Posts by Category: Yamaha

Yamaha September 15, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Low-mileage 1993 Yamaha FZR1000

This 1993 Yamaha FZR1000 from featured seller Gary is museum quality, having covered just 3,000 miles in its 24 years over two owners. The paint and 90s-tastic graphics are scratch, ding and mark free, which is nearly unheard of for a U.S.-market literbike of this vintage.

1993 Yamaha FZR1000 for sale on eBay

Gary's FZR is from near the end of the bike's eight-year production run, and features Yamaha's innovative Exup system, which allowed Yamaha to run super aggressive cams without sacrificing a placid street idle, and gave the bike a smooth powerband from the bottom end to red line.

By 1993, the 145-horsepower FZR1000 was beginning to show its age, as the Honda CBR900RR was on its way to turn the literbike market on its head. Still, the line had managed to top comparison tests and ten-best lists for the previous few years, and left an indelible dent in perceptions of what sport bikes could be.

From the eBay listing:

Up for sale is a Minty almost new condition 1993 Yamaha FZR1000 with only 3,018 miles. This is a domestic model with only two owners. This FZR looks like it has 3 miles on it, not 3000. Completely stock just like the day it rolled off the assembly line. Original tires in excellent shape no cracking. Original brake pads, chain and sprockets in original mint condition. Fairings 100% genuine original OEM Yamaha. Fairings and fuel tank in flawless condition. Bike has just been serviced with new battery and new engine fluids. Needs nothing ready to ride. No rust or patina. Not a speck of rust inside the fuel tank. Bike has been a living room Queen most of its life. Museum quality collector.

Comes with Utah state title. There are cheaper FZR's on the market but not in this condition. This is a premium bike. Please text 801-358-6537 for more photos and questions. $500 PayPal deposit. Balance accepted by check, bank wire or cash in person.

As a breed, the FZR1000 is not at all rare. They were made in their thousands and sold admirably in the U.S. market. What makes this bike special is the scant mileage, new condition and ownership history. It is original down to the brake pads, chain and sprockets, though if you're going to ride it, we would suggest freshening those parts as well as the tires. The auction has just over a day left, so hurry past before the opportunity is gone!

Featured Listing: Low-mileage 1993 Yamaha FZR1000
Yamaha September 12, 2017 posted by

A Little Fizzy: 1993 Yamaha FZR250R for Sale

While most small-displacement bikes these days are relatively simple, economical singles and twins, the Yamaha FZR250R spec sheet reads like a much bigger machine: aluminum beam frame, four cylinders, four valves per cylinder, dual 0verhead cams, an EXUP exhaust valve, and a six-speed gearbox. That adds up to a claimed 45hp and 18 ft-lbs of torque that could push the 310lb dry machine to a top speed of 110mph.

Unlike modern sportbikes with their flexible powerbands, the littlest FZR absolutely required you to chase that screaming 18,500rpm redline to make any sort of progress at all: the technical specs meant Yamaha could eke out every bit of performance possible from the diminutive displacement, but there's only so much that four cylinders and four valves can do with 249cc. So while that redline may be fun for a while, the downside is that you're revving the nuts off of it everywhere, all the time, and 10,500rpm at 70mph in sixth gear makes for some frantic freeway miles.

The FZR250R is a good-looking machine for sure, pink and white graphics notwithstanding but, aside from the novelty and that previously-mentioned shrieking redline, the question here really is: what's the point? The little FZR is nearly unheard of here in the USA: it was officially sold only in its home market of Japan, although many countries have a thriving grey market so they did find their way elsewhere when new to places with heavy taxes on displacements or tiered licensing systems.

Mostly though, they didn't: small-displacement sportbike junkies typically gravitated towards two-strokes like Yamaha's own TZR that were cheaper to buy and run, with similar weight and claimed power but a less-frantic powerband. It was much easier to extract additional performance from two-strokes as well, since the FZR was already pushing the envelope in terms of four-stroke tuning. Ultimately, the FZR requires big-bike maintenance with almost none of the payoff.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha FZR250R for Sale

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1993 Yamaha FZR250R with only 25,499 kilometers (15,844 miles). The BEST thing about these little inline four cylinders is the 18,500 redline. These bikes love to be revved to the moon! This baby Fizzer looks good and has great curb appeal. There are several scratches and tiny chips in the bodywork from it's ride thru life but overall very clean. No dents in the tank and only two tiny cracks in the upper fairing on the left side around the front blinker and the mirror...... Small tear in the passenger seat and some corrosion that will clean up easily. This bike would make at candidate for restoration. Comes with a aftermarket muffler and clear blinkers. Everything else stock. Fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha. Bike runs flawless. New battery and fluids. Fun little bike to ride in the tight turns. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use.

Bidding is up to just over $1,500 with very little time left on the auction. It's not in perfect condition, with some corrosion and scuffs and those non-standard grips and bar-ends, but is complete and the fairings are claimed to be original and it does have a US title. Obviously, pure performance junkies need not apply: power is very limited for wide-open American roads and, even though the handling is good, you're still looking at pretty basic, non-adjustable suspension bits on the FZR250R. But with light weight, you should be able to throw it around with abandon, and wringing that tiny inline-four's neck should provide hours of entertainment. Absolutely hammering a bike in all six gears with few legal consequences could make this a pretty fun toy for backroad riding, especially if you're not a fan of the noise and headache associated with two-strokes. Just make sure you live close to those backroads...

-tad

A Little Fizzy: 1993 Yamaha FZR250R for Sale
Yamaha September 4, 2017 posted by

Unblemished: Original, Thousand-Mile 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

Obviously, the first-generation Yamaha R1 isn't particularly rare in terms of production numbers: this revolutionary sportbike turned the category on it's ear, offering big power in a middleweight package, and it sold well as a result. I'm posting this one up because, unlike most of the R1s you'll find on eBay and Craigslist, this one is almost completely stock, is pretty much perfect, and is barely broken-in, with a mere 1,138 miles on the odometer. Collectors take note: this thing is so clean you could basically eat off of it, and the chain still has the white grease on it that came from the factory!

It wasn't the first time a manufacturer had done something revolutionary in the sportbike world, but Yamaha definitely shook up the establishment with their follow up to the fast, but relatively heavy YZF1000 Thunderace when they dropped their YZF-R1 on an unsuspecting world. Introduced in 1998 and built through 2001, the R1 caught the other major manufacturers completely by surprise. It used an evolution of Yamaha's famous "Deltabox" aluminum frame and their five-valve "Genesis" inline four, now backed a six-speed gearbox with stacked shafts to keep the wheelbase short and maximize swingarm length, instead of the five-speed fitted to its ancestor.

With 150hp and weighing in at 419lbs dry, the bike featured the expected literbike power in a package as light as 600cc supersports at the time and it's still a compelling performer today, missing just twenty or so horses and the electronic aids required to manage it. Braking and handling were excellent, although the lack of a steering damper was a bit of an oversight, considering the power and handling available. Maintenance was a bit of a nightmare however: all that compact packaging meant plug changes and carb rejetting took more time on the R1 than they had on previous bikes. A small price to pay for such near perfection.

This particular bike has been lightly modified, but has just 1,138 miles on it. And it hasn't just been sitting in a corner, collecting dust on flat tires: it appears to have been lovingly maintained and is a very nice example in classic red-and-white "speedblock" Yamaha colors, although the R1 also came in a very striking blue.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

Up for sale my all stock, unmolested, absolutely 1138 actual miles R1. If you're looking for a first generation show collector R1 this is the real deal... You're not going to hear what the bad things are because there are no bad things: it's stunning in every way. It's new really like off the showroom floor. It's been in a climate controlled environment with humidity controlled at around 35% at all times. It still has that new bike smell when it's running if you know what I mean.

Still has the stock tires on it (Dunlop Sportmax 207's) which are in perfect shape with no dry rot. Stock chain still has the white grease on it as shown in pics. Only thing not stock is undertail and turn signals done in 2001. If you look at pics you can clearly see the nuts and bolts are still in new condition to match the authenticity of what condition the bike is. Inside of fairings and underneath also matches authenticity. It runs flawless with no hesitation at all. It has been kept up with oil changes every year just for show/collector status and preventative maint. Same for gas only non ethanol every 6 months with 2oz. of sea foam added at every fill. Bike is truly I think probably the nicest you will find in the US.Maybe the world. No dents dings, no fairings are cracked no broken tabs nothing at all. I mean just looking at the key ignition area you can tell. Fires to life after first push of sta rter button every time. Charging system perfect. It's a new bike really just kept in a time machine literally. That's really all I can say about the bike it's the real deal folks. The bike still to this day people ask new bike and I say no it's a 2000, they're shocked.

My feedback should speak for itself so no worries. If it's not what you expected I will give your money back I'm that honest in my description. Shipping is at your cost not mine but I will help out anyway I can to accommodate your needs. You're more than welcome to come look before you buy as matter fact I encourage you to if you're local. You will be so glad you got it and very proud. Just hope someone takes good care of it. That's it really nothing else to say. Ask any questions you want I will answer. More pics just ask.

The seller doesn't mention the frame sliders, but a little protection is no bad thing, and those turn signals aren't original, but I'd expect they are easy to source and put back to stock. It's hard to get my brain around the fact that someone would buy such a competent, easy-to-use motorcycle and then just basically maintain it, but for those of us who missed out on these soon-to-be collectible motorcycles, this offers up the chance to basically buy one new, only 17 years later...

-tad

Yamaha August 30, 2017 posted by

Mighty Mite: Warmed up 1988 Yamaha YSR 50

With a wheelbase just over three feet, Tonka truck sized wheels and a wet weight that sneaks in four pounds lighter than I am, the 1988 Yamaha YSR 50 set out to make the very most out of the smallest package possible. They were, for better or worse, glorified mopeds, albeit with proper clutches and five-speed gear boxes.

1988 Yamaha YSR 50 for sale on eBay

With working lights and turn signals, they were road legal from the factory, sort of like a 1980s Honda Grom; a nimble city bike that dared you to drag a knee at 30 mph.

This example is not the cleanest we have ever featured, but it packs a custom exhaust, 63-cc big bore kit and a hot carburetor. Those little hop ups should put the 50 mph top end listed on the white-faced speedo within the realm of possibility. Or at least imagination.

From the eBay listing:

Selling my 1988 YSR 50. Its the rare blue and yellow (some say rarer than the black and white one). i have had this bike for a loooong time. Super clean and runs like new. here is a list of mods:

50cc engine bumped to 63cc with mikuni carb and cylinder ported. Boyseen reed cage
Team Calamari Racing exhaust
Chrome frame and swingarm
Fox rear shock with remote reservoir
Team Calamari Racing second fork spring
1/4 turn throttle
Douglas aluminum wheels with Dunlop tires

I do have a bunch of original parts (like wheels, carb, airbox, etc.) that will go with the bike. Bike has clean title and is street legal. Bodywork is near perfect with the exception of the front upper fairing - one of my workers dropped it and cracked the fairing. I do have another original blue one that will go with the bike. You will not find another in this color in better shape. Send message with contact info for more pics and such. paypal is mike@revolutionspeed.com

I will help with shipping but retaining the carrier will be the buyers responsibility. i can get it on a palate and strapped down for shipping. If needs to be crated will be $200 extra

For a true collector, the upper fairing could use some work, but the seller says a good matching one is included. Added to that, the solid aluminum wheels aren't doing a whole lot for unsprung weight, such as it is, but they sure complete the look.

The auction only has a couple days left, so move fast if you want in. Ever ride one of these? Let us know the ins and outs in the comments below!

Mighty Mite: Warmed up 1988 Yamaha YSR 50
Yamaha August 29, 2017 posted by

Rare Beast: 2006 Yamaha MT-01 for Sale

Most of the time, I try to walk the straight and narrow with my posts, sticking to highly-strung, fully-faired speed demons and racetrack refugees. But sometimes my obsession with the weird and rare gets the better of me and I just have to post stuff like this Yamaha MT-01, even if it's coloring outside the lines a bit from a strict “sportbike” point of view. The MT-01 is really much more a muscle bike in the vein of a Ducati Monster or Suzuki BKing than an out-and-out sportbike, but there’s much more going on here once you scratch the surface.

The drivetrain specifications definitely don’t scream “sportbike”: the air-cooled, four-valve per cylinder engine had twin spark plugs for optimal combustion across the face of the huge pistons and was originally found in Yamaha/Road Star Warrior, although in this installation, it featured a lightened flywheel and the first v-twin application of Yamaha’s EXUP valve. The long-stroke unit’s 97mm x 113mm gave 1670cc, good for 89hp and 112 lb-ft of torque, enough to hustle the 540lbs dry hunk of metal along pretty smartly, with minimal need to work the five-speed box. I've never actually heard one run, but reviews all praise the thudding, Harley-esque exhaust note.

If that’s not particularly inspiring to you canyon-carvers, note that the rest of the bike is more Mr Hyde to the drivetrain's Dr Jekyl: that huge lump of an engine was a fully-stressed member and the fully-adjustable upside-down forks and radial front brakes came right off the 2004-2005 R1. The MT-01 had 17” wheels at both ends so you can fit the very stickiest modern rubber and, if that’s not enough to clarify the bike's sporting intent, the 2009 version was available with full Öhlins suspension and Pirelli Diablo Rosso tires straight from the factory.

There's a school of thought that suggests fast road riding is best accomplished by not having to worry about shifting too much. That constant gear-lever-dancing, while fun, isn't as fast as simply surfing a wave of torque in one gear, especially on unfamiliar roads. On track, I'm sure it'd get murdered by a good 600cc supersport. On a winding back road? I bet that same 600 would have a hard time shaking this thing, and period reviews of the bike were very positive.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Yamaha MT-01 for Sale

This torque monster is basically new. There are less than 400 km on this unit. The motorcycle was on the showroom floor and was never stored outdoors. The bike has no wear on its tires and the little nubs on the tires from manufacturing are still there. No accessories added or changed. The color is silver with blue accents. Very limited production on these bikes. 2006 was the first year of production. There is one imperfection or mark from the bike being moved in the showroom. This mark is in the pictures and is cosmetic. The reason I still have this awesome bike is just that. I was going to keep it but just don't have time to ride it. I owned the Yamaha dealership and kept this one for myself.

The MT-01 is an unusual machine, and that's a big part of the appeal.  Build-quality was very high, as the bike was a flagship model for Yamaha, although they haven’t really retained their value in their original markets, as the bike never really seemed to find the right audience. What’s one worth here in the USA? Good question, but this one appears to be in nearly perfect condition, and the seller is asking $12,000. If you could find a way to register it here [the bike is for sale in Canada] it'd make quite a conversation starter at your local bike hang out.

-tad

Rare Beast: 2006 Yamaha MT-01 for Sale
Yamaha August 25, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1994 Yamaha TZR250RS

When it comes to RSBFS, the most popular category for our readers seems to be the quarter-liter two stroke arena. The 250s make up the most often requested, clicked on, and likely purchased machines, and it's not hard to see why. For those who prefer a pure, unadulterated GP racer with handling that would embarrass a strip of velcro on a shag rug, enough power to be interesting (but not so much to be painful), braking that will give you 8 (or 9) cents of change back from your dime, and bodywork that screams purpose yet looks like art, not even the boys from Bologna or Rimini can touch a small-bore smoker. Popular world wide - from the home markets of Japan, throughout Europe and Canada - 250cc smokers made for great rides, affordable club racers, and a stepping stone to real GP bikes. In the US, they are coveted for all this PLUS the fact that none were ever officially imported into the US. That makes them rare with a capital "R." Put rare and drool-worthy together on the same ticket and you have today's 1994 Yamaha TZR250RS. The "RS" refers to Racing Sport - as if there would be any other sport worth considering....

1994 Yamaha TZR250RS for sale on eBay

The TZR250RS - also known as the 3XV model by Yamaha aficionados - consists of a 90 degree v-twin, fed with reed valve induction and twin Mikuni flatslide carbs. A close-ratio gearbox with a dry clutch and add triple disks all around showcases the intent of this machine. Featuring fully adjustable suspension front and rear, the RS model is a sub 280 lb (dry) smoking rocket that will corner with the best on the racetrack. Initially these RS models were home market bikes - which came with a restricted output of approximately 45 HP. Latter markets, including Australia, Western Europe and the UK enjoyed a higher-output machine. As with other smokers of the era, the TZR responds well to de-restriction (figure 30% gains) and traditional two-stroke performance mods. The TZR250 was available in many different configurations, which included a dizzying array of carburetors, ignition modules, exhaust power valves, transmissions and clutches. And as is the standard, each came with specific graphics and marketing nomenclature (250R, 250RS, 250RSP, 250SP and 250SPR).

From the seller:
Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a Beautifully rare Yamaha TZR250RS (3XVA) with only 2,581 kilometers (1,604 miles). This TZR is in very nice mechanical condition. New battery, new fluids and has newer tires on it. Bike runs like the day it was new. This TZR has great curb appeal and looks great. Left rear cowling has two cracks in it and is missing a tiny piece where the two rear cowlings join together. Rims have paint peeling from sitting in time and need to be powder coated. Upper cowling, lower front cowlings have no cracks, fuel tank has no dents. Bike had sat for a while when I found it. I bought it to restore as it would make a excellent candidate for restoration since its got super low miles on it, but never got around to it. It needs to be cleaned up, corrosion removed, new rear left cowling installed and it will look like a million bucks again. Bike is completely stock and all original. Fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha. Original windscreen comes with purchase.

This TZR comes with a Utah state title and is titled as a street bike for road use. Bike will sell to highest bidder regardless of cost, loss or investment. This is an excellent chance to buy a Yamaha TZR250 RS on the cheap!

By the end of the 250cc two-stroke era, all the manufacturers had moved to a v-twin power; packaging and aerodynamics were the primary reasons, although longevity due to perfect primary balance was another positive factor for the vee motors (farewell, parallel twin). Yamaha definitely followed suit here, yet the result is far from another cookie-cutter "me too" 250 GP bike for the streets. The TZR lineup has a rabid following and stands out as some of the more rare variants of this popular class. You will look high and low for another TZR250RS, and - at least in the US - you will be looking for quite a while.

Today's example can be best summed up as very clean and a great starting point for either a rider or a sano-resto-neo-original build. This bike looks like an honest piece of kit, but is far from some of the museum pieces normally seen by this Utah collector (such as his awesome KR-1R). As the rooms of his man cave empty out to make room for new acquisitions, there appear to be plenty of fun items left; you should definitely check out some of his other auctions on eBay, including a cool Ninja 150RR. This TZR250RS is a meaty morsel - and RSBFS readers are serious two-stroke carnivores. Bidding has started slowly, and is only nearing the $3k mark with a few days remaining. Check it out here and start scheming on your plan to score this no reserve auction bike. Good luck!!

MI