Posts by Category: Suzuki

Suzuki October 15, 2016 posted by

In a World – 1990 Suzuki GSX-R750 Racebike

Toward the end of the air/oil-cooled era, Suzuki took one last stab at a higher torque engine, with lightness helping the pistons and rods survive the 13,000 rpm redline.  Set up for racing with a newly built engine and suspension updates, this GSX-R750 appears ready to take it to the track.

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1990 Suzuki GSX-R750 Racebike for sale on eBay

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The "long stroke" 749cc still quite oversquare, the GSX-R750 had a wider torque band than than previous model and accessed 115 hp.  Four 38mm Mikuni carburettors handle fuel delivery.  Everywhere but America the legacy perimeter frame held 41mm upside-down forks, but these have been updated to those from a 1994 model.  Brakes are dual 310mm disks with 280 mm rear.  The race fairing is a pretty good silhouette of the factory bodywork, with no lights or pillion.

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Presented by an Arizona parts manufacturer, this race bike looks newly commissioned and super clean.  The large Hagon decals are puzzling with the claimed RaceTech forks and Öhlins monoshock, but it wouldn't be the first time a sponsor appeared only on the outside.  From the eBay auction:

1990 Suzuki GSX-R750. Was built in 2016 for AHRMA next generation superbike racing. The motor was rebuilt with new rods, pistons, valve springs. Has 1994 forks, all Race Tech parts. Ohlins rear shock, Mikuni 38 flat side carbs, and much more.

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One of the first 750's into the 10-second 1/4-mile bracket, the 1990 machine was also a serious handler requiring an authoritative rider.  Historics can be some of the most fun race weekends ever, with the competition in a long perspective, and the focus on the hardware.  With the inherent simplicity of air/oil cooling, this GSX-R can show them how it was done.

-donn

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In a World – 1990 Suzuki GSX-R750 Racebike
Suzuki October 11, 2016 posted by

Get Lucky: 1997 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A for Sale in Japan

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I once saw Penn & Teller perform and, after their last illusion was complete, the pair appeared onstage, illuminated by a single, overhead spot. They were both casually smoking cigarettes and Penn [obviously] talked a bit about how they both like to indulge in a cigarette after a show. However, he acknowledged that smoking is really bad for you and that kids should obviously not follow their example... Unless they want to look really, really cool. Which pretty much sums up this little smoker: tobacco use may be incredibly unhealthy, but years of tobacco sponsorship resulted in some of the most iconic race cars and bikes of all time. Rothmans, John Player, Marlboro, and today's Lucky Strike Suzuki RGV250SP all have a terrific style, in spite of the product being advertised. Somehow, an RGV in garish period graphics will never look as sharp as one in red-and white with that logo on the side.

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Built between 1997 and 1998, the last generation of RGV used an unusual 70° two-stroke v-twin that Suzuki claimed made 70hp in de-restricted, SP form. As an original Japanese-market machine, this bike likely makes the government-mandated 40hp, so there's obviously plenty of untapped potential here if you know how to find it. In an era where 180hp road-missiles continue to proliferate, kept on the road and out of the trees only by virtue of their state-of-the-art electronics, 70hp doesn't sound like much, but the highly-strung Gamma's lightswitch power and nimble handling mean big rewards for committed riders.

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As trick as they look, the asymmetrical "banana" swingarms of the later VJ22 and VJ23 versions add weight, so the later bikes are actually heavier than the earlier examples, but collectors don't seem to care. Especially since you're still looking at a dry weight in the neighborhood of 300lbs. Personally, I prefer the look of the earlier VJ21 bikes overall, but in Lucky Strike colors, this VJ23 still pretty striking.

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From the original eBay listing: 1997 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A for Sale in Japan

Very rare 2 stroke bike from Japan to you!!
RGV250SP VJ23A  Japan domestic model
VIN: VJ23A-1010**
Year: 1997
Mileage: 29,624km
Condition: Running very well. Both side of side panels are aftermarket but another part is original.
Body work has some deep scratches.
Silencers are for TZR250R 3XV of original.

We'll attach Japanese original title, Sales certificate in English, Bill of sale in English.
Shipping: Price is including the shipping cost from Japan to port near your place. We'll put in the wooden crate and ship by sea.

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Obviously, as a Japanese import, you'll have to be prepared to put this on display or deal with the usual DMV chicanery. But this bike is basically the end of the line for two-stroke performance, and those Lucky Strike graphics really flatter the bike. It appears clean and well-maintained, but does have a few superficial scrapes, scuffs, and cracks, as described by the seller. The Buy It Now price is a pretty steep $7,000 but RGV250s are currently in demand, so I wouldn't be too surprised if the seller gets that much.

-tad

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Get Lucky: 1997 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A for Sale in Japan
Suzuki September 27, 2016 posted by

Unobtanium Alert: 1986 Suzuki GSX-750R LE with only 6 Kilometers in Australia

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1986 Suzuki GSX-750R LE with 6k on ebay australia

Yes, you read that right: 6 kilometers, essentially 4 miles,...since new,...30 years ago!  And its the LE version, which means its a homologation bike. For anyone who doesn't know what that means, here is a bit of history:

Back in the mid 1980's the heads of professional motorcycling decreed that race bikes had to be based on something the public could actually buy.  The idea was that this would keep racefans interested and help drive both interest in the race series and sales for the manufacturers.   But this presented a dilemma for the manufacturers - their bikes would have to be able to be setup to be competitive on the track but also not end up killing any noobs who bought one and rode it on the street.  Many manufacturers quickly realized the best way to resolve the dilemma was not to try to make a "one-size-fits-all-bike" but instead offer two bikes; a standard bike that looked like the racer and had about 70% of the performance, and a"limited edition" bike that was pretty much an actual race bike except it came with lights and license plates.  While the limited editions would be sold through the same dealers, prices would be very high and production would be extremely limited.  The resulting series of homologation bikes included the Suzuki GSX-750R LE, Honda RC30, Yamaha OW01, and Kawasaki ZX7RR.  Even Harley Davidson got into the act, producing 50 street versions of their VR1000 racebike. While some of the homologation bikes were considered sales failures at the time of their introduction, the have all pretty much become highly desired items for most collectors and true sportbike fans.

Even though the GSX-750R had only been introduced the previous year and was already nearly 50 kilos lighter than the competition, in 1986 Suzuki produced 500 'limited edition' models.  The GSX-750R LE offered true race-bike technology, including different brakes, new/anti-dive forks, an upgraded shock, dry clutch, factory fiberglass solo seat, lightweight aluminum gas tank, and a revised swingarm.

Here is a link to a retrospective on the LE.

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Given the mileage, there isn't much to talk about regarding condition/service history.   Instead here are a few of the pics from the eBay listing but don't blame me if you end up suddenly realizing you are drooling!

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So what is it going to take to add this to your collection?  Short answer - a lot.   These were pricey to start with, cost about 50% more than the standard GSX-750 of the same year.  Also there just weren't that many produced and many that were ended up being raced and crashed.  From what I have been able to find, a handful went to Europe, Canada and Japan, so the location of this one in Australia means you probably won't find another one in this condition in the area anytime in the near future...if ever.

The few previous ones of these that we have had on RSBFS seem to have gone for $16,000-$19,000 USD and those had either higher mileage or weren't completely stock.   I would not be surprised to see this one require a price of over $25,000 USD to go to a new owner.  While that is a lot of  money, this is one that I feel confident saying that will continue to appreciate if its kept in the same condition it is now.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Unobtanium Alert:  1986 Suzuki GSX-750R LE with only 6 Kilometers in Australia
Suzuki September 17, 2016 posted by

Forbidden Fruit: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale

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Look, just to be clear: if you’re in California, you’re not getting this bike. The seller is most emphatic on that point. See below. It’s not that it’s completely impossible to find or to title a grey-market import Suzuki RGV250Γ in California, it’s just that you’re not getting this particular bike: apparently the seller tried but didn’t grease the right palms, or use the right combination of ancient incantations, so Title Compliance Overlords in Sacramento sent him a letter, clearly informing him he could not sell the bike to a CA resident. Bummer, but all you Golden State residents need to look elsewhere for your two-stroke fix. “But, but… I just wanted it as a for off-road-use-only track bike!” Sorry, buddy: you’re boned.

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But what’s the big deal with the RGV250 anyway? Well, if this is your first time visiting Rare Sport Bikes for Sale, the RGV250 Gamma was Suzuki’s entry into the hotly-contested and not-available-in-the-USA quarter-liter sportbike class that saw 249cc two-stroke twins battling for supremacy on track and in showrooms throughout the 80s and 90s. The bikes all featured cutting edge performance and technology, but with additional smoke and a lawnmower soundtrack. Lightweight aluminum frames, six-speed, sometimes cassette-style gearboxes, high-strung powerplants, and electronic trickery were the order of the day, and Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki, and even Kawasaki all had bikes in play. Although Honda was the gold-standard in terms of quality and innovation, Suzuki was the wild man of the bunch and it says something that Aprilia cribbed the RGV’s powerplant for their RS250. Probably just that Suzuki was willing to provide them for a good price, but still: it’s a simple, powerful engine with endless tuning options, although by reputation it's more fragile than the Honda NSR's unit.

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This VJ22 model seen here is distinguished by that classic “banana” swingarm that curved upward on the right side of the bike to allow the exhaust’s expansion chambers to tuck up close to the bike. It added weight but looks super-trick and should increase cornering clearance. Suzuki's "Advanced Power Controller” power-valve controller and was introduced to the Gamma in 1991 and helped boost midrange power. The 60hp the seller claims the tiny v-twin produces is completely believable and, although that may not sound like much at first, keep in mind that the RGV250 weighs in at under 300lbs dry.

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Feel free to check out the original listing: there’s plenty of information about the bike, as well as some very strongly worded political opinions...

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale

This is a clean RGV250 VJ22 without the usual corrosion that so many of these import bikes have. I bought this about 18 months ago and did my best to try and title in here in CA. After 6 months of trying I realized that it's not possible to title this here. It's registered in Vermont and I just renewed it in August. Since it's not legal here to ride it just sits in the garage. A few months ago I bought another RGV250 that was titled for a very long time in CA. so I finally have one to ride. I swapped the bodywork that I painted, white wheels and exhaust and put them on my new RGV.

So as to the details on the bike itself. Just did the top end with new pistons and made sure the power valves didn't have any loose pins. Bike has 32,000 km, motor has just under 17,000, km (about 10,000 miles) Starts first kick just about every time and oil injection is set correctly and working. Bike has been de-restricted and has very clean 34mm carbs, full power 22D30 Power controller box and Jolly Moto chambers. OEM body panels that fit nice but have scratches here and there and a few minor cracks. I planned on painting this white with Pepsi decals but I need to spend what little free time I have putting a new roof on my garage before snow flies here. I live in the mountains at 6,250ft elevation and have not jetted this bike for this altitude.  One my other RGV I had to modify the airbox lid for more air and jet down 2 sizes on the needle jets, mains, and go up on the air jets to get it to run right here. I didn't want to modify the airbox on this bike since it should work fine at lower altitude. The first thing you will need to do is jet this bike for your altitude, I left the jetting on stock sizes. If you don't like tuning and working on your bike often, a RGV is not for you. When the weather changes your jetting that worked great before won't even be in the ballpark. These are bikes for guys that like to work on their bikes often, that's half the fun. The power valves are the weak point and it's best to run Cougar Red power valves that don't have the pin problem of stock valves. I run them on my other RGV and they even add a few HP too, Pricey at $500 but cheaper than destroying cylinders and pistons when a loose pin falls into the bore.

If you have never ridden one of these they are a hoot. Super light (under 300lbs with aftermarket exhaust) razor sharp handling, great brakes and 60hp on tap with a light switch power band. This one also has 6 pistons calipers from a GSXR, they will stop you. As for what the bike needs. It could use a paint job, don't make the mistake of buying the Chinese painted body sets on eBay if you want a good panel fit. Front forks should be rebuilt and maybe re valve the GSX-R shock I added to replace the worn out stock one. Front rotors were replaced before I bought it but the rear should be changed. Frame is super clean and undamaged. Rear subframe is straight and I just had it powder coated. Most of the black small brackets were powder coated at the same time. Wire harness is nice with no splices...

If you’re a CA buyer I can't legally sell you this bike. It's in the system and there is no way you can title it in CA I tried believe me. These bikes are starting to get imported here now that the 91 and older GP 250 replicas like this are 25 years old. There quite collectible and going up in value. With a little work this bike can be super nice, no reserve so bid to win.

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It looks like this bike may have been featured on RSBFS awhile back, but with some parts swapped over to a different bike in the same owner's collection. Regardless, there have been no takers yet at the $6,000 opening bid, and there's just one day left on the auction. Certainly, that seems like a reasonable price for a solid, running RGV250, but the bike's questionable legal status and lack of originality may be putting off buyers.

-tad

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Forbidden Fruit: 1991 Suzuki RGV250 VJ22 for Sale
Suzuki September 2, 2016 posted by

Untitled: 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP for Sale

1996 Suzkuki RGV250 R Front

Unlike modern, small-displacement machines like the Ninja 300, the Suzuki RGV250Γ "Gamma" is a high-performance machine in miniature, not a sporty-looking commuter based on a very basic platform. Emissions legislation meant we never officially got any of these little rippers here in the US, but the 250cc class really took off in the mid-to-late 1980s and saw absolutely fierce competition between the four major Japanese manufacturers before interest waned and legislation finally killed the class off by the late 1990s. Other than the Aprilia RS250 that used the very same engine, the 1996 Suzuki RGV250 was basically the end of the line for two-stroke performance motorcycles, as the VJ23 that followed lasted just two years.

1996 Suzuki RGV250 L Fairing

This 1996 VJ22 bike was the last year of the 90° v-twin engine, as the short-lived VJ23 that came along in 1997 featured a 70° v-twin that likely improved packaging, although Suzuki claimed improved power as well: 90° is ideal for smoothness, but on a four-stroke it ends up being hard to effectively fit into a compact wheelbase. That's obviously less of a problem for two-strokes with their very compact heads, but performance margins in the class during this very competitive period were razor-thin and changes that gave even a small advantage were taken very seriously.

1996 Suzuki RGV250 R Fairing

In any event, Suzuki claimed 60hp from the 249cc twin and the surrounding motorcycle otherwise followed the template set down for the quarter-liter class: aluminum beam frame, six speed gearbox, proprietary power valve technology, expansion chamber-clearing curved swingarm, and sub-300 lb weight. In spite of their power valves the Gammas, like all of the 250cc sportbikes were highly-strung, with narrow powerbands that made heavy use of the slick gearboxes mandatory. The snarling exhaust notes and giant-killing performance left a lasting impression on the motorcycling community, and many of the Japan-only models have become highly venerated by motorcycle enthusiasts who've ridden them, raced them, or only know them by reputation and endless combing of the internet for information to flesh out their two-wheeled fantasies...

1996 Suzuki RGV250 Cockpit

This RGV250Γ is the higher-spec SP model that should feature a close-ratio gearbox and a dry clutch to go with the fully-adjustable suspension at both ends of the bike, although buyers should be sure to do their homework to verify that this is, in fact, the real deal. It looks like you can see the dry clutch peeking out from behind the fairing on the right side of the bike, so that's a good sign.

From the original eBay listing: 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP for Sale

Located in Santa Ana, California. This bike is in very good condition for it’s age. Engine runs good, but could use a light carb clean. There are a few minor scratches on the fairing. Bike has only 6529 KM = 3917 Miles on the clock. The solo seat pad will be included with the bike. Also included is a new set of air filters. Bike is sold with a bill of sale only. I don't have a title for the bike. Look at the pictures carefully and ask questions before you bid. This is a USA only auction. Again, this bike is sold with a bill of sale only, no title.

1996 Suzuki RGV250 R Side

Obviously, the lack of a title will be a problem for many buyers, but as always: your mileage may vary. If you're looking to collect or display, this example isn't perfect, but looks like it could be pretty close with a bit of work and, if you want to build a two-stroke race or track bike, none of that will matter anyway. The later versions of the two-fiddy Gamma, especially ones in SP trim, are pretty rare and desirable here in the US, so I wouldn’t be too surprised if this one finds a home without much trouble in spite of potential problems titling and registering it.

-tad

1996 Suzuki RGV250 L Side

Untitled: 1996 Suzuki RGV250SP for Sale
Suzuki August 27, 2016 posted by

Rare Gixxer South of the Border: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LE L Side Front

There may have been monoshock sportbikes prior to the GSX-R750, but the bike's ubiquity and accessibility helped it define the modern sportbike in ways that earlier bikes could not. And while it's true that, if you look up "sportbike" in the dictonary, you'll probably find a picture of a GSX-R, nice examples are getting very hard to find, since owners didn't generally lavish the same level of care on their reliably Japanese steeds that one would on something from Italy...  especially of the GSX-R750 Limited Edition model intended to homologate the bike for racing.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LE R Side

When the GSX-R was introduced, water-cooling was specifically avoided to reduce weight and complexity, and the bike makes due with air and oil-cooling to keep temps in check. The bike used a distinctive alloy beam frame, along with fully-enclosed, very slab-sided bodywork, other characteristics that came to define the sportbike. The stock 18" wheels, however, give the bike's age away, and finding good, sticky rubber to fit the bike at your local motorcycle shop could prove difficult.

Designed to homologate certain features for various production-based race classes, the Limited Edition model as seen here is very rare, and came with a dry clutch, lightweight aluminum gas tank, solo seat, the longer, revised swingarm introduced in 1986, and Suzuki's electronic anti-dive forks. It was significantly more expensive than the standard bike but, as an homologation machine, that really didn't matter much to prospective buyers.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LE L Side

Today, these don't command quite the value of a Honda RC30 or a Yamaha OW01, but are still extremely desirable and should prove to be a pretty solid investment. This example is hanging out in Mexico, and looks like it's in very nice shape, with relatively low mileage, although the wheels appear to be non-standard 17" items. Great if you plan to ride your machine regularly, not so great for collectors.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

This is the very rare edition of 199 units only for the USA by Suzuki Japan. I'm the only owner that this motorcycle has had (I bought it in his box at Austin, Texas in 1988). It's not a copy. Surely it is one of the less than ten (may be five) in the world, in good conditions, but this one is in very good conditions.

Obviously, some of our resident experts can comment on the bike's authenticity, as an LE obviously can be faked, but at a glance it appears to have the dry clutch and anti-dive forks specific to this model, so that's a good sign. There are no takers yet at the $12,900 starting bid, which is certainly expensive for a Slabbie but, considering the rapidly appreciating prices for old Gixxers in general, combined with this examples homologation-special status, that seems like a pretty reasonable starting place for this bike.

-tad

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 LE Ride

Rare Gixxer South of the Border: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale