Posts by Category: MV Agusta

MV Agusta May 18, 2018 posted by

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Launched at almost the same time, MV Agusta's Brutale has always lived in the sleeker F4's shadow. Styling aside, it was just a little bit lower-spec, a little less focused, a little too practical. Like that's a dirty word. I happen to love the design, although it's hard to argue that the F4 isn't a better-looking bike. But you have to suffer for that sublime style. The fact is, as much as I love the F4, it's hard work: the riding position puts lots of weight over the front wheel, the pegs are high, and the suspension is stiff. The Brutale, while by no means plush, certainly can feel that way after spending time on an F4. Which makes sense, since the F4 was designed for the track. For the road? It honestly doesn't get much better for canyon hooliganism than the Brutale.

Like the original F4 750, the Brutale 750S was considered by some to be "too slow," as if 127 high-strung horses in a lightweight naked bike with a nearly dirt-track riding position isn't a recipe for a good time. The 910R seen here followed the original Brutale and displaced... 910cc. At 136hp, claimed power isn't up all that much, but midrange is improved and honestly, it's all the power you need in a naked road bike. Seriously, who is riding these things and really thinks they're not fast enough? Sure, moar power is great and all, but the later 1078 and 1090 versions just seem like overkill, making the 910R the Goldilocks of the Brutale range: not too fast, not too slow. Just right.

The seller of this very clean example mentions a Titanium exhaust, and it looks like a set of beautiful headers and a de-cat link pipe have been fitted, but the bike retains the original "shotgun" style end-cans. Not the worst choice, as the aftermarket never really did come up with anything that looks quite as elegant as these slash-cut bits, although the actual openings in the ends do look kind of... inadequate. But if you're worried about a lack of noise, trust me: this one probably isn't all that quiet.

The only problem I see here is a lack of a Power Commander. MV's of this era can generally use fueling help. They're typically very lean through most of the rev range, then run overly rich at the top end. It makes sense, given limited development resources and the fairly crude technology available when the bike was introduced, but an aftermarket fueling module and some dyno time gives the instant response and fluid midrange the bike was always designed to have. It's perfectly rideable without one, but is well worth the investment.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Selling an MV Agusta Brutale 910R in excellent condition

KBB value at $5880 without considering the premium extras we have here. Price firm.

With top notch quality accessories
1. Titanium exhaust
2. Stock carbon fiber body parts (from MV Agusta)
3. Rizoma mirrors
4. CRG clutch and brake levers
5. MV Agusta cover and upright stand
6. Trickle charger

Title status: clean 
Transmission: manual 

Never down or raced/tracked. Low miles:4890 !!! 
Serviced at Ducati dealer every time.
Have the stock exhaust as well.

Have title in my name.

Good to know the title is clean, but did the seller really need to tell us the transmission is a "manual"? Does a constant-mesh, sequential gearbox even qualify as a manual? The seller also seems pretty impressed by all the "premium extras" included but honestly, this is basically a stock bike, by MV Agusta standards. And that's really the appeal of this one: it's clean, looks very sleek in the unusual black, and hasn't been messed with too much, although the missing Power Commander is something I'd rectify as soon as possible if it were mine. Is it worth the maintenance hassles? Well that's a different story: a Street or Speed Triple certainly handles as well, has plenty of character, and is much easier to maintain. I'd like to say those bikes are less expensive as well, except at the moment they're not: the asking price for this particularly nice Brutale is $5,999. That's pretty much bang-on for a good 910 these days, but Brutales in general are a screaming deal, considering the looks and performance. Anyone have $6,000 they can loan me?

-tad

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale
MV Agusta May 12, 2018 posted by

Limited Edition: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale

As much as I love the MV Agusta F4 750 in the classic red-and-silver colors, it's nice to know that it also looks pretty good in basic black-and-grey. Or flat-black. Or silver-and-blue, or... Reportedly, the design for the MV Agusta F4 was originally intended by Massimo Tamburini as the replacement for the venerable Ducati 916. And I'm sure in retrospect, Ducati very much wishes it had worked out that way, considering the reactions to their Pierre Terblanche-penned 999...

When it was introduced, I was a little disappointed that the new MV was powered by an inline four, instead of a v-twin. But the F4's radial-valved engine has a much more exotic quality than other four-cylinder engines: they sound sort of generically inline-y as they go by, but the pilot is treated to a much more complex noise. Or maybe I'm just infatuated.

In any event, this particular F4 is powered by the earlier, 749cc version of the engine. A claimed 126hp meant the MV was making the right power to compete in the 750cc class, but there were really two problems. One, it was also a bit heavier than other bikes in the class. And two, interest in the 750 class basically evaporated right as the F4 was introduced. Sure, Suzuki still made a GSX-R750, but it lived in the shadow of the new superbike king, the GSX-R1000. And the F4 750 couldn't hope to compete against performance like that.

F4s show up regularly for sale with incredibly low miles, which reinforces the bike's reputation for a punishing riding position. It also points out that they get bought as display items more than actual bikes. Which is sad, because they're pretty great, rewarding sportbikes. If you're expecting this to flatten your eyeballs, you will be very disappointed, and the F4 is hard, and uncomfortable, and very serious. Handling is more stable than agile, but the potential is there for a seriously rapid bike, if you're willing to deal with the uncompromising ergos and bit of extra weight.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300

The MV Agusta F4 was the motorcycle that launched the resurrection of MV Agusta in 1998. The F4 model was created by motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini at CRC (Cagiva Research Center), following his work on the Ducati 916. 

The F4 series bikes have a four pipe undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, large front forks (50 mm diameter) and traditional MV Agusta red and silver livery on the F4 Series Oro. The F4 model is also one of the few production superbikes to have hemispherical chamber 4 valves per cylinder engine.

After meeting and becoming friends, Formula One Racing Legend, Ayrton Senna and MV Agusta President, Claudio Castiglioni began a close collaboration. Borne of a mutual passion for speed, performance, and the painstaking quest for excellence, their friendship continued to grow. 

Today this spirit continues, embodied in the form of a very special motorcycle, the MV Agusta SPR SENNA. Based upon the SPR’s increased performance and capability, the SENNA edition is further distinguished by its limited production (only 50 imported into the USA) and exclusive black color, distinctive red accents, and SENNA graphics.

The SENNA was produced in a limited worldwide quantity of 300 units worldwide, with proceeds benefiting the SENNA Foundation. 

The SENNA Foundation was created to assist in improving the lives of over 300,000 Brazilian children and contributes 100% of its proceeds to the development and implementation of social programs.

The F4 750 Senna was released in 2002 and is rated at 0-60 2.9 quarter mile 10.7 @ 135. The Senna was a limited production run of 300 bikes like the orginal F4 Series Oro. The Senna shared the 136 hp (101 kW) engine of the Evo 02 but with a higher redline of13900 rpm, and top speed estimated at 175 mph (282 km/h) @ 12750 rpm . The Senna also had some suspension upgrades and some carbon fiber bodywork compared to other MVs. 

MSRP was $24,995 in 2002. Only 50 units of 300 produced worldwide arrived in the USA and this one with only 188 miles is arguably the finest Senna available anywhere!

As the seller mentions, this is a pretty rare bike, but considering this is really just a paint-and-graphics update to the F4 750, the $19,999 starting bid is pretty hard to swallow at this point in time. Even F4 Serie Oro bikes haven't gotten much higher than this in recent eBay auctions, so I think the seller is a few years ahead of the curve in terms of pricing.

-tad

Limited Edition: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale
MV Agusta April 14, 2018 posted by

Evolution: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR for Sale

The MV Agusta F4 750 is so often referred to as "one of the most beautiful motorcycles ever created" that it's easy to forget it's actually a pretty good motorcycle as well. Sure, it's brutally uncomfortable and a little bit heavier than the competition, but the engineering is sound and it's an impressively refined piece, considering this was the company's first modern superbike, built from the ground up to compete against the very best sportbikes in the world. It fell a bit short of the mark, but not so far short you could consider it an actual failure, considering the bike's longevity.

The orignal F4 750 was introduced in 1999 and the later 1000cc version that followed in 2005 was basically the 750 with more displacement and some refinements, and every four-cylinder machine produced by the company was based on the same engine and frame, up until the complete redesign of the F4 for 2010. So you're looking at a pretty long-serving package, considering the normally rapid pace of sportbike development, and that second generation F4 introduced in 2010 is still used as the foundation for a mid-pack WSBK contender!

So what was wrong with the F4? Well basically, in a class where power-to-weight ratios are critical, the bike had just average power and about 50lbs too much weight. In any other motorcycle category, that would be pretty meaningless, but in the hyper-competitive sportbike world, it meant everything, especially when you consider the somewhat shocking cost of the F4. Ultimately, the F4 was just a step behind the leaders in a class that was now obsolete, as literbikes were suddenly the top dogs of the sportbike world. MV Agusta solved the power problems with their updated F4 1000 but the damage to their rep was done, and the bikes never really offered any performance advantage over a ZX-10 or GSX-R1000, with less reliability and a whole lot more cost.

The seller claims this is an SPR, but I was under the impression the SPR was introduced in 2004, the ultimate evolution of the F4 750 and is most commonly seen in flat black colors. Whether or not this is an SPR or an S, it's a later version of the bike and should be more refined and reliable than the first-generation examples. The included Power Commander is a nice touch: fueling on stock F4s is pretty terrible from the factory, lean through most of the rev range and then artificially rich at the top. It's especially noticeable on the 1000 but both versions benefit hugely in terms of usability from a fueling module and some dyno time. I've ridden a stock 1000 and a properly tuned example nearly back-to-back, and the difference is pronounced. The stock bike seems to almost bog when you whack the throttle open in the midrange, where as the tuned version pulls as you'd expect: like a freight train.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR for Sale

Need garage space, so newer bikes must go! This 2002 MV F4 SPR was one of two California-legal MVs, purchased from Grand Prix Motors, San Diego. Original owner was importer for MV Agusta in 1970s, Commerce Overseas Corporation. Designer of the MV750S America: pictured in the foreground with this F4. The bike comes with a ton of MV Agusta history accumulated by Commerce Overseas, including racing photos from MV glory days! With only 8,000 miles, this F4 SPR is in "as-new" condition. Equipped with rare MV factory racing exhaust, bike is tuned with a Power Commander. New tires, recent service. Stunning example of the F4 that was produced in SPR form after initial hiccups with early models.

The bike has 8,250 miles on it and there are no takers yet at the $10,000 starting bid. For the most part, it's pretty commonly accepted that the later 1000 is a better bike overall and that the 750 is underpowered and slightly overweight. It is the original though, and rarer, and should prove to be the better investment over time. Plus, an MV is still an MV, and none of them are actually slow. Try to think of them more as... mature, with just a little bit of middle-aged paunch over an athlete's build. Put it this way: if you're riding an F4 and someone is faster than you are on track or down a given stretch of back road, the problem probably isn't the extra 50lbs the F4 carries over a GSX-R... The problem is probably you.

-tad

MV Agusta April 4, 2018 posted by

Signed by the Master: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 for Sale

An MV Agusta F4 750 Senna "signed by the master" would normally mean that it was signed by its creator, Massimo Tamburini. In this case though, the "master" in question is Giacomo Agostini, the famous rider who rode MVs to victory in so many races during the marque's heyday. The F4 was to be their return to prominence, and the 750cc displacement of the original F4 introduced in 1999 would have allowed it to compete in World Superbike, a series with roots in production-based motorcycles, rather than Grand Prix racing.

Unfortunately the F4 suffered in comparison to much more affordable bikes from the Japanese Big Four but, even at the time, the biggest disappointment seemed to come from the bike's lack of any performance advantage compared to the benchmark GSX-R750 and its high cost, rather than any real flaw in the bike itself. Given the exotic looks and racing pedigree, they expected riding nirvana and they got... a perfectly competent, fast motorcycle with typically uncomfortable Italian ergonomics and suspect electicals.

The 750 wasn't actually slow, it just wasn't any faster than a GSX-R750 and really, why would it have been? Aside from a shocking price tag, the big problem was that the achingly beautiful exotic was launched as a 750cc machine just as the class was being made redundant by rules changes in racing and the new breed of literbikes that fit 1000cc power into 750cc packages. MV released their updated 1000cc version of the F4 within a few years, but the damage was done to the bike's reputation, and you still hear people refer to the 750 as if it's a bit of a dog.

Claimed horsepower was 136, with 118 real-world ponies finding their way to the ground, which was nearly identical to a GSX-R of the same period. Unfortunately, weights were not identical: the F4 clocked in at nearly 50 pounds more, full of fuel, and it seems to carry that weight up pretty high. The riding position is definitely uncomfortable and, compared to modern machines, it's awkward at low speeds and runs hot in traffic. But get into a groove and a well set up F4 corners beautifully: it may never have been the most agile bike in its class, but it's a testament to the soundness of the original design that the same basic machine was able to remain competitive for ten years, at least in terms of handling.

I've never been particularly excited by the sound of an inline four, and the F4 doesn't sound all that exotic riding past. But from the saddle there's a metallic rasp not found on other bikes, and the engine has a frantic quality that gives the conventional inline four wail an exotic quality that sets it apart. This particular F4 is the limited-edition [aren't they all?] Senna edition, named after famed racing driver Aryton Senna. Miles are collector-bike low ad the bike is sporting the aforementioned signature of the great Ago on the windscreen.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna for Sale

Extremely rare and beautiful. Part of a small collection of bikes purchased new by NHL Hall of Famer Sergei Fedorov. Bike has been personally signed by legendary MV Agusta rider/ champion Giacomo Agostini! This bike is number 192 of 300 built for worldwide production. MV reported that only 50 of these bikes were imported to North America. Inline 4 cylinder engine designed with cooperation from Ferrari produces 136hp at 13900 rpms. 0 – 60mph in 2.9 seconds. Quarter mile in 10.7 at 136mph. Lightweight and extremely fast. These bikes are legendary not only for performance and handling but for design and collectability!

Bike is in excellent cosmetic, running and riding condition at 3200 miles. The sale includes original owner’s manual, spare key, spark plug tool, and factory red rear wheel bike stand.

The bike appears to be in excellent cosmetic condition, although we really don't care about claimed horsepower for a bike that was famously unexceptional in that regard. The bike wasn't "lightweight" or "extremely fast" but it was definitely a very serious performance machine and it is still one of the best-looking motorcycles ever built. I prefer the F4 in standard colors, with the cool, yellow-faced tachometer, but it certainly looks very special in the black, grey, and red seen here. F4s can be surprisingly affordable to buy at the moment, but values of the very rare Senna are a good bit higher, and Ago's signature certainly adds to the cool factor. Bidding on this example is up to $13,000 with very little time left on the auction.

-tad

Signed by the Master: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 for Sale
MV Agusta March 27, 2018 posted by

Papa-Paparazzi – 2005 MV Agusta F4 Tamburini #256 of 300

Like a director's cut of your favorite movie, a special edition sportbike named for the designer will be a memorable experience.  The Tamburini signature F4 is the second 1000cc special edition, and number 256 of 300 has been upgraded and cared for by a notable collector.

2005 MV Agusta F4 Tamburini for sale on eBay

 

The F4 was introduced in 1999 as a 750cc, and the Tamburini is a bit of a return to the original Oro edition where carbon was used extensively.  The Ferrari-designed heads have the valves arranged on the domed top of the combustion chamber for theoretical optimum flow and power, but complicating the head with valves splayed slightly in three dimensions.  With multi-point fuel injection the 998cc four is rated at 173 hp, and the torque curve is helped by the newly introduced Torque Shift System, which shortens the intake runners substantially as rpm's approach 10,000.  Presuming a skilled rider, electronics can help slow the throttle curve and limit power, but there is no traction control or ABS.

 

Somehow this F4 has amassed 14,800 miles, but looks quite excellent.  Along the way the wheels were replaced with BST carbon fiber, the exhaust changed to the factory racing set, and front brakes upgraded to carbon-ceramics, which alone save around 3 lbs of unsprung weight.  Other upgrades are described in the eBay auction:

The original owner went crazy with upgrades and it has BST full carbon-fiber wheels, a performance slipper clutch, carbon ceramic rotors and Brembo mono-blok calipers.  Also has  Ohlins shocks nice adjustable rear set and numerous other things.   All in all I see well in excess of $20,000 spent on upgrades.
The bike comes with an extra seat, the racing exhaust (installed) as well as the street exhaust.  I am including two keys, the rear paddock stand, the cover as well as a few spares like the original license plate frame, grips, levers and clutch.  Bike has the original invoice as well as service records from new.
The original wheels do not come with the bike but I understand they are available if you choose to take off the $10,000 wheels that are currently on the bike.  
I have just had the bike serviced and it runs fantastic.  The brakes are absolutely amazing!   I had all fluids replaced, valves adjusted and the radiator upgraded with a popular reinforcement (weak link on these bikes) All in service cost $1,600.   
I purchased the bike from Guy Webster who is very well known as a collector of rare Italian motorcycles.  The bike still has his signature "Motoguy" stickers on the bodywork, easily removed. 

 

Guy Webster is a rock band photographer whose bike collection was part of the "Art of the Motorcycle" show in 1998 and got a neat write-up in the Robb Report.  From the looks of it the F4 may have just been too new to really fit in.  My back-of-the-napkin math shows a pretty serious discount from the original purchase price to the buy-it-now, compounded by some dollar-intensive upgrades.  Hopefully a fan will step in and give this distinctive MV a permanent home...

-donn

Papa-Paparazzi – 2005 MV Agusta F4 Tamburini #256 of 300
MV Agusta February 14, 2018 posted by

Jacket Included: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini for Sale

Limited by budgets and economies of scale, many smaller car and motorcycle manufacturers are stuck rehashing the same product line, trying to keep pace with much larger companies capable of significant revamps and updates of their models to keep pace with the ruthless advance of technology and changing consumer tastes. Certainly, the Italian brands have often fallen victim to this and, until pretty recently, even Ducati was often forced to generate excitement through "limited editions" that amounted to performance and appearance upgrades to existing, sometimes obsolete machines. But that's not necessarily a bad thing, especially when your existing, obsolete machine is as spectacular as Massimo Tamburini's most beautiful creation, the MV Agusta F4.

Out of date the F4 may have been by 2005, but when the original bike looks so good and offers such a high level of performance, that phrase is of limited importance. It may have been 40 pounds heavier than more affordable competition like Suzuki's benchmark GSX-R1000 while offering very similar power, but it's not like the F4 was by any measure slow. The biggest issue, aside from purchase and running costs, was how much harder you had to work for that speed: ergonomics really are pretty brutal for anything other than committed riding, and anyone considering an F4 today should keep in mind that the bike is devoid of any electronic safety net, so you'd better be sure of the road surface or be fully upright before pulling the trigger. In an era of 200hp superbikes, it's easy to dismiss a 170hp machine, but inexperienced riders do so at their peril.

To drum up interest in a bike that had basically been around since the 1999 introduction of the F4 750, MV Agusta took their more powerful 998cc version and basically made everything lighter or better or at the very least carbon-fiber-ier and created the F4 1000 Tamburini. The result was still nearly 20lbs heavier than a GSX-R1000 but I'm not sure anyone with the means to buy one really cared. Power was up just a few ponies, but the big news was the addition of MV's interesting and effective Torque Shift System that used two sets of intake runners to improve midrange power without sacrificing the top end.

Inline fours can sound a bit bland to me when they drive past, but the sound of the F4 from the saddle is entirely different, much more frantic and exotic than something like a BMW S1000RR, and the soft stutter of the Engine Brake System on the overrun adds a layer of additional interest. That system was fitted in lieu of a slipper clutch and basically holds a couple of valves on once cylinder open on a closed throttle. It works very well, allowing hard downshifts without locking the rear wheel.

Most sportbikes go through a period of time where they just look out of date, before becoming "classic," but the F4 somehow missed that phase entirely. It's shocking how much attention even an ordinary example can generate, and how good it still looks in the flesh. It's like owning an affordable Ferrari: it doesn't really matter that you bought that 308 a few years back for $25,000, everyone still thinks you're some kind of rich guy, because Ferrari. Of course, if you're interested in today's Tamburini edition of the F4, it would probably help to actually be rich...

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini for Sale

2005 MV Agusta Tamburini #254 our of 300 ever built. Mint condition with 1,400 miles. I am the second owner was originally purchased locally in Dallas TX at an MV dealer will come with all original documents, COA, etc and an MV Agusta leather jacket.

Oooh, a jacket! Well that's it then, I'm going to drop the $38,000 asking price if it includes a gen-u-ine MV Agusta jacket [not pictured]! Hey, considering the original $43,000 asking price, not adjusted for inflation, that price seems almost reasonable. There's not much information in the listing, but what is there really to say about a "mint condition" bike with so few miles? Normally, I'd want to know if the little things that are typically done to improve the F4 have been taken care of, but I'm pretty sure it's safe to assume they haven't considering the mileage and the bike's collectable nature. I'm sure no one will really care all that much about the fragile fuel connectors being replaced with more robust bits, or a Power Commander being fitted and dyno-tuned, but who knows? Maybe someone will get dinged thirty years from now for those sensible changes at some obnoxious, concourse-style event where they judge that kind of "originality" to be critically important.

-tad

Jacket Included: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini for Sale