Posts by Category: Vincent

Cafe Racer August 23, 2012 posted by

Catching Up With Our Sister Sites [900SS Biggelaar, Norvin Cafe, Thunderbird, V7 Sport, TR6, Bonneville Report]

Here is the latest from CSBFS and CBFS! Yep, I'm trying revive the cafe site again. I've been getting a lot of emails and forwards which has reignited my interest in getting this site back in order. Please keep your suggestions coming!

dc

1979 Ducati 900SS Biggelaar | Auction

1979 Ducati 900SS Biggelaar


Norvin For Sale!

Norvin For Sale!



1950 Triumph Thunderbird
| Auction

1950 Triumph Thunderbird


1977 Ducati 900SS Track Bike | Auction

1977 Ducati 900SS Track Bike For Sale


1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport | Auction

1973 Moto Guzzi V7 Sport for sale


Choppahead 1972 Triumph TR6 For Sale | Auction

 Choppahead 1972 Triumph TR6 For Sale


Four times successful at Bonneville in 2012

Four times successful at Bonneville in 2012

dc

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale November 24, 2011 posted by

Happy Thanksgiving! Enjoy Our Weekly Recap from ClassicSportBikesForSale.com!

It’s that time again to give you guys a look at what’s been showing up on our sister sites ClassicSportBikesForSale.com. This week we have a diverse selection. From a Laverda Bol’ d’Or endurance replica to a triplet of Vincents that racked up over $140k in bids. Also, have a look at some of the bikes that have shown up on the RSBFS Facebook page this week. Be sure to like us on Facebook if you haven’t already to not miss a beat this holiday season. Enjoy!

1975 Moto Guzzi LeMans For Sale at CSBFS

1972 Laverda Bol’ d’Or Endurance Replica

 A Trio of Vincents at ClassicSportBikesForSale

1998 Honda CBR F3 Smokin’ Joe’s on the RSBFS FB page

1993 Ducati 888 SPO up for auction seen on the Facebook page!

-JS

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale November 4, 2011 posted by

ClassicSportBikesForSale.com and CafeBikesForSale.com Weekly Recap!

We have had some exciting bike show up on RSBFS in the last couple weeks! If you still aren’t satisfied, then by all means, check out our sister sites ClassicSportBikesForSale and CafeBikesForSale. Here is a look at what has popped up on CSBFS this week. Also, don’t forget to check out the RSBFS Facebook page to see even more bikes! Enjoy!

1953 Truimph T100 (C) at ClassicSportBikesForSale

1958 Parilla 250 Grand Sport up for auction!

1952 Vincent Comet on CSBFS

-JS

Exclusive December 28, 2009 posted by

A Unique Opportunity in Australia: 1967 Vincent Egli & 1968 MV Agusta 500/4

Rupert has emailed us to help spread the word about his classic sport bikes that are being offering for sale at $200,000 for the pair. The bikes are located in Australia and he notes they can easily be shipped to the U.S.

The 1968 MV Agusta 500/4:

quote from the seller:

1968 MV Agusta 500/4
A RECONSTRUCTION

By 1968 MV had won eleven 500cc World championships. Some with the triple and some with the four. Famous MV champions were Giacomo Agostini, Mike Hailwood, John Surtees, Tarquinio Provini, Carlo Ubbiali, and John Hartle.

The machine you are viewing was inspired by the owners teenage awe of unaffordable 60`s MV`s. To realize a dream, it was built in 820 hours between 2004 and 2007, using as many original MV parts as possible. Where original parts were not available, replicas were made from drawings, photos & technical information. The aim of the project was to reconstruct this rare machine capturing its essential characteristics.

Parts were sourced from Germany, Italy, Switzerland, NZ, the US, UK, and Australia. Finding and aquiring parts, especially the engine, frame and hubs, consumed at least 40% of the project time. It would not have been possible without the many clubs, dealers, manufacturers and knowledgeable individuals contacted. Communication, often in other languages, was by mail, `phone, fax, SMS and email. Many interesting conversations were experienced in the process. There are few who have MV knowledge and the most reliable and communicative were found in Germany. The British were easily the costliest, most insular, and unco-operative. The Italians by contrast were found to be helpful, friendly, & warmly sentimental.

There are about 15 racing 500/4`s. Some of them in the MV Samarate museum. However, as they did not reach production, only three roadgoing 500/4`s are known to exist. The one you are viewing, one in the US and, another in Germany. Unlike the shaft drive1968 750S which produced 72HP and weighed (naked) 240kg, this machine has a faired mass of 150kg and is chain driven. Light and agile, it produces 65hp @ 11500 rpm and 5.9kg/m @ 6200rpm. Modern Dellorto carburettors & electronic ignition have been fitted to improve safety and flexibility.

The matching four leading shoe magnesium brakes are of Daniele Fontana design and made by Angelo Menani of Sedriano, Italy. There was no provision for speedo drive at the hub so a Swiss VDO digital instrument has been adapted.
The curved ‘feminine’ silencers are of original shape. They were made at great expense by Giovanni Magni, son of Agostinis` mechanic, Arturo Magni. Hand levers were made to the MV pattern by Tronconi and Novelli s.n.c., Milan. Associate company Motocicli Veloci supplied the alloy clip-ons & some small parts made from ergal. The tank & fairing are of MV pattern by Magni. Seat & narrow front guard are original. The wheel rims made from Borrani tooling by San Remo and Akront. Forks are Ceriani. Shocks Marzocchi. Paint finish and badges are 60`s matched.

The owner is an engineer, thankfully with career experience in procurement. . He ‘mortgaged his mother-in-law’ to fund the reconstruction. As a guide, a 2007 BMW car could be bought for the same outlay. But you ask...”Does it go ?”
Answer.... “Is it true that Dolly Parton can`t fall on her face ?”

and the Vincent Egli:

quote from the seller:

AUSTRALIAN HISTORIC MOTOR CLUB
BLUE MOUNTAINS, NSW AUSTRALIA.

VINCENTS from the 1930's to 1955 were known as the ‘Fastest production machines available…...”A fact, not a slogan”.. Vincents 998cc engine produced more horsepower than all its British and most of its foreign rivals. It was sought after for both road and competition use. In 1967 a Swiss engineer, Fritz Egli, observing the rise of Japanese multis, decided to extend the competetiveness of his racing Vincent by reducing weight and improving the cycle components. He designed and made a motorcycle which became a legend. Its roadgoing derivative sold on the Continent and in the UK, through dealer Roger Slater. However, the Vincent company had ceased business in 1955 & the limited supply of Vincent engines in 1967, meant that less than 150 Eglis were made..

Fritz designed a ‘space’ frame with a large diameter top tube for oil, and a simple but robust triangulated rear section carrying conventional shock absorbers.. He introduced Italian 4 leading shoe brakes and to some, a mechanical Campagnolo disc brake.
These he assembled inside alloy rims made by Borrani. The forks were mostly Italian,
and later, Eglis were fitted with an Avon Marchenal bikini fairing..

Characteristics of his championship winning design include the ‘ banana’ tank, nickel plated chrome moly frame, a 5 inch Shadow instrument, and long conforming front alloy mudguard having two stays.

The machine here was built in about 780 hours by owner/engineer Rupert Moran over a period of three and a half years. It cost about the same as a Falcon or Commodore. The build is largely to Fritz`s pattern using original components where possible from around the world to achieve his essential 1967 features. It has an improved Black Shadow engine rebuilt, and some frame components from Terry Prince…once Fritz`s assistant. Like the original, Italian designed brakes, forks, and rims are used. Sourcing rare components and finding long lost skills to replace others, were the main build difficulties.

Of course, modern materials and manufacturing techniques have allowed sympathetic improvements to roadworthiness, handle-ability and finish. The front wheel for example, is 19inch instead of 20, because only 19inch tyres were available in an appropriate speed rating at the time of build. Capturing the essential features was the main aim.

I have to say honestly that while these bikes are absolutely gorgeous, I have no expertise with motorcycles of this vintage. I'm hopeful that some of our readers will find them of interest as Rupert notes these bikes are for sale due to health. Please email him directly for further information and pictures.

Good luck with the sale Rupert!

dc