Posts by Category: Ducati

Ducati March 4, 2017 posted by

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

If you're looking to get close to your racing heroes, style yourself a Very Serious Motorcyclist™, or just like the idea of riding something with genuine links to legitimate race bikes, homologation specials offer their owners a taste of the trick parts and lightweight performance available to professional racers, all in a streetable package. This 851 Tricolore wears its Italian heritage proudly, and takes things a bit beyond what you'd normally expect in terms of road-legal performance: its about as close to a road-legal race bike as you're likely to find.

The 916 gets most of the fame and is more instantly recognizable, but it's really the earlier 851, introduced in 1987, that paved the way for Ducati's World Superbike success and the company's return to racing glory. The older Pantah-derived air-cooled L-twin engines were certainly high-performance motors in their day, but had been long-since eclipsed by the inline fours from Japan, and Ducati needed something new if they wanted to compete on relatively equal footing with 750cc inline fours in the brand-new World Superbike Championship.

Ducati kept the proven foundation of their v-twin, but added liquid cooling and brand new four-valve heads to create their "Desmoquattro" that pumped out 93hp along with plenty of fat midrange torque and gave the newly introduced 851 the performance to compete, factoring in a bit of a displacement bump that allowed the twins approximate parity with the smaller, revvier inline fours. Wrapped around that heavily updated engine was Ducati's distinctive trellis frame and chunky bodywork, along with ergonomics that were considered extreme at the time, but seem positively luxurious compared to the masochistic 916 that came later... For a while there, the 851 and the 888 that followed were less desirable than the gorgeous 916. But as they say, "familiarity breeds contempt" and with so many of Tamburini's masterpiece running around, it's hard not to be a bit blasé about them now. But the 916 would never have existed without the success of the 851 and that functional bodywork has a style all its own.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale

One of 207 homologation "kit bikes"!
Frame Number: ZDM3HB6T6JB850034
Engine Number: HB6J850032

It was the Ducati 851 that first served notice that high-performance sportbikes and World Superbike racing would no longer be Japanese-only affairs. Where before Ducatis made do with simple air-cooled motors, the 851 had liquid-cooling, four-valve desmodromic cylinder heads and electronic fuel-injection. In 1990 Raymond Roche rode a factory 851 to the World Superbike championship, the first of 13 titles to date for Ducati.

World Superbike racers were required to be based on production streetbikes. One way to get the highest-specification base model possible was to build homologation specials – expensive, limited-edition versions that needed relatively minor modification to be track-ready. Ducati took this so-called "kit bike" approach with the 851 Superbike. Just 207 of these nominally street-legal machines were hand-built, enough to satisfy World Superbike rules, with an estimated 20 examples coming to the U.S.

 Differences from showroom stock include a braced swingarm, close-ratio gearbox, ventilated dry clutch and lightweight magnesium Marvic wheels. No speedometer, just a tachometer and temperature gauge. The motor was upgraded with race-grind camshafts, a hot-rodded electronic control unit, ram-air duct and free-breathing reverse-cone mufflers. It was good for about 120 horsepower.

One of the other differences is a round ring on the seat, which is explained by an amusing folk tale: the claim is that some Ducati employee placed a hot espresso maker on the mold before production, causing a slight deformation in the seat.

The Tri-Colore 851 kit bike on offer has been made fully street-legal, and is titled and registered. Globe-type turn signals mounted in the handlebar ends satisfy the DMV. The original owner was a local Southern California collector of some very interesting and important bikes, particularly Italian, low production machines. He mounted a bicycle speedometer with magnet on the front hub to further satisfy the DMV and clocked 2600 miles. The second owner kept the bike in his private museum of very exclusive Italian machinery and removed the speedo for display.

Mechanically, the bike is in excellent condition. The engine starts easily, idles smoothly and runs well. The bike shifts easily though all gears with a nice clutch action. Brakes, suspension and all electrical systems work perfectly. The new owner should be mindful of tire-pressure as the scuff-free magnesium wheels are notoriously porous. And it sounds fantastic!

Cosmetically, the bike is exquisite, showing light patina conducive with age and mileage. This is truly a Superbike for the street, with impeccable ownership history and is accompanied by a substantial document file, keys, and a clean, clear California title. A great opportunity to own a truly rare and exotic Italian icon.

So what does this piece of Ducati history cost? Well the asking price is $31,900 which is obviously very steep for an 851, but a bit of a bargain compared to the last one of these that was up for sale. This appears to be a different bike, considering that one had never had gas in it or been started, whereas this one has had a bit of use and a couple of concessions to road use added. The small bar-end mirrors are a modern addition, but aren't obtrusive and suit the bike's minimal-road-equipment style compared to the big, chunky, fairing-mounted original road-equipment parts or a more 80s set of "Napoleon" bar-end mirrors. The seller claims that just 207 of these homologation 851s were built in 1988 to meet World Superbike requirements and it looks to be in excellent shape, with just enough wear to suggest that it's in original, well-preserved condition. This is, as the seller says, literally a superbike for the street, with just enough road equipment to keep things legal-ish but not distract from your World Superbike fantasies. Hopefully, anyone that buys this will continue to put a few weekend miles on it from time-to-time!

-tad

Rare Homologation Special: 1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore for Sale
Ducati February 28, 2017 posted by

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

Ducati's first motorcycle was the Cucciolo [or "puppy" in Italian], which was basically a simple engine strapped to a bicycle, an affordable tool to get the Italian population mobile and back to work after the end of World War II. Certainly a far cry from the frameless, race-inspired exotica they're famous for today. This NCR 600TT hails from the middle period of Ducati's history, and is powered by the grandfather of all their modern v-twin engines, the single overhead cam, two-valve Pantah.

They're famous for the format today, but Ducati didn't start out making v-twin sportbikes. Instead, once they graduated from producing simple, efficient people-movers, they built and raced single-cylinder motorcycles of various displacements, before eventually building their first v-twin. The hottest versions of those earliest v-twins featured Ducati's trademark Desmodromic valve-actuation that has become their engineering trademark. But they also used a complex and expensive-to-manufacture system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the overhead cams, and Ducati needed to increase profitability to stay afloat, so introduced a parallel twin that was much more compact and affordable to produce and assemble, much to the horror of famous engineer Fabio Taglioni.

That parallel-twin engine proved to be a massive flop, but Taglioni continued to develop the v-twin on his own, and the Pantah was the result. The revised v-twin swapped the tower-shaft and bevel-drive cam-drive of the earlier engine for a much simpler rubber belt arrangement. This meant the engine was less expensive to manufacture, but also meant owners needed to religiously maintain their bikes, as failure of the toothed rubber belt led to catastrophic engine damage. Today's Ducati engines are direct descendants of that original two-valve v-twin.

This particular Pantah-powered machine is literally a racebike with lights, and includes frame, bodywork, and preparation by NCR. If you're not familiar, NCR are best known today for their high-performance and obsessively lightweight Ducati parts, as well as for converting already expensive exotica into completely un-affordable, even more exotic exotica. But before that, they were originally a race team. The race team, in fact, responsible for Ducati's many racing successes until the creation of their in-house racing division, including Mike Hailwood's famous TT-winning bike, so they've been around the track a few times. Although the bike does include a headlight, a tail light, and turn signals, it appears that wasn't enough to get past rigorous TÜV certification and the bike couldn't be registered for road use in Germany where it was stored for many years. Maybe a new American owner will have more luck?

From the original eBay listing: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale

The 1981 Ducati Scuderia N.C.R was one of the preeminent motorcycle racing teams of all time. They were the de-facto Ducati factory race team from the early 1970s until Ducati took it in-house with Ducati Corsa in 2000. They continued as privateers and had success with rider Ben Bostrom. The company was then sold and continues as a specialist builder of very high end motorcycles.

NCRs wins on the world stage are almost too numerous to mention. But Imola 200 winners Paul Smart, Isle of Man TT winners Mike Hailwood were all on the bevel drive NCRs. The string of wins by Tony Rutter on the belt drive TT2 were all Nepoti and Caracchi machines that made NCR a household name with their distinctive logo of a speeding helmet clad dog.

Nepoti and Caracchi Racing designed their own frame for the belt drive Pantah based series. This was the 600TT. It differs from the more common TT2, which was more of a Ducati design. A total of nine frames were made by Verlicchi and a further two by DM. All but two were racing frames. Of these two street bikes produced, this is the only one built with an alloy gas tank. Imagine a genuine NCR with a steering lock.

This bike has spent most of its life unused in Germany. The owner tried to convert his Pantah to a NCR framed machine, but the TUV would not allow it, due to their ultra-strict type certification. Throughout 1980s, 90s and 2000s it was in hiding. It re-surfaced in 2006 and was recommissioned. However the German owner was still not able to use it.

It came to America several years ago and has been in a private collection museum ever since. It has a US tile as the original donor Ducati Pantah.

Gas has been drained and battery removed for storage and display. We are selling this incredible machine for a client of ours and all technical questions will be answered as quickly as possible but may take time to get as he has limited access. Sold on a clean, mileage exempt US title.

VIN#DM500SL661261

Bidding is up to just north of $9,100 with plenty of interest and plenty of time left on the auction. In general, the earlier bevel-drive bikes are considered the most desirable and collectible Ducatis, but this is an exceptionally rare and cool motorcycle, considering the direct links to NCR and the fact that it's theoretically a roadgoing racebike. Obviously you should be careful to consult with your local DMV if you plan to register this machine for road use, but this one might be best used as the crown jewel in a collection anyway, considering it's status as just one of two ever built.

-tad

Pantah-stic: 1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale
Ducati February 26, 2017 posted by

Not Particularly – 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS

With a boatload of compromises made to accommodate the 998 cc Superbike engine, the list of things that the Monster S4RS isn't is longer than those it is.  All a matter of priorities, as the water-cooled testastretta with top of the line components has a way of re-aligning priorities toward the moment.  This example from Colorado has been comprehensively farkled and looks ready to try and stop time.

2007 Ducati Monster S4RS

Not easy to show everything a water-cooled engine needs and have it look good.  Things that are normally hidden are polished, dressed, aligned, and straightened, with an occasional carbon fiber guard.  The SR4S sports the deep-V sump and curved radiators required by the 130 ponies, and has twin cooling fans that even the superbike didn't get. The red paint of the trellis frame captures the eye and is complemented by the red racing stripe, but the tubular single-sided swingarm was left black.  Forged Marchesini snowflakes in white beckon the microfiber towel and cleaner wax.

The previous owners have been all over this Monster, and customized or updated nearly everything.  Euro-3 emissions required a catalyzer, but that was binned in favor of the Termignoni system.  Rizoma and DucaBike upgrades are everywhere, with SpeedyMoto, Samco, ASV, and assorted carbon accents.   With the exception of holes left from the rear blinkers, it hangs together pretty well, and almost gets a red, white, and blue theme going here and there.  From the eBay auction:

Up for sale is a 2 owner Ducati Monster in perfect condition. It has over 20k in upgrades. New tires less than -100 miles.
Full Termignoni Exhaust 
Termignoni ECU
Open Airbox
Extra gas tank
Speedy Moto bar risers
Rizoma bars 
Rizoma grips
Speedymoto clutch slave cylinder
CRG lanespltter mirrors 
Smoked windshield
Rizoma front blinkers
Integrated rear tailight 
Carbon Fiber front fender
Carbon Fiber rear fender
Carbon Fiber tail fender
Carbon Fiber chain cover 
Carbon Fiber cam belt covers
Carbon Fiber heel guards
Ducabike oil plug
Ducabike front sprocket cover
Ducabike rear sprocket carrier
Ducabike timing cover
Quick change lightweight rear sprocket
Gold DID chain
Re-geared front sprocket
Samco coolant hoses
Rebuilt front forks less than 200 miles ago
Cox radiator guard
Cox oil cooler guard
Rizoma clutch cover
Rizoma clutch pressure plate
Rizoma clutch springs & retainers
Motovation Frame sliders
Clutch & brake reservoir caps 
ASV clutch and brake levers
Blue Anodized adjustable fork dampers

The S4RS isn't a racking up the miles type of bike, and this one has some nice rides in store before the next major service.  Seems like a pro detail would be worth it, though this level of color and carbon will attract attention no matter what.  While other bikes better suited to long hauls and track days, the testastretta Monster is a pretty extreme choice for hacking around.  The quality components, factory and aftermarket, will be beneficial whether you're going across town or for the whole afternoon...

-donn

Not Particularly – 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS
Ducati February 19, 2017 posted by

Ride it like Mike: 1980 Ducati 900 MHR

The history of Ducati racing is long and storied. And while many riders have tasted success on the booming twins from Bologna, perhaps none have matched the exploits of Mike "The Bike" Hailwood. In honor of their legendary rider and his comeback success in the 1978 TT (Tourist Trophy), Ducati created the 900 MHR (Mike Hailwood replica) in 1979 - and continued the model through the mid 1980s. Meant to replicate the racer, the 900 MHR edition had everything it needed to go fast, and nothing else. As a prime example of weight savings, Ducati omitted the electric starter and went with the lighter, old-school method of kick starting. Given the TT background, the occasional bump start would likely also be OK.

1980 Ducati 900 MHR for sale on eBay

The MHR series of bikes was the last major evolution of the bevel drive desmo twin before the introduction of the "rubber band" Pantah. It exudes all of the wonderful charismatic noises and idiosyncrasies of these early Ducatis, while offering up a rare and unique ownership experience. These bikes are not exactly plentiful as far as this era of Ducati goes, as Ducati were simply not moving many bikes period. Nor are they particularly powerful; Ducati rated the L-twin desmo at a mere 72 horsepower back in 1980. That is not a lot by today's standards, nor was it a lot by the Japanese four-cylinder standards of the early 1980s. What the Ducati did have to offer was torque - significant amounts of lower RPM grunt, fed through a dry clutch and 5-speed gearbox. Easier to ride fast through changing conditions than the hyper-strung Japanese multis, it's no wonder that Ducati dominated the TT (Mike Hailwood might have had something to do with that as well).

From the seller:
Ducati 900 SS MHR original 13700 KM (8600mile).
Motorcycle not Mint condition, Very good Running !.
Has crack original screen.
chips and scratch on original paint.
some surface rust.
Brake good working.
Electric works,
Please see more picture for detail.
Kick only Model.
Very rare to find Vintage Bevel Desmo Twin.

The seller has offered some good pictures on this bike, but not too much by way of information. One little bit of info that is definitely missing is the whereabouts of the factory lowers and side panels. The MHR model came with a full envelope of fiberglass, yet this bike is only listed with the upper fairing and windscreen. I do not believe the original lowers are still available from the factory, meaning that 3rd party lowers would need to be sourced to truly complete the bike. Otherwise, this Southern California-based machine looks to be in pretty good condition for a 37 year old import.

We have seen Ducati prices fluctuate wildly over the years on RSBFS. This bike has been bid to up over $13,000 USD and it looks like it will sell. It would be well-bought at the current figure, but I would expect it to go up as we get closer to the close of auction. We have seen these models listed for double this amount in years past - albeit in more complete condition. Fun Fact: These Mike Hailwood Replica machines are not exactly the Holy Grail of rarity when it comes to Ducatis; and estimated 7,000 MHRs were built between 1979 and 1986, making the MHR model the the most numerous of all the bevel-drive twin models made. Still, owning a Ducati from this period does place you in an exclusive group. It is a fantastic looking machine, and likely to fare well in the future. And it is eminently enjoyable today as something you can ride. What more can you ask for? Check it out here, and let us know what you think!

MI

Ride it like Mike: 1980 Ducati 900 MHR
Ducati February 16, 2017 posted by

Worked – 2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto

Ducati SportClassics were made from 2006-2010, and with their cafe-racer looks, were very popular with customizers.  The dual-spark 992cc engine was fuel injected, and its reliability lent itself more to breathing upgrades than internal work.  This example has had intake and exhaust work and some well-executed cosmetic upgrades.

2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto for sale on eBay

Designer Pierre Terblanche got started with the wild-retro MH900E, and completed the thought with the SportClassic line.  Pretty good power from the air-cooled desmodue at 92hp, with stable handling and moderate weight.  Dual shocks and dry clutch make reference to the good old days.  Bars are apparently clip-ons, but have risers and some adjustment to ease the pain.  The seat is the best of both worlds, a dual seat with color coordinated cafe cover.

No word on how many owners, but this Sport has been treated well and shows just one spot of clearcoat failure for its 7,500 miles.  The current owner is an Arrow fan and put on 2-into-1 exhaust and had it altered to work with the passenger pegs.  Velocity stacks and ECU reprogramming complete the respiratory therapy.

Not often seen at this level are the fender-ectomy and SpeedyMoto open cam belts ( with guards ).  Can't say the license plate mount is my taste but there a lot of nice smaller upgrades.  From the eBay auction:

• Pazzo adjustable brake and clutch levers
• Kuan steering damper mount with Ohlins damper
• Rear fender removed
• Taillight flipped and mounted under the seat pan (turn signals reversed to accommodate flip)
• Custom license plate mount with factory license plate light
• STM clutch slave
• Custom Arrow 2 ­1 stainless steel race full exhaust (not a slip on) ­­ I fell in love with Arrow exhaust when I put a system on my Monster. The sound is second to none and this exhaust does not disappoint. The reason it is custom is that Arrow never made a system to fit a biposto bike; it was only intended to fit the 2006 mono. I purchased one and worked with a local exhaust shop to modify it just enough so that it would clear the brake pedal and rear set.

• Speedy Moto frame sliders
• Speedy Moto Leggero belt pulley covers
• Corse Dynamics high performance intake system (includes velocity stacks, air filters, crankcase breather, etc.)
• MW Tuning / REXXER ecu re­flash to accommodate intake and exhaust mods. O2 sensor delete.
• Billet high capacity ECU heat sink
• Corse Dynamics magnetic oil drain plug
• Lane splitter style round bar­end rear view mirror
• RAM Mount triple clamp mounted ball for accessory mounts (phone/gps/etc.)

Light on the miles and looking great, this SportClassic has a steep buy-it-now but the right equipment and up-to-date maintenance.  The Make Offer button is there if this classic red machine speaks to you.  As the wintry mix fades this might be a good opportunity...

-donn

Worked – 2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto
Ducati February 12, 2017 posted by

Your Tax Dollars at Work ? – 2007 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 with 31 miles !

Shoehorning the 992 cc dual-spark into the popular Monster frame, Ducati lined up the elements of a great naked sportbike.  With air-cooled desmodue, single-sided swingarm, and dual mufflers, the model held down the middle of the showroom between the basic M695 and the radical S4RS Testastretta.  This example has been stored since new, and could continue the beauty contest or be rare stock rider.

2007 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 for sale on eBay

Now nearly halfway back through the long and continuing Monster history, the S2R 1000 has a slightly overstuffed vibe but still supports the original concept.  Nicer components such as adjustable suspension, sculpted trellis swingarm, oil cooler, and Marchesini alloys set the scene.  The reliable 1000 DS lump has scores of internal improvements and was found at the top of the range in Ducati's SuperSport and MultiStrada line-ups.  And of course with the Monster it's all on display.

A display bike since new, this Monster has only 21 miles for its ten years, bone stock and virtually showroom.  From the eBay auction:

The back story:  This motorcycle along with a second unit where purchased by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on a research grant testing electric drive systems.  The first bike was the primary, and used for testing of the drive system.  This bike was the back up and went literally untouched.  Upon completion of the research grant both bikes where offered for sale which is how I got a hold of this rare find.  I've had the bike for almost 7 years.  Being my second bike I elected to keep it as a display piece.  I have relocated to Houston from New England and no longer have the space to store the bike.

Quick on its feet around town, the Monster can be a challenge on the slab with just its headlight fairing.  The S2R has a few carbon accents, but the black belt covers, exposed fuel vapor system and Euro-3 catalyst are waiting for the customizer's credit card.  Rather more rare than smaller top-selling Monster, this would be a  great platform for a caught-in-time retro, or for a fan, maybe it's the one that got away...

- donn

Your Tax Dollars at Work ? – 2007 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 with 31 miles !