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Featured Listing: 1982 Honda CB1100R

This is a rare opportunity to get your hands on a very special early Honda homologation special. The CB1100R predates HRC, and was sold overseas to make the big bike legal for competition in Europe and Australia. Honda cranked out just over 4,000 of the 115 horsepower beasts over a three-year run.

The fiberglass bodywork and hand-welded aluminum tank set the bike apart from just another UJM with pretty paint, though this bike has seen use that is most often seen on run-of-the-mill models. The bike was imported 15 years ago, according to the seller, and was ridden extensively across the U.S. after being titled and tagged.

The seller restored the paint and bodywork when he bought it about 10 years ago, and rode it for a short while before mothballing it and storing it in a museum.

From the seller:

Exremely rare limited edition Honda Homologation Special Superbike. Never imported into the US. This bike was built out of the fabled RCS division of Honda. This is a pre HRC special.

The Honda CB1100R was an exotic Honda model that was produced in limited numbers from 1981 to 1983. It is a single-seat, fully faired sport bike based on the Honda CB900F. The R suffix denotes a racing version, however the CB1100R was a road-legal machine produced by Honda and offered for sale to the public. It was produced only in numbers sufficient to meet the homologation requirements for the R to be classed as a production motorcycle in markets into which it was sold. It was Honda's first homologation special and was raced in the production class racing in most major markets: including Europe South Africa Australia and New Zealand. It was not sold in the USA.

This particular bike was imported by a enthusiast about 15 years ago from the Netherlands. He then titled the bike and road it all over the united states. It has some miles on it approx 35k. The body is completely fiberglass and the tank is hand welded aluminum. The pair work is in very nice condition as I restored the body/paint completely when I bought it. I purchased it about 10 years ago and road it around for a few years then it was drained of all gas and has been in storage in my personal museum. Certainly extremely rare and definitely a must have for those with a RC30, RC45 etc type of Honda collection. The motor though similar to the CB1100F that was offer herein the United States is in a much higher state of tune. The Nikko Baker 4 into 1 exhaust is pure music to the ears. The bike will require a full recommissioning for consumables (i.e.: tires, oil, battery, plugs, carb sync etc) prior to riding and sold as is. It will need to be recommissioned if the buyer plans to actually ride this beast.

In 1981 the CB1100R won the New Zealand Castrol Six Hour ridden by Australian pair of Malcolm Campbell and Mick Cole. The CB1100R won the premier Australian production race in 1982, the Castrol Six Hour in the hands of future 1987 500cc GP World Champion Wayne Gardner and team mate Wayne Clark. Other CB1100Rs finished the race 2nd, 3rd and 4th, with 6 CB11000Rs finishing in the top 8 spots. The Australasian success of the CB1100R lead directly to the development of the Suzuki GSX1100SXZ Katana homologation racing specials.

The model designations are CB1100RB (1981), CB1100RC (1982), and CB1100RD (1983). In 1981, 1050 units were sold, followed by 1500 per year in 1982 and 1983. The 1981 “RB” was half faired with a solo seat only. The 82 and 83 models have different bodywork including a full fairing, aluminum fuel tank, and pillion seat covered with a removable seat cowl. The 82 (RC) and 83 (RD) (pictured) were largely similar with differences in paint scheme, rear swing arm and front fork design. In 1983 the Honda CB1100F was launched that essentially was a blend of the CB1100R and the CB900F, for a broader market. The 1981 CB1100RB had a claimed 115 hp (86 kW) @ 9000 rpm.

The CB1100R won big races across the globe under a series of big names, most notable 500cc GP World Champion Wayne Gardner. The bike is listed at $15,000, and you can contact Pete with your interest here: email bocco1@optonline.net and phone number 1-203-515-5146

8 Comments

  • Hi. To be 100% original. The frame, fork-legs and swing-arm should be in a red paint. Its not the correct wheels, should be in gold-color maybe the wrong size to (cb900F). The ignition and on other side the generator- covers should be in a goldcolor. You have to make certain it is an CB1100R motor and not an CB1100F or 900F. The seat should be i red to. Missing is the original 4-2 exhaust. Missing is the toolbox. Cant se the 2 horns, should be inunder the front indicators,the indicators are not original. . The windshield should be clear.

    • Good to know. Thanks.

  • Same bike?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37tQVewlLSw

    • I think it is.

      dc

    • Yes, Same bike. Note the rest of Pete’s collection. Beautiful bikes. I have a set of CB1100R gold wheels if someone wants to get the bike back to original.

  • I am no Honda expert, but I did come of age during the era of this bike and further to Tony’s knowledgeable comments above, I DID notice (on my own!) that the gold wheels were missing from this CB1100R – that’s part of the iconic look.

    Here is one of these bikes, looking closer to original, from these pages almost 2 years ago:
    http://raresportbikesforsale.com/mass-appeal-1982-honda-cb1100r-in-france/

  • Whoever mounted the rotors on the front wheel has them on the wrong side. If he missing that simple detail, what else was missed?
    Possible clone with some correct parts.

    • How many people know which way to mount the rotors and how could this possibly indicate a rogue bike? The black frame and silver wheels don’t give you a clue? This is my old bike, Pete Bocarossa bought it from me and I believe I am still on the title. It is 100% a CB1100R, but the owner in Holland I got it from hated the gold parts on the wheels, engine, etc. and the bike bodywork had been painted red when I got it. I have the color of the bodywork painted back to CB1100R look, but kept the rest as I got it as it was well done and created a unique look. And this bike runs really, really well. Switch the rotors around, and there you go.

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