Posts by Category: MV Agusta

MV Agusta March 25, 2017 posted by

Y2K: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750

From the VERY talented pen of Massimo Tamburini - co-founder and chief designer of Bimota (including the DB1), father of the Cagiva Mito, author of the Ducati 916/748 design language and more - comes a swan song. Tamburini closed out his storied motorcycle design career with the passion to bring MV Agusta back to life. And what he created was considered by many to be the most beautiful motorcycle ever designed: the MV Agusta F4. He passed in 2014, but left behind a legacy of evocative, brilliant designs that beg to be stared at, drooled over and appreciated for decades to come.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 S for sale on eBay

This particular F4 appears to be a standard 750 model, which is officially known as the F4 750 S. It contains all of the great visual elements of the F4 lineup (save for the gold magnesium castings of the Oro model), but lacks the super-exclusive, limited numbers of some of the other MV Agusta models of this time. Still, it shares the fabulous inline four cylinder engine with fabled 4-valve hemi chambers, good for approximately 124 HP. Novel intake runners - dubbed the Torque Shift System (or TSS) - allow for varying lengths in the intake duct work. This high-tech solution maximizes the intake runner length for a given RPM, flattening the power curve. This is a bike that performs as well as it looks.

From the seller:
F4 MV Agusta in very good condition garage kept with good tyre

This is the type of advert that infuriates a RSBFS writer. This is a wonderful machine that looks decent. But there is so little information presented it begs several questions. The bike apparently has a touch over 9k miles on the odo, but no mention of service history, mods or other. Good to know the garage is kept with good tires, though. The seller is looking for $8,800 OBO. So stare at the pics, enjoy the apex of Tamburini's career and talent, and ask questions. This could be a fantastic bike... but some detail is lacking.

Check out the full description here, and then jump back to the Comments and share your thoughts on the F4 lineup. Which is your favorite amid the plethora of limited edition 750 models offered (Oro, Senna, SPR, Neiman Marcus, SR...)?

MI

MV Agusta March 24, 2017 posted by

Flashback Friday: 1977 MV Agusta 800 Super America for Sale

Most factory racing efforts are intended to raise the company profile and sell more bikes, or are used to develop and test new technology that filters down to and improves road-bike performance. But the early road-legal efforts of Ferrari and MV Agusta were basically afterthoughts, and sales of these vehicles were simply intended to help fund the companies’ racing teams. In fact, MV Agusta didn’t even make a serious sporting multi-cylinder roadbike until 1967’s 600 4C, a notoriously half-arsed attempt at a production machine. Luckily, the follow up 750S and 800 Super America rectified that problem, although there were some pretty obvious indications that Count Agusta was uncomfortable putting his company’s hard-won knowledge into a bike that was available to the public…

First of all, there’s the literal elephant in the room: that 560lb wet weight. Sure, the MV Agusta carried that weight well once on the move, and plenty of other sport bikes of the late 1970s were heavy beasts, but considering the 750S cost an eye-popping $6,500 new, you’d think they could have put at least a modicum of effort into weight-reduction. The other component hamstringing the four-cylinder MV’s performance was that strange contraption stretching from the back of the gearbox to the rear wheel: a driveshaft. Supposedly, it was decided that the bike for sale to customers would swap the normal lightweight drive chain for a shaft in order to prevent customers from simply racing their roadbikes. It means maintenance is less messy, but I doubt many of these were ever going to cover the mileage for that to matter. The specialists at Magni made a chain-drive conversion for these bikes, so it might be possible to track one of those down if you have extra coin to spend.

The original 750S made 75hp which was respectable at the time, considering the output of bikes like the CB750 and Ducati SuperSport, but nothing to write home about, then or now. The later 750S America or, as it was known in some parts of Europe, the "800 Super America," bumped displacement to 788cc and swapped the gearshift across to the left side to appeal to riders in the USA although, considering the low numbers produced for all markets, I’m not really sure why they bothered with that…

So if the 800 Super America is basically fat, slow, and expensive, then what’s the point? Well if you equate “inline four” with “sanitized and boring” then prepare to have your eardrums shattered. The beautiful sand-cast, dual gear-driven overhead cam engine with a four-into-four exhaust makes a sophisticated shriek likely unknown to motorcyclists familiar with modern machines. It's narrower than a period Honda CB400 and it does handle, you just have to respect the weight and the monetary value. Which makes it pretty much ideal for the modern rider: a genuine race-replica would probably just be a pain to own, and you'd hate to crash something so valuable, so you're likely to ride at a fairly reserved pace anyway. Perfect for enjoying the play of sunlight along the tank on a beautiful afternoon and the sound of the engine bouncing off the canyon walls.

There's some good information from the seller in the listing, although describing the unloved 600 that preceded the 750 and 800 as "suffering from an identity crisis" is diplomatic in the extreme. Basically, the thing was so pug-ugly it was as if MV had extended their mechanical hobbling to include the style...

From the original eBay listing: 1977 MV Agusta 800 America for Sale

This is a very, very low mileage 4,629km/ 2,876 original miles bike! This example (VIN: 2210507) has 4,629 km was imported from Japan last year and previously was imported to Japan in 1990 and had one owner since then. It’s gorgeous and sounds amazing (refer to running video at link below) – what more could you want? Bike is an original and an un-restored example with great, great patina. This bike needs one thing to ride - GAS! Bike is fully commissioned and ready to ride.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/1us90cevf2xp765/mv%20america.mp4?dl=0

Comes with US Customs import docs so that it can be registered/titled easily in the US.

Feel free to contact me for more information, or for more pics. I can assist with worldwide shipping. I ride and collect and I am always happy to connect with new owners who have the same passion as I do. Oh, and I did put this little bike show on last year... https://petrolicious.com/art-of-the-italian-two-wheel

Frame# 221-0507 Engine# 221-0300

75 bhp, 789.3 cc DOHC four-stroke transverse inline four-cylinder engine with four Dell’Orto carburetors, five-speed mechanical transmission, oil-immersed multi-plate clutch, front hydraulic telescopic fork suspension, rear swing-arm telescopic shock suspension, and front double-disc and rear single-disc brakes. Wheelbase: 1,390 mm

Originally a helicopter manufacturer, MV began manufacturing motorcycles in 1948. The company eventually went racing in earnest, and its dual overhead-cam singles, triples, and four-cylinders dominated international racing from the 1950s through to the 1970s.

John Surtees won his first world championship in the premier 500 cc class in 1956, followed by three successive world titles in 1958, 1959, and 1960. Surtees then turned his attention to Ferrari sports and Grand Prix cars, and to this day, he remains the only world champion on both two and four wheels. The torch was passed to Gary Hocking in 1961, then to Mike Hailwood in 1962, 1963, 1964, and 1965. That indomitable championship run was followed by Giacomo Agostini, who racked up an incredible seven world championships for MV from 1966 to 1972.

Driven by its dominance on the track, the MV, designed by the engineer Remor, was a major success. The beautiful DOHC inline four-cylinder engine was a genuine wonder, and MV thought it best to produce a road-going version for the public. The 600 “Quattro Cilindri” was unveiled at the Milan Motorcycle Show in November 1965. Innovative as it was, however, the 600 was not a major success. Suffering from an identity crisis, it was too expensive and not sporty enough to remind buyers of the MV Agustas ridden by the legendary Surtees, Hailwood, and Agostini. In 1969, increased displacement of 750 cc paved the way for top-level road-going performance.

The ultimate version came in response to requests from American importers. The 750 S America was unveiled in 1975 and produced until 1980. Its displacement was further increased to 790-cubic centimeters. The company had finally produced an exceptional motorcycle worthy of both its name and its fabled history.

The styling is pure Italian and the MV exudes character that few bikes can match. The 750 Sport America is on every serious collector’s shortlist, of which this MV is one of the finest.

The fact that this is no show piece, but a ready-to-go motorcycle just adds to the appeal. Shaft drive or no, these are incredibly desirable motorcycles, and probably the most valuable road-going MVs of all time. Performance obviously won't impress today and wasn't even really top of the class when new, but it was and is a chance to own a genuine bit of the MV Agusta racing mystique from an era that saw them as a dominant force in racing. Bidding is up past $35,000 with the Reserve Not Met, no surprise since previous examples of the 750S and 750S America have been listed with starting bids in the $55,000 to $75,000 range, depending on year.

-tad

Flashback Friday: 1977 MV Agusta 800 Super America for Sale
MV Agusta December 7, 2016 posted by

Legendary – 2007 MV Agusta F4 1000 Senna #109/300

A now-legendary presence at any formula car race, Ayrton Senna won three F1 championships but succumbed to injuries sustained in a 1994 crash at Imola.  The Senna edition of the MV Agusta F4 1000 is a tribute and benefitted a charity formed in his honor, and has some significant improvements in the numbered edition of 300.

2007 MV Agusta F4 1000 Senna #109 for sale on eBay

  

Using the 998cc engine Agusta had recently re-designed from their F4 750, revised Marelli fuel injection put the Senna well into a new power category with 174hp.  The red trellis upper frame used alloy frame connectors and held 50mm Marzocchi forks and Sachs monoshock.  Brembo gold-line 6-puck calipers are radially mounted and squeeze 310mm front rotors with 210mm rear.  The fairing design uses shades of carbon, black, gray, and the red frame and Alcantara seat to elegant advantage.

  

Nicely photographed by a Miami specialty dealer, this F4 1000 has but 1,700 miles and appears flawless.  With its excellent sub-systems, and priced around $30K when new, no owner upgrades are required or expected.  Along with a video showcasing the exotic sound - here - , the owner comments in the eBay auction:

This is the excellence of MV Agusta, in honor of Ayrton Senna, the legend. Senna has graced the F4 1000 with exclusive characteristics such as:
State of the art engine making 174 HP, 998 CC liquid cooled, fuel injected, four Cylinder inline engine with 6 speed manual transmission. A new injection system, the Weber Marelli 5SM, for better power control. The most advanced Brembo four-caliper radial brakes available. Carbon fiber fairings. Quad Titanium racing exhaust. Bike runs extremely well and is like new! Always garage kept.

  

Despite seeming to need a special edition for every season, the MV Agusta cycles were very well designed with help from friends like Ferrari and beautifully made.  The performance was at least equivalent to the superlative materials.  With the new ( and used ) prices requiring a singular rider, an F4 1000 sighting would be notable.  Seeing a Senna edition - with its understated design and exclusive components, even among MV's - that would be an occasion...

-donn

Legendary – 2007 MV Agusta F4 1000 Senna #109/300
MV Agusta November 29, 2016 posted by

Later Bet – 2008 MV Agusta R312 1+1

Later in the long run of F4 1000's, MV Agusta made a play for the Italian SuperStock race series, and it breathed new life into the model.  This R312 carbon edition is a great example.

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2008 MV Agusta R312 1+1 for sale on eBay

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Engine architecture unchanged, the titanium intake valves, new exhaust system, and revised electronic engine controls deliver the ludicrous 183hp while meeting Euro 3 emissions.  The steel trellis frame is also a legacy, but with 50mm Marzocchi forks and Sachs monoshock adjustable for high and low-speed damping, it's become cutting edge.  As are the Brembo radially mounted calipers over 320mm rotors.  Subtly rounded knife edges on the nose, tank, and lowers are complemented by the seat fairing with pillion above and exhaust calliope below.

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Presented in a winning carbon / red / white scheme, this R312 shows just over 9,000 miles and looks excellent, though a trip to spa is in order.  MV has used redline wheels elsewhere, and the forged Brembos here help the red accents on the seats and seat fairing.  The factory took care of all the carbon bling, and the bike otherwise appears stock.  No maintenance or history is offered in the comments from the eBay auction:

The F4 was created by motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini at CRC (Cagiva Research Center) and only 150 were imported into the US. 

The F4 has a four pipe undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, large front forks (49 or 50 mm diameter) and one of the few production superbikes to have a hemispherical chamber 4 valves per cylinder engine.

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A perrenial takeover or bankruptcy candidate, MV Agusta has somehow continued to produce exotic and inspiring machines.  The R312 reviewed as a slightly overweight powerhouse, with finicky electronics and handling that was great when dialed in.  With base models breathtakingly priced, one can only guess what the carbon edition might have cost.  Impossible for an amateur to photograph, the carbon fairings are a great addition to a fine model year, sure to cause a tip of the sunglasses at any coffee stop...

-donn

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Later Bet – 2008 MV Agusta R312 1+1
MV Agusta November 28, 2016 posted by

Brutally Handsome: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

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MV Agusta's Brutale represents the sane and reasonable option compared to their take-no-prisoners F4. Limited development budget meant the bike shared plenty of the fully faired machine's DNA and it used a similar, if not identical frame, single-sided swingarm and wheels, along with a slightly detuned version of the radial-valved inline four. But the Brutale used a less ass-roasting shotgun exhaust set up, and dropped the gorgeous, Tamburini-designed fairings and clipons for a sleek headlamp and a tapered handlebar. Considering the brutal ergonomics of the F4, this is a good thing if you want to ride your exotic Italian, instead of just display it.

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The original 750 was considered by many to be a bit underpowered, although I suspect many of those people are size queens: the early Brutale was still plenty fast, considering the upright riding position and lack of wind protection... The later bikes like the 1078RR and 1090RR really might have been a bit too much, leaving the 910R like this one as the "just right" middle ground. Handling is excellent, with quality suspension at both ends, and the 136 claimed horses of the 910R will keep you very entertained.

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The Buy It Now price is listed at $6,700 for this example, which is on the high side for a Brutale but, considering the low miles and claimed condition, seems reasonable. If you're looking for a good deal on a truly exotic nameplate, the Brutale represents a very good deal at the moment, at 2/3 the price of a comparable F4 but with ergonomics that will let you actually ride the thing without murdering your back or crushing your fingers against the fairing when you try to maneuver it at low speeds.

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From the original eBay listing: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

In like new condition under 4,600 original miles. The bike does not have one scratch, chip, dent or scratch, adult owned garaged and covered all its life, comes with a bit of carbon fiber, (solo rear seat cover and rear tire hugger) has frame sliders, battery tender lead, new tires Avon 3D super sport front and rear....also included is the single sided rear stand, stainless steal rear wheel nut and front axle nut removal socket, two keys, factory manual and tool kit, clear title on hand... you will not find a nicer or cleaner Brutale, won't be disappointed.

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Like a great many Italian machines, these are beautifully designed but sometimes indifferently assembled. Get a good one, and you'll be looking at a champagne motorcycle on a beer budget. Get a bad one and it will eat you alive, trying to keep it running, and with MV being in-and-out of solvency over the past decade or two, parts availability can be spotty. If something's not in stock at your local dealer, assuming you have a local dealer, the wait for parts to ship from Varese could be long. Especially if you happen to need something during August, when the factory is likely to be closed...

-tad

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Brutally Handsome: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale
MV Agusta November 22, 2016 posted by

Limited Edition: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini for Sale

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MV Agusta certainly got the basic components right when they introduced their exotic and achingly-beautiful F4 750, but it was down on power and a member of the suddenly superfluous 750 class. Luckily, they were easily able to bump their displacement to play in the liter-bike class, although the new MV Agusta F4 1000 was obviously much more expensive and no faster than bikes like the Suzuki GSX-R1000. It's tough for small manufacturers to keep pace with the rapid development of companies like Suzuki, so while the big Gixxer went through four different iterations between 2005 and 2008, the F4 soldiered on with very little in the way of fundamental updates. So how to stimulate interest in the same old [blindingly fast, exotic, Italian] thing? Take the fundamentally good chassis and engine, swathe it in lightweight bodywork and distinctive paint, and call it a "numbered, limited edition." In this case, the bike in question is named after the father of this machine and one of the most talented motorcycle designers of all time: Massimo Tamburini.

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Well, they also added a few cool gizmos to the engine, in addition to all that shiny carbon and paint. Interestingly, MV Agusta's Torque Shift System and Engine Brake System are intended to improve rideability, not peak horsepower. Which makes sense since 174 claimed horsepower is really skirting the edge of controllable power anyway, for a bike lacking modern traction control systems. The Torque Shift System uses variable length intake runners to boost midrange power and keep the bike's screaming top end. The Engine Brake System takes the place of a slipper clutch, basically leaking fuel and air into the engine on closed throttle to provide engine braking without locking the rear tire. Surprisingly, the system works very well.

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The result is a very fast motorcycle with stunning looks that still look modern more than fifteen years later. This particular Tamburini looks basically perfect. As it should be, considering the asking price and the low miles. These listed at a stunning $43,000 new, so today's example could be thought of as something of a bargain...

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini #85 of 300 for Sale

"My Dream, My Bike" - Massimo Tamburini

One of the most exotic motorcycles ever built. The MV F4 was limited to only 300 made, only 59 brought in to the USA. The plaque on the triple clamp shows #85 of 300. Very rare indeed. Few would argue its beauty. And even if you never ride the Tamburini, looking at it might be enough. Gold-toned mesh covers the fairing vent holes, while forged aluminum wheels are gold anodized to continue the theme, just as with the 6 piston billet Nissin front brake calipers. The low-friction titanium-nitride coating on the 50mm Marzocchi inverted fork sliders jives nicely with the gold anodized uppers.

Aside from the fuel tank which is steel, the Tamburini's bodywork is nearly all carbon fiber, finished to a very high standard. A nice touch is the F4 and CRC logo work on the fairing sides that lets the c-f weave “peek” through the high-gloss paint. Who needs decals when the underlying material itself is so nice you simply leave paint off? Sensual shapes and exotic materials set the Tamburini apart. Front axle carriers and brake calipers are machined from billet for maximum rigidity, while lower triple-clamp, frame sideplates and gorgeous single-sided swingarm are lightweight magnesium. And check out the carbon-fiber weave on the fairing panels!

Only 4,159 miles, adult owned and fully serviced. 

Arrow pipes and all booklets, plaque authenticating serial number, etc.

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Low-mileage, low-production run F4s show up for sale pretty regularly,  owing to the fact that they're often bought as display pieces and objects of lust more often than they are as functional motorcycles. Which makes sense, considering how awkward and uncomfortable they can be to actually ride on the street... They obviously offer handling and straight-line performance on par with the rest of the class, but their outright expense, crippling ergonomics, and high maintenance costs mean these are best left as occasional weekend or track-day toys: you masochists out there using your F4s as daily transportation have my respect. Obviously, if you want the gorgeous lines and don't have the $35,000 the seller is asking for this Tamburini, a more common F4 can be had for less than a third of the price and is just as stunning, if not ultimately as valuable.

Hell, I prefer the very stylish five-spoke wheels on the original F4 anyway...

-tad

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Limited Edition: 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini for Sale