Posts by Category: Suzuki

Suzuki October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Like Ducati’s MotoGP inspired Desmosedici, the square four in the Suzuki RG500Γ "Gamma" in today's Featured Listing wasn’t actually a detuned version of the race bike's engine. Race bikes engines are built for power, not longevity, and simply “de-tuning” is probably not going be enough to make one work in a road bike. So in both cases, the engines shared the configuration and general specifications with their MotoGP racebike counterparts, but few or no actual parts. Which almost makes them cooler in my mind: in both cases, the one-off engines were built to be installed in a very limited run of exotic motorcycles, with no intention that they be mass-produced or turn much of a profit. These engines and bikes exist seemingly only for a very small group of enthusiasts, and there's something inherently cool about that. Also, I love using the Greek alphabet typing up these posts.

The "configuration and general specifications" we're talking about in this case refers to the two-stroke, twin-crank, disc-valve square four that displaced 498cc. Four very compact Mikuni flat-slides fed fuel and air into the engine, and the gearbox was a quick-change cassette six-speed. Of course it featured a power valve system, in this case Suzuki's AEC or Automatic Exhaust Control that helped smooth out the two-stroke's abrupt powerband. The result? The Gamma put just a bit less than 100hp worth of stinky, heavy exhaust smoke out of its four tiny stinger exhaust pipes.

The rest of the bike was more familiar, with an aluminum frame not all that different from the GSX-R, with hydraulic anti-dive forks in the front and Suzuki's "Full-Floater" system out back. Skinny period 16" front and 17" rear wheels mean terrifyingly skinny tires that look like they'd be more at home on a beach-cruiser bicycle today, but were par for the course in 1986. With 340lbs worth of dry weight to push around and less than 100 horses to do it with, performance seems like it would be unimpressive. But it's the very nature of that spiky power delivery, the all-or-nothing acceleration that requires constant use of the gearbox to make fast progress, the challenge that seems to get two-stroke fans excited.

Unless you're "of a certain age" or younger and a bit of a bike nerd, the appeal of the whole two-stroke thing may fly over your head. They're smoky, buzzy, and generally pretty high-maintenance. They also have famously narrow and fairly abrupt powerbands, making them challenging to ride quickly. But even though they do require more regular maintenance than a four-stroke motorcycle, the upside is that they're relatively simple to work on, lacking traditional intake valves, and therefore cams, cam chains, cam belts, pushrods, or any of the other bits typically associated with "normal" motorcycles.

This particular bike is claimed to have seen the attention of the famous Rick Lance during its refresh and appears to be in extremely nice condition, ready to become the showcase of the next owner's collection and hopefully be the talk of every motorcycle gathering when the new owner takes it out for a spin and stretches its legs.

 

From the Seller: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for Sale

Located in Greater Chicagoland Area 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

This 1986 RG500 Gamma with 17,769 km (approximately 11,041 miles) is in near mint original condition.  It comes out of the famous BAC car and motorcycle collection. It was extremely well cared for by the previous owner and the current owner.  BAC has owned this bike for almost ten years.  The current owner searched for almost two years to find the best one that could be found.  After purchasing the bike, he had Mike the Chicagoland expert on Gammas along with Rick Lance, a Gamma guru, to supply necessary technical information to bring this bike back to its original factory condition and near mint condition.  The bike runs just as you would expect an original factory bike to run.  And looks exactly like an original factory bike would look after only a few thousand miles were put on it.

Over the years many of these bikes have either been raced into the ground or had the engines pulled out to put in a smaller bike leaving the close to mint original bikes very few and far between.  The current elderly owner has collected cars and motorcycles and says that these Gammas have a long way to go in terms of appreciation and wants to be sure that the next owner is going to preserve the intrinsic and cosmetic value as he has invested so much time, energy and money to bring this bike to its highest level.

Mike the master Gamma mechanic and Rick spent two long years getting this bike and all its necessary parts together to make this bike one of the finest original Gamma’s that exists.

Great bike for those who want only the finest and priced accordingly.

Asking price is $18,500 negotiable.

Other two-stroke GP replicas of the period compromised: the RD500LC famously added a balance shaft to make the bike more civilized, while Honda's NS400R went with a smaller displacement to help home-market sales. Both offered a much more refined experience, and both have a far less rabid cult following than the RG500 as a result. Prices have been steadily rising, although the RD and NS have increased in value as well, perhaps simply because RGs have been nearly unobtainable for a while now. If you've been looking for an RG and have the cash to spend, this one is worth a look.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale
Suzuki October 12, 2017 posted by

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

It's hard to imagine that, just a couple years before the introduction of the GSX-R750, Suzuki's top-performing repli-racer was the stylish, but very last-generation GS1000S, a bike with twin shocks, handlebars, a center-stand, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing. The original "Slabbie" GSX-R750 that came along in 1985 brought modern endurance-racing style to the masses and codified the formula laid out by much rarer and more exotic machines like the Bimota SB2. This particular GSX-R750 Limited Edition claws back some exotic cachet from the Italian brand, and is one of just 299 imported to the USA to meet AMA homologation requirements.

The heart of the GSX-R was an oil and air-cooled inline four with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. It lacked liquid-cooling in a bid to save weight, reduce complexity, and improve reliability, but still had a few high-tech tricks up its sleeve: Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" featured a double-chambered oil pump was designed to more efficiently circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the bottom of the pistons. The aluminum frame used a mono-shock rear and four-piston brake calipers clamped triple discs. The Limited version added a very trick dry clutch, lightweight solo seat tail section, and the GSX-R1100's electronic anti-dive forks.

The Limited was differentiated by the striking red, white, and blue paint seen here on the distinctive, slab-sided bodywork, compared to the standard white-and-blue or red-and-black available on the regular GSX-R. When new, the bike was the most expensive Japanese sportbike, and was priced at $6,500, a shocking $2,000 more than the standard model. Performance advantages were very minimal but that wasn't really the point and this is, to my mind, the best-looking version of the early GSX-R.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

Race homologation special. It has 4545 miles. This bike is in as near perfect collectors condition for a 31 year old bike. Motorcycle was just fully serviced (ie carbs were serviced; all fluids changed; new tires added, as originals showed signs of cracking.)

These bikes have surged in price, exceeding $20K in most cases.

If you are looking at this bike, you know what it is, so NO LOW BALL OFFERS!!!!

The seller is correct that prices have surged, and his bike appears to be in excellent, very original condition that includes a stock exhaust that could be either "cool and retro" or "shockingly ugly" depending on your predilection for slotted heat shields. Certainly it's of value to collectors. Unfortunately, while his $20,000 asking price is fair, it actually seems just a bit on the high-side, at least looking at Limited Editions we've featured here on RSBFS in the past. I'm not sure just how far off his asking price an offer would have to be before it qualifies as "a low ball offer," but I have a feeling he may be disappointed. Will at least one buyer meet his asking price? It's very possible: those same recent bikes I mentioned didn't quite get to $20,000 but were very close.

-tad

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale
Suzuki October 9, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

The market for factory replicas is hot right now, especially from the 1980s era of Superbike racing. These were the days of low-tech, skinny tires, big handlebars and manly men riders. Air-cooled, inline fours with two-valve heads and a quartet of carbs ruled the track. Motors were impossibly wide, bias-ply tires were (by today's standards) impossibly skinny, forks were still conventional and had yet to be turned upside down, and brake rotors had yet to grow to the insane proportions of current hardware. This was a key period of sport bike development, and this fantastic 1980 Suzuki GS1000S "Wes Cooley" replica highlights all that was right about the moment.

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Wester Steven Cooley won the 1979 and 1980 AMA Superbike Championships on a Pops Yoshimura-prepped Suzuki GS1000S. Suzuki never officially cashed in on Wes Cooley's name and fame, but the 1980 GS1000S was a stunning silhouette of the AMA racer. It was only in the years following that these models became know as Wes Cooley models - but it only seems fair given Kawasaki's similar creation of the ELR. To build the replica, Suzuki used the standard GS1000 offering; the limited edition "S" model came a year after the rest of the GS1000 lineup. The Wes Cooley replica did not have any material differences to the other GS1000 models in terms of engine, but it did share what was widely regarded as the best chassis to emerge from Japan during the era. Ultimately, that was the secret to the success of the bike on the track. For its first entry into the 1000cc market, Suzuki created a winner - both on the race track as well as the showroom.

From the seller:
1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Good solid riding classic, clean GA title, you don't see too many of these in this condition, although no museum piece it shows nice and rides well, starts right up and everything works like it did back in 1980. A cool survivor to ride "as is" or to do a complete showroom restoration, I have the stock air box and stock exhaust although the mufflers look good, underneath they are starting to give in to the dreaded rust.

New Michelin tires, new OEM petcock, new OEM clutch, new K&N pod filters, new Dynojet kit, new oil and filter, new OEM head gasket just installed (inc bills for work done) head decked, valves checked, new OEM o rings and gaskets used. paint work is shiny and shows well, no rust on or in the tank, has some signs of an older repair on the fairing, has had one re bore with OEM pistons and rings at 40k or 8 thousand miles ago. The seat really needs a new cover, the clock no longer functions, the fuel gauge is intermittent and the needle from the oil temp gauge has come off. This bike has been my rider for the past several thousand miles and gets plenty of attention everywhere it goes.

Just a good solid representation of a getting harder to find classic, ready to ride home to anywhere in the country today.

Make no mistake - this is a rare make and model. Suzuki had no plans to bring the GS1000S into America. But when US dealers saw it during an overseas dealer conference they pressured Suzuki into importing the model. Reports indicate that dealers in the US were allotted a single bike, with only 500 units imported for 1979 and 700 units for 1980. Today few survive in recognizable condition, and those that do are commanding higher and higher prices. This one has higher mileage than some we have seen, but there is still a lot of life left in it yet.

This beautiful Suzuki time piece is located in Georgia, and will be going to a good home at the end of this No Reserve auction. There have been a large number of bids early on, showing the level of interest that these Wes Cooley replica models generate. Jump in before it is too late, as this 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica looks too good to pass up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley
Suzuki October 7, 2017 posted by

Sweet Tooth: 1989 Suzuki RGV250Γ for Sale

Many of the most iconic race replicas are rolling billboards for tobacco products: Marlboro, John Player, Gauloises, Lucky Strike. Of course, that's no longer the case, with tobacco manufacturers largely banned from advertising on race bikes and cars, but it's hard to deny that those designs are memorable. But what if you're a racing fan, and want to own a bike from the glory days of two-stroke Grand Prix competition, but are morally opposed to the addictive, cancer-causing weed? Well, you can always look for a race replica a bike that advertises something less-lethal. Maybe something like this Suzuki RGV250Γ in Pepsi-Cola colors that just promotes... slightly less-lethal diabetes and obesity-causing sugar?

The pace of development for the 250cc two-stroke class was relentless, with multiple, distinctly different versions of each company's bike introduced during the short period between the mid 1980s and the early 1990s. This example of Suzuki's smoky two-stroke v-twin is actually a bit of a hybrid, combining the frame and bodywork of the earlier VJ21 with the swingarm and exhaust of the later VJ22. The VJ21 used a simple unit made of rectangular, box-section aluminum, while the later VJ22 used a curved, "banana" style swinger that was also made from aluminum, but distinctively curved on the right-hand side to allow the bulging expansion chambers to tuck in close to the bike's centerline and allow maximum lean angles.

The engine was Suzuki's liquid cooled, 90° two stroke v-twin with power valves and backed by a six-speed gearbox, a package that eventually found its way into Aprilia's entry into the class, the RS250. Power for de-restricted examples was in the neighborhood of 60hp, plenty to motivate the claimed dry weight of just 282lbs. The front wheel was 17" but the rear was 18" as was fashionable among two-stroke sportbikes of the period, but irritating if you're trying to shoe one today.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki RGV250 VJ21 for Sale

Up for sale is this clean 1989 VJ21 with a fresh top end and paint job. The bike handles well, and pulls strongly. It has benefited from an upgraded VJ22 arched swing-arm and cool dual single sided exhaust. It also has a new battery installed. It was recently imported from the UK.

The bike will come with copies of all the US customs paperwork, European registration documents, and a Bill of Sale. This is a classic and can be registered in all 50 States. I ask that the winning bidder pay a $300 deposit within 24 hours. I offer shipping with a right of refusal guarantee. If you've paid the deposit and delivery fee you can opt out of the sale whatever your misgivings may be. My delivery rates are competitive among motorcycle shipping companies.  Thanks for looking at my auction. Please check out my other listings. I currently have a variety of Grey Market Japanese Imports from Europe/UK available. I welcome all inquires and bids. However, please, please, please only bid if you willing, and able, to dispense with this transaction in a reasonable about of time. Happy Bidding! 

This one is a runner for sure, not a collector: the paint looks sharp, but isn't original, and the bike has been updated with that stylish banana swingarm of the later VJ22, along with the matching "shotgun" exhaust set up. I like the swingarm, but I'd ditch those weird green-gold levers for a set of black ones immediately if it were my bike. The big draw here? The $5,750 Buy It Now price, making it one of the most affordable RGV250s we've seen in a while. The seller claims it "can be registered in all 50 states" but that's simplifying things a bit, from what I understand. Especially in California. As always, caveat emptor. 

-tad

Suzuki October 4, 2017 posted by

Featured listing: Like-new 1982 Suzuki Katana

The 1982 Suzuki Katana ended a long era of Japanese bikes focused first on reliability, practicality and speed and cosmetics a distant second. The 1,000cc Katana changed the course of bike styling in general, but was an especially loud wakeup call for Suzuki's countrymen.

To get the seismic effect they were after, Suzuki turned to Europe, employing the services of former BMW design chief Hans Muth. The result was literally and figuratively edgy, with a pointed beak, creased bodywork and a square headlight. The deeply-dished rider saddle and body-color pillion perch gave the bike an even more purposeful stance.

Underneath, the bike featured standard UJM fare: a fairly archaic steel tube frame, an air-cooled inline four and big wheels. The Katana was stiffly sprung and had fairly narrow clip-ons, which slowed turn in and gave it an aggressive-for-the-time riding position.

This Katana is in near-perfect condition, and the odometer shows not quite 2,500 miles. It retains its stock mufflers and period-looking tires, and is only fed airplane fuel.

From the seller:

1982 Suzuki GSX Katana

The owner of the collection of this highly collectable rare 1980s motorcycle thinks you would agree that the 1982 Suzuki GSX Katana is one of the 25 most beautiful bike designs ever produced. Most people know that this Japanese motorcycle was designed by a German designer and he certainly did not let anybody down in the appearance, designs, colors and overall dimensions. The design just flows, the colors just work and even the seat is an important element in the design.

Most people know that because the Japanese bikes were so well built and dependable, most of them had the wheels ridden right off of them. For a wonderful collector bike like the Katana 1000 most of these bikes besides being ridden into the ground also when new had their muffler systems immediately modified for what was then thought to be a better muffler system. For serious collectors, today original mufflers are one of the most important elements on a collector motorcycle. Non-original mufflers just don’t cut it with serious collectors.

The Katana that you are looking at is about as close to mint as any Katana you will ever find. It runs great and is kept on a trickle charger and the tank is only filled with airplane fuel. This bike is ready to be ridden coast to coast but suggest more local rides to preserve its value and original fit and finish. The mufflers are 99% perfect.

This is a true collectors piece and we doubt if you will ever find a nicer one. Call us to discuss the details and for our price at 847-668-2004 cell 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. CST.

Current owner wants to make sure that this bike goes to a good home.

Call the sellers directly to discuss the sale details. Email: adreply514@gmail.com This is not a bike to be missed!

Featured listing: Like-new 1982 Suzuki Katana
Suzuki September 27, 2017 posted by

Dry clutch, adjustable suspension, no reserve: 1990 Suzuki RGV250SP

eBay has been awash this summer in rare and exciting two-and four-stroke quater-liter bikes from Japan, a testament to the collector market for these bikes, which are neither common nor terribly easy to import. This 1990 Suzuki RGV250SP is at least the third of its kind we have posted this summer, and it is offered out of Utah with no reserve.

1990 Suzuki RGV250SP for sale on eBay

The RGV250 Gamma is known as one of the fastest and most powerful 250cc two-strokes of any era, clearing 60 horses in de-restricted form. The SP version, like the one listed here, meant adjustable suspension and a close-ration gearbox operated via a lightweight dry clutch. In full-bore trim, these things were capable of a top end past 130 mph and a 0-60 time that put it close to middleweight four-stroke territory.

This RGV250SP is the last of its kind in the Utah collection of our buddy Gary, who seems to have a limitless supply of very nice, road-ready grey market mounts. This one is in very good, but not perfect shape and sports an aftermarket exhaust system that sports carbon fiber mufflers. The fairings are all clean and original, but the bike has some scratches, grime and marks.

From the eBay listing:

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1990 Suzuki RGV250 SP model with only 6140 kilometers (3815 miles). This SP comes with a dry clutch and fully adjustable suspension. Bike is in mint condition with only a few scratches, scrapes and handling marks. This RGV has an aftermarket exhaust with carbon fiber mufflers. All fairings are 100% genuine Suzuki OEM. This bike rips and runs just like the day it was new. Comes with new engine fluids and new battery. Tires should be replaced with new rubber.

This is my last VJ22A, don't miss out! Bike comes with Utah title and is titled as a street bike for road use. $500 deposit due immeadiatly after auctions end. Remaing balance due in 5 business days by check, bank wire or cash in person. Text 801-358-6537 for more photos or questions.

The auction is a no-reserve affair, and bidding is already up to $5,000 with less than two days left.

Dry clutch, adjustable suspension, no reserve: 1990 Suzuki RGV250SP