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Aprilia February 17, 2017 posted by

Tiny Titled Two-Stroke: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale

Back when two-strokes ruled the entry-level sportbike class in Europe, Aprilia’s RS125 was designed to appeal to new riders who wanted something sporty, but were limited in terms of displacement and outright power by strict licensing laws that prevented the purchase of bikes that in the USA would be considered "learner bikes." Sponsor logos and race-replica paint jobs were the order of the day and, made between 1992 and 2012, the RS125 had a pretty long and successful run. Details and styling varied throughout production, according to tastes of the period, but spec was similar: a 124.8cc two-stroke, single cylinder and six-speed gearbox, aluminum beam frame, racy big-bike looks, and a sub-300lb dry weight.

This version of the RS125 is clearly meant to resemble Aprilia's range-topping RSV1000, with those angular, cat's-eye headlights and stealth-fighter angles, although it shares those traits with the RSV4 that followed as well. Ultimately, the RS125 was superseded by the RS4 that more closely matched the look of the bigger RSV4 and was powered by a four-stroke single to meet today’s more stringent emissions requirements. It’s a perfectly competent machine and looks very sharp, but it lacks the pop and fizz of a manic two-stroke, and is far less tunable to boot.

The RS125 were never officially imported to the USA for road use, but some made it here "for offroad use only" and they do come up for sale from time to time. Unfortunately, the sleek little RS125 has two problems: one, you can’t just call it an “RS125” or people might not be clear what bike you’re talking about. Did you mean the Aprilia or the Honda’s entry-level race bike? Two, and obviously more significantly, the same titling and registration issues that affect all grey-market two-strokes apply here. If you live in a state with a liberal DMV, you may be able to find a way to make one road-legal without too much trouble: titled examples like this one have shown up on this site before. If not, you’re stuck with a handsome display piece or a very slow track day bike. If I was looking for a display bike, I’d probably want a bit of genuine racing machinery or something truly historic...

Fortunately, this example is ready for road use, at least in Pennsylvania...

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Aprilia RS125 for Sale

For Sale-York, PA. 2009 Aprilia RS 125 2 stroke. Clean and clear title. 798 miles. 34mm DeLorto carb, V-Force 3 reeds, pinned TPS, pipercross OEM style air filter, Arrow exhaust, Tyga carbon fiber rear hugger, chain guard and engine cover, Rhinomoto front and rear axle sliders, Driven Racing swingarm spools, R&G tail tidy, Evotech exhaust hanger, Woodcraft rearsets w/ GP shift, Aprilia OEM European ECU and harness to allow lighting, factory signals, mirrors and TS relay, Ohlins front fork springs, many replaced OEM parts included, Dyno tuned by Eraldo Ferracci of Fast By Ferracci. It comes with the factory Aprilia parts book and service manual. This was $5499 new in 2009 when only 150 were imported for racing only. It came derestricted with no lighting. Considering the amount of kit put on this bike and the rarity of this bike I think it is a more than fair price. I reserve the right to end this auction as the bike is also for sale locally. Serious bidders can contact me for more pictures or information. I will not ship this motorcycle so it will have to be picked up. Bike will have to be picked up within two weeks of auction end or deposit will be forfeited. You must have at least a 95% positive feedback rating to bid and at least 20 positive feedbacks. Deposit can be made through PayPal but the balance must be paid in cash.***It is currently tagged, titled, inspected and insured in York County, PA. It is titled as a regular motorcycle.

So what’s it worth? Well this seller has set the starting bid at $6,000 and there are no takers yet so he may be aiming a bit high. Certainly this one has that road-legal status, very low miles, and has been thoughtfully modified using quality parts and tuned by the famous owner of Fast by Ferracci. Eraldo had his hands on my Ducati Monster when I had it in to be rejetted and I was pretty happy with the results, so that'd certainly be a selling point for me. If you're in the market for a little two-stroke sportbike you can thrash the living daylights out of without tripling the national speed limit and live somewhere it can be titled, this one might be worth a look.

-tad


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Ducati February 16, 2017 posted by

Worked – 2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto

Ducati SportClassics were made from 2006-2010, and with their cafe-racer looks, were very popular with customizers.  The dual-spark 992cc engine was fuel injected, and its reliability lent itself more to breathing upgrades than internal work.  This example has had intake and exhaust work and some well-executed cosmetic upgrades.

2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto for sale on eBay

Designer Pierre Terblanche got started with the wild-retro MH900E, and completed the thought with the SportClassic line.  Pretty good power from the air-cooled desmodue at 92hp, with stable handling and moderate weight.  Dual shocks and dry clutch make reference to the good old days.  Bars are apparently clip-ons, but have risers and some adjustment to ease the pain.  The seat is the best of both worlds, a dual seat with color coordinated cafe cover.

No word on how many owners, but this Sport has been treated well and shows just one spot of clearcoat failure for its 7,500 miles.  The current owner is an Arrow fan and put on 2-into-1 exhaust and had it altered to work with the passenger pegs.  Velocity stacks and ECU reprogramming complete the respiratory therapy.

Not often seen at this level are the fender-ectomy and SpeedyMoto open cam belts ( with guards ).  Can't say the license plate mount is my taste but there a lot of nice smaller upgrades.  From the eBay auction:

• Pazzo adjustable brake and clutch levers
• Kuan steering damper mount with Ohlins damper
• Rear fender removed
• Taillight flipped and mounted under the seat pan (turn signals reversed to accommodate flip)
• Custom license plate mount with factory license plate light
• STM clutch slave
• Custom Arrow 2 ­1 stainless steel race full exhaust (not a slip on) ­­ I fell in love with Arrow exhaust when I put a system on my Monster. The sound is second to none and this exhaust does not disappoint. The reason it is custom is that Arrow never made a system to fit a biposto bike; it was only intended to fit the 2006 mono. I purchased one and worked with a local exhaust shop to modify it just enough so that it would clear the brake pedal and rear set.

• Speedy Moto frame sliders
• Speedy Moto Leggero belt pulley covers
• Corse Dynamics high performance intake system (includes velocity stacks, air filters, crankcase breather, etc.)
• MW Tuning / REXXER ecu re­flash to accommodate intake and exhaust mods. O2 sensor delete.
• Billet high capacity ECU heat sink
• Corse Dynamics magnetic oil drain plug
• Lane splitter style round bar­end rear view mirror
• RAM Mount triple clamp mounted ball for accessory mounts (phone/gps/etc.)

Light on the miles and looking great, this SportClassic has a steep buy-it-now but the right equipment and up-to-date maintenance.  The Make Offer button is there if this classic red machine speaks to you.  As the wintry mix fades this might be a good opportunity...

-donn


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Bimota February 14, 2017 posted by

The VDue that worked:
1999 Bimota VDue Trofeo in Italy

Update 2.14.2017: We last posted this bike roughly a year ago, and bidding stopped at a little over $20k, reserve not met. Links are updated with the current auction. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Here is something we have only had on RSBFS once before, a Bimota VDue Trofeo edition.  The Trofeo was a track oriented VDue produced by the factory that incorporated a host of changes which Bimota claimed fixed the problems that had plagued the VDue since its launch.

vduetrof1

1999 Bimota VDue Trofeo in Italy

The VDue was supposed to be a game changer for Bimota; it would have not only the specialized frame and top-spec suspension components Bimota was known for but also have a new direct-injected 500cc two-stroke v-twin.  Pollution regulations in the 1990's were making it harder for new two-stroke models to get approved for street use. Bimota decided the solution was fuel injection; it would defeat a lot of the pollution and would place Bimota at the top of the sportbike-as-luxury-item category.

As regularly RSBFS readers know, despite the promise of the VDue design, the first VDue models had major problems, especially in the fuel management and engine areas.  These problems have been detailed in previous VDue listings here on RSBFS.  For anyone who is curious, an especially good explanation was done in a post back in December by RSBFS contributor Tad D which can be read here.

Suffice to say the VDue is now considered the bike that forced Bimota into bankruptcy and the last of the big/500cc two-stroke sportbikes.

vduetro4

The Trofeo was an effort by Bimota to prove the VDue issues were resolved.  Built as a run of 26 track-focused bikes by Bimota and "leased" to racers by Bimota for a sponsored challenger/race series called "Trophy", the 26 Trofeo editions came with serious racing components, including race-oriented carburetors, a race-spec electrical harness and ECU and different exhaust systems.

vduetroph5

According to research, the Trofeo edition did not have the engine issues or peaky power delivery that had plagued the earlier models and the engine didn't suffer any major issues.   Another 177 VDue's were produced after the Trofeo version and those also seemed to have less problems but the initial reputation remained. and the VDue was one more nail in the coffin of Bimota.

Note:  I can't help but think what might have been if Bimota had taken the VDue racing first, identified and then resolved the engine issues and then made a street legal VDue version available to the masses.  Perhaps we would still be hearing stuff like this on the streets of the USA today.

vduetrof3

For this VDue Trofeo mileage is listed as zero and the bike has apparently been in a collection since 2003.  This bike shows a VIN# of 26 and the seller indicates this is the last Trofeo and the only one that is still in NOS condition.

NOTE:  According to the VDue.it website, the Trofeo models cannot have a numberplate for road usage.  Not sure what this means for any non uk buyer.

Obviously a full service (including tires) would be required before it went back on the street.

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • Not to be confused with the injection model or the later not factory built Evoluzione road model.
  • This is the last of 26 units the factory built in 1999 to compete in the Bimota 500 VDue Trofeo.
  • The bike is new unused/new san some small scratches in years of storing.
  • Unique occasion to own the most desiderable version of the only Bimota model with Bimota engine!
  • The only one of the 26 units still new

vduetrof2

What is this "last" VDue Trofeo worth?   Well I have seen VDue's listed for between $22,000 USD to $39,500 USD and given their limited production run of only 378(ish) units an average price for a VDue is tough to pin down.  In the UK gently ridden fuel injected models seem to be offered around $24,000 USD while in the US prices seem to be about $7,000 higher .  This one is supposed to be the last Trofeo which isn't fuel injected and has zero miles so I would guess a price of $27,000-$32,000 USD. While that price is kind of steep for a 16 year old bike that had a reputation for engine problems and might not be able to be used on the street, I do think it would be a jewel in any collection.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner


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Laverda February 14, 2017 posted by

Love, Italian Style: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale

Considering I can comb eBay for months on end and not see a single Laverda for sale, it's crazy that we've seen not just one but three worthy examples representing a couple different eras recently. From the 1990s Formula that might be more familiar to our readers, to the more vintage 1984 Jota and today's Laverda SFC1000, fans of the Breganze Bruisers have been spoiled for choice of late. The RGS1000 SFC was a bit of a last gasp for the original Laverdas before their death and subsequent resurrection during the Zane-era, a technological dinosaur that had been continually updated since the early 1970s to keep up with the ever increasing pace of sportbike development. Laverda knew they were falling behind the curve, as were all of the European brands, and they recast themselves as purveyors of elegant sportbike alternatives for distinguished gentlemen to help justify high prices, outdated technology, and "classic" styling. And even though the RGS wasn't a sportbike in the high-revving, light-weight idiom, it was still a blood-and-thunder brute with high-quality suspension, stability, and very real road-going performance.

Certainly, the "SFC" name of this very exclusive RGS variant was a bit of a cheat: produced in very limited quantities, the original SFC was based around Laverda's parallel-twin and was a barely-disguised racebike with lights stuck onto it to make it "street-legal" in the loosest sense of the phrase. Obviously, laws regarding that kind of thing were much simpler back then... SFC was an acronym for “Super Freni Competizione” which translates to “super braking competition”  and referred to the huge aluminum drum brake found on the original bikes. Later machines used a pair of discs as seen here, which provided less sexy but more reliable stopping power.

The engine was Laverda's long-serving and very charismatic three-cylinder 981cc engine, here with a 120° crankshaft that made for smoother running, along with high-performance cams and other assorted go-fast bits to raise the power from 85 to 95hp. Early examples of the Jota, Laverda's original, hairy-chested three-cylinder sportbike, used a 180° crankshaft that basically ran like a four-cylinder with a miss. It was good for power, but vibrated excessively and was eventually replaced with a smoother-running 120° crank. Even though the revised crank is considered a bit of an abomination by some Laverda purists, condemned of the sin of being "too civilized," if you've ever heard one of the 120° bikes, "civilized" isn't the first thing that springs to mind... It's raw and very Italian, and sounds like a Stradivarius violin crossed with a chainsaw being used to cut down a tree made of silk, dark chocolate, and truffles, or some other equally ludicrous simile. Basically, if you're expecting the soft whir and refined yowl of a modern Triumph triple, you'll be sexually aroused, pleasantly surprised, or horrified, depending on your feelings about earplugs.

So even though this was intended as a high-performance motorcycle, it was a bit behind the times when it was new. But if calling this an "SFC" is technically a bit of a stretch and merely a calculated dip into past glories to paint a moribund package a brighter shade of orange, this is still a very special motorcycle, as can be seen from the description below.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale

This unique SFC 1000 – one of a tiny number made – is in great original shape. It is a perfect runner receiving all it needs in the past four years to operate as new. The serial number shown is correct...0001.  Here's the story behind it:

This bike was built for Alexander Claren, a Cologne architect who designed Ewe Witt’s dealership (the German importer of Laverdas).  Claren saw the prototype bike at the Cologne motorcycle show and had to have one. He persuaded Witt to order one – requesting number 0001 - from the factory for immediate delivery and thus it was built ahead of the production line. The first production bike was number 1001, following Laverda’s usual numbering protocol. There are a series of letters from Piero Laverda in the file that accompanies the bike confirming the numbering.

SFC 1000 production ran alongside the RGS, RGS Corsa and various RGAs from 1985 through 1989 but few were made. SFC 1000 specifications changed only in detail as tiny batches of bikes were constructed. The most important visual differences were the color – red or black – and the wheels – three-spoke Oscam cast wheels or Akront wire spoke rims. The engine in all SFC's starting with this bike was to Corsa specification – that is 95bhp at 8000rpm - 5-speed, Marzocchi forks and rear shocks, Brembo Gold Line brakes, and either Smiths or Veglia instruments. All top quality components.

Two additional sets of factory exhausts and silencers come with the bike.  These are: a set of three into two in chrome (some SFC's had black, some had chrome) and a rare set of three into one.  The ignition currently on the bike is a modern Sachse electronic with selectable advance curves, but the factory original unit also comes with the bike. Note:  mileage shown is in km.

These bikes are rare. Don't miss an opportunity to own this one.

They were making these things, or titling them anyway, as late as 1988 by which point this machine would have been horribly outclassed by the latest generation of four-cylinder sportbikes from Japan. But while that might have mattered when the bike was new, it's pretty irrelevant now: it has classic looks you'd never confuse with a GSX-R or ZX or FZR or even FJ that would have mopped the floor with the RGS. And the bike's lardy 500lb dry weight was motivated by a stout 95hp so it's not exactly slow, even now.

So what's it worth? Well not much, unless you're an aficionado, so the $14,500 starting bid might seem outrageous if this is your first time clapping eyes on an SFC1000. But if you're a Laverda fan, that seems like a very reasonable place to start, considering what other rare Laverdas like the original Jota and even the standard RGS are going for these days.

-tad


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Buell February 14, 2017 posted by

Uppity – 2008 Buell XB12R Firebolt

Erik Buell created a few career's worth of rider's motorcycles, but they were also for the thinking rider.  The XB12R grabbed a few engineering concepts and hung on.  Centralized mass, low unsprung weight, and and frame rigidity were the factory's goals, and by all accounts they succeeded.  Harder to quantify issues like handling and fun factor are addressed by the short wheelbase and big V-twin.  Lightly updated, this XB12R is a badge-carrying 25th Anniversary edition, and looks great for its nearly 21,000 miles.

2008 Buell XB12R Firebolt for sale on eBay

Based on the Harley-derived 1203cc muscle, the XB12R sports 84 ft.-lbs. torque and makes do with a 5-speed trans.  Innovations such as fuel carried in the alloy chassis spars and oil in the swingarm are special to the XB series, belt drive, Zero-Torsion-Load front brake, and Uniplanar vibration absorbing engine mounts are Buell paradigms.  Futuristic but not really a glamour solution, the frame-mounted fairing has a bit of an angry bird thing going, but it works well with the big Showa fork tubes and padded frame elements.

Though the brand is again between sponsors, Erik Buell began as a Harley-Davidson engineer and racer, and started manufacturing his own designs in 1983.  This red and gray model has a few nice updates, current maintenance, and has also largely been left un-remuddled.  From the eBay auction:

There is a brand new, highly regarded, Drummer SS exhaust installed and the race ECM was
reprogrammed (by IDS, the builder of Buells race ECM's)  to match, precisely, the configuration of the Drummer, the K&N intake filter and the expected minimum octane fuel (92) to be used.
 
 The rear light has been upgraded to the 2010 rear LED light. There has been a new cooling fan installed in the last month as well as a new drive belt, front sintered brake pads, new rear pads, engine oil and filter were changed, transmission oil changed, clutch cable and head set bearings were checked. In the last 60 days both forward and rear rocker boxes were removed, machined and resealed, there is a new set of NGK plugs, and a recent AGM battery.

With its light weight and flexible power unit, the Firebolt tested as a great-sounding and turning sport machine, with simplified maintenance.  The limited choice of updates speaks well of the owner, as the engine has an ocean of mods available, and sportbikers love customization.  This XB12R really wants little more than fresh tires and a new rider...

-donn


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