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Posts by Category: Ducati

Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn't there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16" wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati's victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner's estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell'Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn't want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16" rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet - if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca
Ducati August 8, 2018 posted by

Hey 19 – 1998 Ducati 900 SS/FE

The ( original ! ) owner of this 900 SS/FE must've been at the dealer in late 1997 to have cadged chassis number 016 of 300.  The end-of-model commemorative had mostly the best of the 900SS years, and where Ducati left off, this owner has updated to even better.

1998 Ducati 900 SS/FE for sale on ducati.ms

Ducati's 2nd generation Super Sports had the first generation of 904cc air-cooled desmo, with single overhead belt-driven cams helping deliver 84 hp.  Though for most of the 90's the SS had been a white frame and red or yellow fairing, the cosmopolitan FE had a dark gold trellis frame and silver monoposto bodywork.  Showa forks and monoshock were specified and of course Brembo's finest 320mm hardware.  Carbon fiber dash and mudguards provide a technical accent to the black 17-inch wheels.

Offered on the fan site ducati.ms, it sounds like the then-new owner poured darn near the purchase price right back into his new FE in engine and suspension work.  And then rode it sensibly to its current 8,400 miles.  The coordinated look of the billet rear sets and muffler brackets is outstanding, and it's rare to see a full Akropovich exhaust of this vintage.  The owner's comments from the for sale -post- :

Bought the bike new in 98 , it is #16 of 300 final editions Ducati produced of that generation of the SS (91 to 98) a great series , I also had a 91 and 93 super light but this was/is the nicest I've had.  To make it the best for me, (I didn't like the "fuel infection" and looks of the 99's) I took it to my friend Jeff Nash ( owner of AMS Ducati Dallas) soon after I bought it to massage it and work his magic   As I recall, it was to the tune of about 9-10k dollars extra spent back 20 years ago - I'll try to remember all what's been done .

He went all through the engine, balancing /lightening/polishing/porting, and adding the higher comp/displacement 944 kit, and added Kiehin FCR's 39's (he advised the 39's would be much smoother than 41's for street , and he was right) I added a 50mm Spaghetti / Titanium exhaust made by Akrapovic ( very hard to get that or Termi's back then) also have the K+N filter airbox mod.

Ohlins rear shock , and RaceTech mod to front forks, and then the really nice/light Marchesini magnesium 5 spoke wheels.  Custom billet pipe hangers footpegs and fully adjustable clip on bar assemblies, Corbin seat, recent Optima gel battery, rear stand ,tank bag ,tinted windscreen assorted extras carbon goodies etc ..

I believe I have all the original parts , and have new tires on bike.  And sitting on the shelf , new belts, fluids and filter I haven't got around to doing this year.

The FE reviewed as a sharp all-rounder, in hindsight made all the sweeter by the next year's emissions-driven re-design.  Just in time for the Final Edition ( and hopefully #016 wasn't too early to get it ) was a three-phase charging system which ended battery life woes for the air-cooled desmos.  Ducati took flack at the time for charging a premium for already depreciated tech, and with the updates this owner made, it would be interesting to know how the sale goes.  Hopefully the new owner is an RSBFS reader and can give us an in-flight report...

--donn

 

Hey 19 – 1998 Ducati 900 SS/FE
Ducati August 2, 2018 posted by

Sponsored Listing: 2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale!

Iconic Motorbikes is the Premier Sponsor for RSBFS. Thank you for supporting the site, Adam and team! -dc

If you have the Desmodromic Flu, the guys over at Iconic Motorbikes have the cure! And it's a very, very yellow pill to swallow! The whole range of Ducati's Tamburini-designed superbikes are likely at a low-ebb in terms of values, so if you've ever wanted one, now's probably the time to buy in. From the 916 that was introduced in 1994 through the end of production with the 998 in 2004, the package evolved constantly with improvements to the frame, engine, and fuel system. But the looks stayed largely the same, and the Ducati 996 offers up some pretty good value at the moment.

2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale at Iconic Motorbikes

The 996 is obviously the middle-child of the line: it's not the collectible original or the best-developed of the bunch, but has improved power and reliability compared to the 916 and prices are generally lower than the 998. Handling for all of them was superlative, and if you really think you're a good enough rider that you'll "get bored" with the 996's mere 112hp, more power to you. But somehow I still think there are guys who can lap faster than you on a nice R6...

Its ergonomics are famously uncompromising, but the aftermarket Corbin seat seen here which should help somewhat, and the dash is wonderfully simple: just speedo, tach, temp gauge, and a row of idiot lights. None of which should probably be completely trusted, since this is a Ducati after all. The exhaust on this one isn't original, but I personally wouldn't want a 996 with the stock cans and Ferracci's bits were apparently rebadged Arrow or SilMoto parts, both of which were of good quality.

This example has under 13,000 miles on it and has been well-maintained. There are a few minor blemishes, as described, and it looks like the battery vent tube came loose at some point and a bit of acid damaged the clutch cover, but it's mostly hidden behind the bodywork. As I've said before, very few bikes look good in yellow, but the Tamburini superbikes somehow pull it off, in spite of the relatively unbroken slabs of bodywork. To me, that's always been the genius of this design: those side panels are huge and basically flat, barring a few small vents and bulges, and yet the bike still appears lithe and elegant.

From the Seller: 2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Fully Serviced & Ready to Go! Amazing Condition!

Very few motorcycles look good in yellow, but the Ducati 996 is one of them! Pure Italian style and beautiful in person, this example is one of the cleanest we’ve come across.

Maintenance is absolutely critical for four-valve Ducatis, and this 996 has had a complete service: belts, fluids, tires… It’s literally perfect mechanically and is ready to go. As far as the body is concerned, it is in amazing condition indeed, with only 12,741 miles on the clock. Many of these 996s have a little hazing or discoloration in the headlights, but not this one: they’re crystal clear, just like new. The motor was tuned by a well-known Ducati expert, and more info is available to interested buyers. Tires are brand-new and still have the nipples, so you’re good there too!

There is one mark on the back of the tank, perhaps caused by some leathers or a jacket rubbing. But it’s a raised mark, so I’m thinking we can polish it out. I took some Mothers Cleaner to it, but it still needs a little more work. The clutch cover shows some very minor stains, as you can see from the one picture, but most people replace them anyway to expose the dry clutch and help it run cooler.

The bike is fitted with a set of carbon fiber Fast by Ferracci cans and a Corbin seat which is a must-have, as the original seats may as well have been made of wood… They are brutal.

Want to see her in person first? Fly into LAX, we’ll come get you as we’re only about 15 minutes from the airport.

The asking price is $7,390 and, although you can find examples of the 996 for as low as $4,500 you could very easily end up spending the difference to make it right. I've seen this bike in person and it is exactly as described: it's not technically perfect, but it is tastefully-modified, very clean, well-maintained, and ready to go. Basically, it's what you'd expect from a bike that's been owned since new by a well-heeled collector who regularly rides his bikes.

-tad

Sponsored Listing: 2000 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale!
Ducati July 30, 2018 posted by

Featured listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore!

Update 7.31.2018: The seller notes, "It had its last major service in June 2016 when it had 16,848 Km performed by GP Motorcycles here in San Diego where they did belts, valves, all fluids including forks and re-valved and sealed the rear shock. " -dc

The Ducati 851 is rare and special enough in Ducati's classic blood red livery, but it's worlds more special in the Italian flag tricolore paint scheme. The 851 was Ducati's first real foray into the gem-like speedfreaks we know today. Before there were Panigales, there were these. Only there were fewer of them. Way fewer.

This example has been used as intended, which is to say: it has been ridden. It's in show-quality condition, and wears Ferracci pipes, though the originals are included, along with a bunch of paperwork, the factory rear stand and the original windscreen.

From the seller:

I believe its a 851 Strada 1/304 from what I’ve seen online. It has 18,734 KM (11,640 miles) with Vin# ZDM851S1850158 Engine # ZDM851W4850621. I believe I am the 2nd owner of this incredible machine. 1 being the person who purchased this from Cagiva directly in Spain and who had it imported here to the states, which I have paper work from and will include the original letter from Cagiva regarding the transport to him when it was imported which can be seen in one of the pics. I got it on consignment through this gentleman out of Munroe Motorcycles in San Francisco about 8 years ago and have taken care of any bugs and gremlins it had while in my care. I mostly dealt with electrical issues from the time I bought it but thought they were all taken care of till I had swapped it over to a LiPo battery a couple years ago where the bike almost caught fire due to the battery almost blowing up. It has since had the stator and the voltage regulator replaced and I do think now everything on the bike is in great working order with no issues of any kind. I bought it with the Ferraci slip on pipes already installed, thank you Julio, and they sound amazing and are deep and throaty. Since Im a rider I had the original Marvic wheels from my SuperLight fitted to this bike from the beginning of my time with her. That way it looked stock but was on 17" wheels and I could replace tires easily and proceed to log miles without concern. I just had the original 16” wheels put back on to sell it but am including the brake carrier/caliper set up with spacers and hardware so if the new owner wants to put 17” wheels back on it should be easy for them to do so.

So along with the hardware for 17” wheels I am also including with it the original letter and paperwork from Cagiva along with its original stand, official Ducati 851 workshop manual, original tool kit, paperwork form previous owner along with all records, original exhaust pipes which do show some slight scuffing but I got it them that way so not sure of when that occurred as I have never dropped or scratched it, original used wind screen with slight scuffing which again came that way so not sure the story there, custom Geza motorcycle cover, 3 keys and a clear California title with registration good till August of 2019. I rode it to Laguna Seca the last year Moto GP was held there and had it on Ducati Island and was even approached by Ducati and they borrowed it for an official photo shoot where they parked it under the Ducati banner and got some nice shots of it. I only say this because it was a cool little moment for me having this bike and it was quite neat to see the attention it got from the Ducati higher ups.

Interested parties can contact Josh here: jahshua@me.com

If the bike were mine (dream on), I'd follow the seller's advice and stick on a set of 17s and call it good. If you keep it on two wheels, the 851 is a blue-chip collector ride and should gather value even if it isn't a garage queen.

Featured listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore!
Ducati July 26, 2018 posted by

1974 Ducati Mk.3 450 Desmo

Hard to believe it was just 1968 when engineering director Fabio Taglioni put Ducati's street eggs in the desmo basket, having used the valve actuation technique in race machines for several years.  The Mk.3 line included 250, 350, and 450cc singles, and while this last-year model hasn't run in a while, its low miles and great cosmetics make it look worth some effort.

1974 Ducati Mk.3 Desmo for sale on eBay

The original bevel-drive engine uses separate cams to drive each valve, singing to 8,000 rpm on their way to 30 hp.  The Dell-Orto carburetor with a throat just over an inch in diameter handles the fuel mixing, and while there is an electrical system, starting is by a left side kick lever.  The Mk.3 gained a 5-speed transmission, helping keep the single on the boil.   The chassis has a hunch about the future of the engine being a stressed member, but in this case the steel backbone keeps things together.

A limited amount of this bike's long history is available, but it looks to be an older restoration and re-paint in a typical Ducati chrome yellow.  The age makes the correctness of details way beyond my knowledge base, but maybe a knowledgeable reader can point out a great original component or glaring faux pas.  The owner says this in the eBay auction:

Up for sale a beautiful 1974 Ducati single Mark 3 450 motorcycle.  10,785 miles show on the odometer.  This used to be a blue Mark 3 originally.  The original seat will be included.  Clear title in hand.   The bike has not been started in years, so it will need to be sorted out if you want to put it on the road, no battery. Sold as is with no returns.  Light scuffs and scratches from years of storage.

Many of the elements on the Mk.3 appear almost comically lightweight, but the magic 100 hp/liter was still just over the horizon.  With the gear driven desmo and cable brakes, not much to refurbish in the return to service.  But a careful inspection and slow start are advised, brake and shifter are not on their usual sides...

-donn

1974 Ducati Mk.3 450 Desmo
Ducati July 13, 2018 posted by

Little SPO: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

To me, the very names for cars and bikes are simple, to the point. Leganza? What the hell's a Leganza? Or a Spectra? But a GTO, or... a GTO? That just sounds cool. Thunderace sounds kind of silly, but R1M? That just exudes confidence. Even with a naturally cool-sounding language at their disposal, the Italians know that simpler is usually better, and that the sexiest motorcycles don't need silly, made-up names: simple, blunt, alpha-numeric designations suggest a no-need-to-brag confidence. It's like a special code, and Ducati 888 SPO is basically shorthand for speed.

An evolution of the earlier 851, the liquid-cooled, four-valve 888 was the epitome of "truth in advertising." Displacing 888cc, Ducati's big v-twin was meant to take the fight to the Japanese Big Four in production-based racing, move them into the modern era, and allow them to compete at top levels of the sport. Sure, the Pantah provided the foundation four the new liquid-cooled engine, but there's no way a two-valve, air-cooled v-twin was going to have a ghost of a chance against the inline fours in World Superbike and AMA racing, and Ducati's success in those series brought them back to prominence on the world stage.

Over in Europe, they got the standard 888 Strada and the higher-performance 888 SP5. But the SP5 wasn't road-legal here, so we got a sort of halfway step between the two that was dubbed the SPO or Sport Production Omologato. It was distinguished by the solo tail, high-mount exhaust, and an Öhlins shock with adjustable ride-height. Unlike the SP5, the SPO used a steel subframe instead of a lightweight aluminum one.

Look, if you've been waiting since my first paragraph to tell me how I'm wrong and that some cool bike names exist, go right ahead. It's not like I'm going to disagree that exceptions exist: Superleggera springs immediately to mind. But I still say that 888 SPO is a name that is aging better than Fireblade. On that note, it is kind of odd that here in the USA, land of the Vortec V6 and the Blue Flame Six, we got the CBR instead of the Fireblade and the YZF1000R instead of the Thunderace... So I guess we like our car-related names silly but our bike names [mostly] serious.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

This is a near mint 888 SPO 1993 model. Needs nothing, belts and service were done, starts and rides wonderfully, new battery, just downsizing my collection. One flaw on the number one decal. Runs like new, good tires, needs nothing. It needs to go to a 888 lover. Pics say everything. About 13,000 miles which may change if I decide to take a hop. I reserve the right to cancel the auction the bike is for sale locally in the Fort Worth, TX area.

Cash sale, no endless emails or pen pal questions... This is the real deal and a great bike!

Thanks for looking

Aside from that first image, the photos are uniformly terrible, and the usual top triple shot showing the Limited Edition plaque is missing, as is any verification of the mileage. But that doesn't seem to be deterring bidders. Previous SPOs we've featured have sold for right around $10,000 but it appears values have risen in the past year: bidding on this example is up to $12,000 with several days left on the auction. That's not really a surprise: the 851 and 888 were pretty undervalued for a while, but collectors have definitely started to notice them and recognize their significance as the original modern Ducati superbike.

-tad

Little SPO: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale




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