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Suzuki March 6, 2018 posted by

Low Mile Lookalike – 1979 Suzuki GS1000E Wes Cooley

I had expected an "S" with the GS1000 badge on this sparkling Wes Cooley commemorative, but the differences between the -E are minor and hardly detract from the aggressive looks of this AMA Superbike commemorative.

1979 Suzuki GS100E Wes Cooley for sale on eBay

Suzuki and Yoshimura joined forces and were almost instantly successful on the AMA Superbike trail.  Lightness was given priority, which helped the air/oil-cooled four's 90 hp move things in the right direction.  Pneumatic rear shocks were replaced with regular hydraulics on the -S, though forks remained air-charged.  The solid triple disks could handle the heat but not a light touch, squeaking around town.  Suzuki nailed the chassis geometry and came away with a quick-handling package that could accept a 1000cc engine's power.

Not many miles has elapsed for this GS1000, replica paint still shines, and aluminum castings made before today's miracle coatings look good.  Period Kerker is polished nicely.  Might be nice to try the rear quarter view without the luggage rack.  From the eBay auction:

Purchased in 2005, bike had approximately 5K miles on it

2005 - installed after market rack and rear tire; had front and rear tires rebalanced, and professional valve adjustment

2014 - new clutch and speedometer cable installed

2016 - new battery

No disappointments in running condition; bike runs as good as she looks! Bike has always been garaged and well maintained. This bike had the after-market Vance & Hines exhaust system (4 into 1) when I purchased it, so I do not have the original stock pipes.

Bike as you see it is exactly as I purchased it in 2005; has not been altered or repainted. The only addition / change I made to it was the after-market rack, rear tire and mechanical items (as mentioned above).

Lifting the bikini fairing from BMW's R90/S gave designers the excuse to fit a lower handlebar, receiving a sporty riding position as part of the bargain, helping high speed stability.  Suzuki played a little catch-up with the -S, it was originally just offered in Europe, but stateside dealers clamored - after all, it was the AMA winner !  Which might explain the -E instead of -S, maybe a dealer-done special or early example.  A close look at the rear wheel might divulge, the -S had an 18-inch rear.  Maybe a knowledgeable reader will have the whole story, meantime we will just have to enjoy...


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Sales Report March 4, 2018 posted by

Sales Summary – December 2017

The final month of the calendar year brought with it weather for some parts of the country, but that did not freeze up the supply of great bikes. Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let's take a look back at December 2017 and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.

SOLD Bikes

2001 Bimota V-Due Evoluzione Corsa - SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)

1996 Buell S1 Lightning - SOLD for $7,000

1998 Ducati 900SS FE - SOLD for $9,995

1986 Honda VF1000R - SOLD as a Featured Listing for $5,000!

1980 Kawasaki Z1R - SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)

1999 Suzuki Hayabusa - SOLD for $5,700!

1993 Yamaha TZR250RS - SOLD for $8,301!

Unsold Bikes

2001 Aprilia RSV Mille R - No sale with bids up to $3,716

1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike - No sale with bids up to $6,455

1992 Bimota Tesi 1D - No sale at $65,000

1995 Bimota SB6 - No sale at $24,900

2009 Bimota DB7 - No sale at $26,000

Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K - Listed as no sale with bids up to $20,100

2007 BMW K1200R Sport - No sale at $12,999

1978 NCR-Ducati 900SS - No sale at $39,000

2000 Ducati 996S - Listing ended early

2006 Ducati PS1000 LE - No sale at $13,490

1986 Honda NS400R - listed ended early

1988 Honda CBR250R - Zero bids at $3,995 opening ask

1992 Honda VFR400R - No sale at $9,500

1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 - No sale with bids up to $6,599

1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R - No sale with bids up to $14,000

2011 KTM RC8R - No sale at $10,900

Suzuki Carbon Katana Resto-Mod - No sale with bids up to $18,500

Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 - No sale at $120,000

1991 Suzuki RGV250 - Listing ended early

1993 Suzuki GSXR400 - Listing ended early

1995 Suzuki RGV250 - listing ended early

2003 Triumph Speed Four - No sale with bids up to $1,175

1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No sale at $25,000

1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No sale with bids up to $15,200

1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No sale with bids up to $13,300

1987 Yamaha FZ600 - No sale with bids up to $3,150

1993 Yamaha GTS1000 - Zero bids with a $6,000 opening ask

2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE - No sale at $18,600

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Moto Guzzi March 4, 2018 posted by

Grey Goose – 1984 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Mk. III

Rare as an air-cooled Moto Guzzi Le Mans is these days, a square-head Mark III is not often among them.  And you wouldn't be faulted for expecting orangey-red or black, but this example was re-done in a very BMW-ish grey metallic.  The overall condition, trim Mk.III fairings and black wheels mask the age of this well cared-for Guzzi.

1984 Moto Guzzi Le Mans Mk. III for sale on eBay

The Le Mans has had such a long run that every example can be a history lesson.  The Mk.III was a substantial revision, angular from cylinder heads to fairings, with slight changes to engine and chassis geometry.  What weren't changed were the Le Mans paradigms - shaft drive, linked brakes, clip-ons, stable handling, and generous torque.  Gas rear shocks and coupled air forks were a notable addition, as were 18-inch wheels  front and rear.

Owned by a BMW wrench and evident mega-fan, this 850 Le Mans was treated to many performance enhancements and charcoal urban camouflage - looking very good for 30, thank you.  Original parts to ( gasp ! ) return it to stock are also included.  From the eBay auction:

It has been treated lovingly, always stored in a heated dry environment. It has been owned by a BMW Motorrad Master Technician (myself) since 1989. It was ridden briefly a few days ago to take the photos you are viewing. It definitely needs to get out and stretch its legs a bit but it has been registered as non-op here in California (it is fully insured however) and it needs tires as the Metzelers mounted on it are vintage as well.

It has been treated to the best, most desirable upgrades in the time I have owned it. Almost all of the upgrades were carried out in 1990 and 1991. The upgrades include RaceCo (Brooklyn, NY, RIP)  helical cut gear-driven camshaft, Ohlins piggyback shock absorbers, TeleFix adjustable handlebars (NLA), Agostini alloy rearset footrests (NLA), de-linked brakes with custom Kosman brake lines, K & N individual air filters, brand new Dyna ignition (with good used spare), new Lucas coils, and TeleFix fork brace. It includes one Albert sport bar end mirror that is shown in the photos. It also received new rings, a full de-carb and valve guide seals a few years back. I am including all of the original stock parts that I hung onto including the airbox, Marzocchi shocks, footrests, coils, cam sprockets, handlebars, etc. See photos for details. The photos are part of the description and I do not state that everything is included to return it to stock trim. If you don't see it, it is not included.

The paintwork was done by the legendary Mike Stolarz at Bavarian Cycle Works in 1990. It is as gorgeous as the day it was completed. It is charcoal metallic and silver metallic with hand painted gold pinstripes. The decals and pinstriping were clear coated with the rest of the paint. It contributed to winning a trophy at the Corona Del Mar bike show despite having been ridden all the way from San Francisco the day before and competing without the benefit of a wash!

Even in the mid-eighties the Guzzi's were idiosyncratic, using their own measures of an exciting ride rather than the yardstick of the stopwatch and race results.  The Mk. III was replaced for a few years by the 948cc CX-100, while the company completed development of noise and emissions-compliant airbox and carburetors.  The early-80's reintroduction was a homecoming for fans of the model, and continued almost for the rest of the decade.  This Mk. III looks to have received the star treatment right from the very beginning...


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Ducati March 3, 2018 posted by

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

I realize that I'm spoiled. I'm spoiled because my current riding group includes five or six MV Agustas that actually run, a pair of RSV4s, a few Ducatis, a couple Bimotas, and a KTM. I'm spoiled because I live in Southern California, and car and motorcycle exotica are everywhere: I've recently come across a few Arch Motorcycles, nearly every variety of 90s two-stroke, Confederate Fighters actually being ridden on the road, a slew of Bimotas, pretty much every vintage and modern sportbike you can possibly imagine, even a Gurney Alligator. Which is possibly why I'm surprisingly blase about the Ducati Desmosedici RR, one of the most exotic machines of the past twenty years.

It's not fair to the Desmo. I should be incredibly impressed by it, but it probably doesn't help that I've never really thought the Desmo was all that beautiful. It's no doubt a very aggressive machine, with a leering, hungry-catfish face and a wild exhaust that exits through the top of the tailpiece, at least in stock form: there's also a Ducati Performance system that vents two of the cylinders through the bellypan on the right side and the others through a more traditional underseat pipe. But although it lacks the slim-waisted purpose of a 916 or the sculptural elegance of an MV Agusta F4, the D16RR, meant to closely ape the look of Ducati's 990cc MotoGP racebike, has an air of ruthlessness about it and looks like nothing else on the road.

The original idea was to take Ducati's V4-powered MotoGP racebike and detune it, then sell a few to well-heeled enthusiasts to use at trackdays or as living room ornamentation. While other "race replicas" of the period generally consisted of race bike colors, graphics, and even sponsors splashed across otherwise stock bikes, Ducati went and made a bike that had almost nothing in common with any of their production motorcycles. It even used an annoyingly-authentic 16" rear wheel, something that must be pretty inconvenient when you're trying to get street tires to shoe this thing.

Of course, the D16RR is obviously no "homologation special" since MotoGP is a prototype series and the bikes need share nothing except a badge with a company's roadgoing offerings. Appearances and specifications to the contrary, the Desmo doesn't actually use a detuned MotoGP powerplant: race engines in the premier class don't factor longevity into the equation and, even detuned, don't make useable or practical road bike powerplants, considering they lack things like a charging system or a starter...

Instead, Ducati basically whipped up an entirely new V4 engine for the bike that very, very closely mirrors the specifications and layout of the racebike while at the same time sharing almost no parts... So you still get a 989cc 90° V4 with gear-driven cams, Desmodromic valve actuation, and a "twin-pulse" firing order that gives it a bit of Ducati flavor compared to a "screamer" or "big-bang" configuration, along with a beefed-up cassette-style gearbox.

Considering the price tag, you could be forgiven for being unimpressed with the 170hp output and 425lb wet weight, but the numbers alone fail to capture the wild, track-bred character. And the Desmo is littered with top-shelf parts that help reign in the power, like the Öhlins FG353P gas-pressurized forks up front that are truly "race spec" and normally cost as much as a new GSX-R600...

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

No compromise, Italian passion personified. The high water mark for street legal sportbikes.

#895 out of 1500.

1878 miles all street so far. May increase in the next few months I don’t think I can resist doing some track days on this bike as the weather improves.

Serviced by a Ducati Master Technician at 1814 miles.

Clean title in hand, all manuals, 2 keys, technical workshop DVD.

Here’s a good article detailing the specs and history of this bike:

The bike is in my living room right now, seems perfectly normal to me, but wife isn’t amused - please buy this so I can start sleeping in my bed again.

I'm willing to deliver or meet you within a 1000 mile radius of Salt Lake City for a small additional fee.  Please contact me for details.  Or is a good option for shipping.

Bike is for sale locally also, I reserve the right to end this auction at any time.

This one appears to be nearly untouched, with under two thousand miles. Which makes sense because the seller claims it's currently being used in lieu of a big-screen television or a painting of a ship being tossed on stormy seas to liven up their home. They may have chosen to get rid of the Desmo, but is that the real problem here? New, the bike retailed for $72,000 and the 1,500 built were quickly snapped up by collectors, although anyone looking to quickly flip their purchase for profit were severely disappointed: these can often be found for well under that, and certainly much less than today's example with an $80,000 asking price. Have values jumped sharply, or is this seller simply ambitious?


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Yamaha March 2, 2018 posted by

Big Fizz: 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM

It's hard to find an FZR 1000 that isn't as cool as a snow cone in a blizzard, but the '89s and '90s really speak to me. Maybe it's the Bike of the Decade designation for the '89s. Maybe it's the Ow01-aping bug-eyed fairing. Maybe it's the sub-three-second 0-60 and 170 mph top end. Probably it's a little of each.

1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM

In any case, the drool comes on hard and strong when one of these comes up, and today's 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 3GM is from a friend of the site whose rides are always a cut above the rest. It has one aftermarket fairing to replace a cracked original, but the bodywork is otherwise untouched. The cracked original piece is included, for those who have to have everything just as it was.

From the eBay listing:

Time to sell the big guns! Up for sale is a very nice 1990 Yamaha FZR1000 with only 14,640 kilometers (9,097 miles). This FZR is in excellent condition and looks beautiful. Upper fairing had a crack in it so I put on a new very high quality FRP upper fairing from Italy. (Original fairing included in sale if you’d like it). The rest of the fairings are 100% genuine OEM Yamaha factory. Bike has stock exhaust and OEM factory passenger seat cover for that solo look. Bike would be in perfect condition if not for the right side inner plastic panel. There is a very small piece that has broken off. You wouldn’t notice it if I didn’t tell you but it’s there. Original windscreen has a few scratches and blemishes but very clear. Regardless, this is a very nice bike. No dents in the tank, the muffler is perfect no scratches, the fairings are perfect no scratches and the bike runs like new. Just serviced with new Dunlop Sportmax tires, new battery and new engine fluids. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use. $200 deposit due immeadiatly after sales end thru PayPal. Balance due within 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Please text 801-358-6537 for more photos or questions.

It's a great piece of early '90s nostalgia, and remains a ridiculously fast motorcycle, even in the face of 30 years of development.

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