Posts by Category: Honda

Honda January 28, 2017 posted by

Endurance: 1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA Edition

Among the modifiers, tuners and hot rodders of the motorcycle world, the lines can be drawn between the majors and the minors. The majors contain those that made the jump beyond tuner - be it kit producer or full-fledged manufacturer. I'm thinking the likes of Rickman, Bimota, Spondon, Harris, NCR and the like. The minors are full of extremely talented - but smaller scale output - organizations that often specialize in one type of make or model or focus on racing classes. Think Kalex & Speedup (concentrating around Moto2 racing), or any of the individuals that started careers improving race bikes (e.g. Tony Foale). This group also includes boutique builders such as Lance Gamma (who, incidentally offer services beyond RGs) and Nico Bakker (who is capable of designing/building anything). This list is potentially endless, and I'm sure readers can rattle off a dozen potentials. One such entry that must be included in this group is the D’Hollander family out of Belgium.

1979 DHOLDA Honda CB900 for sale on eBay

Focusing on Honda specifically for racing - and specializing in Endurance events - D’Hollander combined his own name with that of Honda to create the DHOLDA brand. While the beginnings were small (the grandfather originally made bicycle frames, before moving to mopeds), DHOLDA can be credited for winning at least one major Endurance event every year throughout the 1970s. We are not talking club-level racing either: 24 hours of Francorchamps (Spa), 24 hours of Barcelona, 1000 km at Mugello, and of course, the Bol D'Or. Into the 1980s and beyond, DHOLDA migrated into SuperBike, SuperSport, SuperMotard, as well as stock classes (i.e. 600), always with Honda. Alongside the business of racing DHOLDA created a business catered to street riders with go-fast parts and tuning services. It is from that side of the DHOLDA organization that this wonderful period CB emerged.

From the seller:
Welcome to a great opportunity. This is a very rare DHOLDA CB900F European Spec CB900F tuned by famous DHOLDA of Belgium race tuner Jean D'Hollander. Please feel free to google "DHOLDA Honda". This bike is Honda Racing History heritage, not sure if ever actually used in competition. I believe it is one of a handful of tuned bikes much like AMG is for Mercedes. The bike engine has been bored to 1000cc and the head has been reworked as is the custom exhaust and carbs. I have been in touch with Mike D'Hollander who is Jeans son and now runs the famous tuning company along with his sister. He indicated that his father, before he passed away in 1995 was big on building these king of incredible bikes. I have the emails and willing to forward them to you. The history of the bike as far as I know is it came to the USA in 1980-81 from Europe. It has all European gauges (look at speedo KPH) so it shows 13219 kilometers which is just over 8,000 miles. This is very low mileage! It sat in an air conditioned warehouse until recently. I have gone through the bike and cleaned most of the grime and dust off it and got it looking pretty decent.

More from the seller:
Everything works on this bike. The tank is coated and clean. The carbs could probably use a cleaning but work fine. The engine is a high compression, all four cylinders about 200psi(very nice) and it burns no oil,no smoke at all. Engine is tight and has no leaks at all, not a drop of oil. It revs like the devil, with plenty of power. I estimate over 100hp, maybe 110-120hp. It has a custom fairing-fiberglass and Euro headlight with switches for parking,head lights and high beam, each position controlled by rider. The brakes are good but tires are probably 30 years old with tread but should be replaced. I rebuild the rear brake master cylinder with fresh fluid both front/rear brakes and new oil/filter. Hope I didn't miss anything but please ASK QUESTIONS! 718-551-4451. I would like whomever gets this bike to be able to appreciate the provenance and history. Maybe it belongs in a Museum but I am a regular guy who loves to find these kind of rare bikes and passes them on to the right person that has the ability to display and store them. Currently I have a clear Florida title.

It is not exactly clear what tuner services and modifications were bestowed upon this bike. It wears the Endurance-style fairing made popular during the era, replete with dual headlights necessary to light corners through the long nights of 24-hour races. It also sports a significant bump in capacity with a big-bore kit and who knows what other engine wizardry DHOLDA was capable of during this time. Any way you look at it, this bike looks serious; dated, perhaps, but serious.

DHOLDA is not only still around, as an organization DHOLDA is thriving with both racing and street tuning sides of the business. As long as it's a Honda, they have solutions that can improve your ride or race. And if the old-school Endurance stance is your look, check out this very cool DHOLDA Honda CB. The BIN price is $11,900, with the auction near $5k with reserve still in place. As always, let us know what you think!

MI

Endurance: 1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA Edition
Honda January 27, 2017 posted by

Odd Import: 1983 Honda MVX250F

In the world of import two strokes, you may be intimately familiar with RGs, NSRs, RZs and the like. What you don't hear much about is the MVX. One of the oddities of the popcorn set, the MVX represents Honda's engineering might coupled with a healthy dose of experimentalism. Unlike the RD/RZ/RG set with parallel twins (or later, the RG V-twins), Honda pulled a page from their GP racing manual and created a V-3 triple cylinder machine. With a configuration similar to the Ducati L-twin layout - but with two front cylinders - the MVX was no wider than a parallel twin while showcasing an extra cylinder. Balancing the odd number of reciprocating parts was accomplished via a slightly heavier connecting rod on the 3rd, upright cylinder. The result was 49 horsepower at 9,000 RPM, with redline starting at 10,500 RPM.

1983 Honda MVX250F for sale on eBay

You would be forgiven to pass this off as a glorified moped - with flashy graphics but no street creds. After all, is that a drum brake up front?? In reality, what appears to be a drum brake is actually a clever inboard single disk. The centralized location eliminates the torque created by traditionally-situated single disk implementations, although heat buildup during extreme use would continue to plague the setup. Honda eventually adopted a conventional twin disk arrangement for the NS-series of bikes that were to follow.

From the seller:
The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title.
Low miles (2884km)
Engine number MC09E-1014852

The engine running to half a year ago, I stayed for a while. So, Cleaning of cab & spark plug. The color of the tank is slightly peeling off. Coating inside the tank

Part of the engine & frame that has been simple painted . A little cracked of single seat. The end of the stand is broken. Battery replacement required.

The seller has done a good job providing photos and video of the bike in question. Like the last bike from this seller, this MVX lacks any title. Given that the MVX never came near US shores (Japan and Pacific Rim countries were the sole recipients), getting this one licensed for road use might be a bit dicey. For its age and origination, this bike looks to be in great shape (which is not always the case with overseas imports). As always, RSBFS recommends that you do your homework and plan ahead if you have a hankering to act.

If you decide to act, better bring your wallet - the opening ask for this one is $5,800. We have not had enough history with these bikes to really derive a value, so it will be interesting to watch this one and see where it goes. The MVX is very rare in the US, but how much value does that add? What do you think? Does this 1983 Honda MVX250F tickle your fancy? Would you prefer this over a similar year two stroke from Suzuki or Yamaha? Check it out, then share you thoughts in the comments. Good Luck to the seller and all potential buyers!

MI

Odd Import: 1983 Honda MVX250F
Honda January 26, 2017 posted by

The Next Big Thing? 1982 Honda CB900F Super Sport for Sale

Everybody sits around bemoaning the bikes they coulda-woulda-shoulda bought (or shouldn't have sold) before they dramatically increased in value. So here's your chance, if you missed out on dirt-cheap Slabbies or for-peanuts VF1000Rs or a price-of-a-cup-of-coffee Ducati 900SS, here's a nice clean Honda CB900F Super Sport with what is claimed to be a factory option fairing. This bike is from the very last generation of superbikes before the GSX-R and it's ilk transformed the motorcycling landscape. It's big and relatively heavy, a hot-rod UJM with an air-cooled inline four, roomy ergonomics, and a twin-shock rear end. The bike was only available for a couple years here in the USA, before being replaced in 1983 by the CB1100F.

Powered by an undersquare 901cc inline four that produced 95 claimed horses and was backed by a five-speed gearbox, the 570lb (wet) CB900F isn't a particularly fast bike by today's standards, but it was a good handler and very well-received at the time. The styling is very much of the era, with little ducktail flip a the back and very 1970s graphics. Overall, it looks a bit like a Ducati Darmah if you squint just a little. They straddle that era between classic and modern sportbikes and may be heavy and slow by today's standards, but also pretty useable real-world motorcycles.

Most examples of the CB900F are big, burly nakeds, but this one has what is claimed to be a factory option fairing that gives the bike a bit of an endurance-racer look and should make it a great mile-eater in the event your local bike gathering spot isn't so local...

From the original eBay listing: 1982 Honda CB900F Super Sport for Sale

SPECIFIC DETAILS:  This BEAUTIFUL bike is a very nice survivor.  The condition is ORIGINAL except where noted. I am the SECOND OWNER.  The original owner had Honda install the Sport Fairing and the Continental (European) kit.  This kit included the Super Bike handlebars and the rear set of foot controls.  I have the original handlebars and foot controls.  The exhaust is a 4 INTO 1 Yoshimura.  I have the original exhaust which is in good condition.  I recently invested over $3,000.00 on the KEIHIN CR31 Carbs, K&N Filters, Dyna 6000 Ignition system and coils, OHLIN rear shocks and Progressive springs.  I have not installed the Progressive springs.  The brake pads were recently replaced.  The tires are in good (fairly new) condition.  I have all of the original parts to this bike (carbs, shocks, ignition, etc.)  I have the factory Honda service manual.  I also have the factory Honda protection cover. (All of the original items that I have noted above are included in this auction).

This bike is a little cold blooded, but once it’s warmed up, it runs strong.  If the bike sits for more than three or four weeks, the battery will need a charge.  Not sure if it is something with the battery or something else.  This bike does have the Honda clock and AMP gauge.

The fairing has a small crack by the left mirror.  The right side lower fairing has a small crack.  There is a small dent on the lower left side of the gas tank.  There are a few other chips, scratches and scuffs, very normal for the age.

I would rate the condition of this bike as VERY GOOD (8.5 to 9 out of a 10) considering that it is a 35 year old survivor.

This bike is a vintage super bike that is a thrill to ride and definitely turns heads where ever I go.  Don’t miss out on this rare piece of motorcycle history.

These are currently not very expensive to buy for the most part, but if you're planning on jumping in here to make a killing when the market for early 80s superbikes explodes, you may want to look elsewhere: the seller is asking an eye-watering $9,500 for this one, although bidding hasn't quite caught up to that ambitious goal. Mileage is reasonable, it looks to be in excellent cosmetic condition, it's been updated with a set of Keihn carbs that should improve performance and reliability, and it's fitted with that unusual bodywork. Is all that worth the premium the seller is asking?

-tad

The Next Big Thing? 1982 Honda CB900F Super Sport for Sale
Honda January 19, 2017 posted by

Mr T: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo

Time to jump into the Wayback Machine and make the trek back to the 1980s. Legwarmers are optional equipment here. What you are looking at is perhaps the most polished and complete of the factory Turbo bikes of the era. A technological tour de force of the time - along the lines of 2001: A Space Odyssey - the CX650 Turbo promised the next big direction for motorcycle motivation. Honda was experimenting with every engine configuration and size possible during these times, and the blown, traverse V-twin powering the CX series was but one of the contenders. The result of Honda's engineering might made it all work surprisingly well: the CX650 Turbo was known as the roll-on king due to the power available on boost. Even by today's standards this model pulls strongly through the gears and can shame modern machinery.

1983 Honda CX650 Turbo for sale on eBay

The problems with all of the Factory turbo bikes - weight, complexity, unpredictability and cost - were never really eliminated. The inexorable creep of time provided better advancements in different directions (think V45 Interceptor & Hurricane). It didn't help that the Turbos were pricey machines in the showroom, and riders voted with their wallets; The dream of boosted power quickly fell by the wayside. An interesting step during a period of fantastic development, the boosted bikes from the 1980s are now becoming respected as potential collector items. Prices are very slowing inching upwards as finding a clean example becomes more difficult.

From the seller:
Here is a true survivor, all original, 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo motorcycle with 24,238 miles on it. From the factory this bike produced 100 horsepower and is capable of hitting 140 mph. This is a very rare bike because there was only 1,777 of them made and less than 1200 imported to U.S. and Canada. This bike ran the quarter mile in 11.95 seconds at 112.4 miles per hour and has average touring range of 243 miles. With in the last 150 miles I have done the following: new tires, brakes, starter, starter clutch, fork seals, springs and fork fluid. This bike has fresh oil and filter, new spark plugs, new differential fluid and cleaned the fuel system, and runs great, very fun to ride. This bike has not been painted and it good shape for its age. The bike has a minor oil leak and some minor body damage. The bike has clear title and is sold AS-IS, no warranty. The bike is available for viewing while it is up for sale. Shipping will be the buyers responsibility. This bike is not sold as a new bike, it is used and in good shape. There is scratches and some cracks in the plastic and stickers are faded. More pictures are available upon request.

All the Big Four Japanese manufacturers created Turbo bikes - and parts are scarce across the board. If you are in the market for Turbo, you'd be advised to purchase the most complete one you can find. As for Hondas, the '83 650cc model is miles ahead of the CX500 Turbo in terms of performance and general response. Weakness are few; aside from the scarcity of parts (such as bodywork), these machines are known to eat stators. It is not common to find one that will not charge the battery while otherwise running fine. Replacement requires you to pull the engine, and with factory parts no longer available you will need to source an alternate. But that is really the only warning here.

This bike looks to be complete, and pretty good overall despite minor cosmetic damage. The seller has provided good information and numerous pictures. Mileage is above average for the collector set, but it is always nice to see a bike that has been run as intended. These motors are good for many, many miles so that is not a real worry. If you are in the market for something different, this just could be your ticket. Check it out here, as the bidding has been low thus far - you might just find yourself with a bargain Turbo. Whoosh!

MI

Mr T: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo
Honda January 17, 2017 posted by

Survivability – 1995 Honda CBR900RR

Honda designers set their sights on a slighter, lighter superbike for the early 1990's and based the new model on a 750cc in-house prototype. With a new 893cc engine installed, the resulting package was just a tad heavier than Honda's own 600, and had a substantial weight advantage on other unlimiteds.

1995 Honda CBR900RR for sale on eBay

With Fred Merkel's '88-89 Superbike World Championships in the rearview view mirror, Honda executives wanted something new at the superbike end of the showroom.  New for 1992, the CBR900RR used the alloy twin-spar chassis, with aluminum swingarm.   For the 1994 update, Showa revised the spring rates for the cartridge forks and rear shock for the Pro-Link progressive rear.  The forks also had adjustable compression damping to help tame the quick front end with its 16-inch wheel.  A new nose for the fairing incorporated asymmetrical "fox-eye" headlights, another weight saver.

Under 10,000 miles and 20 years separate this CBR from the dealer's floor, and though it'd be hard to call almost any Honda rare, how many double-R's have been tucked away clean and stock ?  The Jersey-based owner keeps his comments spare in the eBay auction:

Very Rare Like New

Everything is original except D&D Slip-on

Peculiarly without a racing class since WSBK ruled a four-cylinder could displace only 750cc, the open-class CBR900RR set the world on its ear, with weight and handling from the class below, and power a match for any liter bike.  The angular and modern 1994 update remained true to the formula.  After that the inevitable weight gain and mission creep nudged the model toward daily driver or sport-touring realm.  For fans of the brand or the 'Blade, the 1994-5 model year is a great choice, and this example is unfettered with low miles...

-donn

Survivability – 1995 Honda CBR900RR
Honda January 7, 2017 posted by

Grand Prix Dreams: 1990 Honda RS125 for Sale

The second Honda RS125 that's been up for sale in the past couple weeks, this looks like a more bare-bones offering than the last one we featured, although it still appears to be in decent shape. If you're not familiar with the RS125, it's no "race replica": it's an over-the-counter competition machine meant for racing, not a stripped-down roadbike. Weighing in at 160lbs with a half-tank of fuel, it is powered by a very slightly undersquare 124.4cc two-stroke single that is backed by a six-speed gearbox.

These tiny two-strokes aren't for novices: the high-strung little engine makes a stunning 40+hp and that kind of power-to-weight means regular rebuilds, and shepherding the power from that tiny engine requires constant tuning and gearing changes to suit different altitudes, conditions, and tracks. It helps that the competition design means they're relatively simple to work on, but these are serious Grand Prix motorcycles, and potentially a stepping stone to bigger, faster bikes and more prestigious classes.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda RS125 for Sale

Very rare Honda GP racer RS125, 125cc two-stroke single.
Very nice original condition.
1990 model legal to Vintage class racing.
Please see pictures for more detail.
Any questions please ask.
Will ship worldwide.

There's not much bidding activity so far and no Buy It Now price is listed, so perhaps this bike just hasn't found its audience yet, or maybe folks are looking for listings with more detailed descriptions? Is it the lack of extras? Spares for these little race bikes are very desirable, owing to the fact that they can be a pain to acquire and will be regularly needed if you plan to keep one running: 125s are often associated with cheap, reliable transportation, but the RS125 is a racing machine, and will require regular tuning and maintenance if the new owner intends to use the bike for its intended purpose.

-tad

 

 

Grand Prix Dreams: 1990 Honda RS125 for Sale