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Posts by Category: Suzuki

Suzuki February 20, 2018 posted by

Better Than the Real Thing? 1980 Suzuki XR69 Replica for Sale

We don't normally like to post up bikes that stray too far from stock, but this very useable, purpose-built replica of Suzuki's XR69 seemed too well put together to pass up. And certainly, this isn’t just some GS1000 with an aftermarket fairing slapped into place with some stickers holding it together. It's gorgeous, painstakingly crafted, and fully-prepped to compete in vintage racing classes. In some ways, it's even better than a real XR69. Crash one of those, and you've destroyed a valuable investment, a living historical racing document. Crash this one, and it's just money, and significantly less money than an actual XR69.

The original XR69 was a late 70s/ early 80s four-stroke superbike, a bit like a WSBK and MotoGP hybrid. The engine was obviously based on Suzuki’s production GS1000, but power for the race engine quickly outstripped the ability of the stock platform to handle it, so Suzuki provided frames and suspension parts from their two-stroke GP bikes, and the bikes suddenly handled as well as they went. 1981 saw a switch from a dual shock setup to a Full Floater rear suspension and even better handling. Surprisingly, engines were developed by Pops Yoshimura instead of Suzuki’s in-house racing department, and the 997cc DOHC, 16-valve inline four put 134hp through the GS1000's five speed gearbox. The package was updated with a dry clutch in 1983 and top speed was 170mph, depending on gearing.

This one obviously has some minor differences. It uses a monoshock rear that would more likely have been found on the 1981 model and appears to use 17" wheels at both ends. But the frame looks pretty authentic to my inexpert eye and the overall effect is very impressive.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Suzuki XR69 Replica for Sale

For Sale: Suzuki XR69 - A replica of the factory Yoshimura 1980 Suzuki XR69 raced for endurance racing in Europe ridden by Wes Cooley. This bike was built for the sole purpose of racing the International Challenge at Phillip Island in Australia. I have raced this bike last year and is extremely fast and performs like a modern bike. The suspension has been transformed by Dave Moss out of California and is flawless for me.

Pro mod built crank with 493 Katana rods. displacement: 1280cc. 39mm CR Keihin carbs. 31mm titanium intake valves. Stainless steel 27mm exhaust valves... extensive porting, new springs, ti retainers, hard faced cams and rocker arms. $6k in the head. No expense spared in building this engine as well as bike! All work performed by Larry Cook Racing in Portland OR.  Undercut transmission. Billet clutch hub with brand new Barnett clutch plates. Sigma Slipper clutch. Dynatek 2000 ignition with grey coils. Wego A/F gauge. Chromoly outstanding CMR custom built frame out of Canada. Custom 4:2:1 exhaust by Hindle. Brand new Ohlins rear shock with different springs. EBC front rotors and pads with unbelievable stopping power. Able to be started on the end of crank with hand starter. All making 171.5 hp. at the rear wheel with 110 fuel. There is more power to be found with different fuels!!Has tremendous power down low as well.

An extremely comfortable ride as well! Recently completely rebuilt because of top end oiling issue with new sleeves and custom pistons and tested at Utah. Perfect and Ready to go for Phillip Island with Dunlop newer slicks (1 practice session and 1 break-in session on Dyno) For all you professionals wanting to race a bike for Team USA at Phillip Island 2019 this is the one that will get you in the pointy end of the race.

What's this really worth? Well, it obviously has very minimal historic value, not being an actual historic racing motorcycle. But it is a fully-built racing machine built to compete on the vintage circuit and that $26,000 asking price seems pretty fair, considering the parts and labor that have gone into this one. The market for a replica historic racing motorcycle may be small, but this one will hopefully find the right buyer.

-tad

Better Than the Real Thing? 1980 Suzuki XR69 Replica for Sale
Suzuki February 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R712

Update 2.20.2018: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Update 2.12.2018: The GSX-R712 has been kept warm all winter in the living room and is ready to ship and run at your house this spring. Price has been dropped to $9,750.


The 1980s were a watershed era for sport bikes. This was a period of constant escalation between the Big Four manufacturers out of Japan. Amidst the fighting came many new innovations and a quantum leap in performance. And none epitomized the arms race quite like the revolutionary GSX-R from Suzuki. A winner in the showroom and a clear favorite for amateur and professional racers alike, the air/oiled cooled GSX-R was a definitive game changer for riders everywhere. Fast forward 30+ years later, and while the 80's era GSX-R is still striking, performance has not kept up with modern machinery. That is where this owner stepped in, creating a vintage 80s hot rod with performance enhancements to bridge the gap. This is an amazing build that we know RSBFS readers can appreciate; this one-of-a-kind machine has the stance and the history to give it serious street creds, but with updates to back it up in the canyons.

So how do you build a GSX-R712? Start with a good 1986 example of a GSX-R750 - well regarded as the best chassis of the day. Remove the 750cc engine and replace it with a second generation GSF1200 Bandit motor. Purists will note that the 1200 Bandit was an evolution of the GSX-R1100 engine, which makes this a perfect fit from a lineage perspective. Once that epic change has been completed, you then turn your attention to, well, everything. Rebuild the front end with new and upgraded components. Work over the swing arm and rebuild everything connected to it. Replace and upgrade braking components. Anything still stock must be completely refurbished. With the mechanicals in perfect shape, you then turn your attention to cosmetics. This is where little changes can make a huge impression. Source new lightweight bodywork and make subtle alterations to clean up the classic lines. Dress up the wheels and powdercoat to suit. Apply paint and graphics that act as an homage to the original, but modernize as well. Then step back and behold the glory of what you have created: a GSX-R712.

From the seller:
1986 GSXR750 complete Moderation 396 lbs semi wet
• Probolt Titanium hardware throughout 97% moto
• GSRX1100 rear wheel & casting markings removed
• wheels powdercoated Vegas gold
• new sealed wheel bearings
• custom billit wheel spacers
• Avon Roadrider tires
• forks serviced with new seals & bushings, powdercoated text black
• steering head bearings serviced
• clip-ons powdercoated texture Black
• performance fork springs, ..90
• swing arm powdercoated texture Black, new bearings complete
• Fox Shox serviced by Cogent Suspension
• 500lb spring powdercoated Red
• all calipers powdercoated with new seals and boots, titanium bleeds
• custom HEL brake lines front, rear and clutch
• rebuilt clutch slave cylinder
• new Brembo master cylinders, Front brake & clutch
• new CRG adjustable levers & mirror and adapter
• rear brake rotor SV lightened
• Pit Bull 520 chain conversion, EK chain Blue
• new LTD replica chain guard
• new NRC engine covers
• gauges fully restored inside & out, Perfect
• new Shorai battery LFX14L5-BS12
• Gen 2 Suzuki GSF1200 motor
• new Suzuki fuel petcock
• new Suzuki headlamp relays
• Stage 3 Dynojet
• Uni pod filters
• Delkevic SS header
• Danmoto Carbon Fibre muffler
• Air Tech light weight body custom made, thanks Dutch
• Probolt Aluminun body fasteners
• RD decal set, installed by Adam Stevenson @ AccuGraphix
• Jarrell Paint works Paint & prep work
• Zero Gravity smoke windscreen
• gas cap cerikoted
• super light led tail light
• seat pan modified, lightened
• Mikes Upholstery recovered seat, Blue
• TrailTech switches
• abbreviated wiring harness

Price $10,250 $9,750


For More Information:
Contact Edward Hessel at stathome@bellsouth.net
Text or call: 502.541.5253




Bikes like this amazing GSX-R Rod do not come along often. This is mainly because this is a very expensive, time-consuming process requiring patience and know-how. Most riders lack both the cash and the skill to create something this stunning, but would not hesitate to drool over it (and lust for one). A bike this good makes a personal statement that tells the world that you have great vintage taste and yet you also worship at the altar of performance. It is also likely a losing proposition for the seller; I could easily see $10k worth of parts in this rocket, not counting paintwork or specialized labor.

Slab-sided Gixxers are HOT right now - we see both collectable as well as pretty rough examples on a semi-regular basis. And we see the occasional Limited Edition unicorn - with prices in the stratosphere. This particular example takes the basic slabbie form and uses it as the foundation for a real hot rod superbike. Think of it as a higher performance slabbie with the cache of an L.E., but without the price tag. There is no doubt that this is a special bike - something the entire RSBFS staff agrees upon. The conversion is super sano, the lines are amazingly clean, and yet the whole package retains the classic looks of the original GSX-R. Check out the large number of very high-res pictures. I dare you not to fall in love with this bike. Once you do, reach out to the seller (stathome@bellsouth.net). You cannot build this bike for the asking price, and you will never see another like it again. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R712
Suzuki February 12, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Resto-mod Suzuki TL1000R

SOLD IN 24 HOURS! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Suzuki TL-1000R was a bold but flawed stab at stealing big v-twin superbike dominance away from Ducati. The bike was a bit of a misfit, impressing neither road testers nor road racers, as it was overweight and fitted with a mystifying and dangerous radial damper rear suspension. Aside from a few privateers racing at the club level, the bike never achieved much on the track, and its street sales hurt as a result.

Superbike Universe aimed to solve that problem, taking on a used TL-1000R as a project and producing the bike you see here. It has been relieved of its butt-puckering rear suspension and given a traditional Penske clicker shock. The front end, heavy as stock, has been tossed in favor of a set of upside down forks off a 2009 Gixxer, which have been treated to custom internals. The brakes also got more than a once over, with stainless steel lines, Brembo Monoblocs and a radial master cylinder taking over duties.

From the seller:

Here is another result from the long brutal winters here in the Northeast. I started out with a stock TL1000R and set about stripping everything I could off of it to lighten it up. The super heavy front end was replaced with a 2009 GSXR1000 front fork with 25mil K-Tech internals. The brake set up is truly one finger amazing. I used a Accossatto Radial master cylinder, custom Core stainless lines and a set of Brembo Monoblack calipers from a 2014 GSXR1000. Those massive Brembo's clamp down on a set of 330mm PVM superbike rotors. Out back I ditched that crazy Suzuki rear suspension box/spring thing that didn't work and weighed about 30lbs. I replaced it entirely with a custom Penske triple clicker and a one-off billet Linderman linkage. Not only did I loose a ton of weight up high but the rear end works perfect now!. The bike rolls on a rare set of 5 spoke MARVIC magnesium wheels that allow for amazingly quick turn in. A very rare 2 in to 1 Yoshimura exhaust helps get rid of burn fuels and again a shit load of weight. All brackets for the rear sub frame and passenger accommodations were cut off and trimmed accordingly. A fiberglass single seat Sharkskin tail and a custom under tray tidy up the rear of the bike. In all I lost over 108lbs off the original bike. They say that the TL100OR weighed just 424lbs in the original bike specs but that is complete bullshit. It weighed 493lbs fully wet when I started this project. Now with it weighs a super light 384lbs fully wet and with three gallons of fuel. If you push this around you feel the super light weight. I had an awesome Lance Johnson Paint Worx Yoshimura paint scheme applied to the stock /aftermarket bodywork. It looks fantastic and rides great! Certainly one of a kind and is exactly the bike Suzuki could have ended up with if they continued development. Put this Superbike Universe special in your collection now for a fraction of the cost of development.

The real eye opener is the claimed weight loss: more than 100 pounds off the stock bike, via a combination of suspension, wheels, brakes and body work. The whole package, complete with a ton of one-off and rare parts, will set you back $7,500. If you have an affinity for odd ducks or under dogs, or just like the idea of a howling Japanese v-twin, this thing is your mount.

Featured Listing: Resto-mod Suzuki TL1000R
Suzuki February 12, 2018 posted by

Carte Grise – 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition in France

Spanning the globe, as Wide World of Sports used to say, in this case to bring you the thrill of a Limited Edition lightweight GSX-R750R.  In oddball JDM red and brown, the LE is a standout with only a few hundred made to homologate it for AMA Superbike racing.  This French-registered GSX-R looks great and has correct Yoshimura exhaust.

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition ( France )

1986 was the second year in GSX-R750 history, with just a few tweaks from the introductory model.  Though the alloy Full Floater swingarm was extended, the aluminum frame and air/oil-cooled 100 hp engine were hallmarks of the design.  The Limited Edition had a couple of nice updates from the base model, New Electrically Activated Suspension ( NEAS ) anti-dive forks and big brakes from the GSX-R1100, along with lightweight dry clutch and close-ratio transmission.  The solo seat and fairing were quite a bit lighter than the biposto.  The entire package was around 400 lbs. dry, weighing less than most 600 cc machines of the day.

Housed in a Paris suburb, this LE appears complete and undamaged save a scratched area on the left fairing.  The owner states it has matching numbers and is registered on a grey card - indicating standard registration, which may ease import and re-documenting.  Not too many pictures and almost no history, so bid accordingly and make this your excuse to visit Paris for a pre-purchase inspection.

Surprisingly light and expensive, the Limited Edition wowed reviewers and race machines were immediately successful in endurance events, but had to wait until 1989 for Jamie James to grab the AMA crown from Honda.  A bit of a grail at this point, the LE's rarity is worth pursuing and some travel might be part of the fun.  Though "Pops" Yoshimura passed away in 1995, the company is still run by his sons with a location in Chino, California, and manages Suzuki's AMA Superbike and Supercross racing efforts.

-donn

 

Carte Grise – 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R Limited Edition in France
Suzuki February 10, 2018 posted by

Rare Screamer: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK71 for Sale

Most times, even if their models share no significant components, motorcycle manufacturers go to great lengths to make sure their bikes all share a strong familial resemblance. In fact, the most recent GSX-R600 and 750 are virtually identical and appear to share their frames and body panels, with only their engine displacements, graphic treatments, and tachometer faces to differentiate them. That makes particular sense at the moment, since the GSX-R750 has pretty much been in a class of one since the the ascendance of the 1000cc machines and developing a bike that shared most of its important components with another mass-produced model was virtually a requirement. Ironically, with the seeming demise of the 600 supersport class, I wonder if it won't be the 750 that has the last laugh... In any event, the designers of the GK71 version of the Suzuki GSX-R400 clearly didn't get that memo.

Taking a look at the bigger 750 and 1100 versions of the GSX-R, this 400 looks markedly different. The tail is sleeker, with a pronounced taper when viewed from the rear, the fairing has several rows of gills, like a small, primitive shark, a single headlight in place of its bigger siblings' round units, and an actual dash, instead of a foam instrument surround. All-in-all, it's very obviously a Suzuki, but looks very little like the larger GSX-R models.

The seller refers to this as a 1987 and a shot of the title confirms this but, supposedly, the 1987 had twin headlamps and gold brake calipers, so this may in fact be a 1986 model year bike, since that appears to have been the only year with the rectangular headlamp. The exhaust pipe would also have more of a perforated style shroud like the 750 and 1100, but the aftermarket Micron fitted here makes it hard to say for sure. Regardless, you're looking at a 398cc inline four making 60hp and backed by a six-speed gearbox, hung in an aluminum twin-spar frame with a weight of 337lbs dry.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK71 for Sale

Here we have a rare, well maintained, and super quick Suzuki GK71 GSX-R400. This is a clean machine sporting corrosion free aluminum frame/swingarm, stock fairings, and only minor imperfections. It sounds great, and pulls linearly all the way up to redline. I had great fun running this bike over the mountain during last year's TT races on the Isle of Man. It ran faultlessly, and was the impetus of many a conversation with other race fans.

The GSX-R400 was rarely seen outside Japan, and there's been little interest in the bike for the most part, as it wasn't nearly as exotic as the Honda NC30, as refined as the CBR400, or as agile and affordable as the FZR400. It was a bit crude in comparison, but was still a very competent, relatively sophisticated machine, and a slight lack of performance compared to rivals shouldn't discourage anyone at this point. 30,000 miles is on the high end for a collectible sportbike, but assuming it's been properly maintained and cared for, that wouldn't put me off too much assuming the price was right. And considering the bidding is up a bit over $1,500 I think you'd have a hard time finding something else that offers this combination of rarity and unintimidating performance.

-tad

Rare Screamer: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK71 for Sale
Suzuki February 2, 2018 posted by

Big Style, Modest Power: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK76 for Sale

I ran into a nice young rider the other weekend while I was eyeing his flat grey EBR 1190RX. We talked about the bike and all its neato Buell-y features, and he asked me what I was riding, so I introduced him to my Daytona, which also happens to be grey... "Aren't you a little big for that?" He asked.  Obvious "that's what she said" jokes aside, it highlighted a common misconception, at least here in the USA: smaller sportbikes are "learner" machines, and serious riders should move up to a "real" bike as soon as possible. Of course, bikes like today's Suzuki GSX-R400 are an argument that maybe smaller is just fine, and that there's plenty of fun to be had on a motorcycle that offers serious handling, but only modest straight-line performance.

Strict licensing and taxes on displacement mean that bigger bikes can be flat out impossible in many overseas markets, no matter your experience or skill. In those places it was often the 400cc class that was hotly contested throughout the late 80s and early 90s: witness the fact that the FZR600 was the lowest-spec bike of Yamaha's sportbike range with a glaring, low-tech difference: it used a relatively heavy steel frame instead of a lighter aluminum unit as seen on the 400cc and 1000cc models. In fact, the very first GSX-R was actually a 400cc model, and Suzuki applied the lessons learned to their smash-hit GSX-R750, although many aren't aware that the earlier bike even existed.

The third iteration of the evergreen Gixxer is also currently the least desirable, and this GSX-R400 is styled to match its bigger siblings. Not only does this generation still exist in that nether region between classic and modern, the bikes were generally heavier than the bikes they followed, with less performance. The Gixxer was peakier and a bit cruder than competitors like the CBR400, and as a result it was a bit of an also-ran, although it should still offer plenty of bang for your buck. Weight for this version of the GSX-R400 was 367lbs dry and the little 398cc inline four made 59hp at 12,500rpm.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400 for Sale

Up for No Reserve auction we have a 1991 Suzuki GK76 GSX-R400. This bike sports slick OEM graphics, and is quite a good looking machine. It has recently been tagged and registered in Tennessee and is ready for the road. On the performance front I feel the carbs would benefit from a good cleaning. With that said, the bike starts up easily enough, idles, and runs right on up to redline. These are rather difficult to come by, and this one will make a nice addition to someone's collection.

Considering how popular Suzuki's sportbikes have been worldwide, it's surprising we haven't seen more of these up for sale here in the US, now that they can be legally imported. They certainly weren't the the best 400s but, being a Suzuki, plenty were sold. The seller includes a nice little video of the bike being zapped up and down a backroad, and it's nice to see that the bike is a solid runner, because it's not in showroom-perfect condition: aside from some scratches and plastic bits that have naturally discolored with age, the end can looks to be in pretty sorry shape and the non-standard turn signals are small and unobtrusive, but their fake-y "carbon" finish isn't very tasteful and originals might be difficult to source, depending on whether or not they're exclusive to this model... But all of that can be overlooked if the price is right, and with just two days left on the auction, that price is a mere $2,225 which could make it a screaming deal of a little screamer, if the bidding stays low.

-tad

Big Style, Modest Power: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK76 for Sale