Posts by Category: Harley Davidson

Harley Davidson December 15, 2010 posted by

1975 Harley-Davidson RR250 roadracer

For sale: 1975 Harley-Davidson RR250 2 Stroke Water Cooled GP Racing Motorcycle

Here is another very rare Harely-Davidson roadracer, brought to us by the same seller of the RR350. This time, we are looking at the RR250 model. This came from The Motor Company's association with Aermacchi during the AMF years.

From the seller:
1975 Harley Davidson RR250. This is a very rare very complete example imported by me from England 7 or 8 years ago. I have not started it as it has been stored. It was run just prior to the import. It is not perfect, it has some surface rust from storage but it is easily rectified. This was originally a monoshocker but somewhere in its race history it was converted to a twin shock. The mono shock mount tabs are still there. It also has a single disc forward. There is not a lot of information on these bikes available but one source does say that there were 25 water cooled examples built each year from 72 through 76. The frame and engine numbers are as follows. *250/2c/2t/10118* on the frame steering neck and *250/2c/2t/10118* on the transmission case which is where the shop manual says they should be located indicating, to me, matching numbers. I do not know if the sequence of serial numbers began with the air cooled version. The bike has been stored for about 6 years.

Like its RR350 brother, this auction has attracted good attention. Value of this bike is difficult to gauge as we just don't see too many of these bikes crossing the block. If interest and bidding is any indication, though, this will be a good auction to watch. The current price is just north of $11k, with the reserve still firmly in place. To check out the action, .

MI

Harley Davidson November 19, 2010 posted by

Brilliant or Blasphemy? 1977 Harley-Davidson Sportster XLCR

For sale: 1977 Harley-Davidson Sportster XLCR Cafe Racer!

In the mid-1970s, the cafe racer craze was in full swing. Bikes like the Ducati Super Sport, Norton John Player Special and Moto Guzzi LeMans were gaining market share. Willie G Davidson, then Vice President of Styling for Harley-Davidson, decided the cafe racer scene could help grow the fortunes of AMF-controlled H-D. He was wrong.

You can almost see the mental checklist used to create this unusual bike: Sporty bikini fairing (check), blacked-out paint (check), cast "mag" wheels (check), triple disk brakes (check) tachometer (check). In all, these features led to the creation of a unique motorcycle that simply didn't sell. H-D produced but an estimated 3,123 units during a limited, 2-year run.

From the seller:
1977 Harley Davidson XLCR Cafe Racer Never used, Never registered, Brand new condition, always kept in climate controlled area, with only 4/10th of a mile, Yes under 1 original mile!!!

Hello everyone I am very proud to offer this near once in a lifetime chance to own a Unused, Untouched, never registered 1977 Harley XLCR Cafe Racer motorcycle that has only 4/10th of a mile from new.

This bike is on the 1 owner title and has always been kept inside in a climate controlled area since it was new in 1977. The bike was ONLY pushed outside of it's showroom area to take all the pictures. I wanted to take the pictures in the sunlight to show the beautiful condition. The bike could use a good wiping down to get the dust off and the chrome to sparkle, but rest assured this bike is in perfect condition in everyway...

It would be safe to say, without a doubt, that this IS the absolute lowest mile and completely untouched, most original XLCR in the World!!!

As it turns out, the Harley crowed wasn't very interested in sportbikes, and the sportbike crowd wasn't very interested in Harleys. This perfect storm created a rare collectable, and this particular bike has yet to turn over a single mile. So what is the current price for a "new" 1977 XLCR? This particular unit has a BIN price of $27,500 (!) and the auction is at $12,500 with the reserve still in place. , and determine if this is the sportbike of your dreams.

For those of you who don't need a zero mileage bike, there is another lightly used XLCR with 5,286 miles , with a BIN of $15k. Although not as original or clean as the new bike above, it represents another avenue if the XLCR is your goal. Some pictures of this alternate bike are below.

Predecessor to the VR1000 and the Buell lineup by many years, the XLCR was an idea a little too strange to catch on. These models do appear to gaining in value over the years however, so now might be the time to jump on the collectable cafe racer bandwagon!

MI

Buell March 3, 2010 posted by

1985/86 Buell RR1000 Battletwin Factory Racer Located In The U.K.

This is a Buell RR1000 that ran for the factory in AMA competition!  Located in Tring, United Kingdom is a 1985/86 Buell RR1000 Battletwin. 

Supposedly there are 50, or so, of these running around the world and due to collectors eating these up early on--Gasp!--the majority of the bikes were never raced.  The chassis that is featured here has, as the seller claims, been run in the 1985/86 AMA Battle of the Twins events and a Battle of the Twins event in Italy.  To know the entire history of this bike, we must go to the seller:

This bike was purchased as a kit of parts directly from Erik Buell in 1992 (less wheels, forks and brakes) by an Italian collector who then built the bike to it's current specification in 1993. The bike was then raced in the italian BOT (Battle of the Twins) of that year under the CR&S banner.

The chassis varies slightly from the production RR1000 chassis and is described by Erik Buell as a "lightweight version which is better for racing". This chassis and other parts were used by Buell Racing in 1986 as part of the "works" supported race effort.

This bike is top spec inside and out built with Brembo billet brakes and race discs, Ohlins suspension; front forks are GP type and rear shock was built for Buell and the wheels are Technomagnesio. The Engine, primary and gearbox were completely overhauled in 2002 receiving new pistons, titanium valves, race springs, rods, all bearings and crank rebuild. Cams are Storz and the heads are fully gas followed and twin plugged. Carbs are 42mm flatside Mikuni's. Exhaust is Buell works. The bike has done very little work since but has been maintained regardless.

This bike seems be made up of some very real factory parts with a very real race history.  The seller claims to have, and shows, the documentation of this bike's history.  Recently, everyone seems to have become sentimental to anything with a Buell badge--except perhaps a blast--because of the recent demise of Buell.  The sale of this bike seems to coincide perfectly with this rose-colored rush to remember the good times before H-D brought everything to a halt.  This bike is all the money at $155,000; however, it is one of the first Buells and actually carries an AMA season and European race history.  This bike is very rare no matter what your thoughts of Buell as a company are; What will reassure that this bike stays insanely valuable will be a large number of people feeling that this bike is very, very special--I don't think this should be a problem.  See a fantastic write up by Dave Gess here.  See the RR1000 on eBay .

AG

Harley Davidson February 6, 2010 posted by

Rare 1994 Harley Davidson on ebay

1994 VR1000 with only 120 miles is up for grabs on ebay.

Now, before you all go waving your arms and shout: "Harley don't make sport bikes!", please read up on the VR1000 as listed on the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame website.  Or check out another VR1000 listed on here previously.

With that knowledge in hand, I present you a :

The 1994 VR 1000 was the first pure racing motorcycle Harley-Davidson ever built. Every other Harley racer, from 1915 through 1993, had been a modified production machine. The VR was purpose-built from the ground up.

Milwaukee has never been comfortable with the concept of purebred competition machines. Eighty years earlier the founders had 'been dragged mumbling into the racing game, convinced of its necessity only after Indian had captivated the sporting enthusiasts of the 1910s and 1920s.

But once installed in the Milwaukee hierarchy, the racing department proved itself a continuing resource of team spirit and public good will. People rode their motorcycles to the races, and supported their favorite riders and manufacturers.

Harley-Davidson had maintained its support of dirt tack, the traditional American fairgrounds racing, and built a few XR 1000 production-based roadracers. But nothing on Milwaukee's menu suited the demands of Superbike racing in the 1990s. At the upper outposts of "street bike" competition, the track-wise roadsters weigh 375 pounds (170kg) and produce 150 horsepower. Handling and braking factors are tuned to millisecond response margins. All of which is enormously expensive to achieve.

With some money in the bank, Harley decided to build its second eight-valve racer, with an American engine, chassis and brakes. Engineer Steve Scheibe headed the team, and called in experienced help from NASCAR and Indy Car racing. The project took five years and produced a double-overhead-cam, 60-degree V-twin, with 4-valve heads, Weber-USA electronic fuel injection and liquid cooling. Power went by gear to a multi-disc dry clutch and through a 5-speed transmission.

The first bikes used a Penske inverted fork and Wilwood six-piston brake calipers. The road model carries an Ohlins fork with titanium-coated stanchions. The body work is constructed of carbon fiber, and the factory listed the dry weight at 390lb (176.9kg). The production schedule was set for 50 copies of the VR 1000, the price of each listed at $49,490.

The VR first appeared on the racetrack for the Daytona Superbike race in 1994.

There were few illusions about the early chances, and teething problems were anticipated, but the motorcycle handled remarkably well. Top speed was not at the level of frontrunners, though rider Miguel Duhamel turned in good results on some of the tighter circuits. Results for the 1995 season were disappointing, and rider Doug Chandler had difficulty coming to

terms with the machine. National dirt track champion Chris Carr was also on the team and showed a quick learning curve.

Rumors circulated during the offseason that management disputes in Milwaukee cast doubts on the future of the VR 1000. The factions split as they had a half-century before; the economic rationale perceives big-league factory racing as large expense versus small return. The sporting enthusiast segment says racing pays huge dividends in public relations, and puts the company logo on television. And wins hearts and minds.

This is a great example of 1 of the 50 motorcycles built to homoligate the VR-1000 for the AMA race circuit.

Now, I am probably one of the last Harley fans on earth, but I must say the VR1000 is one special Harley that I would not mind having - and I didn't even know that only 50 were made! Any serious collector should have one of these in their collection (0r museum)!

phil

Cagiva December 24, 2009 posted by

MidAmerica Auctions, Inc. January 7-9 2010 Las Vegas, Nevada.

This is an odd post as it isn't about a specific bike in the sale but there will be some very interesting ones available (to name just a few):

  • 1967 Aermacchi CRTT
  • 1971 Benelli 250 Cafe Racer
  • 2000 Cagiva Mito
  • 1978 Ducati Super Sport
  • 1958 Gilera 125 Race
  • And much, much more.

It's worth looking at the current consignment list to see if there is something in there for you--there is everything from vintage road racers and flat trackers to Harley's.  Remember, it's not too late, you can always phone in a bid.  See the bid list here. See the MidAmerica Auctions, Inc. website here.

AG

Harley Davidson December 23, 2009 posted by

1994 H-D VR1000 #20 of 50 ever made!

1994 Harley Davidson VR 1000 #20 being offered at $55,000.00

Ultra rare is the only wat to describe the VR1000 when they come up for sale. This one is located Viola, WI and has both the OEM bodywork and a set of race bodywork that is currently on the bike. The first two pictures below are of the actual bike for sale, but the last two are pictures that I found just to show how it looks with the OEM bodywork on it. I've had the opportunity to view a race version and a street version up close and personal and I must say that it is unique in it's own way. I don't think it's any secret that these were only street legal, when sold as new, in Poland. But, I'm sure some of our viewers could get it titled and tagged for street use in the states 😉

You may recall a few months back I posted a Pascall Picotte VR1000 Full Factory Racer that was for sale at Picottoe Motorsports. It was listed for sale at $50,000.00 and didn't sell on ebay. So for me it raises the question of which is more rare? A Factory VR racer or a Factory street goer? Now, #20 is not all stock and that is being disclosed by the owner/seller. S&S has done extensive engine work and it has been ran in the Salt Flats. So what do you think? Is a VR Factory racer more or less valuable than a bone stock VR?

The VR in H-D's words:

In 1994, Harley-Davidson returned to the top level of professional road racing with the VR 1000 Superbike Race Team. Despite memorable performances during its eight-year run, including a pole position in 1996 and podium finishes by Pascal Picotte in 1999, Harley-Davidson concluded in 2001 that the VR 1000 was at the end of its development cycle and was no longer competitive in the AMA Superbike series. While the program was ended following the 2001 season, the VR 1000 Superbike racing program helped Harley-Davidson develop and refine technologies such as liquid-cooling and electronic fuel injection. The program also led to the development Harley-Davidson's first production liquid-cooled motorcycle, the 2002 VRSCA V-Rod.

The H-D PR makes it sound a little better perhaps than it actually was for the race team in my opinion. Some of the last memories I have of it on the race track is Scott Russell leaning it against the gaurd rail, sitting down and watching the rest of the race as if that's what was expected to happen. It seemed as if no matter who was recruited to to help the effort it didn't help the reliability and speed of the bike. I personally was very excited to see H-D competing in the AMA and wanted them to suceed. But, we all know the result. However, we still have the VR1000 which will live on to be looked at and discussed for many years to come.

The story behind #20:

This particular VR1000 was purchased by S&S Cycle to get an idea of where H-D might be going in the future. The bike and engine were all new, aluminum perimeter frame, top of the line suspension and lots of exotic light weight components. The engine was impressive, 60 degree V-twin, liquid cooling, 4 valve head, overhead cam shafts, and fuel injection. S&S worked for a couple years on the VR1000 expecting to see a version hit production or at least see it become street legal in the US. Power and torque were raised dramatically over the stock bike, special pistons, cams, head work, intake, and a high output exhaust were the majority of the improvements. In 1995 S&S took the VR out to the Bonneville Salt Flats. The bike was tall with a short wheelbase, perfect for road racing, but at Bonneville, not so good. At top speed on the salt the VR would just spin its rear tire. The upgrades did prove to be reliable and much faster than stock, it ran 166 mph on salt, not bad.

Bike is said to be in excellent condition and ready to fire. I've never seen one of these on the road and don't really expect to, but think of the conversations you would have at your local Bike Night.

Cheers!

dd





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