Classified features and exclusions:

  • No RSBFS staff editorial, your content only
  • Vendors are welcome to list items for sale.
    Contact us for advertising your business.
  • 3 high resolution images
  • Up to 150 words
  • 1 month listing
  • 1 edit per month
  • $10 per month

Classified ads return to RSBFS!

While we focus on the very best SportBike for sale listings on the main page of the site, this area is to cater to everything else that our audience may find of interest:

  • Bikes that aren’t perfect
  • Bikes that aren’t SportBikes
  • Projects
  • Memoriabilia
  • Parts
  • Pretty much anything!

We handle every classified in the same manner we do our Featured Listings:  by hand and working with you via email.

Email us to get started!

Posts by Category: Ducati

Ducati May 19, 2018 posted by

In The Beginning: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale

Ducati's modern era really started here, with the 851. The air-cooled Pantah engine, with its rubber cam belts, was a step forward, compared to the bevel-drive twins and set the stage for Ducati's move into the future. But it was the liquid-cooled, four-valve version of their classic L-twin that finally brought them fully into the modern era and allowed them to compete against the very best sportbikes from Japan in the newly-formed World Superbike Championship.

Sure, their throbbing, torquey v-twin was down on power, compared to a screaming inline four. But a fat, useable midrange helped make up for some of the theoretical horsepower gap, and a bit of additional displacement took care of the rest. The 851 wasn't as reliable or as affordable as the Japanese competition, but it could handle with the best of them.

The new liquid-cooled, four-valve engine was dubbed, naturally, the Desmoquattro and displaced 851cc. Truth in advertising! The bike was fed by very effective Weber-Marelli fuel injection for a claimed 104hp. The original bikes look a little bit awkward and old-school, rolling on 16" wheels, but those were quickly changed to 17" hoops and, by the time this 1992 version rolled around, it looked very modern and exotic, although not nearly as elegant as the 916 that followed. The upside is slightly more comfortable ergonomics that work better on a bike far more likely to be used for 7/10th canyon rides than 10/10ths race track sorties these days.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale

BEAUTIFUL 1992 Ducati 851 

*PERFECT CONDITION* 7k miles

Well maintained! 

Never dropped/crashed!

VERY light signs of (normal) use! 

Magnesium Marchesini wheels

Spaghetti exhaust

Obviously not as beautiful as the 916 that followed, but it is very purposeful and aggressive, with the white frame adding a classic touch. I do wish the seller had removed some of the bodywork so we can see the condition, along with some better shots of the "spaghetti exhaust," a reference to the system's smooth tangle of large diameter piping that was based around equal-length headers and replaces the ugly crossover junction with actual tubes. Sure, a set of carbon-fiber cans will help your red stallion sound more Ducati-y but if you really want it to sound like the real deal, you need an expensive full system. This set is likely a Silmotor system to match the end cans, since I believe they're still in production. Otherwise, this is a clean, low-mileage example of an appreciating classic sportbike, and has a couple of pricey aftermarket bits that should genuinely enhance performance.

-tad

In The Beginning: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale
Ducati May 17, 2018 posted by

Clean, Low-Mileage, and Nearly Stock: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale

After languishing in infamy for a few years, Ducati's 999 is finally getting a bit of respect for being the impressive machine it has always been. If the 999 had been built by anyone other than Ducati, and it had been the follow up to pretty much any bike but the 916, its praises would have been sung from every rooftop. But although the regular and S model bikes are finally getting a bit of respect, collectors were always on to the 999R.

The 999 was an improvement over the 916 in terms of power, reliability, and ergonomics, but the 999R stood head and shoulders above the more common versions, even though they don't look very special to the casual observer: Ducati's R bikes are always pretty subtle. A bit of a red frame here, a flash of gold from shock or fork tubes, a logo unpainted to let the carbon weave show through the paint...

The main changes are under the skin, since the R was created to allow the 999 to compete in various racing classes, including AMA Superbike racing. And we're not talking about some cams and a different fuel map. The 999R featured an entirely new cylinder head design, along with high-compression pistons, titanium rods and valves, all hidden within sand-cast engine cases. The result was much more oversquare than the stock bike for exactly 999cc, along with 134hp at the wheel.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale

Immaculate 2 owner 2006 Ducati 999R. Only 1740 miles. I purchased from the original owner in 2010 and have accumulated a grand total of an additional 225 miles. Recently serviced and new battery. I added a slipper clutch but still have the original. Also added bar end mirrors. Never dropped, no dings, dents, no track. I am not comfortable riding the bike as can be seen by the mileage. Have the original owner's manual and service manual CD. Absolutely no disappointments with this bike. If you have read this far you know all about the 999R and that 2006 is most likely the best year. No trades.

Bidding is currently up to $12,300 and the Reserve is Not Yet Met. But since the Buy It Now price is set at $15,995 I expect that won't be a problem by the time the auction ends, since there's plenty of time left and there is lots of activity on this one already. That might be because the bike has very low miles and is mercifully unmolested: the awful original license plate holder even includes the stock reflectors! The bar-end mirrors look pretty silly and, depending on the position of the clip-ons, might be nearly useless, but should take all of five minutes to remove. The slipper clutch might not be original, but is a very practical addition in keeping with the bike's character, and can always be removed.

-tad

Clean, Low-Mileage, and Nearly Stock: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale
Ducati May 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2001 Ducati MH900e #413

The singular MH900e has made regular appearances here at RSBFS, the Terblanche design and sparkling execution combined for a quick sell-out of the run of 2,000. This collector has been nicely personalized with an unusual eye toward usability.

2001 Ducati MH900e #413 for sale on eBay

The red and polish MH900e has such a distinctive design that discussion of its specs is secondary, but the fuel injected desmodue pulls its weight.  The air-cooled 904cc is tuned for 75 hp and a wider torque band, making the long, low piece of art more rideable.  Outdoing their usual trellis fretwork, Ducati made the chassis show off the engine and its systems.  Beside being a fabricator's showcase, the sculpted single-sided swingarm works well with the Paioli reservoir shock and eases rear wheel cleaning.  The fairing / tank combination flows, and the separate exhausts wind their way out to the long underseat mufflers.

The owner of this MH900e wanted to ride it more than most, and his modifications are good-looking and practical.  Foremost, a neat mod replaces the battery / tank internals and  increases fuel capacity to a realistic 4.6 gallons.  Updates to the levers and belt covers are well chosen, and the stainless exhaust looks great compared to the factory black.  More detail from the eBay auction:

Super, super clean, with tasteful upgrades, runs with no issues, sounds awesome, and is not a garage queen, but actually ridden, yet lives in my living room most of the time. I'm moving, and no room for several bikes, so here's your chance.

Rizoma cam belt covers, Rizoma Urlo grips and levers, now Brembo master cylinders, fresh oils and Pro-One billet finned oil cooler/filter, California Cycleworks tank/battery conversion which increases fuel tank capacity almost twice as much and rids the ugly and heavy dual battery. Has Lithium single battery, open pod filters, high voltage Dyna ignition, belly pan eliminator (have original), fully polished and chromed stainless exhaust is a beauty, yet not loud and great sound. Luimoto cross stiched suede seat cover, good tires, 3D show chain, etc.

Ducati made the low volume special work well enough to impress reviewers, though long ergonomics and compromised dash and mirrors reinforced its showy roots.  While it looks too cool for most owners to let it outside, this one has amassed enough miles for an oil change, but not so many that the next owner couldn't bring it into the hall.  Bidding on the auction is quite active and there is a reasonable buy-it-now of $22,000.

At the other end of the spectrum, the owner also has a fully restored 1938 BMW R66 on offer - here -.  Questions about either machine can be addressed through the eBay auctions...

-donn

Featured Listing – 2001 Ducati MH900e #413
Ducati May 9, 2018 posted by

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Designed to resemble their race-winning TT1 machines and the very last bike built before a buyout by Cagiva, the Ducati F1 was a bit rough around the edges but, in spite of a kit-bike feel and build quality, was a true thoroughbred. The F1 and its variants languished in obscurity for a while, since it wasn't quite a classic and didn't offer a more modern Ducati's refinement or parts availability.

The F1 used a version 749cc Ducati's air and oil-cooled two-valve Pantah motor, tuned to produce 76hp. With just over 400lbs to push around, performance wouldn't give the inline fours from Japan much trouble in a straight line, but it could handle with the best of them.

The two-valve engine was caged by a trellis frame by Verlicchi and wrapped in bodywork that was decidedly old-school, compared to more modern machines like Suzuki's "Slingshot" GSX-R. Ergonomics were clearly an afterthought, with even the air-cleaners sticking out from the bodywork, waiting  to foul the rider's knees.

It's not the most collectible version of the F1, but comes with some very nice extras. F1s had a 16" front and 18" rear wheel combination, but the Oscam parts fitted to this example both appear to be 16". They definitely look trick, with the polished rim and modular construction. The seller includes plenty of information about this bike, as you can see below, and it looks like the bike is ready to go.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

1988 Ducati 750 F1, only 19,411 miles, many Monjuich upgrades, great condition

Details:

  • 1988 Ducati 750 F1 (ZDM750R/2)
  • only 19,411 miles, Monjuich upgrades
  • very rare in this condition
  • selling for senior friend who is second owner
  • never raced but has taken part in a few track days
  • V2, 4-stroke, 70HP, Desmo
  • air cooled, 5-speed, chain drive
  • dual front disc brakes, single rear disc
  • only 416 lbs, very quick, not a beginner bike!
  • one key, factory owners manual and 750 Montjuich shop manual
  • fully street legal once you remount the turn signals (all wiring there)

Upgrades and extras:

  • 2-into one Ducati Montjuich pipe
  • Second Ducati Montjuich tailpiece with seat reworked by Sargent
  • Montjuich fender
  • Oscam wheels (very rare)
  • Throttlemeister-style throttle lock
  • rear paddock stand

OEM parts included:

  • Stock front and rear wheels
  • Factory F1 pipes, very solid with minor surface ticking, great candidate for blasting and repainting
  • Factory centerstand and OEM swingarm
  • Factory chainguard
  • four turn signals and pigtails, all need new stalks

Cosmetic:

  • Overall cosmetics are very nice, paint glossy, no rash on panels
  • small garf in belly pan, top edge of fairing, and spot where tailpiece meets seat
  • few rubs on rear subfender
  • few jacket scratches on tank 
  • seat in very good shape
  • no dents in tank
  • few oxidized spots on Oscam wheels but nice shape overall

Mechanical:

  • tires have zero miles: Michelin A59X and M59X
  • tires are 2004 and 2005 build date but were properly stored in heated shop so still soft
  • bike starts easily, runs, rides and brakes well
  • fresh oil and K&N filter, brake fluid flush, clutch fluid flush
  • front calipers and master cylinder put thru ultrasonic and rebuilt
  • carbs ultrasonic treated and rebuilt with kits installed
  • new brake pads
  • new timing belts
  • valves set
  • new fuel taps (Bevel Heaven) and fuel lines
  • new engine cover seals
  • repacked steering head bearings
  • lubed cables
  • horn feeble at times and not working others
  • turn signal circuits all there and work but no signals mounted
  • tripmeter reset works but not hard mounted
  • sidestand has been shortened

Well, 19,000 miles on a well-maintained Ducati Pantah isn't anything to be scared of, but sure isn't museum-piece low or anything to brag about... But it does appear to have been sympathetically owned, very well maintained, and sensibly updated. The seller also includes a short clip of the bike idling and revving, along with plenty of additional pics. Bidding is very active and up to $9,000 with a few days left on the auction. Folks are asking for north of $20,000 for Laguna Secas and Montjuichs, although basic F1s seem to be much more modestly valued. Given the upgrades and the amount of time left on the auction, I expect this one to go a good bit higher before the auction ends.

-tad

Tasteful Upgrades: 1988 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Ducati May 7, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

It’s obvious that we’ll continue to see Ducati’s iconic “L-twin” for the foreseeable future, but the recent introduction of their V4 Panigale represents the end of the v-twin superbike era that really began with today’s Featured Listing Ducati 750GT. If you ask anyone to name the earliest Ducati v-twin, one of the Supersports is the one most likely to spring to mind. But this GT was actually the first, and possibly most significant machine to be powered by the elegant and desirable “Round Case” twin.

It’s difficult to overstate how important the v-twin was to Ducati's present fortunes. Prior to the introduction of the 750GT in 1971, Ducati built single-cylinder road and race motorcycles, the most sophisticated of which used their now widespread Desmo heads that eschewed springs for a more precise and positive system of cams to both open and close the valves. But, singles, while profitable and popular in much of the world for their simplicity, economy, and light weight, would never have allowed Ducati to develop a real fan base in that largest and most lucrative of markets: North America.

The original incarnation of the roadgoing v-twin did not include Desmodromic valve actuation: until the Pantah, that was reserved for the Supersport models exclusively. However, it did use a system of tower shafts and bevel gears to operate the cams for very precise timing, and that clockwork masterpiece is a far cry from modern motorcycle engines that are often mercifully hidden behind fairings or a tangle of wires and hoses.

Performance for the 748cc engine was relatively modest by today’s standards, but this was a considered a serious machine and a 750GT can definitely keep up with modern traffic. Braking won’t be up to current standards, but the 60 claimed horses and 407lb dry weight meant a top speed of 125mph, so you can easily out accelerate most cars leaving a stoplight and handling was excellent.

Although only 4,000 or so 750GTs were actually built, they paved the way for Ducati’s big-bike ambitions and their current status as the premier European bike brand, with a balance of sales volume and exotic cachet that extends well beyond the enthusiast market and into the general population. This example is being offered by Moto Borgotaro, a Brooklyn-based shop that specializes in quality classic bikes, maintenance, and restorations.

From the Seller: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale

Bike is presented by Moto Borgotaro Inc. located in Brooklyn , N.Y. 

This is a fantastic 3rd production stage 750GT that has a lot touches from the earlier series 750GT's -- I would call this the ultimate rider as that how it was set up... Why? well lets start with the good... complete motor rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA. earlier 72' tank and tins, completely rebuilt wheels (high lip Borrani style), frame re-done, chrome redone, new Conti pipes, updated electrical, low bars, newer Avon's.. the works.

Close up, flaws etc... The bike is excellent in person, minor flaws as follows -- dash is cracked (common) and it is the earlier style 3 light, scratch on underside of rt. hand pipe, you only see it if your looking for it, brake lever bent out a bit on the end. No it is not 100% original but frankly the bike is fantastic and Mr. Duzick's motor and restoration is excellent... ride this bike.. this is the one. 

-- There are more than 50 additional photos from restoration. 

DETAILS

  • Third production stage 750GT with earlier body work 
  • Engine # 756389
  • Engine crank on up rebuild in 2009 by Mike Duzick of Mikmar Motors, Paxinos, PA
  • 72' GT tank and tins all re-done in black 
  • Restored seat 
  • New Contis 
  • New Chrome all around 
  • Complete rebuilt wheels 
  • Original shocks
  • Sold with a clean New Jersey title
  • Only 513 miles since restoration in 2009 
  • New Sealed battery 
  • New electrical, and electronic ignition 
  • Newer Avon Roadriders 

The 750GT was probably the most practical of the original v-twins, and this one looks like the perfect collectible, round-case Ducati to actually ride on weekends. I'm a fan of Moto Borgotaro's recent offerings and this bike seems pretty representative of the kind of bikes they've had available in the past: not over-restored, cosmetically "perfect" museum pieces, but extremely clean, well-maintained bikes for collectors who also want to regularly use their acquisitions. Head on over to the eBay listing for some more info, or just to keep an eye on the auction: there are just a couple days left, and bidding is up north of $18,000.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1975 Ducati 750GT for Sale
Ducati May 2, 2018 posted by

One Owner: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

Prior to and even during the era of the 916, Ducati still needed to shift their relatively slow, old-tech 900SS. The 916 obviously grabbed headlines, handled like it was on the proverbial rails, and looked like sex. But it was also prohibitively expensive for the plebs to buy and especially to maintain, hideously uncomfortable for regular riding, and an all-around experts-only machine. The 900SS, on the other hand, was the everyman exotic, a real Ducati, but one that was based on slightly outdated technology. Today's Superlight helped stimulate a bit of fresh interest in the working-man's Italian sportbike by adding a bit of style, lightness, and shockingly yellow paint.

The fact that it's down a bit on straight-line performance doesn't mean it's a bad bike though, far from it. And "outdated technology" also means "simpler to maintain." Changing Ducati's toothed rubber cam-drive belts is a two-year or 12,000 mile service, whichever comes first. But the procedure is pretty straightforward and can be done by any competent mechanic. The valves on the two-valve engine aren't all that tricky either and the lack of liquid-cooling and the associated hoses and bracketry mean access isn't all that difficult. That is more work than a Japanese sportbike of the same period, but no one buys a now-classic sportbike thinking it won't need a bit of work, and at least here that work is pretty simple to do.

The Superlight was basically a 900SS with fully-adjustable suspension, a solo tail, open clutch, upswept exhausts pipes that increased cornering clearance, lightweight composite Marvic wheels with a distinctive polished rim, and the critically important numbered plaque on the triple clamp: just 861 were sold in 1993 so these are very rare, if not all that high-performance. Obviously, red is the traditional, and often preferred color for Ducatis, but it seems a shame that more aren't painted yellow like this example, since very, very few motorcycles look good in yellow. The handling of the 900SS was never in doubt, and the older Super Sport has much more comfortable ergonomics than the admittedly extreme 916. Just fit a more supportive Corbin saddle, throw on a backpack, and head out for a long day of riding, without concern that you'll need to down half a bottle of ibuprofen when you get back.

If eyeball-squashing acceleration is the only metric by which you judge a motorcycle, you're going to hate this bike. If you think a 170hp bike just isn't fast enough, this isn't your machine. But there's a reason that the two-valve, air-and-oil-cooled Pantah in its various iterations gets mentioned on every "best motorcycle engine ever" list: that sucker has character. I'm biased here: I think it's the best-sounding motorcycle engine of all time, especially with a bit of extra boom liberated by some carbon-fiber cans. But it also just has a great, punchy midrange that just kind of slings you forward after each shift. The 70-75 horses a good 900 makes at the rear wheel may not sound like much on paper, but it's plenty to whip you along a canyon road and legions of Ducati fans aren't just buying these because of some perceived mystique. I mean, of course some of them are just buying a name, the idea,  but the same is probably true of the majority of motorcyclists in one way or another.

This collector bike is more of a rider, though: it's a little scruffy, some of the panels have fatigue cracks around their mounting points, and it generally needs some attention to the details. But if the mechanical bits are all in good working order, you can do a bit of a rolling-restoration on it while enjoying the sound and feel of your vintage-ish Ducati. Starting bid is about half what a cleaner, lower-mileage Superlight might sell for, so if you're handy with the wrenches, this might be a great way to pick up an appreciating classic for cheap.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale

I’m the original and only owner. The Superlight was bought new in Austin, Texas and has a clear title. The yellow color was only available in the US. I’m a mechanical engineer and performed all routine maintenance myself. The bike has never been crashed. It is all original except the muffler brackets broke and were replaced and the rear wheel fatigued and was replaced with an appropriate Ducati Monster rear wheel. The bike is in fantastic condition with only some spider cracks in the body work in the usual places as shown in the pics. New Michelin tires, seat and windshield are in great shape, 26,041 miles. Comes with pictured rear stand. Runs, rides great.. You won’t be disappointed. 

Miles aren't as low as some other examples we've seen, but aren't anything to worry about: well-maintained Pantah engines can triple this mileage with ease. Just change the belts and adjust the valves, top off with oil occasionally between changes if the level gets low, and enjoy. The weak spots are well-known and relatively simple to sort out, parts to maintain them are widely available, and most everything on the Superlight is shared with the more common SS-SP and SS-CR versions. Aside from those Marvic wheels of course. It's a shame the rear wheel isn't the correct item, but with no takers so far at the $4995 opening bid, I expect this will be on the cheap side for a Superlight. Grab this one, pocket the savings, and prowl eBay for a matching rear.

-tad

One Owner: 1993 Ducati Superlight for Sale