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Sport Bikes For Sale August 21, 2017 posted by

Granddaddy’s Repli-Racer: Clean 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750

The values the first Suzuki GSX-Rs have begun their inevitable climb into the stratosphere, but it is still possible to pick one up for less-than-stupid money. They are rare and sought-after in any condition, so you cannot expect to pay Craigslist-bargain prices for them, but they're attainable.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for sale on eBay

And you want one. The boxy. tri-colored fairing could only have come from a specific era in an especially loony decade. Before the smoothed-over soapbar fairings of the Honda CBR Hurricane pushed slippery shapes into fashion, Suzuki cut and creased its way to the unique, slab-sided form-over-function fairings we see here.

The bodywork is odd and gawky, but purposeful, so it works. And if the looks don't get you, what's underneath the plastic is ready and willing to try. The bike is built around an alloy perimeter frame that straddles an air- and oil-cooled 750cc inline four.

For its time, the bike was a featherweight technological marvel, sporting anti-dive forks on a bike that barely pushed 400 pounds without fluids.

This is example shows very well, though it sports a few blemishes, and has a smattering of non-original paint. The seller notes a raft of recent maintenance, including a carb cleaning, a valve adjustment and new fork seals.

From the listing:

Original super clean 1986 GSXR750. 49 state bike with clear California title. 13,200 original miles. Cosmetically the bike is extremely clean All original fairings that have been professionally repaired (standard cracks around mirror mounts) and repainted (only the cowl, side panels and lower. The rest are original paint & condition) in factory colors. All original hardware. No dents in tank. A little bubbling of air under tank decal strips on side (see pic) No tears in seat. The engine cosmetically is extremely clean. All original and complete. Good tires. Carbs just rebuilt. Complete service and valve adjustment just done. New fork seals. Has manual adjustable cam chain tensioner. Comes with original one. Runs and rides great.

* Bike is for sale locally so I reserve the right to end auction early

The bike is at $3,500 with a single bid and five days left in the auction. Grab it before the prices soar!

 


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Suzuki August 21, 2017 posted by

Tu Meke TL: 1998 Suzuki TL 1000R in New Zealand

While the majority of RSBFS posts are tied to North American ebay listings we really do like to showcase bikes from all over the world.   You could even say we seek to span the globe to bring you a constant variety of RareSportbikes...the thrill of the Britten V1000...the agony of  the Bimota VDue (NOTE: Bonus points to you if you read that bit of text and heard the voice of the dearly departed Jim McKay).

Today's post is a very nice 1998 Suzuki TL1000R located far from the RSBFS offices in Wellington New Zealand.  This one looks to almost completely OEM and has the lovely and cleanly-styled phlolina-yellow bodywork which seems to be the most desired by collectors.

1998 Suzuki TL1000R in New Zealand

For anyone unfamiliar with the TL series, lets begin by saying there aren't many motorcycles that have been through such a roller coaster of desirability.  It all began in the late 1990's when Ducati V-twin powered machines were killing it on the track and the sales floor.  In response Suzuki announced they would deliver their own V-Twin powered sportbike, including both a WorldSuperBike/WSB capable machine to compete against the Ducati on the track and a street version for everday use.  The result was the TL-S/R series.

Anticipation for the new Suzuki V-Twin was very high and the TL-S/street version was launched in 1996 with the R version scheduled for the next year.   The quick verdict was that the new 90 degree v-twin engine was equal to or better the Ducati .  However, while the engine was good,  a significant handling issue quickly reared its head; front wheel lift (no pun intended).   The problem was quickly traced to the rear suspension, which was an offset rear shock with a separate rotary damper, a setup that had been chosen due to the reduced space caused by the new V-Twin configuration.  While this configuration worked in day to day riding,it could become overwhelmed by heat and heavy loads, which obviously happen on a sportbike quite a lot.  The result would be front end lift and when a rider rolled off/dropped the wheel, major tank slap and high side crashes could happen.   The problem was so significant that Suzuki offered steering stabilizers as standard on both the TL-R launched the next year and TL-S's but the entire TL lineup never really shook its reputation as a "widowmaker".

Note:  For anyone interested, a really good explanation of the rotary suspension function on the TL can be found here.

The handling wasn't the only challenge the TL1000R had to deal with.  Another major issue was that the R version never really delivered on its promise to rival the Ducati as a WorldSuperBike/WSB machine.

"The real killer though was that the R never came close to being the Ducati-beating WSB-contender Suzuki intended it to be.  Despite its stumpy wheelbase, the R was confoundingly both heavier and larger than the S and too bulky all around.  Equally problematic was the motor: although producing a claimed 135 bhp in stock TL-R trim. it proved difficult to tune...After only 2 seasons Suzuki decided it'd be too expensive to develop/race successfully and re-focused its race development efforts on its proven inline 4 GSX-R750 series instead."  Practical Sportbikes 2017

Perhaps the final issue that set the TL1000R up for sales failure was that Suzuki never developed a unique identity for the bike.  The TL1000R was even offered in the Suzuki traditional blue/white color scheme which made it hard to distinguish from the its GSX-R sister bike.  Since a large part of the appeal of the TL was supposed to be that it was NOT an inline 4, making it look just like one seems to be quite an odd decision.  The result of all this is that the TL1000R developed a reputation as a big failure for Suzuki and some models were left on the sales floor for quite a while.

Now despite all the issues noted above and the bikes general reputation as a failure, the TL1000R was still a very good bike for 98% of riders.  While it didn't live up to the hype at the time it was launched, it still had a bonkers engine that was significantly easier to live with than its Italian competitor (no belts!).  It was also surprisingly comfortable and was quite attractive.  Later models came with the aforementioned steering damper which solved much of the handling problems and many of the concepts introduced on the TL1000R can be seen in the later Hayabusa.

Unlike many late 1990's Sporybikes the TL1000R has managed to maintain an active community of owners on the web and the fandom for the bike never really went away.  More importantly from a collectors standpoint, the TL was recently named as one of the top 10 collectible bikes to acquire "before prices get stupid".

OK, now lets turn our attention to this particular 1998 Suzuki TL1000R.   First, location means this one is probably only going to appeal to one of our Australian or New Zealand readers, or perhaps someone who is willing to incur some shipping costs.   The seller indicates that was previously a Japanese bike but unlike a lot of bikes we see from Japan, this one it looks to have been well cared for/not treated as a disposable item and kept in stock trim.  The only non-OEM pieces I am seeing are some rear turn signals/indicators and some stickers on the rear fairing hump.  NOTE:  The rear seat cover/"hump" is a fairly rare item so bonus points for it being in place and looking to be in good condition.

Mileage is stated as just about 14,000 miles/22,000 kilometers.  A new battery and rectifier have also been fitted and rubber looks to be in good condition but no mention is made of age and fluids would probably be due for a refresh.

So what's this V-Twin bit of Suzuki history going to cost you?   Prices for a pristine TL1000R have definitely started to climb but aren't reaching stupid money yet.  The asking price for this one is $6,900 USD which is towards the high side of recent TL1000R's listed on ebay but given the condition of this one and the fact that its in the best looking color scheme, the asking price doesn't seem to be out of wack.    Also the seller does appear to be a dealer so some negotiation wouldn't seem unreasonable.

Let me just conclude by saying this -  I have always liked this bike a lot; I think it looks like a meaner and more manageable Hayabusa.  Also I think most potential buyers will admit that a large part of the TL1000R appeal is that its different and its reputation for not suffering fools gladly.   While a TL1000R probably won't experience a dramatic appreciation in value, if it was located closer to my current location I would definitely be considering trying to acquire it for my personal collection.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 


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Honda August 20, 2017 posted by

Legal Smokers: Two 1982 Honda MB5s

The early 1980s were an interesting time for motorcycle enthusiasts. Big changes were in the air, and all manufacturers were scrambling to develop disruptive models in the search for performance and sales; think of the groundbreaking Ninja 900, GSX-R 750, V45 Interceptor, and the Turbo era bikes, to name a few. Riders and drivers across the US were still reeling from the energy crisis, and many commuters were in search of cheaper forms of transportation. Enter the Honda MB5 - a 50cc motorcycle meant to appeal to beginning riders as well as commuters the world over. In the US, the MB5 was officially imported into all 50 states and is a one year only model (it had nearly a 10 year run in Europe). While not the usual diet for RSBFS (likely more toy than trick), there is no doubt that the MB5 is a rare machine and a curious footnote for two stroke enthusiasts.

Two 1982 Honda MB5s for sale on eBay

1982 was the key year for the Honda MB5 in the US. Colors included the red/blue scheme as seen here, as well as a black/red model (the latter being the more rare of the two). The mighty 7 HP power plant consisted of a single cylinder, 49cc air cooled two stroke engine that included a counter-balancer to lessen vibration (a good thing, given the 10,500 RPM operating range). Fueling was simplified via oil injection (no more mixing oil with the gas during fill ups), and maintenance was simplified via CDI ignition (no points - which was still a relatively advanced concept by 1980). Power was transmitted via a wet, multiplate clutch through a 5-speed transmission. The whole package was complimented by Honda "ComStar" style wheels of 18" diameter, a decent instrument cluster (speedo, tach, warning lights), and a front disk brake. Rear suspension is handled by a conventional twin-shock arrangement, the shocks being "laid down" to appear more like a single shock setup. For street legalities, the MB5 includes a compliment of headlight/taillight plus turn signals.

From the seller:
I present here a pair of my MB5s, always garaged indoors away from sunlight and dampness when not ridden, red/blue, which to the best of my knowledge are all stock w/ original paint that is not sun faded, both w/ low orig miles, emits very little exhaust smoke at idle and when screaming thru the 5 gears at 9500 rpm, are generally 2nd kick Hondas and 1st kick when warm and note that the non rack bike is needing tires, a flasher, a front brake switch and a battery strap.

All D.I.D rims are clean and not pitted, have good clean gas tanks, frame, handlebars, non faded speedometer/odometer and tachometer gauges, seats w/ bright logo, no leaks on the exhaust pipes undersides and paint that matches all the components. The 1 side stand will remain on the bike w/ rack which I’ve added.

The engine(s) revs up to 9500+ rpm without missing a beat and winds back down holding a steady 1400 rpm idle, have cooling fins w/ rubber dampers that are all intact and w/o cracks. Better yet, although simple, are that both bikes have both working lo and hi beam headlights… 1 is a Stanley original while the other is a Sylvania Halogen replacement I was fortunate enough to find. Sometime back I had installed flash-to-pass switches on the bikes to prolong beam life but have removed them. I will remove my 3rd or Borg eye LED and rear LED lights.

By the mid 1980s gas prices had dropped back down to (if not below) normal levels. The need for a 75-100 MPG commuter vehicle abated - especially one that came with the limitations of a 50cc slightly-bigger-than-a-scooter two wheeler. As a result, most MB5s were either completely thrashed by young teens with aspirations of Spencer, Roberts or Lawson (don't ask me how I know), or otherwise abandoned to the gods of rust and neglect. Finding one in decent condition is difficult due to the relative rarity; finding a pair in decent nick is a rare occurrence indeed. Both of these bikes appear to be in better than average condition, with one of them sporting the rare, Honda accessory luggage rack.

There may be no substitution for cubic inches, but this pair of 50cc machines deserves better than obscurity. Like many attempts by Honda during this time, the MB5 only lasted a single year. Yet these were blessed with typical Honda craftsmanship, and reliability of the one-lunger is far better than your average 1980s mechanized machine. More for fun and curiosity than something that you would likely use on a daily basis, this duo of MB5s will be selling together. Opening ask is a pretty reasonable $3,535 (a fair price for one MB5 is good condition) - with no takers as of yet. Check it out here, and feel free to jump back to the Comments on 50cc machines. Did you spend any time on a tiny smoker? Let us know, and good luck!!

MI


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Aprilia August 20, 2017 posted by

Thrilla From Aprilia: 1997 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

Aprilia was late to the quarter-liter two-stroke party when they introduced their RS250 in 1995, but the bike stayed in production long after the NSR, TZR, and the RGV that donated its powerplant had gone the way of the dodo, with road bikes available until 2002 and "for off road use only examples" several years after that. There were two generations of the bike, with a restyle partway through the bike's production run in 1998. This particular example features the earlier bodywork and dash, which I personally very much prefer to the later, more "modern" style.

The bike used a very lightly modified version of Suzuki's RGV250 engine, so specifications are basically identical, although buyers don't have to worry about Japanese market horsepower restrictions, and should have somewhere in the neighborhood of 55hp, although more is possible at the cost of longevity... The bike also used Suzuki's six-speed transmission, although Aprilia used their own aluminum beam frame and banana swingarm that are much more sculptural than Suzuki's more industrial-looking components. Triple Brembo discs are almost overkill: they're the same kit found on bikes like Ducati's 916 and Moto Guzzi Sport 1100 that weighed significantly more than the little Aprilia's 300lbs...

Period reviews praise the bike's light weight and handling, although it was, like all the other 250s, pretty bare-bones and high-strung. Later bikes had a very trick-looking dash, but these earlier machines have the gauges clearly divided into the required tachometer and a speedo/idiot light cluster that could easily be removed when prepping the bike for race duty...

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

Absolutely stunning RS250 in superb condition.  Frame is immaculate, bodywork in excellent condition with minor scratches and scuff marks.  Comes with two un-installed Michelin pilot tires. All consumables in super good condition (brakes, chain, sprockets).  12400 original kms, starts on the first kick hot or cold.  New plugs, clean air filter, oil changed, power valves degreased.  Ready to go!  For this week and this week ONLY, free crating, free shipping to continental North America, no paypal fees, export fees on me!  Serious inquiries only please, no low balls, no time wasters.

The Buy It Now price for this very nice RS250 is listed as $8,300 although I'm not sure if that's US or Canadian dollars, making this either a good deal or a great deal, considering the apparent condition. Obviously you'll have to handle importation issues, and registration could be tricky depending on where you live. Maybe just park it in your living room until it's 25 years old?

-tad


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Yamaha August 19, 2017 posted by

Barenaked Two Stroke: 1991 Yamaha R1Z

Looking like a modern take on the wildly popular RZ350 two stroke, the 1991 Yamaha R1-Z somehow never made it out of Japan. That's a shame, too, because the R1-Z sports a too-sexy-for-my-fairing steel trellis frame and the powerplant from the TZR250 race replica.

1991 Yamaha R1-Z for sale on eBay

Sneaking in under 300 pounds dry, the little smoker makes fantastic use of the 45 horsepower that was de rigeur among JDM quarter liters of the time. With as much time as TZRs spent on race tracks, waking an R1-Z up likely wouldn't be a challenge.

This R1-Z shows quite nicely, and comes with a clear Washington State title, so putting it on the road in your home state shouldn't be too much of a challenge. It does have marks in keeping with its age, and some pitting on the fuel filler cap, but the paint looks very nice. We are particularly fond of the "INDIVIDUAL SPORTS" graphic on the tank. Note the pillion seat.

From the listing:

INTRODUCTION:::

You are looking at a 1991 Yamaha R1Z. The Yamaha R1Z was legally imported from japan and now has a legal Washington State clear title. Yamaha r1z is a very rare unique blend of race inspired two stroke motor put into a open café inspired trellis frame. The R1Z was a bold move for Yamaha at the time and way ahead of the styling trend; the motor used in the R1Z is identical to the tzr250 parallel twin motors of the same time period so the R1Z is a very quick 250cc naked sport bike. This particular R1Z has very low 9300 miles (14,900 kilometers), and the bike is mostly all original and in good shape. But please feel free to read more about the specifics of this bike and see the pictures for detail. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. U.S. and International bidders are welcome to bid on this motorcycle but must arrange shipping themselves...

BODY:::

The body work is in great condition, all of the painted body work is near perfect with the exception of some very small rock chips on the front of the gas tank as can be seen in the pictures. The frame is in great shape with no major scratches or nicks and the motor is nice and clean. Overall the body is in very good condition for its age.

MECHANICAL:::

The bike runs and rides perfect, and it shifts smoothly through all 6 gears. The carburetor was recently cleaned and adjusted, and a full service tune-up was performed which included new, spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, oil change, and brake fluid flush. All of the lighting and electrical components work as they should.

CONCLUSION:::

This is a great opportunity to buy a very rare nice and clean 1989 Yamaha R1Z. These bikes were never imported into the USA and very few were exported outside of Japan to any other countries so it is a very rare Yamaha model. If you need any additional pictures or have any additional questions please feel free to email us. Domestic & International buyers are welcome to bid but must arrange the shipping themselves. However we will be glad to assist with any loading of the motorcycle. We have helped with the shipping of motorcycles across the country and overseas for other customers in the past. Please feel free to bid as long as you make the shipping arrangements.

Bidding on this beast is just south of $2,200 with nine days left in the eBay auction. Does this stir your inner oil burner? Let us know in the comments below.


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