Posts by Category: Moto Guzzi

Moto Guzzi October 4, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1981 Moto Guzzi LeMans II

The Moto Guzzi 850 LeMans II took the marque's sportiest offering from the '70s and updated its styling and technology for the new decade. What had been born in the mid-70s as the high-compression, big-carb version of Guzzi's familiar v-twin standard was updated with air-assisted forks, linked brakes and Nikasil cylinder walls.

The 850 LeMans II also got a new wind tunnel-tuned half fairing, that now encased a square headlight and integrated turn signals. Little else changed with the big Goose's styling, but the front-end revamp was striking enough to suggest this was a new machine.

The 850 LeMans II is fairly rare in this country, with the American market being saddled with the LeMans Mark II CX100 in this bike's stead. The CX100 punched the big vee out to 1,000 cc, but is generally considered the more ponderous and compromised of the two bikes, displacement notwithstanding.

This example gets ridden regularly in the spring and summer, according to the seller, though never in rain. It has covered just 11,000 miles in its 36 years, and is in impeccable shape. The paint and soft parts are not faded or damaged, though the bike does not look factory fresh.

From the seller:

The 1981 Moto Guzzi Le Mans II that you see in this ad is a bike as we understand it that was not generally imported into the United States. Most people are familiar with the Le Mans I 750 but many collectors here in the United States have not had the opportunity to see and ride a Le Mans II 850.

This 1981 Moto Guzzi Le Mans II is part of a very serious automotive and motorcycle collection in Chicagoland. The collection has many post war Italian highly collectible motorcyles from the 1970s and 1980s. The owner of the collection has said that all the Italian motorcycles sound and handle terrifically but the Le Mans II is superior in the handling to just about all the other Italian sport bikes. It not only sounds great but has that extra 100 cc over the Le Mans I that gives it a little more boost off the line and top end. And as the current owner says, “it just reads your mind” in terms of what you would like it to do in terms of handling.

This bike is kept on a trickle charger and is only filled with aviation fuel and currently has between 50 and 200 miles put on it per season. It is always available to be instantly started twelve months a year but of course is only taken out in summer months and never when it is wet.

The detailing and fit on this bike are exceptional and it is hard to find a single mark on the mufflers considering they are a flat black finish; they could easily be scuffed if somebody were neglecting total care of the bike but are still near perfect. This bike has been babied its entire life and is a very rare bike in the motorcycle collecting world and deserves the continuing care that it has had over the last 36 years. The owner does want the bike to go to a good home and if you are interested in talking further about it, call 847-668-2004 cell from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. CST we would be happy to discuss details and price. An extremely rare piece of history.

To get your hands on this piece of rare and collectible Italian motorcycling history, reach out to the seller at the above number or by email: adreply514@gmail.com

Featured Listing: 1981 Moto Guzzi LeMans II
Moto Guzzi October 3, 2017 posted by

Flawed Masterpiece: 1955 Moto Guzzi 8C “Otto Cilindri” for Sale

Fans of modern machinery may not understand how Moto Guzzi, with their clunky driveshafts and pushrod v-twins, is allowed even a grudging membership to the sportbike club. Of course, a look back a bit further shows Guzzi was very successful in a variety of racing classes throughout the 40s and 50s. But they wanted to play in the premiere 500cc Grand Prix class with Gilera and MV Agusta, both of whom used inline fours as the basis for their race winning machines. Guzzi knew that, in order to compete without years of development, they needed to try something new that would increase power without increasing weight, and they did it with the "Otto Cilindri." Long and low, with a period "dustbin" fairing that made it look like a wheeled torpedo, the bike was as terrifying for riders as it was for the opposition.

The brand new 500cc Grand Prix machine was powered by a brand new V8 engine... Let's just stop there and let that sink in for a moment. A motorcycle. Powered by a 499cc V8. That's not a euphemism or a catchy name. That's "V8." As in "has eight cylinders." It also had four gear-driven overhead cams, eight Dell'Orto carburetors, liquid cooling, oil stored in the frame, and weighed in at 326 pounds with the full fairing in place. If this thing had actually finished a few more races, it'd be in the pantheon of all-time greats. Unfortunately, that's why this bike is a glorious footnote, instead of an unforgettable masterpiece.

The main issue was that the 78hp produced by the ferocious engine was too much for the tire and suspension technology of the period. The bike was capable of very nearly 180mph, but period testing and races were plagued by crashes, with riders eventually refusing to pilot it until it stopped trying to actively kill them. Which is saying something, since basically the entire sport of motorcycle racing was trying to kill riders during this period. Handling was likely compromised by the engine being set too far back in the frame. This was common practice at the time, ostensibly to increase traction at the rear, but put too little weight on the front for stability and handling. Mechanical failures didn't help: the bikes overheated and broke cranks with alarming regularity.

The Otto Cilindri was terrifyingly fast, even considering the mechanical and handling problems: it actually finished fourth and fifth at the 1957 Isle of Man TT, with the fourth-place bike running on 7 cylinders. Considering the ambition of the project, the reliability and handling challenges are no surprise and it is likely that, with time, the bike would have realized its full potential. Unfortunately, Moto Guzzi pulled out of Grand Prix racing in 1957, so this project will always be more of an interesting "what if."

From the original eBay listing: 1955 Moto Guzzi 8C for Sale

Moto Guzzi 8C "Continuation"

Model year 1955

Rare opportunity to acquire one of only 7 "continuation" built in 2001 by Todaro/Frigerio from original Moto Guzzi Factory drawings.
This is the last built, fitted with ORIGINAL crankshaft, pistons and timing gear.

Fully working.

 

Parade race and collect.

Bike is currently located in Italy, 33080 Roveredo in Piano, but i can get them delivered all around World at cost, no problem.

Hat tip to Odd-Bike, where I originally saw this bike posted. Just a handful of the V8 race bikes were ever built, and only two of those remain. But in the early 2000 a small run of seven "continuation" models were built to the original's exact specifications, including the magnesium engine cases and brake drums, although the continuation bikes will likely benefit from improvements in metallurgy. Note that the seller claims this is "fully working" which means that, not only is this a historical artifact, it's also an actual, rideable motorcycle. I'd bet this is one of the rarest, most exotic and historic machines we've ever featured on this site, although it's a bit older than our usual focus. Just how incredible this engine was in concept and execution is beyond the scope of this post or my limited engineering knowledge, but if you've never heard of this thing, it's worth checking out additional sources.

-tad

Flawed Masterpiece: 1955 Moto Guzzi 8C “Otto Cilindri” for Sale
Moto Guzzi October 1, 2017 posted by

Sunday Goose: 2000 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport for Sale

It's a shame we'll probably never see a modern Moto Guzzi sportbike, since they've been nominated official "heritage brand" for the Piaggio Group. Especially disappointing, since Guzzi was active and successful in a variety of racing classes up into the 1970s. Guzzi even had a modern superbike in the works intended to compete head-to-head with the 916. This new superbike engine kept the longitudinal v-twin, but used a narrower angle between the cylinder heads for more cornering clearance, liquid-cooling, four valves, and even chain drive. Now, we'll probably never see a modern Moto Guzzi sportbike, since they've been nominated official "heritage brand" for the Piaggio Group. Until things change, we're got  this roadster V11 Sport as the sportiest production Guzzi of the modern era.

Tractor jokes aside, bikes like this V11 Sport were a definite step in the right direction after the charming, but very agricultural Sport 1100 that dabbled in modernity after the very long-in-the-tooth Le Mans series and the retro 1000S. It still used the company's torquey, two-valve and air-cooled twin, here displacing 1064cc and producing a respectable 91hp. After years stuck with a clunky five-speed box, the V11 introduced a much more modern, smooth-shifting six-speed that, although hampered a bit by the intertia of the shaft drive, could even be upshifted clutchlessly.

Handling and balance were good, although obviously it wasn't as light as naked offerings from Ducati. Considering that it's nearly 550lbs ready-to-roll with a full tank of fuel on board, the V11 Sport isn't a hard core sportbike and wasn't pretending to be. It was a sporty roadster meant to evoke Guzzi's history while simultaneously hinting at a future that would unfortunately never arrive.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport for Sale

Very fine V11 Sport dressed in the stunning green with red frame. I am the second owner. I purchased the bike from a older gentleman who had put very few miles (1600) on the bike. I haven't done much better as my riding miles are spread between a number of bikes. Machine is in stock form except for the carbon fiber mufflers (beautiful music), CRG barend mirrors, headlight protector, and Ventura tail pack. Tail pack is simply removed by two screws as is very handy for day trips. 

Headlight rim and front brake lever have small rash spots due to tip-over.

A friend of mine bought one of these off eBay, without ever having actually seen one in person.

After winning the auction, he asked me, "It's not really that green right? That's just the photos?"

"No man," I said. "It really is that green..."

It's a shockingly vivid color, but it suits the bike. Certainly kids seem to love it, and they always wave when he passes cars, and point excitedly. He still has it, and loves it. The V11 Sport was also available in a subtle silver or a sleek black, but this color combination, meant to evoke the original, extremely rare "teliao rosso" version of the early 70s V7 Sport, is the one I'd have, hands down. Think of it a safety feature. With prices of the older Sport 1100 and Daytona variants on the rise, the V11 is the only game in town if you want an affordable, collectible Guzzi. It's definitely a quirky machine, but if you're looking for something odd and charismatic that can also cut a rug and comes with the trademark Guzzi boom, this is worth a look.

-tad

Sunday Goose: 2000 Moto Guzzi V11 Sport for Sale
Aprilia September 24, 2017 posted by

A Roundup of our featured bikes that are still available for fall riding season

The days might still be hot here on the East Coast, but they're steadily getting shorter, and the evenings have the familiar cool snap. Summer is nigh over, but here at RSBFS we are just gearing up for one of the best seasons to get out on a sportbike and relish the crisp temperatures and bright foliage.

If you didn't find your steed in the summer season, fear not. We have compiled a list, in no particular order, of still-active featured listings begging for the chance to be your late-year mount. Check it out below.

For those whose riding gear is as stylish as it is functional, this 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE is ready to match your sartorial splendor with subtle, classy tones and a fantastic butternut-brown saddle.

Featured Listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

If you'd rather not sacrifice performance for high-end materials and sexy bodywork, there is a 2015 Kawasaki H2R in Santa Clara, California. It might not be road legal, but 310 supercharged horsepower should make you the absolute king of late-season track days.

Featured Listing: 2015 Kawasaki Ninja H2R for Sale

The second retro-styled Ducati on the list, this 2009 Ducati Sport 1000 looks the absolute business with an aftermarket bare aluminum tank and seat cowl, and wears a set of OZ Cattiva wheels. Those tweaks, especially the metal tank and cowl, will make the bike both easier to live with and easier to throw around autumnal back roads.

Featured Listing: 2009 Ducati Sport 1000 for Sale

Among the true gems on this list is one of our favorite all-time listings, the 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R from Gary in Utah. It's only the second bike of its kind we've listed, and the last one was in England six years ago. This one is one of a very few in the U.S., and is titled for street use to boot. Someone get this before we do something very silly.

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R!

Ramping up the rarity, expense and exclusivity a notch or ten, we get to the 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini. Number 192 of 300 examples built, this very special MV commemorates the man who designed the Ducati 916, ran Cagiva and founded Bimota. Special is an understatement.

Featured Listing – 2005 MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini #192

Staying with the exclusive and Italian theme we have a 2014 Ducati 1199 Panigale Superleggera that has been given the full WSBK treatment. It's track-only, but it definitely walks the walk and has won a number of amateur races.

Featured listing: 2014 Ducati Superleggera in WSBK Spec!

If the Ducati is too old, or too brittle or too Italian, this 2016 Yamaha YZF-R1 Factory British Superbike racer should fill in nicely. Hell, find a buddy and find out once and for all who's who.

Featured Listing: 2016 Yamaha YZF-R1 Factory BSB Superbike for Sale

If you are looking for an older, more approachable but equally rad Yamaha, look no further than this 1987 Yamaha TZR250 two-stroke. It currently lives in Canada, but is five years past the magic 25 mark, so registering it in the States should be a relative breeze.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

The first Bimota on the list, sort of, is, fittingly, a replica of the first bike Bimota ever built. The 1975 Bimota HB-1 replica is a bespoke steel frame wrapped around a Honda CB750 engine as reliable as time. A replica this may be, but it's spot-on and should not be missed.

Featured Listing: 1974 Bimota HB1 Clone for Sale

Sticking with the rare Honda theme, this 1990 Honda RC30 came out of the collection of guru Jim Granger, and carries a long list of mods and hot rod parts. It has recently been listed on eBay, where bidding is picking up steam.

Featured Listing: Ex-Jim Granger 1990 Honda RC30

For those in search of rideable rarity across the pond, the 1994 Suzuki GSXR-750 SP featured below is still looking for a home. Not as hard edged as some other race reps, it's still a handful, and has acres of '90s charm.

Featured Listing: One-of-Six 1994 Suzuki GSXR-750 SP in England

Still haunting the Nashville, TN, Craigslist, is this one-owner 1991 Ducati 851. It is in miraculous shape, having covered just 1,600 miles, and it is a true piece of history. If you have the means, we highly recommend picking one up. They are so choice.

Featured Listing: 1,600-mile 1991 Ducati 851 Strada Biposta

Slightly less rare, but equally Italian and impressive, this 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport comes from the same seller and is in similar condition. It has way more miles under its tires, but is ready to be ridden and loved for years to come.

Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

Just relisted with RSBFS is "Motoman's" Bimota SB8R and wears a buy-it-now of $9,000.

Featured Listing: 1999 Bimota SB8R for Sale

Rounding out the list is my personal favorite. The screaming, all-black, two-stroke Aprilia of my nightmares, the Aprilia RS250. From our buddies at Speed Werks, this thing is titled and ready out of Delaware.

Featured Listing: Aprilia RS250 from Speedwerks

Aaron

Moto Guzzi September 20, 2017 posted by

Racy Goose: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale

Guzzi is generally thought of these days as a purveyor of weirdo touring rigs, butch nakeds, and alterna-Harley cruisers, all with their big v-twins turned 90° from the expected orientation and the cylinder heads sticking out by the rider's knees. But in the 1950s and 1970s, Moto Guzzi made genuine sportbikes and competed successfully in various racing series. They attempted a comeback in the early 1990s with this Daytona, the first Guzzi in decades to use something other than the Lino Tonti designed frame that was introduced on the original V7 Sport way back in 1971... Which tells you just how excellent that frame was to begin with, but also speaks to Guzzis very limited development budget.

When the time came to develop a new sports motorcycle, Guzzi actually turned to privateer Dr John Wittner for input, an American dentist who successfully campaigned a Guzzi in AMA Pro Twins racing during the 1980s. The new machine that resulted was built around a "spine" frame with distinctive side plates that featured holes where it was apparently joked that you could stash a sandwich... The powertrain featured Guzzi's familiar five-speed gearbox, automotive-style clutch, and shaft drive, but the engine featured a significant update in order to produce competitive power: four valve cylinder heads.

The updated 992cc engine was designed to squeak in under the 1000cc limit for various racing classes and is claimed to be overhead cam as well, but it's really more "high-cam" as the heads do each have a cam, but the valves are actuated via pushrods and rockers, and the bike lacks liquid-cooling. Power was a respectable 92hp and with high-quality WP suspension the bike did handle well, although significant weight compared to other sportbikes meant fast riding was hard work. That longitudinal engine layout means you do still get some torque reaction accelerating out of a corner, but it's relatively minor and something that you adapt to quickly.

 

 

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale

My understanding is Moto Guzzi Built 150 Daytona's in 1993. They imported 50 into the US.  Bike has been serviced & ready to ride. New tires, All fluids changed, valves adjusted, fuel tank was cleaned & sealed.

Significantly, this Daytona features the European-market trapezoidal headlight instead of the more common rectangular unit like the one seen on last week's Sport 1100. I'm a huge fan of these Guzzis in general, and the headlight makes a huge difference to me in terms of looks: a later 1100cc Daytona with the headlight seen here has a place in my dream garage. This bike also features a desirable pair of Termignoni exhausts that should liberate a glorious boom from the Italian twin. It's a bad sign when it's easier to do valve adjustments than oil changes on your motorcycle, but that's probably the case with Guzzi's longitudinally-mounted engine. Even as late as the V11 Sport, you had to drop the pan to change the filter, It appears that the bike has an aftermarket, external oil filter adapter fitted: you can see it at the front of the engine. It's not mentioned by the seller, so maybe it was added by a previous owner? In any event this is a practical addition, and suggests that maintenance has been a priority for this bike. Overall, the bike's condition is very good, and mileage is just 3,473 from new. There's been no interest so far at the $10,000 starting bid but, with just 1000 or so built and Italian good looks, these are definitely collectible.

-tad

Racy Goose: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona for Sale
Moto Guzzi September 15, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

Not too many motorcycles look good in screaming yellow, but I think the Guzzi 1100 Sport is definitely one of them. A two-valve version of the exotic Daytona that was developed by Dr John Wittner from his successful Battle of the Twins racer, the 1100 Sport was a very unconventional motorcycle. By the 1990s, sportbike convention dictated liquid-cooling, four valves per cylinder, six-speed gearboxes, full fairings, and chain final drive. Of course the 1100 Sport had none of these. Would it beat a CBR or GSX-R of the period on a racetrack? Of course not. But the Guzzi has charisma in spades, plenty of torque to punch you out of corners, and it makes up in stability what it lacks in agility.

The half-faired styling means that hulking engine and gearbox are proudly on display, with the two-valve cylinder heads sticking out into the breeze by the rider's knees, here fed by fuel injection, which replaced the Dell'Orto carburetors in 1996. In spite of the relatively low-specification suggested by the air-cooling, pushrods, and two valves per cylinder, the 1064cc engine put out an honest 90hp and 70ft-lbs of torque, with 82 ponies present-and-accounted-for at the rear wheel.

It seems like an odd choice for a powerplant, but the bike's long history goes some way towards explaining it. Some of the Guzzi's "agricultural" reputation comes from that honking big v-twin that rocks the bike to one side when you rev it, due to the longitudinal crankshaft arrangement, and the clunky five-speed gearbox. But it probably doesn't help that the package is often associated with an Italian military tractor that dates back to the 1960s, although even the earliest Guzzi V7 motorcycles apparently shared no mechanical parts whatsoever with that odd machine. Those origins may sound like an unlikely foundation for a fast, agile motorcycle, but Guzzi's V7 Sport and Le Mans were considered very capable sportbikes at the time.

Unfortunately, by the time of the 1100 Sport, the big Guzzi was probably more GT than actual sportbike, but that's just fine, considering that the majority of riders never actually use their bikes on track. And even then, most do so only occasionally. For weekend riding, the triple Brembo brakes can pull you up short to avoid errant deer in the roadway, while quality suspension means stable handling, but passenger accommodations aren't great, as no grab-rail is fitted.  Reviews of the 1100 Sport were generally very positive when the bike was tested in isolation, although the aforementioned gearbox and the bike's 490lb dry weight did come in for some criticism.

Unfortunately, this Goose never really had a chance when compared directly to rivals: the 916 was obviously lighter, more agile, and faster, as well as being the sexiest bike of the era. And Japanese machines were more powerful, cheaper, and user-friendly. But that's hardly the point here, and Guzzis have long been bikes you buy because you like Guzzis, not because they are quantifiably "better" than any other bike. And if you are a Guzzi fan, this particular 1100 Sport is in impeccable condition!

From the Seller: 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale

For Sale: Rare and Low Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport in Excellent Condition. I am the 2nd owner and bike came from California. There were only 1,314 of these produced in 1997 and approximately 450 units in Yellow. It has always been stored inside and very well maintained. It also has been stored, when not ridden on a bike stand. All service recently completed including:

* All oil and filters
* Full Tune-up
* Valve adjustment
* New Tires
* New brake pads
* New Battery - Lithium

You will be hard pressed to find one this clean and with low mileage. Bike starts up easily and rides and drives very good. As you will see in the pictures the bike is extremely clean and comes with original manual, repair manual, original brochure, a couple of magazines from1997/1998 featuring this bike, original and spare keys.

Bike comes standard with Brembo Brakes, Marchesini Wheels and all of the expensive Italian upgrades. 

The seller is asking $9,500 for this low-mileage example. Just a few years ago, a decent 1100 Sport could be had for half that, but values have been steadily rising and it's hard to find one with anywhere near this mileage. With solid performance, good reliability, and easy maintenance, this Guzzi can tackle winding back roads, attracts tons of attention wherever you stop, can even do a bit of light sport-touring, and will generally put a big smile on your face. 1100 Sports are odd and quirky and ergonomically-challenged, yet owners often rack up big miles on them, owing to the platform's soundness and the engine's reliability. And clutch-replacements aside, basic maintenance is a snap: the unusual engine configuration may have some ergonomic drawbacks, but this may be the easiest bike you've ever adjusted the valves on, and pushrods mean no rubber cambelts to replace!

-tad

Featured Listing: Low-Mileage 1997 Moto Guzzi 1100 Sport for Sale