Posts by Category: Suzuki

Sport Bikes For Sale October 20, 2017 posted by

Slightly scruffy but ready to go: 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

Yet another two-stroke from the land of Craigslist, this 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma wears the brand's iconic blue and white superbike livery and looks very nice, despite its fair share of scratches and scuffs. Further signs of the bike's age and use are cracked bolt holes at the mirror mounts on the cowl.

With the ugly stuff out of the way, this looks like the perfect Gamma to enjoy on your local backroads, with a set of aftermarket pipes and pod filters and a set of 17-inch rims from a Katana, which will improve handling and tire choices. The front brakes are Katana fare, too, and are a good bit bigger and more powerful than the stock units. The improved handling and stopping will be a welcome change on the Gamma, which has a reputation for being something of a demanding ride.

Save the pod filters and pipes, the 500cc square-four mill is stock, and was good for a stout 93 horses at the output shaft when new. That's more than enough to make the front end lively when the power hits, especially given the bike's 400-ish pound wet weight.

From the Craigslist ad:

Canadian model. Clean California title in hand. 19,640 kilometers so about 12,200 miles.

The good stuff: Bike runs awesome. Motor, tranny and carbs are stock. Has LG style pod air filters. Battery is new and has been relocated to original airbox location. Stock oil tank and pump in place. Upgraded with Katana front 3" and rear 3.5 X 17" rims. Larger Katana front rotors and calipers for better braking. Braided brake lines front and rear. Nikon pipes. New spark plugs. New transmission oil. Jetted for pods and pipes, but you will want to verify jetting for your area.

The bad stuff: Minor scratches on tank, solo seat cowl and mid fairing. No dents in tank or broken tabs or cracks on bodywork except upper cowl. Upper cowl has the typical cracks at the mirror area, but cosmetically it is very nice. Lower cowl is a fiberglass Lance Gamma replacement. See pictures for details.

Overall this bike is a great example of the RG500 that has the proper upgrades. Minor cosmetic work and the bike will be perfect. $14,500.00 OBO

With the rideability modifications the bike should be a peach of a canyon carver. The ask is healthy for a 32-year-old bike, to be sure, but the values of these old GP-style two-strokes have spiked recently, so it is not outside the range of reason.

Slightly scruffy but ready to go: 1985 Suzuki RG500 Gamma
Sport Bikes For Sale October 19, 2017 posted by

Silver Wolf: 1987 Suzuki RG400 Gamma

If memory serves, this is only the second 1987 Suzuki RG400 Walter Wolf we have featured with silver livery instead of the much more common navy blue. Further adding to the intrigue is this bike's 400cc displacement, as we much more often feature its bigger 500cc brother.

The seller claims to have had a bunch of two-stroke Suzukis over the years, and says the 60-horse 400cc square four gives up little performance to the bigger bike. A quick Google does not back up that claim, with available spec sheets showing the 500 made 93 horses. For perspective: both bikes weigh about 400 pounds, but the 400 gives up more power than most dual sports make to the 500.

Weight, handling and road manners should be pretty close despite the grunt differential, and suspension, chassis bits and body panels should swap right over. This bike looks great and has all its original bodywork, though the seat cowl wears paint that does not match the rest of the bike particularly well.

From the Craigslist ad:

1987 Suzuki RG400 gamma

Only 4500 miles or 7200km, miles are correct I am sure, new tires, original bore and piston/piston rings, good original condition, everything works good. 4 cylinder 2 stroke moto gp replica that only goes up in value. Bike sat for many many years in Japan before I got it. I cleaned the carbs and rotors and put a few hundred miles on it. Runs good, no issues I am aware of. Bike is all original except for Sugaya exhaust ( excellent sound and performance) and pod air filters with carb jets changed for filters and pipes. I have owned many RG500 and this 400 runs just as fast, cant understand why the 500 goes for so much more? There are very few differences between the 500 and 400, almost every part is interchangeable, mostly piston diameter and a few other minor things. VERY easy to get low cost parts, not that you would need any, these are the most reliable motors that I know of. The original OEM body work is very good, NOT the cheap aftermarket bodywork you see on ebay, original OEM all of it, NO typical cracks near the mirror mounts, some repairs here and there, scuff on the right side, see pics. I did paint the OEM seat cowl and it does not match that well, have the rear seat if you dont want to use it. Tank has some rust in it, I cleaned it and never had any problems. Vermont reg/title, we must transfer it here in Florida. If your looking for a bike to ride, this is a good fit, if your looking for a museum piece or something mint, DO NOT BOTHER!! send an email through CList if you want to chat. If your thinking about making an offer lower than my price the answer is NO, FIRM PRICE, thanks for reading my ad.

The $9,500 firm asking price seems reasonable, given the machine's rarity and condition, and the fact that similar 500s are trading closer to the $15,000 mark these days.

Silver Wolf: 1987 Suzuki RG400 Gamma
Sport Bikes For Sale October 17, 2017 posted by

Slab with Spares: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750

As age takes its toll, even bikes that were fairly commonplace are getting rarer and rarer, a fact that is amplified when the many examples of the model in question were victims of racetracks, inexperience or bad hack jobs. The result is that bikes like this 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 are becoming more desirable and expensive, even in their most pedestrian guises.

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750

To be fair, there isn't much that can truly be called "pedestrian" about one of the first bikes in the ongoing repli-racer wars, with around 100 horsepower out of an air/oil cooled inline four pushing about 450 pounds. The lithe perimeter frame, and stout brakes and suspension make for an impressive-if-dated ride.

This third-year Gixxer has covered just over 12,000 miles across three owners, and reportedly was stored in a living room for some of its life. Whatever the case, it has obviously been well cared for by all three people, as it shows just a few small blemishes and wears what appear to be brand-new tires.

The seller notes a list of spare and original parts that will come with the bike, including the stock airbox and exhaust.

From the eBay listing:

PLEASE DO YOUR RESEARCH ON VALUE OF THIS BIKES!!

1987 GSXR 750 in very good original cosmetic and running condition, please see pictures for the condition of the bike. fairings have minor nicks and scratches from normal use, NO Clear Peeling just normal aging. ike is good running strong condition and looks very nice overall.

COMES WITH;
STOCK EXHAUST,
REAR GRAB BAR,
STOCK AIR BOX,
SUZUKI REAR STAND,
PARTS BIKE W/TITLE
AND SOME MISCELLANEOUS PARTS.

I’ve owned various GSXR’s since 1987 so i’m very familiar with these bikes. I’ve had this bike since 2013; it’s been a pleasure to have it as it gets a lot of attention due to it’s condition as it’s a pleasure to ride it. from what I was told I’m the 3rd owner and the bike sat in the 2nd owners libingroom for over 18 years, I have put less than 50 miles on it as I only turn it on periodically, it’s stored covered in cool dry place.

Clean and clear California title. Please ask any and all questions before bidding!

With almost a week to go, the bike has attracted little activity with a $6,500 opening bid. The opening bid is toward the high end of what we have seen other bikes like it sell for, but with values of the limited edition bikes more than doubling this ask, it's not totally unhinged.

Slab with Spares: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750
Suzuki October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale

Like Ducati’s MotoGP inspired Desmosedici, the square four in the Suzuki RG500Γ "Gamma" in today's Featured Listing wasn’t actually a detuned version of the race bike's engine. Race bikes engines are built for power, not longevity, and simply “de-tuning” is probably not going be enough to make one work in a road bike. So in both cases, the engines shared the configuration and general specifications with their MotoGP racebike counterparts, but few or no actual parts. Which almost makes them cooler in my mind: in both cases, the one-off engines were built to be installed in a very limited run of exotic motorcycles, with no intention that they be mass-produced or turn much of a profit. These engines and bikes exist seemingly only for a very small group of enthusiasts, and there's something inherently cool about that. Also, I love using the Greek alphabet typing up these posts.

The "configuration and general specifications" we're talking about in this case refers to the two-stroke, twin-crank, disc-valve square four that displaced 498cc. Four very compact Mikuni flat-slides fed fuel and air into the engine, and the gearbox was a quick-change cassette six-speed. Of course it featured a power valve system, in this case Suzuki's AEC or Automatic Exhaust Control that helped smooth out the two-stroke's abrupt powerband. The result? The Gamma put just a bit less than 100hp worth of stinky, heavy exhaust smoke out of its four tiny stinger exhaust pipes.

The rest of the bike was more familiar, with an aluminum frame not all that different from the GSX-R, with hydraulic anti-dive forks in the front and Suzuki's "Full-Floater" system out back. Skinny period 16" front and 17" rear wheels mean terrifyingly skinny tires that look like they'd be more at home on a beach-cruiser bicycle today, but were par for the course in 1986. With 340lbs worth of dry weight to push around and less than 100 horses to do it with, performance seems like it would be unimpressive. But it's the very nature of that spiky power delivery, the all-or-nothing acceleration that requires constant use of the gearbox to make fast progress, the challenge that seems to get two-stroke fans excited.

Unless you're "of a certain age" or younger and a bit of a bike nerd, the appeal of the whole two-stroke thing may fly over your head. They're smoky, buzzy, and generally pretty high-maintenance. They also have famously narrow and fairly abrupt powerbands, making them challenging to ride quickly. But even though they do require more regular maintenance than a four-stroke motorcycle, the upside is that they're relatively simple to work on, lacking traditional intake valves, and therefore cams, cam chains, cam belts, pushrods, or any of the other bits typically associated with "normal" motorcycles.

This particular bike is claimed to have seen the attention of the famous Rick Lance during its refresh and appears to be in extremely nice condition, ready to become the showcase of the next owner's collection and hopefully be the talk of every motorcycle gathering when the new owner takes it out for a spin and stretches its legs.

 

From the Seller: 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma for Sale

Located in Greater Chicagoland Area 1986 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

This 1986 RG500 Gamma with 17,769 km (approximately 11,041 miles) is in near mint original condition.  It comes out of the famous BAC car and motorcycle collection. It was extremely well cared for by the previous owner and the current owner.  BAC has owned this bike for almost ten years.  The current owner searched for almost two years to find the best one that could be found.  After purchasing the bike, he had Mike the Chicagoland expert on Gammas along with Rick Lance, a Gamma guru, to supply necessary technical information to bring this bike back to its original factory condition and near mint condition.  The bike runs just as you would expect an original factory bike to run.  And looks exactly like an original factory bike would look after only a few thousand miles were put on it.

Over the years many of these bikes have either been raced into the ground or had the engines pulled out to put in a smaller bike leaving the close to mint original bikes very few and far between.  The current elderly owner has collected cars and motorcycles and says that these Gammas have a long way to go in terms of appreciation and wants to be sure that the next owner is going to preserve the intrinsic and cosmetic value as he has invested so much time, energy and money to bring this bike to its highest level.

Mike the master Gamma mechanic and Rick spent two long years getting this bike and all its necessary parts together to make this bike one of the finest original Gamma’s that exists.

Great bike for those who want only the finest and priced accordingly.

Asking price is $18,500 negotiable.

For more information please contact adreply514@gmail.com

Other two-stroke GP replicas of the period compromised: the RD500LC famously added a balance shaft to make the bike more civilized, while Honda's NS400R went with a smaller displacement to help home-market sales. Both offered a much more refined experience, and both have a far less rabid cult following than the RG500 as a result. Prices have been steadily rising, although the RD and NS have increased in value as well, perhaps simply because RGs have been nearly unobtainable for a while now. If you've been looking for an RG and have the cash to spend, this one is worth a look.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ Gamma for Sale
Suzuki October 12, 2017 posted by

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

It's hard to imagine that, just a couple years before the introduction of the GSX-R750, Suzuki's top-performing repli-racer was the stylish, but very last-generation GS1000S, a bike with twin shocks, handlebars, a center-stand, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing. The original "Slabbie" GSX-R750 that came along in 1985 brought modern endurance-racing style to the masses and codified the formula laid out by much rarer and more exotic machines like the Bimota SB2. This particular GSX-R750 Limited Edition claws back some exotic cachet from the Italian brand, and is one of just 299 imported to the USA to meet AMA homologation requirements.

The heart of the GSX-R was an oil and air-cooled inline four with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. It lacked liquid-cooling in a bid to save weight, reduce complexity, and improve reliability, but still had a few high-tech tricks up its sleeve: Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" featured a double-chambered oil pump was designed to more efficiently circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the bottom of the pistons. The aluminum frame used a mono-shock rear and four-piston brake calipers clamped triple discs. The Limited version added a very trick dry clutch, lightweight solo seat tail section, and the GSX-R1100's electronic anti-dive forks.

The Limited was differentiated by the striking red, white, and blue paint seen here on the distinctive, slab-sided bodywork, compared to the standard white-and-blue or red-and-black available on the regular GSX-R. When new, the bike was the most expensive Japanese sportbike, and was priced at $6,500, a shocking $2,000 more than the standard model. Performance advantages were very minimal but that wasn't really the point and this is, to my mind, the best-looking version of the early GSX-R.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

Race homologation special. It has 4545 miles. This bike is in as near perfect collectors condition for a 31 year old bike. Motorcycle was just fully serviced (ie carbs were serviced; all fluids changed; new tires added, as originals showed signs of cracking.)

These bikes have surged in price, exceeding $20K in most cases.

If you are looking at this bike, you know what it is, so NO LOW BALL OFFERS!!!!

The seller is correct that prices have surged, and his bike appears to be in excellent, very original condition that includes a stock exhaust that could be either "cool and retro" or "shockingly ugly" depending on your predilection for slotted heat shields. Certainly it's of value to collectors. Unfortunately, while his $20,000 asking price is fair, it actually seems just a bit on the high-side, at least looking at Limited Editions we've featured here on RSBFS in the past. I'm not sure just how far off his asking price an offer would have to be before it qualifies as "a low ball offer," but I have a feeling he may be disappointed. Will at least one buyer meet his asking price? It's very possible: those same recent bikes I mentioned didn't quite get to $20,000 but were very close.

-tad

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale
Suzuki October 9, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

The market for factory replicas is hot right now, especially from the 1980s era of Superbike racing. These were the days of low-tech, skinny tires, big handlebars and manly men riders. Air-cooled, inline fours with two-valve heads and a quartet of carbs ruled the track. Motors were impossibly wide, bias-ply tires were (by today's standards) impossibly skinny, forks were still conventional and had yet to be turned upside down, and brake rotors had yet to grow to the insane proportions of current hardware. This was a key period of sport bike development, and this fantastic 1980 Suzuki GS1000S "Wes Cooley" replica highlights all that was right about the moment.

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Wester Steven Cooley won the 1979 and 1980 AMA Superbike Championships on a Pops Yoshimura-prepped Suzuki GS1000S. Suzuki never officially cashed in on Wes Cooley's name and fame, but the 1980 GS1000S was a stunning silhouette of the AMA racer. It was only in the years following that these models became know as Wes Cooley models - but it only seems fair given Kawasaki's similar creation of the ELR. To build the replica, Suzuki used the standard GS1000 offering; the limited edition "S" model came a year after the rest of the GS1000 lineup. The Wes Cooley replica did not have any material differences to the other GS1000 models in terms of engine, but it did share what was widely regarded as the best chassis to emerge from Japan during the era. Ultimately, that was the secret to the success of the bike on the track. For its first entry into the 1000cc market, Suzuki created a winner - both on the race track as well as the showroom.

From the seller:
1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Good solid riding classic, clean GA title, you don't see too many of these in this condition, although no museum piece it shows nice and rides well, starts right up and everything works like it did back in 1980. A cool survivor to ride "as is" or to do a complete showroom restoration, I have the stock air box and stock exhaust although the mufflers look good, underneath they are starting to give in to the dreaded rust.

New Michelin tires, new OEM petcock, new OEM clutch, new K&N pod filters, new Dynojet kit, new oil and filter, new OEM head gasket just installed (inc bills for work done) head decked, valves checked, new OEM o rings and gaskets used. paint work is shiny and shows well, no rust on or in the tank, has some signs of an older repair on the fairing, has had one re bore with OEM pistons and rings at 40k or 8 thousand miles ago. The seat really needs a new cover, the clock no longer functions, the fuel gauge is intermittent and the needle from the oil temp gauge has come off. This bike has been my rider for the past several thousand miles and gets plenty of attention everywhere it goes.

Just a good solid representation of a getting harder to find classic, ready to ride home to anywhere in the country today.

Make no mistake - this is a rare make and model. Suzuki had no plans to bring the GS1000S into America. But when US dealers saw it during an overseas dealer conference they pressured Suzuki into importing the model. Reports indicate that dealers in the US were allotted a single bike, with only 500 units imported for 1979 and 700 units for 1980. Today few survive in recognizable condition, and those that do are commanding higher and higher prices. This one has higher mileage than some we have seen, but there is still a lot of life left in it yet.

This beautiful Suzuki time piece is located in Georgia, and will be going to a good home at the end of this No Reserve auction. There have been a large number of bids early on, showing the level of interest that these Wes Cooley replica models generate. Jump in before it is too late, as this 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica looks too good to pass up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley