Posts by Category: BMW

BMW May 19, 2017 posted by

Plenty – 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika

BMW had great success with its long-running R1100S, and brought home some trophies, at least in the Boxer Cup marque series and some longer endurance races.  The racey Boxer Cup Replika has Randy Mamola's signature and some interesting updates from the S.  This one has just break-in miles, and looks terrific.

2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika for sale on eBay

At least until the R1200S came out, the R1100S had the ultimate boxer engine, the 1085cc making 98 hp with the help of single overhead cams actuating four valves per side.  The BCR sports carbon valve covers and a Laser exhaust.  The R1100S used BMW-centric Telelever front end and Paralever rear which included shaft drive, but the Replika used longer fork tubes to increase possible lean angle, and a shorter rear torque arm to sharpen up handling.  Standard BMW dampers were superseded by fully adjustable Öhlins on the BCR.  Brakes are up to BMW's fine standard, and though ABS was available it's not present on this example.

 

Leading a sheltered life in west coast Florida, this BCR looks excellent in the factory's white and blue checkerboard.  Unadulterated but not neglected, the owner claims a new timing chain but this would have meant a huge event, so I'm thinking ( hoping ! ) they are referring to a new alternator belt.  Notes from the eBay auction:

An eye-catcher for sure, especially when pulling into a BMW dealership

Meticulously maintained in Air Conditioned, Dehumidified Space

Started and driven short distances every other week using octane boosted marine fuel

Brand new battery, timing belt (chain), Oil-Filter-Plugs changed at least annually

Rides beautifully, more comfortable than a Sports Touring Bike than a Sports Bike
 
Reviews of the R1100S almost always included a caveat, " for a sport tourer " or " for a BMW ".  While it's less of an issue for the Replika, it's still hefty at 550 lbs. wet.  That weight will disappear in the cruise, but in the twisties or at a track day it will exact its toll.  But maybe your sporty ride is to the racetrack, an informal show, and home again.  BMW has over 90 years of motorcycle manufacture in the rearview mirror, and a great sporting heritage.  And while it has been overtaken by the more conventionally sporty S1000RR, the Boxer Cup Replika is plenty quick for the average bear, and has enough giddyup to get arrested in 2nd gear...
-donn
 
Plenty – 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika
BMW April 14, 2017 posted by

Pugilist: 2003 BMW Boxer Cup

I know there are some RSBFS faithful out there that refuse to believe a BMW can be sporty OR rare. I beg to differ. As such, I offer you this 2003 Boxer Cup machine, created by BMW to capitalize on what was essentially a one-make Battle Of The Twins series. As #172 in a 200-bike limited production, it is justifiably rare - even if this is really an upscale version of the R1100S model. As for the sporting equation, I rely on the likes of Reg Pridmore, Randy Mamola, and Kevin Schwantz to comment; all have been competitors on BMW twins. Sure, at age 77 Reg could probably beat all of us on track even if he were riding a motorized skateboard, but each of these professional riders has shown the possible performance attainable from the bikes out of Bavaria.

2003 BMW Boxer Cup for sale on eBay

With carbon fiber fender and mudguard, a full belly pan, carbon valve covers with cylinder head pucks, twin under-seat exhaust, Ohlins suspension on both ends and a special setup that raises the rear of the bike to aid in cornering clearance, the Replika machine is as sporty as you could get in the BMW world during this time. Evoking the 5 year racing series was a marketing coup for BMW, and with model-specific graphics (including Mamola's replicated signature on the fairing) this BMW promises to be something different.

From the seller:
Thank you for viewing my favorite moto: 2003 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika
This rare bike is amazing to ride! Comfortable, smooth, fast, and people love the timeless design. If you have made it this far into my listing, then I don't need to write 10 pages explaining the Boxer Cup racing series and the limited production of very rare commemorative Bimmers that were sold around the world. Specifically, this moto is a great example of a well-preserved and maintained R1100S BCR that has always been adult ridden, never dropped or even leaned on, garage-kept, and will always be a fan favorite to every type of rider.

More from the seller:
I purchased this from a private owner in spring of 2016, had it enclosed shipped from Florida, and loved every second of riding it. Sadly, I am moving and need to downsize for the time being. The spark plugs, all fluids, and tires were replaced at 7,300 miles (shortly before I purchased it). This bike is nearly spotless: I'd rate the condition of it around a 9.3/10 with only stress cracks on the windscreen, a few very minor scratches on the gas tank, seat cover, and a few chips on the lower front of the bellypan. I have pampered this moto for 3,000 miles, and most of them are highway from weekend adventures. The rear tire is starting to show a little wear, but should easily perform for another 2,500-3,000 miles before replacing.

Sure, it was not until the S1000RR and piles of money that BMW finally met the competition head on in World Super Bike - but the Boxer Cup paved the way. This example is very, very clean. Miles are certainly low for what we all know to be a dead reliable lump of a motor, and unlike some of the high-strung Italian supermodels you can ride this one through some pretty decently sized service intervals. It's everything you would expect from a BMW twin, with a little extra cachet, performance and exclusivity. Check it out here for all of the details and some great photos. Then jump back into the comments section and share your thoughts on the Boxer Cup - genuinely good race series, or mad marketing ploy von Deutschland?

MI

Pugilist: 2003 BMW Boxer Cup
BMW April 5, 2017 posted by

The Ultimate Boxer: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale

In the early days of motorcycle design, there were a variety of alternatives to the telescopic forks that have become the standard in an industry evolving towards efficiency but, unfortunately also towards homogeny. Even the S1000RR that followed today’s HP2 Sport as BMW’s flagship sportbike is evidence of this: that striking asymmetrical bodywork is wrapped around an inline four and conventional, if highly sophisticated suspension. Sure, it blew everything into the weeds upon its introduction and has more performance than any mortal can actually use on the road, but it’s kind of… same-y. You certainly can’t accuse the HP2 of that.

It may look like a pair of telescopic forks up front, but that’s actually BMW’s Telelever front end, and the HP2 features a pair of Öhlins shocks: one in the rear, and one controlling the movement of the front wheel. These days, the only real players in the alternative front end game are BMW and Bimota, although there are always a few weirdo independent builders lurking in the wings. Forkless front ends have distinct theoretical advantages, but generally seem to have two problems. One, they’re more complicated to design and manufacture, and multiple linkages in set ups like the one used by Bimota can lead to play and vagueness in the handling, something that should actually be a strong point of the design. But the bigger issue seems to be the fact that the rest of the industry revolves around telescopic forks. They aren’t ideal, but people know how to set them up and make them work, you can buy highly-developed components off the rack from specialists, and riders are familiar with how they feel: Bimotas and BMWs are actually engineered with a bit of dive tuned in, so they don’t feel completely alien to riders used to telescopic forks.

Like the front suspension, the engine of the HP2 is a bit more than it seems as well. Sure, it uses BMW’s iconic flat-twin engine with its longitudinal crank, shaft-drive, and cylinder heads sticking out where you might find the highway pegs on a Harley Fat Boy. But inside, you’re looking at titanium connecting rods, and the bike debuted new four-valve cylinder heads with radial valves that helped the bike produce a claimed 128hp. Those heads feature skid plates in case you deck them out on track: roadgoing cornering clearance is generous, but track riders are advised to add a bit of rear ride height, and might need to adjust their racing lines slightly if they’re used to dragging elbows in the corners. For the rest of us, this is a very capable mount for road or track.

Elsewhere, the bike was kitted out with the best of everything: monstrous radial Brembos, adjustable ergonomics, and even a quickshifter that was the very first fitted from the factory to a production motorcycle. Carbon fiber is everywhere and includes a self-supporting rear seat unit, and helped the bike weigh in at a relatively svelte 392lbs dry. Keep in mind that those exotic titanium rods will need replacement at the 30,000 mile mark, but that’s a long way off for a collectible like this, and at least you just need two of them…

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale

This is the ABS version.  One owner bike.  Own the coolest boxer ever. This is number #103.  Only 1987 miles.  Bike is nearly perfect.  There is a small blemish on tail section.  Tires are like new, bike has been maintained at local BMW dealer with full records. Currently has extended warranty until June of 2017.

So the original listing makes the lazy eBay poster move of copy/pasting the bike's manufacturer's specs in place of any detailed information about the bike being offered. Sellers take note: no one cares about the fact that the bike has a three-phase alternator. And just what in the hell is "inner leg curve, unladen weight"? If you've got some sort of wild racing cams in your bike, the people looking to buy it might want to know. Otherwise, it just smacks of "well, I know I should post something here in this section..." It's basically non-information: no one is reading it, and most of it is pretty meaningless even if they did. I'm assuming with just a shade under 2,000 miles it probably hasn't needed anything. And even if this isn't the original owner, I'm sure the "full records" mean that the seller can confidently say "there are no issues" leave it at that.

HP2s are quirky, fast, rare, and actually usable, although they don't seem to be particularly desirable yet. Maybe they're confusing to collectors? Neither fish nor fowl, with decent, but not eyeball-flattening performance and sporty, but not particularly beautiful looks. High-quality, light-weight, race-bred parts attached to a platform ultimately limited by design in terms of absolute performance. But with a whole raft of perfectly fast, competent, and slightly vanilla inline fours out there that can be had by the bucket load, it's hard to put a price on character and individuality. Or maybe you can: the Buy It Now price for this one is $16,999 which is pretty much right on the money for a nice HP2

-tad

The Ultimate Boxer: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for Sale
BMW March 28, 2017 posted by

For a Beemer – 2004 BMW R1100S

After a 20-year break since the R100/S, BMW's re-entrance to the more sporting side was thoughtfully  considered, with lots of new engineering, and as they approach classic status, a great success.  This nicely-updated R1100S looks excellent and fans of the brand would say, just broken in with 22,000 miles.

2004 BMW R1100S for sale on eBay

The R1100S arrived with concepts new to sportbikes - the four-valve 1085cc boxer, Telelever  front and Paralever rear suspension with shaft drive, single-plate clutch, ABS, and some things newer to BMW - clip-on handlebars and underseat exhaust.  BMW kept their vaunted build quality and usual Bosch fuel injection, but tried to leave the weight behind.  The engine is a stressed member of the aluminum chassis, and the supersport fairing flows from the beak, over the tank to the pillion cover.   Great power at 98 hp with 72 ft.-lbs. torque, and with a dry weight of 505 lbs. it's light for a BMW.

Offered by an Illinois dealer, this R1100S looks well taken care of and has the optional grey / orange checkerboard.  A more sporting build since the ABS, centerstand, and heated grips were left off.  The owner has upgraded to Ohlins dampers on both ends, and added conspicuity lights on the fork legs.  The bags look like they just came out of the closet where, handy as they are, they should be returned.  From the eBay auction:

This 2004 BMW R1100S has only 22,370 miles and has had all of its maintenance performed by Cycle Werks in Barrington, we are an authorized BMW dealer.  This bike comes with BMW Saddle Bags, Ohlins suspension, Aux. Driving Lights, and much more!

For a BMW it's sporty, light, and this one with low miles, and though succeeded by the R1200S, the R1100S is regarded as the better track machine.  The bike was the source of many years of the Boxer Cup, a single marque support series, resulting in the special edition Boxer Cup Replica.  But you can find an R1100S at almost any track day or racing school, just look for the guy with no trailer, he'll be riding it home...

-donn

 

For a Beemer – 2004 BMW R1100S
BMW February 24, 2017 posted by

Brains and Brawn: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

Before the introduction of their conventional, but devastatingly effective S1000RR, BMW was known for their durable, quirky motorcycles and "old man in a Roadcrafter suit" image. But in the lead-up to the introduction of the RR, BMW attempted to revive their forgotten, but very legitimate sporting image with the limited-production HP2 Sport. BMW already had an inline-four engine that would, on the surface, have seemed like a more likely candidate for sportbike-ification, but BMW instead chose to base their sportbike on their iconic 180° flat-twin configuration. Did they choose the twin to clearly separate the planned inline-four superbike from their previous offerings? Or was the existing, longitudinally-mounted "brick" simply too heavy for sportbike duty? I'm not sure, but the resulting HP2 ended up being much more "nerd Ducati" and less "Teutonic Gixxer."

In terms of specification, the HP2 is surprisingly close to Ducati's L-twin-powered superbikes of the period: two cylinders, 128hp near the 9,500 rpm redline, and a claimed 392lbs dry weight is probably closer to the older 999 than the 1198, but the HP2 is still in the ballpark. That low weight looks especially impressive when you realize power reaches the rear wheel via a heavy driveshaft, and the BMW comes with a raft of high-performance parts to turn what might otherwise have been a bit of a sow's ear into the proverbial silk purse: dual overhead cam heads, radial valves, titanium connecting rods, adjustable ergonomics, and even a self-supporting carbon-fiber subframe. The lack of a slipper clutch is unfortunate, considering the rotational mass of the powertrain, but one is available if you have the time or money to drop the engine and install one.

The sometimes vague feeling often criticized by reviewers of BMW's "alternatively suspended" bikes is happily missing in the HP2, and handling is considered a high point, while Brembo monoblock calipers offer impressive stopping power well in excess of what might be required to rein in those 128 horses. The heads sticking out in the breeze do ultimately limit cornering clearance, but you'll need to be on a race track before it becomes anything more than an academic issue. Luckily, it comes fitted with plastic sliders... A bit of rear ride height helps, but dragging an elbow in corners might ultimately be impossible if you lack simian proportions.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale

Original adult owner purchased from Lone Star BMW in Austin Texas.  Carbon fiber body panels, forged aluminum rims, brembo antilock brakes, clutchless upshift, and ohlines suspension.  All warranty work done and service completed.  Replaced the fuel pump with a ethanol compatible unit. Never dropped, raced or crashed.  There is a blemish on the right lower fairing from a stone.  This is the ultimate boxer. With only approximately 115 ever imported to the US, you don't have to wait for this to become a rare classic - it already is!  Clear Texas title.  2016 miles.

Keep in mind that there's a price to be paid for all that exclusivity and high-performance technology: these weren't meant for casual owners and, when new, were priced north of $20,000. Maintenance costs are appropriate for a low-production exotic as well, and BMW recommends the titanium connecting rods get replaced at 30,000 miles, so start saving now. Hey, at least valve-adjustments should be a snap!

-tad

Brains and Brawn: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport for Sale
BMW January 8, 2017 posted by

Feeling Feint – 2007 BMW R1200S

Not feathering the throttle in the twilight of the flat twin engine's development, BMW made a great re-design for their 4-valve boxer sport. The R1200S was more sport and less touring, and this mint example has done very little of either.

2007 BMW R1200S for sale on eBay

For 2007 BMW went more mainstream, shelving the cast aluminum backbone for a much lighter trellis frame, with the power unit providing support for the Telelever front and Paralever rear suspension.  The oil-cooled heads have four valves running off a single overhead cam with 122 hp being the result.  The usual outstanding brakes are available with a sport-oriented two channel ABS that also has a defeat switch.  Frame-mounted supersport fairing flows into the sculpted tank and seat fairing, above a couple of the nicest alloy wheels ever.

There's a sad part to the story of every 10 year-old sportbike that hasn't even made oil-change miles, but it's good news for a fan of the model.  This R1200S was also well-spec'ed with ABS, heated grips, and jazzy option paint.  Original tires would need a serious reality check before any kind of spirited riding.  The Georgia-based second owner says this in the eBay auction:

Complete leather box and key fob, pressure gauge etc. the manuals and brochures are as new. I have the original invoice. Bike has been in heated garage. Candy Cane Paint ($800 option) with BMW suspension and 5.5" rear wheel. ABS, heated grips, factory power plug, battery pigtail for charger. Leo Vince Carbon cylinder covers, Pitbull rear stand. Oil changed with factory oil. Brake purge and bleed. NO codes on my GS911. Original tires, appears as new, but stored out of the ultraviolet. This bike shows as new.

The R1200S with options went into the upper teens, and the auction has quite a few bids with the reserve still unknown.  Even though it reviewed as the sport tourer that didn't forget about the sport, expectations still have to be tailored to the realities of the big twin, which will dance a half-step to the right when you open the throttle exiting a corner.  But if you missed out on the 1200S ten years ago, this would be a good way to rewind and try a so-new-the-headers-aren't-blue, very luxurious, and rather rare super sport...

-donn

 

 

Feeling Feint – 2007 BMW R1200S