZR 1000 for sale in Georgia
Aprilia July 19, 2013 posted by

Month in Review: June 2013 Sales Report

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Welcome back to our latest sales report, where savvy buyers and sellers keep an eye on market values. We blogged a record 60 bikes in June and readers purchased 14 bikes in total.

Lowest sale price: $2900
Highest sale price: $19800

Congratulations to June’s buyers and sellers!

dc

Let's get it started with this 1996 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 that had a buy-it-now of $3600 and sold after one relist for $2950.

1996 Suzuki GSX-R 1100


This Yamaha YZR500 replica build in the UK was first listed for about $22,600 but ended up selling for $20,500 after two relists.

Yamaha YZR500 replica


In Arizona this 2002 Aprilia RS250 MKII sold for a shade over $9k.

2002 Aprilia RS250


This red-headed Moto Guzzi V11 Rosso Corsa sold for a very reasonable $5500.

2003 Moto Guzzi Rosso Corsa


Here was a sharp 1997 Yamaha YZF750R that sold for a mere $3700.

1997 Yamaha YZF750R


Next is this 1987 Honda CBR600 Hurricane that sold for $3950.

1987 Honda CBR600 Hurricane


A cult favorite, this 1985 Yamaha RZ350 sold for just $5000.

1985 Yamaha RZ350


This 1982 Ducati 900 Supersport pulled in $17,100!

1982 Ducati 900SS


After being relisted once, this 1996 Bimota BB1 is going to sell for $5444.

1996 Bimota BB1


With one relist, this Yamaha FZR400 sold for $3450.

Yamaha FZR400


Combining items in a single auction almost never works, but in the case of this lot with a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 and 1987 GSX-R50 sold for $13,100.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100


Here's an ugly duckling that sold for just $2900.

1996 Yamaha FZR600


In the Pacific Northwest, this 1990 Honda NSR250R (MC21) sold for a mere $4825.

1990 Honda NSR250R


While not a Formula, this 1999 Laverda 750S sold for just $4550.

1999 Laverda 750S


And this nearly new 2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss sold for an astonishing $19,800!

2002 Ducati 998S Bayliss


At the other end of the spectrum, this 2001 Ducati 996 with just 1100 miles sold for $7500, which I think might be the best Ducati of the month.

2001 Ducati 996


Another 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100, and this one sold for $5400.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 1100

Month in Review:  June 2013 Sales Report

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