Posts by Category: Cagiva

Cagiva February 3, 2017 posted by

Snapshot – 1987 Cagiva Allazzura 650SS

Founded in 1950 and a relatively minor manufacturer, the Castiglioni family leveraged the Ducati brand in 1985, and though they had thoughts of folding it into Cagiva, only a few larger displacement bikes were produced before they acknowledged Ducati's greater name recognition.  The Alazzurra was a sporty mid-size with a Ducati-branded desmodue aboard, and had a lot in common with, and improvements to, the Pantah on which it was based.

1987 Cagiva Allazzura 650SS for sale on eBay

With its newly designed supersport fairing, the Alazzurra looked a little more modern than the Pantah it was intended to succeed.  The recently designed engine was a revelation, especially above 5000 rpm.  Moderately-sized Brembo and Marzocchi hardware acquitted themselves in the braking and suspension departments but were more sport-touring than race replica.  The relatively light weight and willing engine endeared the Alazzurra to reviewers.

Coming out of a Florida home, this Cagiva has been faithfully rejuvenated and updated by its most recent owner.  A lot of details in the eBay auction:

This survivor was purchased from the widow of a friend of mine several months ago.  The odometer shows 5200 miles and is probably accurate based on the condition of the instrument cluster, the wiring and in particular the black chrome head pipes ( these are almost always corroded).  The valves are in spec and the oil came out pretty clean with no metal bits. Engine runs very strong, clutch doesn't slip and gears  shift well.

Upgrades include 38 mm Marzocchi front forks ( probably from an 860 GT ), K-N air filters, Dyna coils, 280 mm Brembo cast iron rotors, as new Avon tires, adjustable steering damper, Brembo Goldline brake and clutch levers, black chrome Conti mufflers ( there is a small ding on the left Conti above the C ).  These things were on the bike when I got it this past fall.  I found and rebuilt the missing rear brake caliper, rear  master cylinder, replaced the droopy rear turn signals with shorter new old stock CEV's, replaced the leaking fuel petcocks with Bevel Heavens aftermarket items, installed new old stock Superbike bars, English high quality bar end mirrors, rebuilt carburetors, added alloy tops, alloy oil and ignition sight  windows, stainless steel brake lines front and rear, new Thomasselli throttle and cables, timing belts, oil and filter, fork oil, replaced ignition pick up lines with Bevel Heaven kit, repaired the rear turn signal wiring ( amazingly all the wiring except the PU's and the rear turn signals remain intact, soft and pliable ), installed a new fuse box from Moto Guzzi to replace the original ( which was missing the cover ).  All that to the tune of about $2000-- receipts included.  All the lights and gauges work, the  brakes are very strong, the clutch doesn't slip, forks don't leak, steers and tracks true.

Still, there are a couple of things to do before she goes out the door, but not seeming deal killers, and the the Alazzurra has a much-improved Corbin seat from the previous owner.

As project bikes go, this one seems about 90 percent complete, and though the ask might be a little high for an obscure almost-done, the work that has been done looks ok and there is the "make offer" button.  The Alazzurra reviewed as a little less racey but more friendly than the preceding Pantah, and got gigged for gas-crisis jetting but was otherwise a nice rider.  No arguing the rarity, and if you like the classic feel, this low-mile Alazzurra could be sweet Sunday morning bike...

-donn

 

Snapshot – 1987 Cagiva Allazzura 650SS
Cagiva January 16, 2017 posted by

Some Assembly Required: 1989 Cagiva 500GP V589 for Sale

We don't normally post project or incomplete bikes here on RSBFS, but this one seemed too good to pass up: one of Cagiva's inspired but ultimately doomed series of 500cc GP machines, the V589. Battling against the established giants, Cagiva originally experimented with an inline-four configuration but eventually followed Suzuki's successful formula with a square four, before switching to a V4 in 1986. They may have struggled to win races, but if bonus points had been awarded for looks, the Cagivas might have stood a better chance, since they're considered by some to be the prettiest racebikes of all time.

Even if you don't agree, the specifications are certainly stunning: in an effort to keep up with the more established players, Cagiva experimented with some really wild technology, considering these were racing in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Extensive use of carbon fiber, traction-control, and electronic suspension were all tried to give Cagiva a competitive edge, although consistent success eluded them and they withdrew from competition at the end of 1994.

Earlier machines like this one had clear stylistic links to the Ducati 916 and Cagiva Mito which should be no surprise, as the V589 was designed by Massimo Tamburini. Some versions included a carbon fiber swingarm, although this one has the aluminum version. Much of this V589's bodywork is missing, but that's no surprise as those bits are pretty expandable on a race bike. Fortunately, it has the all-important frame, although it sounds like that will require some changes to re-orient the shock, as it was modified at some point to try an alternative configuration.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Cagiva 500GP V589 for Sale

This is a genuine 1989 Original Factory Works Cagiva V4 500 Grand Prix race bike, as ridden by Randy Mamola etc. It is sold as an incomplete project and is for restoration.

The engine has been rebuilt recently and is fresh but I would still check it as it's stood for a little while. The factory records confirms the original build date of 23/06/89. The frame is chassis 4, it has a special fuel tank which was used to test the ignition in the tank area and also modified to try a top mount shock rather than the original horizontal fitting. The swing arm and shock are the original horizontal type so the frame would need reverting to take the horizontal mounts. There is a linkage arm, the shock is a special Öhlins 500GP unit made for Cagiva. The dash includes temp gauge, Magnetti Marelli ignition, rectifier, battery, PV controller. There is a radiator, coil packs, PV motor, magnesium wheels with front discs, sprocket, cables for throttle and pv, the complete triple clamp magnesium assembly, footrest hangers, rear master cylinder, cast water pipes, upper front fairing, belly pan with air box sections. There are exhausts and silencers but will need modifying to fit as they are later year. Some small parts also. So it is a very good basis. All the parts are original Cagiva GP but as the bikes changed constantly from race to race some parts are from varied dates and may need work to fit. Please study the photos to see what is included, everything is shown.

The main missing parts are fork legs (Marzocchi or Öhlins were used at various times) carburettors, brake calipers (Brembo or AP were used) seat unit, mid-fairing section, tacho, bars with levers and throttle, wiring, some other small parts.

I can put the buyer in touch with a collector who has other Cagiva parts to finish the bike.

The price for this one-of-a-kind bit of racing history? Just $55,000 but, considering the missing parts and what they will cost to track down or create, this is definitely an "experts only" proposition, but those of us with reasonable means can still look at the possibilities and dream...

-tad

Some Assembly Required: 1989 Cagiva 500GP V589 for Sale
Cagiva March 28, 2016 posted by

Monster Fighter: 2000 Cagiva Raptor 1000 for Sale

2000 Cagiva Raptor R Side Front

Cagiva's Raptor was a followup to the Ducati Monster by the original bike's designer, Miguel Angel Galluzzi. Powered by Suzuki's powerful, reliable and, most importantly, low-maintenance v-twin in both 650 and 1000cc flavors, the Raptor attempted to recreate the magical Monster formula for Cagiva. Unfortunately, while it was better in pretty much every quantifiable way than the air-cooled Monster, it never really captured the imagination of the buying public and was never officially imported to the USA, making this one of only a couple I've ever seen for sale here.

2000 Cagiva Raptor L Side

With 105hp and weighing in at around 400lbs with gearing to suit a naked bike, the Raptor 1000 is a fairly quick machine, although it obviously can't compete with modern supernakeds like the KTM Superduke. But those contemporary bikes would be virtually uncontrollable without modern electronic aids, something the Raptor obviously lacks entirely.

2000 Cagiva Raptor Dash

Unfortunately, the only couple Raptors I've seen here in the US are the "standard" bikes, not the much wilder V-Raptor that featured a slightly insane, very angular pointed headlight unit and a pair of air-tubes that curved back over the tank and look like they were cribbed off a Bimota SB8R... The standard Raptor is a good-looking bike but, in my opinion, lacks the elemental quality of Galluzzi's original Monster. It's bland and overstyled at the same time, with gimmicky gauges and a busy cast frame in place of the simple trellis unit of the Ducati.

2000 Cagiva Raptor Tank

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Cagiva Raptor 1000 for Sale

This bike may look like a Ducati Monster, since it was designed by the same designer, Miguel-Angel Galluzzi. However, when Cagiva divested Ducati (Ducati and MV Agusta were all owned by Cagiva under Claudio Castiglioni at the time) the later-designed Raptor employed the more powerful and reliable Suzuki v-twin motor. Google 'Cagiva Raptor 1000 (2000-2005) Review' to read some of the background of the genesis of the Raptor.

This bike is rare in the U.S. This may be the only Cagiva Raptor in the U.S. If you own one I would be interested to hear from you. I don't think they were ever imported here.
The bike is exotic in its Italian naked bike background but extremely reliable with its fuel-injected water-cooled Suzuki motor which doesn't require the valve adjustment every 6000 miles like the Monster. The Suzuki motor is also much more powerful than the air-cooled Ducati Monster motors of that vintage. The Suzuki motor is still used in production bikes and in flat track racing.
 
I bought this bike from the second owner in 2005, flew out to Los Angeles and rode the bike the 2000 miles back home to Springfield, Illinois without problems. Since that time I've put relatively few miles on it riding locally. The maintenance history of the bike during the time I've owned it is shown below.
 
The bike has metric instrumentation, so the speedometer and odometer readings are in kilometers. This requires some mental calculating when riding.
 
Everything works on the bike, except that the headlight does not come on with the ignition key switch. So I currently have a rubber band around the flasher switch (found on European-version bikes) to keep the headlight on continuously. I have an appointment with the local Cagiva dealer to have this fixed, so that may be remedied by the time of sale if it doesn't require parts ordering.
 
The bike runs strong and has a great v-twin exhaust note. It pulls cleanly and handles nicely, weighing only a little over 400 pounds. It is essentially in original condition as can be seen from the photos, still wearing most of its original 'MV Agusta S.p.A.' stickers. The tires only have a couple thousand miles on them although they were installed in 2007. The front fender and tank color have been changed to an original factory Cagiva color because the fender and tank were silver with MV Agusta badging when I bought it.
 
The bike is being sold with its original exhaust pipes which are in very nice condition. I have recently installed a new set of Staintune stainless steel exhaust pipes which have a somewhat throatier sound. These are not included in the sale price, but I would sell them for an additional $800 (these are $1200 retail if you can find them) above the sale price of the bike.
 
Please note that the photos shown in this auction were taken last year. However, they are still an accurate depiction of the bike's condition as only a few hundred kilometers of local cruising have been put on the bike since the time of these pictures. The bike has always been stored indoors in a heated garage with battery tender during the off-season.
2000 Cagiva Raptor L Side Engine
When new, this would have been a lower-maintenance, more powerful alternative to Ducati's air-cooled Monster. Now, it's role is a bit more ambiguous. The Suzuki V-twin is a fantastic motor. It's plenty powerful, and I'm sure a set of TL1000R cams and other parts would likely slot right in to get the Raptor up to that bike's claimed 135bhp. Unfortunately, electrical parts and bodywork will likely be shipping over from Europe, so "reliability" becomes a relative term.
2000 Cagiva Raptor SeatThis particular machine has very reasonable miles considering its age and looks to be in excellent cosmetic shape. Which is certainly a great starting point for a bike this rare at this price point: you certainly don't want to buy a cheap, basketcase exotic.  In spite of the condition, there are no takers yet at the $4,500 starting bid. Considering a decent Monster of the same era can be had for much less, this may just be priced a bit high.
-tad
2000 Cagiva Raptor R Side
Monster Fighter: 2000 Cagiva Raptor 1000 for Sale
Cagiva September 13, 2015 posted by

Rare Curiosity in the USA: 1986 Cagiva Aletta Oro S2 for Sale

1986 Cagiva S2 L Side Front

Cagiva's "Aletta Oro" S2 was designed to be a stylish, entry-level sporty motorcycle for countries where a "starter bike" is defined as something other than a 600lb, 883cc machine with no cornering clearance. The name translates as "gold wing" and the little bike offered up the usual light weight and nimble handling required to compete in the class.

1986 Cagiva S2 R Side Rear

This is no race-rep corner-carving two-stroke like Aprilia's RS250, and had comfortable ergonomics, oil-injection, a six-speed gearbox, and a convenient electric-start that set it apart from other bikes in the class. Interestingly, that little door in the right-side fairing doesn't cover the fuel cap. Instead it allows you to access the water-cooled bike's radiator filler. And that comprehensive dash looks like it was taken straight off the Alazzurra 650, something that can't be said about too many bikes...

1986 Cagiva S2 Dash

So while this was really never intended to be much more than a starter sportbike, it is still very cool and a far-cry from the Ninja 250s that passed for beginner "sportbikes" here in the USA. With 23hp and a sub-300 pound dry weight, it should be fun and very manageable.

1986 Cagiva S2 R Side Engine

This example isn't in absolutely perfect condition, with a few minor chips and scrapes and those aftermarket rear signals, but looks to have been well cared for all 2,500 miles, and the body panels appear to be in good shape, a serious concern when shopping for a weird budget bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Cagiva S2 for Sale

Up for sale is a clean, and very rare 1986 Cagiva S2 125cc motorcycle. We are a multi-line motorcycle dealership, selling new BMW motorcycles in addition to Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and a few other brands. This Cagiva S2 125cc is both electric start (although there is no battery currently installed) & also kick start too.  Motorcycles like these are getting rarer & rarer each year & a bike like this deserves to be part of somebody's Italian motorcycle collection!  This bike has not been started in the past 2-3 years, but was in great running condition last time it was on the road.

A hard to find and rare motorcycle like this needs to be preserved in this original condition.  This Cagiva has just over 2,517 miles and was previously registered in New Hampshire, which does not issue titles for motorcycles older than 1999.

1986 Cagiva S2 R Side

I'd expect parts to keep the engine running wouldn't be difficult to obtain in this era of eBay, although shipping times could have you waiting a while. Bodywork however, could be a pain and/or expensive to ship, so while this will probably prove to be a cheap buy, don't drop it or you might find yourself creating the world's first S2 "streetfighter..."

-tad

1986 Cagiva S2 L Side

Rare Curiosity  in the USA: 1986 Cagiva Aletta Oro S2 for Sale
Cagiva April 18, 2015 posted by

Mini Strada: 1987 Cagiva Freccia 125 on its way to UK

freccia1

Don't feel bad if you aren't familiar with this mini Ducati Paso; this is only the 2nd Cagiva Freccia posted on RSBFS.  This little Italian two stroke from Cagiva is called the Freccia (which means arrow). It was introduced in May 1987 and was designed by Massimo Tamburini who is now famous for the 916 and MV Agusta F4. The Freccia was effectively a 125cc version of the 750/907 Paso.

Cagiva claimed the Freccia could hit a top speed of around 97 mph, which was close to what most 250s could achieve at the time.  Reviewers of the the Freccia wrote that it had decent revs at around 3000 rpm but really came on the boil at 7000 rpm.

"Rev it and you get  a big rush in power as the exhaust valve opens fully... put the power bump together with a new chassis and riders get a 125-class MotoGP experience, provided they kept the engine at the upper reaches of the rev range."

Click here to rear a review of the Freccia.

freccia5

1987 Cagiva Freccia 125 for sale on ebay uk

This particular Freccia is being offered by a UK seller but apparently its still in Japan right now.   The seller indicates it will be available in the UK in a few months so inspection of the bike isn't possible right now.

As for condition,  the bike looks dirty with a few scuffs/decal removal residues but I don't see any evidence of crash damage.  Color scheme appears to be correct (available colors were Red/White and Blue/White).  Also I don't see significant amounts of rust which is always a concern with bikes from Japan.

The seller is a dealer and the ebay post provides limited info about the bike.  Here is what the seller has to say:

  • low mileage (only 778 on the odometer!)
  • original condition
  • turns over with good compression ,requires general servicing.
  • sold AS IS

freccia3

So what's this little Italian two stroke worth?  Well it's certainly rare, it's a two stroke, and it was  designed by the legendary Tamburini.  The price when new in in 1987 was 4,698,900 Lira which converts to about 1,750 GBP or $2,2624 USD today.  But the "As-is" statement from the dealer is a bit of a concern since this can mean anything from "all servicing must be done by new owner" to "its held together by zip ties".  I would think that anyone interested in this junior version of the Paso might want to chat to the dealer and if possible, do a visual inspection when it arrives in the UK later this year.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Mini Strada: 1987 Cagiva Freccia 125 on its way to UK
Cagiva March 20, 2015 posted by

Bite-Sized Italian: 1998 Cagiva Mito125

1998 Cagiva Mito L Side Rear

At a glance, it'd be easy to mistake this frisky little Cagiva Mito for something else... Looking for all the world like a 2/3 scale Ducati 916, right down to the instruments and the transverse steering damper mounted to the headstock, it's really just that aluminum beam frame that gives the game away. Ironically, the Mito is much, much rarer, especially in the US, than it's bigger, more mature cousin.

1998 Cagiva Mito Dash

The Mito was introduced in 1989 and powered by a water-cooled 125cc two-stroke single that put out 34hp and used a seven-speed gearbox to keep the peaky little motor on the boil. Ridden to victory in the 1994 Italian 125cc championship by none other than Valentino Rossi, this little race-replica is a sharp-handling little machine, and while 30-odd horses may not sound like much, consider that it's coming from just 125 screaming cubic centimeters...

1998 Cagiva Mito Cockpit

Earlier bikes had a less 916-ish design, but the bike was restyled in 1994 by, not surprisingly, Massimo Tamburini himself.

1998 Cagiva Mito R Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Cagiva Mito for Sale

When I saw this  machine for the first time I was sure that it was a 916 Ducati like the one I have owned since 1995.(designed by the same designer). The difference was the 7 speed gearbox which was my first clue that it wasn't a 916.The Mito is quite rare in the USA cuz the 2 strokes are not popular here in the states. They are very popular in Europe and in fact in some countries can be ridden by younger riders with the speed reduced. In fact it would only register the equivalent of 65 mph(its KM equipped).After modifying with racing parts I was seeing 112 mph(180 km) on the speedo. My investment is over $8000.00 plus labor. The machine has only 399KM and now is for sale(too many toys).

This machine has never been raced ,only ridden on the street to prove the package. If you are an inspiring racer there is a class for it here in the USA ,or its a crazy cool street rod.

1998 Cagiva Mito Front

The Buy it Now price is set at $6,000, with plenty of time left on the listing. That is a lot of cash for a 125: an Aprilia RS250 would provide similar lightweight performance for less money. But, as good-looking as that bike is, the "baby 916" aesthetic of the Mito really can't be beat and, if you're a collector, you're unlikely to find a more original, low-mileage example. Especially with just 399km on the clock, it'd be a shame to thrash this the way the builders intended.

-tad

1998 Cagiva Mito R Side Fairing

Bite-Sized Italian: 1998 Cagiva Mito125