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Suzuki October 12, 2017 posted by

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

It's hard to imagine that, just a couple years before the introduction of the GSX-R750, Suzuki's top-performing repli-racer was the stylish, but very last-generation GS1000S, a bike with twin shocks, handlebars, a center-stand, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing. The original "Slabbie" GSX-R750 that came along in 1985 brought modern endurance-racing style to the masses and codified the formula laid out by much rarer and more exotic machines like the Bimota SB2. This particular GSX-R750 Limited Edition claws back some exotic cachet from the Italian brand, and is one of just 299 imported to the USA to meet AMA homologation requirements.

The heart of the GSX-R was an oil and air-cooled inline four with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. It lacked liquid-cooling in a bid to save weight, reduce complexity, and improve reliability, but still had a few high-tech tricks up its sleeve: Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" featured a double-chambered oil pump was designed to more efficiently circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the bottom of the pistons. The aluminum frame used a mono-shock rear and four-piston brake calipers clamped triple discs. The Limited version added a very trick dry clutch, lightweight solo seat tail section, and the GSX-R1100's electronic anti-dive forks.

The Limited was differentiated by the striking red, white, and blue paint seen here on the distinctive, slab-sided bodywork, compared to the standard white-and-blue or red-and-black available on the regular GSX-R. When new, the bike was the most expensive Japanese sportbike, and was priced at $6,500, a shocking $2,000 more than the standard model. Performance advantages were very minimal but that wasn't really the point and this is, to my mind, the best-looking version of the early GSX-R.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

Race homologation special. It has 4545 miles. This bike is in as near perfect collectors condition for a 31 year old bike. Motorcycle was just fully serviced (ie carbs were serviced; all fluids changed; new tires added, as originals showed signs of cracking.)

These bikes have surged in price, exceeding $20K in most cases.

If you are looking at this bike, you know what it is, so NO LOW BALL OFFERS!!!!

The seller is correct that prices have surged, and his bike appears to be in excellent, very original condition that includes a stock exhaust that could be either "cool and retro" or "shockingly ugly" depending on your predilection for slotted heat shields. Certainly it's of value to collectors. Unfortunately, while his $20,000 asking price is fair, it actually seems just a bit on the high-side, at least looking at Limited Editions we've featured here on RSBFS in the past. I'm not sure just how far off his asking price an offer would have to be before it qualifies as "a low ball offer," but I have a feeling he may be disappointed. Will at least one buyer meet his asking price? It's very possible: those same recent bikes I mentioned didn't quite get to $20,000 but were very close.

-tad


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Triumph October 11, 2017 posted by

Black-Clad Bruiser: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Triumph’s entire 1990s range of sport, sport-touring, retro, and naked machines like this original Speed Triple was built around a common spine frame and two engines, the 885cc inline triple seen here and a larger-displacement inline four. This allowed Triumph to quickly create new variations and mirror market trends without sacrificing quality, a strategy that led directly to today’s world-class motorcycles. But the company's road to success was a difficult one. They were long gone by the early 1990s, a victim of the Japanese motorcycle industry’s massive growth in the 1980s. Triumph was able to hang on throughout the 1970s, trading on their handling and reputation for performance. But once the Japanese bikes’ handling caught up with their reliably powerful engines, it was all over but the shouting.

The reborn Triumph of the 90s knew that it could never hope to compete with the Japanese in terms of outright performance, so they focused instead on quality and capitalizing on the brand’s undeniable mystique. The new Triumph motorcycles offered real-world performance, decent handling, and surprisingly high fit and finish. It's not the lightest or nimblest of machines: none of these first-generation John Bloor-era Triumphs were. But they were well-built and charismatic, just as intended.

T309 Speed Triples are definitely not track machines: a top-heavy weight distribution caused by the spine frame compromised handling, although there was a promotional one-make race series for them called the "Speed Triple Challenge" that must have been fun to watch. The rugged triple and five-speed gearbox may not offer performance that will set your hair on fire today, but the 98 claimed horses mean the Speed Triple is plenty fast for road use and the bike should sound great with the aftermarket three-into-one exhaust seen here.

The seller refers to the bike as "this original naked bike." If he means "one of the original naked bikes" then he'd be correct. The Speed Triple was introduced in 1994, but Italian rival Ducati's Monster was introduced a year prior in 1993 and Honda's proto-Monster Hawk GT was first available all the way back in 1988, although it was kind of a sales flop at the time. Nevertheless, the Speed Triple is one of Triumph's best-selling bikes of the modern era and, much like the Monster, can probably be credited with the company's current success.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Thanks for looking. This is a very good condition 1995 Triumph speed triple. It has recently had a top end overhaul and new timing chain and tensioner/guides. The bike fires on the 2nd crank every time and runs awesome. I am looking to sell to downsize my collection due to a growing family. 

I have and will include with the selling price, the original Triumph dual exhaust that is pictured in one photo. It is not installed but all hardware is there. 

Many spares are included as well which were given to me by previous owner. 

I have owned for the last 5 years and have had a blast riding this original naked bike. This bike was the first year the speed triple was offered in the USA. My offering is your chance to own a modern classic. 

There's been no interest in the bike so far at the starting bid of $1,500 but there are still a couple days left on the auction. The first-gen Speed Triple is nearly a classic at this point, but modern enough you can count on it to start every day, and the build quality of the Bloor-era bikes is high. They've been pretty cheap for a while now, and many that come up for sale feature signs of neglect, but this one looks very nice, and supposedly comes with a bunch of additional parts, so it might be worth looking into as a future collectible.

-tad


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Honda October 10, 2017 posted by

The Last and the Best? 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

Sometimes, the very final version of a car or motorcycle is a pale shadow of the original, as the years inevitably add pounds and dilute the purity of what made the original example so desirable. But the Honda NSR250R went out with a bang instead of a whimper, at the top of its game, and is considered by many to be the best of the series. The MC28 might have put on a couple pounds compared to the previous MC21, owing largely to that very cool ELF-designed Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm that was heavier than the double-sided aluminum units that preceded it, but the bike was packed with cutting-edge technology.

There were three versions of the MC28, the standard R version, the SE that came with a dry clutch, and the SP that included the dry clutch and a set of lightweight Magtek wheels. This example is the regular R, but all MC28s are pretty special and come standard with that Pro-Arm swingarm, a 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin and a six-speed cassette gearbox for easy, track-side gearing changes.

The two small combustion chambers were still filled by carburetors, but the charge was ignited by what was probably the most sophisticated electronic control system available on a motorcycle at that time. The fourth iteration of Honda's electronic ignition was called, naturally, "PGM-IV." The system took in sensor input from the throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and adjust Honda's RC "Revolutionary Controlled" Valve for maximum power and response.

The biggest concern if you're looking at a NSR250 is whether or not it has been de-restricted: power for the Japanese-market 250s was limited to just 45hp, and it can be very difficult to unleash the bike's full potential without the HRC version of the ignition card that functions as the MC28's key. The seller doesn't mention whether or not this bike has already been de-restricted, but it's worth a quick email to the seller as this will affect the value and desirability, especially for anyone interested in riding this little machine in anger.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

This is a 94 Honda NSR250 MC28 v-twin 2-stroke sportbike with credit card ignition and only 6000 kilometers (3600 miles). 

Clean North Carolina title with the correct 11 digit VIN. These are quite rare to find in the US as they were originally only sold in Japan, and this is the lowest mileage example I have ever seen here in the US. It is completely stock and all the controls are tight and smooth as you would expect on a low mileage bike. I bought this bike in 2011 after it had been removed from storage, fluids changed/replenished, new tires mounted, and new chain installed. I start it up several times a year and ride it occasionally but I doubt I have put over 200 miles on it since I have owned it. I recently put a new battery in it and disassembled the carbs to clean the bowls and jets out.  It starts and runs as it should.  I don't need to sell this bike but I have a lot of other toys and feel it is time to turn it over for someone else to enjoy if that person is out there. Tool kit is in place and I also have the passenger seat pad.  Rear stand and indoor cover is included.  Has one scuff on the right side of the tail section that has been touched up, and the rear of the right lower is discolored.  Other than that, very minor blemishes only.  Not really interested in any trades. 

Winning bidder must pick up bike in person in Charlotte, NC and pay in cash.  Title will be signed over at that time.  Willing to discuss shipping if you make all arrangements to have your carrier pick bike up at my house after all funds have cleared.

The Buy It Now price for this NSR250 is $10,000 which is reasonable for a nice, clean NSR250 with a US title. The MC28 included some of the most advanced technology ever available in the two-stroke 250cc class, and is thought of by many as being the best-looking of the breed, with the cool single-sided swingarm providing the visual flourish that seals the deal. Unfortunately, residents of states like California might be out of luck, as titling can prove impossible for a bikes less than 25 years old. Of course, if you "know a guy," or "know a guy that knows a guy" then you can probably make that happen but, if you're in a state where registering this might prove possible, it's a huge help that this bike comes with a clean US title. Otherwise, maybe just buy it and display it for a couple years before you try to register it. Certainly, the last of the Honda two-strokes will only going go up in value.

-tad


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Suzuki October 9, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

The market for factory replicas is hot right now, especially from the 1980s era of Superbike racing. These were the days of low-tech, skinny tires, big handlebars and manly men riders. Air-cooled, inline fours with two-valve heads and a quartet of carbs ruled the track. Motors were impossibly wide, bias-ply tires were (by today's standards) impossibly skinny, forks were still conventional and had yet to be turned upside down, and brake rotors had yet to grow to the insane proportions of current hardware. This was a key period of sport bike development, and this fantastic 1980 Suzuki GS1000S "Wes Cooley" replica highlights all that was right about the moment.

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Wester Steven Cooley won the 1979 and 1980 AMA Superbike Championships on a Pops Yoshimura-prepped Suzuki GS1000S. Suzuki never officially cashed in on Wes Cooley's name and fame, but the 1980 GS1000S was a stunning silhouette of the AMA racer. It was only in the years following that these models became know as Wes Cooley models - but it only seems fair given Kawasaki's similar creation of the ELR. To build the replica, Suzuki used the standard GS1000 offering; the limited edition "S" model came a year after the rest of the GS1000 lineup. The Wes Cooley replica did not have any material differences to the other GS1000 models in terms of engine, but it did share what was widely regarded as the best chassis to emerge from Japan during the era. Ultimately, that was the secret to the success of the bike on the track. For its first entry into the 1000cc market, Suzuki created a winner - both on the race track as well as the showroom.

From the seller:
1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Good solid riding classic, clean GA title, you don't see too many of these in this condition, although no museum piece it shows nice and rides well, starts right up and everything works like it did back in 1980. A cool survivor to ride "as is" or to do a complete showroom restoration, I have the stock air box and stock exhaust although the mufflers look good, underneath they are starting to give in to the dreaded rust.

New Michelin tires, new OEM petcock, new OEM clutch, new K&N pod filters, new Dynojet kit, new oil and filter, new OEM head gasket just installed (inc bills for work done) head decked, valves checked, new OEM o rings and gaskets used. paint work is shiny and shows well, no rust on or in the tank, has some signs of an older repair on the fairing, has had one re bore with OEM pistons and rings at 40k or 8 thousand miles ago. The seat really needs a new cover, the clock no longer functions, the fuel gauge is intermittent and the needle from the oil temp gauge has come off. This bike has been my rider for the past several thousand miles and gets plenty of attention everywhere it goes.

Just a good solid representation of a getting harder to find classic, ready to ride home to anywhere in the country today.

Make no mistake - this is a rare make and model. Suzuki had no plans to bring the GS1000S into America. But when US dealers saw it during an overseas dealer conference they pressured Suzuki into importing the model. Reports indicate that dealers in the US were allotted a single bike, with only 500 units imported for 1979 and 700 units for 1980. Today few survive in recognizable condition, and those that do are commanding higher and higher prices. This one has higher mileage than some we have seen, but there is still a lot of life left in it yet.

This beautiful Suzuki time piece is located in Georgia, and will be going to a good home at the end of this No Reserve auction. There have been a large number of bids early on, showing the level of interest that these Wes Cooley replica models generate. Jump in before it is too late, as this 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica looks too good to pass up. Good Luck!!

MI

Yamaha October 9, 2017 posted by

Rarity with unfortunate paint: 1993 Yamaha GTS1000A

The Yamaha GTS1000's front suspension is from an era when bike makers were getting into wild experimentation to eliminate the shortcomings of conventional two-legged forks. Bimota spat out its interpretation with the Tesi, John Britten tried with the Hossack design, and Yamaha licensed RADD, Inc.'s design.

1993 Yamaha GTS1000 for sale on eBay



Before we go any further, it has to be said that the GTS1000 is way more sport tourer than sport bike, but its rarity and innovative spirit make it worthy of a space here. Needless to say, the buying public didn't catch on to what engineers knew inherently, and bought bikes they could understand, which carried traditional front ends.

That left the GTS out in the cold, and few made it onto the streets.

The GTS you see here has, ah, been altered some from stock, and we can't say that is necessarily a good thing. To each their own, we suppose. It also has been sitting for the last decade, and will need the maintenance that comes along with that.

From the eBay listing:

ORIGINAL OWNER, 18,000 MILES. STOCK EXCEPT FOR CUSTOM PAINT IN 1997. HAS BEEN SITTING IN GARAGE SINCE 2006, SO NEEDS A NEW BATTERY AND PROBABLY FUEL LINES. STILL TURNS HEADS. INCLUDES OPTIONAL YAMAHA SADDLEBAGS. HEALTH FORCES SALE.

Though the cosmetics are polarizing, they have almost certainly lowered the cost of entry of this rare beast, and these things will certainly become more desirable the older they get. For the right price, it could be well worth snapping this one up and embracing the weird while you decide whether to take it back to stock.


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