Posts by Category: Ducati

Ducati March 7, 2018 posted by

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Ducati's mid to late-80s bikes existed in a kind of limbo: the modern sportbike was taking shape, and the Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca was birthed during this transitional period. The 750 F1 and its variations weren't quite the refined-ish, modern-ish, mass-produced-ish machines of the Cagiva era, but they weren't the nearly hand-crafted bikes of the Fabio Taglioni era either. The Laguna Seca was named after the famous California race track where Marco Lucchinelli found success in 1986, and just 200 examples were built.

The 750 F1 used a Verlicchi-designed steel trellis frame that gave it a look familiar to fans of later Ducatis, and the bike was powered by a 749cc version of their air and oil-cooled engine, here producing a claimed 76hp. Notably, the F1 still has the rear cylinder in its original configuration: later SS models had the rear cylinder rotated 180° to place both carburetors in the vee of the engine for much more elegant packaging. The bike was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble Ducati's successful TT1 race bikes, with 16" wheels front and rear, while a dry weight of just 385lbs meant the now-familiar two-valve Pantah engine didn't have much mass to push around, giving the bike a 136mph top speed.

Quality was a bit kit-bike and the bikes were relatively crude as delivered, but the potential was there for a seriously fast motorcycle, if one took some time to develop it. Almost as if Ducati didn't bother finishing the bikes, knowing that most owners would modify them to suit their needs anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

The only changes to this bike upon delivery was the installation of the proper directionals, rear brake light switch and horn for street use. I installed a proper muffler in the place of the very loud Verlicchi megaphone. The bike also received an upgrade to the wheels and discs although retaining the 16"size. Magnesium Marvic/Akront rims as on the Monjuich and full floating discs replaced the original cast F1 style wheels and semi floating discs. All original parts are included in the sale. The bike is in excellent condition with only 2830 miles and has never been raced. Mileage as shown in photo is in kilometers.

The F1 and its variants spent years undervalued, but at this point, values have increased significantly, and the opening bid for this example is a cool $20,000. The bike is, as the seller indicates, not completely original, but the changes made are period correct and the parts needed to return it to stock are included. The original machine was basically a race bike with lights, so the addition of some small, folding bar-end mirrors is probably a wise concession to road safety: "First rule of Italian driving: what's behind me is not important..." I'd probably see about adding some low-restriction foam pods to those carburetors as well, since plenty of grit and sand can get past the mesh screens currently serving as "air filters."

-tad

Uncompromising: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale
Ducati March 3, 2018 posted by

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

I realize that I'm spoiled. I'm spoiled because my current riding group includes five or six MV Agustas that actually run, a pair of RSV4s, a few Ducatis, a couple Bimotas, and a KTM. I'm spoiled because I live in Southern California, and car and motorcycle exotica are everywhere: I've recently come across a few Arch Motorcycles, nearly every variety of 90s two-stroke, Confederate Fighters actually being ridden on the road, a slew of Bimotas, pretty much every vintage and modern sportbike you can possibly imagine, even a Gurney Alligator. Which is possibly why I'm surprisingly blase about the Ducati Desmosedici RR, one of the most exotic machines of the past twenty years.

It's not fair to the Desmo. I should be incredibly impressed by it, but it probably doesn't help that I've never really thought the Desmo was all that beautiful. It's no doubt a very aggressive machine, with a leering, hungry-catfish face and a wild exhaust that exits through the top of the tailpiece, at least in stock form: there's also a Ducati Performance system that vents two of the cylinders through the bellypan on the right side and the others through a more traditional underseat pipe. But although it lacks the slim-waisted purpose of a 916 or the sculptural elegance of an MV Agusta F4, the D16RR, meant to closely ape the look of Ducati's 990cc MotoGP racebike, has an air of ruthlessness about it and looks like nothing else on the road.

The original idea was to take Ducati's V4-powered MotoGP racebike and detune it, then sell a few to well-heeled enthusiasts to use at trackdays or as living room ornamentation. While other "race replicas" of the period generally consisted of race bike colors, graphics, and even sponsors splashed across otherwise stock bikes, Ducati went and made a bike that had almost nothing in common with any of their production motorcycles. It even used an annoyingly-authentic 16" rear wheel, something that must be pretty inconvenient when you're trying to get street tires to shoe this thing.

Of course, the D16RR is obviously no "homologation special" since MotoGP is a prototype series and the bikes need share nothing except a badge with a company's roadgoing offerings. Appearances and specifications to the contrary, the Desmo doesn't actually use a detuned MotoGP powerplant: race engines in the premier class don't factor longevity into the equation and, even detuned, don't make useable or practical road bike powerplants, considering they lack things like a charging system or a starter...

Instead, Ducati basically whipped up an entirely new V4 engine for the bike that very, very closely mirrors the specifications and layout of the racebike while at the same time sharing almost no parts... So you still get a 989cc 90° V4 with gear-driven cams, Desmodromic valve actuation, and a "twin-pulse" firing order that gives it a bit of Ducati flavor compared to a "screamer" or "big-bang" configuration, along with a beefed-up cassette-style gearbox.

Considering the price tag, you could be forgiven for being unimpressed with the 170hp output and 425lb wet weight, but the numbers alone fail to capture the wild, track-bred character. And the Desmo is littered with top-shelf parts that help reign in the power, like the Öhlins FG353P gas-pressurized forks up front that are truly "race spec" and normally cost as much as a new GSX-R600...

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

No compromise, Italian passion personified. The high water mark for street legal sportbikes.

#895 out of 1500.

1878 miles all street so far. May increase in the next few months I don’t think I can resist doing some track days on this bike as the weather improves.

Serviced by a Ducati Master Technician at 1814 miles.

Clean title in hand, all manuals, 2 keys, technical workshop DVD.

Here’s a good article detailing the specs and history of this bike: https://www.sportrider.com/sportbikes/ducati-desmosedici-rr-firebreather#page-4

The bike is in my living room right now, seems perfectly normal to me, but wife isn’t amused - please buy this so I can start sleeping in my bed again.

I'm willing to deliver or meet you within a 1000 mile radius of Salt Lake City for a small additional fee.  Please contact me for details.  Or haulbikes.com is a good option for shipping.

Bike is for sale locally also, I reserve the right to end this auction at any time.

This one appears to be nearly untouched, with under two thousand miles. Which makes sense because the seller claims it's currently being used in lieu of a big-screen television or a painting of a ship being tossed on stormy seas to liven up their home. They may have chosen to get rid of the Desmo, but is that the real problem here? New, the bike retailed for $72,000 and the 1,500 built were quickly snapped up by collectors, although anyone looking to quickly flip their purchase for profit were severely disappointed: these can often be found for well under that, and certainly much less than today's example with an $80,000 asking price. Have values jumped sharply, or is this seller simply ambitious?

-tad

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale
Ducati February 9, 2018 posted by

Lookalike – 2001 Ducati 996 with 2,057 miles !

For six out of the eight years Carl Fogarty rode Superbikes for Ducati, he either claimed the championship or came in second.  That sustained championship riding ( 1992-2000 with 1996 spent on Honda ) has led to countless sticker kits and many factory tributes.  This 996 has updated -S components and a race-look decal set, but more importantly has never been registered and spent most of its life on display.

2001 Ducati 996 for sale on eBay

 

Ducati updated the successful 916 in response to twins from Suzuki and Aprilia, keeping most of the package except for improvements in the power area - the 80 additional cc's helping deliver 122 hp and 69 ft.-lbs. torque.  Two fuel injectors per intake ensure outstanding response at WOT, but some mere mortals had the system modified to improved part-throttle running.  Brembo produced new and improved Gold Lines for the 996, and the -S had Öhlins adjustable dampers and Marchesini alloys.

 

Evidently a showroom display, this 996 barely has break-in miles and looks great except for needing a nice detail.  Beside the correct Öhlins and wheels, pair of Micron mufflers and Corbin seat are the main enhancements, and the race livery is a good likeness.  From the eBay auction:

This motorcycle is a former Ducati dealership owners personal motorcycle that has never been registered. Bike has only 2057 miles on it and is in excellent condition.  The motorcycle has carbon fiber Micron exhaust. Along with many other carbon fiber items. This bike has the dealer installed Fogarty decal kit. This can be removed for a non race bike look. All Ohlins suspension, including steering stabilizer.

 

No matter how low the mileage, cam belts, tires and fluids will have to be done, though deferring the valve clearances could be debated.  That's presuming that the next owner is a rider, which seems appropriate for the not super-rare 996.  If care is taken not to get stuck in traffic and over-tax the cooling system, the 996 with S updates can do more than look fast.  Though the starting bid is set high, it's certainly showable, and riding to the show would be the way to go...

-donn

Lookalike – 2001 Ducati 996 with 2,057 miles !
Ducati February 7, 2018 posted by

Improving Perfection: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

Many people assume that whatever dusty, badly-lit, low-resolution photographs they’ve taken will be enough sell their valuable motorcycles and include almost no additional information. But it’s easy to head in the other direction and go full-on used car salesman, which the listing for this Ducati 999R has done, going so far as to describe it as being “built like a MotoGP bike…” Hyperbole is fine: I obviously indulge in stylistic excess regularly. But comparing an homologation superbike to a pure prototype racing machine suggests someone who is more of a salesman than a knowledgeable enthusiast.

Considering that the 999R has basically little in common with a MotoGP machine other than the Ducati name and the fact that it has two wheels and an engine, "built like a WSBK bike" would be much more accurate, and much closer to the original point. So if the 999R, even a “custom” one, is really nothing like a MotoGP race bike, what exactly is it?

Well unlike the 999S that was basically a spiffed-up version of the standard 999 with nicer suspension and some carbon-fiber farkles for "weight savings," the 999R was intended to homologate the bike for competition, AMA Superbike racing in particular. Titanium rods and valves meant less reciprocating mass, a completely new cylinder head design meant better breathing, and bore and stroke were completely different than the standard bike, much more oversquare, to increase the bike's appetite for revs: 104mm × 58.8mm versus 100mm × 63.5mm for a displacement of exactly 999cc, instead of the 999's 998cc... Compression was higher and the crank knife-edged where it lived behind the sand-cast engine cases, all of which added up to 134 rear wheel horses and 76.6 lb-ft of torque.

The seller suggests that this customized 999R is even more desirable than a completely original bike, and lists everything that's gone into it. The main issue here is that in hyping up changes that supposedly make the bike "more bad-ass," he's missing the real point of the 999R’s value. Originality is often critical in establishing the desirability of limited-production bikes like this and, as the listing describes the “custom” touches, I’m imagining the value dropping in the minds of potential buyers. That’s not to say that the changes are bad, mind you, and the modified engine definitely could prove to be enticing to buyers who actually plan to use their purchase for track or fast road work. But I'd definitely want someone other than the person who wrote the listing to tell me about the build in more detail.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

UPGRADED - CARBON WHEELS

THIS IS IT! The Ducati 999R - Motorcycle History. If you are looking for one the baddest bikes ever made - this is it. Pure Ducati. Period!

When owning one of the rarest bikes in the world is not enough we invite you to take a look at our custom 2005 Ducati 999R. This is your once in a lifetime opportunity to own a piece of motorcycle history. This bike is in perfect condition with very low miles. Truly breathtaking! This 999R is highly upgraded:

- $10k Engine Rebuilt with Lighter Titanium Rods by Ducati Race Technician
- BST Carbon Fiber Rims
- NCR Rear Sets Custom Made
- Brembo Brakes and Master Cylinders
- Custom Seat
- NCR Race Gas Cover
- STM Dry Clutch
- EVR Cylinder
- Dark Upgrade Windshield
- New Rear Brake and Turn Signal
- 6112 Miles on Bike Overall (After Engine Rebuild Less than 1000 miles)
- Garage Kept
- Bike Has Never Been Down

There’s no other way to describe the Ducati 999R than as a race bike with lights; it really is that close to the real thing.

Breathtaking quickness—0 to 60 mph comes in less than three seconds—is matched by the bike’s Brembo brakes. The Ducati 999R is built like a MotoGP bike so it’s dripping with exotic parts. The Desmodromic motor is packed with titanium, specially coated alloys and magnesium. Many carbon fiber parts and the exhaust heat shield is from a carbon/ceramic composite.

Mileage is pretty low and the bike does look very sharp, helped by some high-quality, professional photography. Of course, all of the 999 models had dry clutches, so the listing is probably referring to an STM slipper clutch [and cool slotted housing], and I'm pretty sure the bike had Brembo brake and clutch masters originally, just not the radial units seen here. Also, when did "Dark Upgrade Windshield" become a selling-point for a rare and collectible superbike? Are the original parts, especially the wheels, included? At least any missing peripherals can likely be cheaply sourced at the moment to get it closer to stock condition. The $19,880 Buy It Now is on the higher end for an original R, but the question remains: do the changes made to this particular bike increase or decrease the value?

-tad

Improving Perfection: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale
Ducati February 6, 2018 posted by

178 Miler: 2002 Ducati MH900e

I know it is early in the year, but I'm going to go out on a limb and proclaim this advert as one of the top 5 worst presentations of 2018. Fortunately, the bike is a MH900e - the Terblanche-designed internet wunderbike that put Ducati collectables on the map. Sold in limited numbers and online only, the Y2K re-interpretation of the Mike Hailwood replica classic is a little bit of eye candy artwork, a little bit of a modern torture rack and a little bit of a parts bin special. It is also a great investment vehicle for those who don't like to ride.

2002 Ducati MH900e with 178 miles on eBay

Based around the ubiquitous Ducati L-twin, the MH900e started life out as a 900 Supersport. With air cooling, two valve desmodue heads and dry clutch the MH900e exudes all the coarseness of the lower echelon Ducatis. The rest of the bike is pure Terblance, with stylish extremes at every angle. From the front the circular headlamp and fairing calls to mind the late 70s and early 80s Ducatis that were so successful on the track. At the rear the offset rear shock draws the eye to the unique swing arm, the shotgun exhausts and the wheel that seems to hang out in space. Even the splash of colors combine with the chrome accents to stand out. The presence of the bike is amazing, making the MH900e one of the most popular bikes NOT to ride.

From the seller:
Part of a collection. Rare 2002 Ducati MH900e. Well babied from day one. Never raced, abused or even wet for that matter.

Between the lousy pictures and the non-existent text, it does not appear that this advert was created by an enthusiast. It is listed as "Ducati Sport Touring" and the listing has no VIN number. How about one or two pics in focus? It is too hard to actually move the bike to a point where you can take a decent photo? What is the history of the bike? What collection is it part of? Why is the collection being sold off / liquidated? When was the last time this bike ran? A picture might be worth a thousand words, but a poor pic simply prompts a thousand questions.

According to the limited info in the advert, this particular example sports but 178 miles. That is closer to being new than many we have seen. However it is interesting in that mileage does not really seem to affect the MH900e values; perhaps it is because so few MH900e models actually accrue road yardage (rumor has it that they are too uncomfortable to ride much), or perhaps it is simply because these are rare bikes that always have a market. Regardless, this example appears to be a well-cared specimen that is looking for a new home. The starting ask is Canadian $18,000 (approx $14.5k USD), which is well-below market value. There is a reserve in place, and you can expect the seller to be looking for somewhere in the $20k USD neighborhood. Check it out here and then let us know if you would like one of these in your collection - and why. Good Luck!!

MI

178 Miler: 2002 Ducati MH900e
Ducati January 26, 2018 posted by

Glamourpuss – 1994 Ducati 888 in Britain

The 888 was designed by Pierre Terblanche and a light update to the muscular 851, Ducati's first desmoquattro.  American Doug Polen had won the 1991 Superbike World Championship on an uprated 851, and the 888 homolagated the changes for the next year, returning with the #1 plate.  This 888 has been treated to a silky resto-mod and a day in the photo studio.

1994 Ducati 888 ( Britain ) for sale on eBay

The architecture of Ducati's original four-valve desmo led to a distinctive sound, the rat-a-tat exhaust announcing 104 hp.  Often seen with number plates front and rear, the fairing has fresh air intakes and snug monoposto seat.  Showa forks and Ohlins monoshock were constants throughout the build, and for 1994 a carbon front fender was added, and wheels were painted to match the bronze frame.

 

Just about everything about this English 888 has been updated and/or re-finished to a very high level.  The robot-faced front end and engraved triple-tree won't please everyone, but the owner says most stock parts are included in the eBay auction:

Some features include:
Twin injector throttle bodies.
Full 50mm race exhaust system. New.
Corse slipper clutch.
Alloy subframe.
Vented engine casing (clutch side).
Rear ride height adjusters.
New brakes (Braking rotors), pads and lines.
New Nitron race prepared rear shock.
Revised and updated front nose with new lights.
Extended/strengthened side stand. Now does not lean over too far or spring up.
AFAM alloy chain & sprocket set.
New Bridgestone tyres BT016.
Revised one off airbox with foam filter & 916 style bell mouths and 916 throttle.
Billet rear sets, handle bars, petrol cap, levers, pre-load, reservoir caps and clutch slave cylinder.
Carbon belt covers, front mudguard, hugger, instrument surrounds.
Engraved top yoke by Don Blocksidge. Plain mirror polished top yoke also sold with the bike.
Rear swingarm, yokes, suspension linkages and fork lowers have had casting marks removed and then mirror polished.
Paintwork brought back to top standard.
Every nut and bolt changed to stainless steel.
New hoses.
Heads removed from bike and full service with valves brought up to race specs with new belts.
There's been a lot of bespoke parts made for this bike and 100+ hours spent on the build.

 

Hard to argue with a Euro-spec 888 - brawny, rare and championship-winning, and there are a lot of nice touches here.  The alloy seat frame and improved side stand are my favorites, and the undressed pictures are at least as interesting as the studio shots.  Finding the rider to pay this kind of premium might take a little doing, but the current owner can enjoy the view while the search goes on...

-donn

 

Glamourpuss – 1994 Ducati 888 in Britain