Posts by Category: Triumph

Triumph May 16, 2015 posted by

Triple sec – Sweet 1995 Triumph Daytona 900 Super III

Revived by entrepreneur John Bloor after their final bankruptcy in 1983, Triumph Motorcycles engineered a family of engines using a 76mm diameter piston and established a manufacturing facility in Thailand.  The venerable brand celebrated it centenary in 2002 and has continued manufacture and now completes almost 50,000 motorcycles per year.  This particular bike is a nice example of one of their best machines.

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left

1995 Triumph Daytona 900 Super III

20150515 1995 triumph daytona 900 super iii right front

Initially designed in 1989, the smooth-running 885cc triple underwent a major review in 1993 and with Cosworth's help emerged with 115hp, and somewhat lighter thanks to pressure casting the engine cases.  Too busy trying to stay alive to enter into racing, modern Triumph cycles never experienced the weight loss racing requires, and the Super III carries 465 lbs wet.  But with the aluminum frame, 43mm forks, 310mm front disks, the entire package tests lighter than it should, a well-balanced handler.

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii cockpit  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left tank

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left seat fairing  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii left engine

The speed yellow fairing on this example appears better than excellent, the lower reaches of the classic shape protected from chips by automotive film.   The black monoposto seat looks cushy and in nice shape, the pillion seat under a fairing.  Very polished and very pretty 3-into-1 header with carbon muffler appears to be the only modification, and belies the 8900 miles the odometer shows.  Have to like it when someone's been detailing the engine !

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right engine detail  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right rear wheel

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii tool kit  20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right engine

From the eBay auction:

Proudly kept and displayed indoors with only 8900 original miles. (That's less than 450 miles/year)100% Original everything*. Perfect condition; no scratches, dents, or nicks of any kind. Carbon fiber everywhere. Aluminum 6.6 gallon tank.

As second owner, I've meticulously maintained the bike in every way. All questions will be answered immediately.

20150515 1995 triumph 900 super iii right rear

Though a revised 675cc engine has led to recent racing successes by a contingent of privateers, the Daytona Super III was developed before the racing program and is a smooth, powerful road bike, the 1995 being a nice update from the original design.  This auction looks to be for one of the very best of this model.

Triple sec – Sweet 1995 Triumph Daytona 900 Super III
Triumph May 2, 2015 posted by

1st of the 2nd: 1st gen Triumph T595 Daytona in yellow

t5953

1997 Triumph T595 (955cc) Daytona for sale on ebay

Here is a personal favorite of yours truly, a 1st generation Triumph Daytona T595.  Although these bikes carried a model designation of "T595", the 1st generation of the reborn Daytona actually featured a 955 cc displacement three-cylinder engine designed in part by Lotus.   Along with the other triple-cylinder Triumphs, the Daytona helped to establish the newly reborn Triumph as a real alternative motorcycle manufacturer.

The big Daytona was the first serious big sportbike for the reborn Triumph but it couldn't compete with the best the Japanese had to offer (especially when Yamaha brought out the R1 in 1998).  While the big Daytona wasn't able to match the hardcore sportbikes from Japan, it was big, fast, smooth, comfy, able to do medium level touring while still looking great.  The big triple was often referred to as a British version of the Honda VFR and even though the bike couldn't compete with the hyperbikes appearing out of Japan, reviewers were generally positive.

Here is an excerpt from Viserdown.com:

Judge the bike by its lap times and you’d have to agree; the T595 never matches the Japanese competition but the big Triumph does have two real aces. The first is personality which counts for an awful lot, much more to most of us than shaving fractions of seconds off lap times. In the Daytona’s case much of it comes from the Triumph three cylinder engine’s rough charm. The second ace is it’s a bike which works better on real roads than it does on a racetrack. It’s more stable and easy to use than the Japanese competition.

t5954

This 1997 Daytona T595 looks amazingly clean with only 9263 miles.  There are a few nicks in the paint but certainly nothing major and no evidence of the bike being down.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • 100% original '97 Triumph Daytona T595 (955cc)
  • New TORS carbon low exhaust + updated to corresponding tune
  • Service done in the last 50 miles includes
  • Valve adjustment
    Entire intake tract cleaned. Spotless down to the valves.
    Injectors pro cleaned + flow benched
    New fuel pump, pressure regulator, fuel filter, hoses, + dry break fittings
    Coolant flush + fill w/ engine ice
    Flushed brakes
    New plugs, air filter, hoses, gaskets, o-rings, grommets, etc.

  • New AGM battery 1 year ago on float
  • Only non-triumph parts are the fuel pump + pressure regulator<
  • Only cosmetic flaws are ichip in the rear lens + few small paint chips on fender and tank.
  • Bike has been in the family since 1999. Tires should be replaced soon, lot of tread but old

t5956

Is this big Daytona worth the $3,800 asking price?  Well while the 1998 version in silver (when it was marked as the 955i) is the most popular among collectors, this is still a hell of a lot of bike for not much money. Overall I think this one is being offered at pretty close to the right price and may be a good opportunity for a "more experienced" rider who still wants a sportbike to have something that can do everything they need.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

1st of the 2nd:  1st gen Triumph T595 Daytona in yellow
Triumph March 14, 2015 posted by

The other 600: 2002 Triumph TT600

tt6001

Here is one we haven't had on RSBFS before, a 1st gen Triumph TT600.  Despite being the first 600cc sportbike with fuel injection, the introductory triumph 600cc bikes have been pretty much forgotten about, which is a shame because they are actually excellent "intro/learner" bikes for people new to 600cc sportbikes.

tt6002

2002 Triumph TT600 for sale on ebay

The first generation TT600 always had excellent handling and brakes but also suffered a marked lack of power low down and too much throttle hesitancy.  Also the styling was considered slightly "meh" with oddball molded air intakes and a somewhat overly large exhaust silencer/canister.

The engine mapping issues were resolved for 2002 but the bike still had a few recalls which isnt surprising given it was a completely new engine for Triumph.   The real problem was that even after the fixes there wasn't really anything to make the TT600 into an object of lust.  Also the 600cc Triumph was still more expensive than the japanese models.

I suppose its not surprising the that the Triumph 600cc models didn't really start selling until the next generation, the Daytona edition.  Sales really going at the next generation of the 600cc, the excellent 675 but the 2002 and onward TT600 are still really good bikes, especially for newer riders.

tt6003

This particular TT600 looks to be in excellent shape, with just a few scrapes/small cracks in the fairing.  Mileage is actually a bit higher than I expected at over 14000 miles but this does show that the bike isn't fragile.  However no mention is made of service history so recall fixes should be verified.  Also any buyer might want to assume fluids and new rubber as part of the ownership cost.

tt6004

Is this TT600 worth the asking price of $3,200 USD.   To be honest, probably not...even though it is a bit of a rare sportbike, KBB retail seems to be slightly over 2,000 USD so some haggling would probably be in order.  Also, unlike the 1st generation Triumph speed triple, these bikes will probably never appreciate significantly....but they are a bit of a rare sportbike and are a good, basic 600cc sportbike.  Perhaps a RSBFS fan in florida could pick this one up as a daily rider or to introduce a younger family member into the joys of owning something different.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

The other 600:  2002 Triumph TT600
Triumph November 12, 2014 posted by

Cosworth: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III 900

super31

Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. is the largest surviving British motorcycle manufacturer but it hasn't been an easy path for the Uk-based manufacturer.  The entire British bike industry basically collapsed back in the early 1980's and  Triumph went into receivership in 1983.  After a few years and a lot of legal wrangling, British businessman John Bloor ended up acquiring the name and manufacturing rights and his "new" Triumph motorcycle company re-started sportbike production in the early 1990's.

Between 1992 and 1997 Triumph produced the much appreciated but ultimately underpowered 3 cylinder Daytona 900. This bike was a successor to the 0riginal Daytona 750 and boasted a more acceptable riding position designed to increase its sporting ability.  But the power to weight ratio was still a problem, especially when compared to other bikes at the time such as the GSX-R and the ultra-light Fireblade/CBR.  So for the 1994 model year Triumph produced the Daytona Super III, a very limited production run of 150 bikes designed to help re-balance the power/weight issue for the big Triple.

super33

1995 Daytona Super III for sale on ebay

The Daytona Super III had a host of changes from its predecessor, with the major one being a significantly more powerful engine. The power improvements were due to a collaboration with the tuning gurus at Cosworth and was accomplished by using higher compression pistons and a redesigned cylinder head. The end result was a power increase from 97 bhp to 115 bhp.  Overall the Super III was a more responsive and higher performance ride, and also had many parts switched to carbon fiber and improved brakes.

super38

While the new Daytona sill wasn't as light and agile as the CBR/Fireblade, it was certainly a big step forward and it offered something the ultra-light hyperbikes did not; the ability to be used for both blazing speed runs and medium duty touring.    Almost immediately after being introduced, the Super III was identified as a speed touring monster; consider the following review from the August 1995 issue of Motorcyclist magazine.

 First thing you notice is it isn't in the same mold as Japanese race replicas such as Suzuki's GSX-Rs,  it feels long, tall and still a bit heavy.  It can't flick through chicanes like a repli-GP machine and it doesn't rev way into five figures. But the Daytona is deceptive; its point-to-point performance is superb, with most of the credit for this belonging to a new engine that ticks over with a slightly cantankerous rumble that tells you 'I'm an engine'.  From the instant you press the button, the Triumph exudes the sort of engine character that Japan largely designed out years ago. 

There are no bottom-end flat spots, just a rising tide of willing revs. The Daytona Super III is content to potter at slow speeds but useful power begins to swell at 3000rpm, continues unabated until the 9500rpm red line and at no point does it ever feel remotely stressed.  Peak revs equates to 148mph in top gear which might not seem impressive in an age of 150mph 600s but it is how the new triple's getting there that sets it apart.  While most engines of comparable range are either bland or plain slow, the 900 is a speed touring monster, an unburstable projectile from A to B. 

The rest of the package is of the same high quality.  The gear changes are positive, with no under-selection, the truck-sized clutch practically redundant once on the move. Six speeds is overkill, but allows relaxed top gear ratios. In almost every area, the bike seems over-engineered. 

The Super III does a superb job of filling a segment that seems to have been vacated except for the ZZR; charismatic sportbike that can also be used as a daily rider and medium distance touring machine.   No doubts that this bike will become an important piece of the reborn Triumphs legacy and a future classic.

super34

This particular Super III looks to be amazingly pristine.  The seller includes excellent hi-res photos on the ebay auction and also a link to a youtube video.

Here is some of what the seller has to say about this particular Super III.

If you have been looking for a collectable Triumph from the modern era, this is the one!   There were only 150 of these bikes worldwide.Bike only has 9767 original miles, has always been garaged and has never been in the rain. Special features include carbon fiber fender and sub-fender, carbon dash, 6 pot calipers, and seat cowling. Paint and carbon fiber look as new. All fluids are fresh and bike has been maintained perfectly.Tires are almost new with 95% tread remaining. Lots of extras (see auction for details)

super3carbon

So what's this particular Super III worth?  The KBB website doesn't have a price for these which is a common problem if the bike is produced in small numbers like this one was.  A few Super III's previously posted here on RSBFS seemed to go for around 3-5k USD, which is pretty cheap for a bike that gives you this much performance and versatility and given the outstanding condition of this example, I would expect price expectations to be at the upper part of the range.   This bike seems like an excellent opportunity for a collector to acquire a pretty rare bike that they could also use on a regular basis without having to go to the chiropractor afterwards.

MG

Cosworth: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III 900
Triumph September 27, 2014 posted by

A Pair of Threes: Two First-Gen Speed Triples for Sale

1995 Triumph Speed Triples

A plucky spirit and old-world charm were ultimately no match for the industrial might of the Japanese and Triumph was gone by the early 1980's. The motorcycle landscape was changing rapidly, and they simply couldn’t keep up with the pace. So when construction magnate John Bloor changed his plans to raze the Triumph factory to build housing tracts and instead decided to resurrect the famed company, he knew something new was needed. In order to give the reborn company the versatility to create new models and respond to market trends, as well as create interesting, niche motorcycles with minimal risk, a new philosophy was needed.

The modular design resulted in a pair of engines mated to a versatile spine-frame that lent itself to a variety of configurations and eventually included supersports, adventure-touring, sport-touring, cruiser, standard, and café-racer styles. That café racer was the very first Speed Triple, and I just happened to find two prime examples this week: a very rare and very nicely prepared track bike and one of the best street examples I've seen in a very long time.

1995 Triumph Speed Triple Challenge Replica L Front

While the bikes that resulted from the modular design weren’t as refined as Japanese alternatives, they were successful, setting the stage for the company’s current line-up. Trading on character and heritage instead of outright performance, it’s no surprise that the 1200cc four-cylinder models were less successful, and the entertaining 900cc [actually 855cc] triple came to take center stage, a formula that’s worked so well for them since.

1995 Triumph Speed Triple Challenge Replica R Side

To promote the Speed Triple, the new bike was campaigned in a one-make race series name, originally enough, the “Speed Triple Challenge.”  The first bike is a replica of those track-only bikes, and features many difficult-to-obtain parts.

1995 Triumph Speed Triple Challenge Replica L Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Speed Triple Challenge Replica Track Bike for Sale

 I believe it has been said that these are fastest in Black.  It was and orange bike converted to all black just for color choice and not due to damage.  I have had this for a couple of years and have been converting to represent the Speed Triple Challenge series bikes. It has a serious amour of love, attention and $ put towards it. First of was finding all the black panels.  Bike has the Sebring/ factory race header with an Arrow titanium exhaust can, front end was ton through and re springer by Race Tech. Penske, $$$$, remote resivor rear shock. Keihin fcr39 race carbs installed and add a great intake sound. Specially sourced Sprint Steering Damper with proper brackets sourced new from UK.  Front and rear fenders are Carbon Fiber from the factory special Super III. The carbon has been professionally re surfaced and clear coated, will not fade in the sun like all the others. Six piston front calipers are also from a Super III and are an incredible performance option. Custom made carbon numberplate and tank pad. Wheels have been restored and painted in a grey metallic that just set off just right. Bike is set up for the strew with lights and bilkers. I have only used it 300 miles in two track days in the past two years. Tires are Pirelli Super Corsas and are still good - only 300 miles on them.  So, this is not your run of the mill early Speed Triple, it has thousands of dollars of rare and unobtainable rare parts, just try and find them.

1995 Triumph Speed Triple Challenge Replica R Tank

But according to most of what I’ve read about the early Hinkley bikes, trying to build one for the track is really like teaching a pig to rollerskate so, unless you like tilting at proverbial windmills, perhaps it’s best to look at an example that’s for use on the street.

Like this very, very clean and very, very orange example: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

1995 Triumph Speed Triple R Side

Never restored, never repainted, never crashed first generation Speed Triple. I hunted for 2 years to get this one and secured it from a collector in Tucson AZ. Being dry climate and hardly used, it was cosmetically perfect, but had a bikini fairing and bar risers added. I had Cascade Classics of Portland OR completely go through it to get it back to stock, then started from there to refine it more. I have enjoyed riding her around Oregon backroads, sometimes taking my kids for rides, but now it doesn't get used. When I have time for riding I use the Ducati or Aprilia sport bikes. My policy is: if I don't ride it she has to go; hence selling the one bike I said I will never sell!

Features

Beautiful condition original Speed Triple that made the Hinckley bikes famous

Period 1995 Super III exhaust system. Tuned for this exhaust (much time/money here). Runs better than new (dyno charts prove it)

Invested $2,000-$3000 per year whether it needed it or not e.g. new rubber hoses on engine, flushed/cleaned radiator overflow tank, fitted new front brake pads with modern Triumph safety pins.

At oil/filter changes, oil comes out looking new. Uses no oil whatsoever. No rattles or noises. Silky smooth power

Never had engine apart, never crashed, never restored, never repainted, seat never recovered. Cam covers removed at 9,000 miles to check valve clearance; didn't need adjustment.

What comes with bike: Woodcraft clip-ons, Triumph brand period bikini fairing, OEM mirrors, unpainted cowl, spare orange grab rail, race 3-1 headers, workshop plus owners manual, all original documents: DMV docs, service receipts, original 1996 bill of sale etc.

1995 Triumph Speed Triple Dash

The original Speed Triple can, along with the Ducati Monster, be credited with popularizing the naked sports machine trend. Other manufacturers may have gotten there first, but those bikes [CB1, Hawk GT, Bandit400, etc…] are relative footnotes. It’s easy to see the Speed’s charm: a powerful, throbby engine with just enough handling for a sporty morning blast through the twisties, and enough individuality and sex-appeal to make the rider feel special.

1995 Triumph Speed Triple R Side Engine

All the different era Speed Triple bikes have their charms, but the first of the line always has some extra bit of excitement about it. I really like these, especially their generally rock-bottom prices. It’s the kind of bike I’d never own as my only bike, but I’d love to have space in my garage so I could have one as a slick daily hack. That means neither of these are really the right bike for me. But if you’re looking for a collectible early Speed3, you are very unlikely to find one in better physical shape that hasn’t been sitting in a crate since the 90’s. Honestly, I am always trolling for these and they’re never this nice and only rarely this orange. It’s pricey, but you probably won’t find a better one.

And if you’re looking for a seriously one-of-a-kind track-day or race bike, your search is definitely over. Just don’t buy it if you don’t like answering questions about your ride: any time that thing is parked up, people are likely to wander over and ask about it.

-tad

1995 Triumph Speed Triple L Side

A Pair of Threes: Two First-Gen Speed Triples for Sale
Triumph August 28, 2014 posted by

1990’s Budget Britbike: 1997 Triumph Daytona T595

Fast, classy, and just a bit different, this Triumph Daytona T595 represented a huge change in thinking for the recently resurrected company. Early on in Triumph's John Bloor era, cost-cutting measures that didn’t compromise reliability or quality were in full-effect, and basically all of their bikes were based around a common frame and two engines, which gave plenty of versatility to create new models by simply swapping parts around. So a 900cc triple or a 1200cc four could be slotted in, with different bodywork and suspension fitted to create a range of motorcycles that eventually included a dual-sport, a sport bike, a sport touring bike, and a naked roadster.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Front

The resulting motorcycles were never be able to compete directly with more pure and focused designs: multi-purpose engines and frames were always going to be too heavy, and not optimized for specific tasks. But the designs were modern and significantly improved on the reliability and usability of the older Triumphs, helping pave the way for the Triumphs of today.

And even though the bikes were generally not focused enough to really compete against dedicated sportbikes from Japan, they had far more character, good looks, were sized for larger riders, and were uncommon enough for folks looking for something different than the usual shrieking fours. The original Daytona came in both four and triple flavors, although the added weight of the larger four cylinder moved it even further towards the sport-touring end of the spectrum.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Rear

The second generation of the Daytona was a big leap forward in terms of both style and performance. While the unfortunately-designated T595 sounds like it should be packing a 600cc motor, it’s got a big, meaty 955cc triple that pumps out 130hp. Like the earlier Daytona, the T595 was a bit too heavy for serious track duty, but as a road-weapon it was hard to beat, with a comfortable seating position, excellent brakes, and plenty of torque. Very much a GT, the perfect bike for folks who wanted to buy British but also wanted a completely modern machine.

Some minor low-production-volume quirks aside, the Daytona delivered.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Triumph Daytona for Sale

Check out this super cool and hard to find bike!! 1997 Triumph Daytona T595 in Strontium Yellow. A real classic sport bike. Lots of performance and great styling to boot. The 955cc in line three cylinder engine with 130 horses and 74 foot pounds of torque makes this baby boogie. With almost a five gallon fuel tank, a six speed transmission, and a low weight of only 435 pounds you can great range and travel on this bike.  This bike has super low miles for the year with only 11,280 clicks on the odometer the Daytona has only averaged about 660 miles a year. Very clean bike and freshly serviced. Priced right and ready to roll today.

These aren’t especially rare, but they’re pretty hard to find in such nice original condition. I loved the styling at the time, especially in silver, and I think it’s aged pretty well. Too curvy by far to look modern, the proportions are very nice and a lack of outrageous graphics favored by Japanese manufacturers keeps things simple and elegant. This is one of those bikes that, like the GSX-R 1100, I’d love an excuse to buy: a long highway commute, or as a weekend getaway machine.

1997 Triumph Daytona L Rear

It’s unfortunate that Triumph doesn’t make a big-bore Daytona today: just take a Speed Triple and fit a fairing. It wouldn’t be competitive in  any eligible race classes, but neither was the old one. In today’s market, where “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” seems to be less and less of a concern and bikes with oddball-displacements like Kawi’s 636 and Ducati’s 899 offer additional choice and high performance in a very sporty package, it seems a no-brainer, especially considering the success and popularity of Triumph's 675 Daytona.

-tad

1997 Triumph Daytona L Side

1990’s Budget Britbike: 1997 Triumph Daytona T595