Classified features and exclusions:

  • No RSBFS staff editorial, your content only
  • Vendors are welcome to list items for sale.
    Contact us for advertising your business.
  • 3 high resolution images
  • Up to 150 words
  • 1 month listing
  • 1 edit per month
  • $10 per month

Classified ads return to RSBFS!

While we focus on the very best SportBike for sale listings on the main page of the site, this area is to cater to everything else that our audience may find of interest:

  • Bikes that aren’t perfect
  • Bikes that aren’t SportBikes
  • Projects
  • Memoriabilia
  • Parts
  • Pretty much anything!

We handle every classified in the same manner we do our Featured Listings:  by hand and working with you via email.

Email us to get started!

Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Honda January 2, 2015 posted by Tad Diemer

All the Toys: Honda NSR250

Honda NSR250 R Side

Here's one from Craigslist in South Carolina, a Honda NSR250. The NSR250 was a roadgoing two-stroke v-twin sportbike that's been largely forgotten here in the Land of "Bigger is Better," where two-strokes have long since vanished from the road. But among those in-the-know, they're much sought-after by collectors and fans of the two-stroke Moto GP era, and riders looking for a light, fast track day machine that stresses finesse over brute power.

Honda NSR250 R Side Front

250's are often associated with the derogatory "learner bike" epithet, but it's obvious at a glance that this is no commuter or toy: triple disc brakes, aluminum frame, and single-sided swingarm scream "high-performance" and the six-speed cassette gearbox obviously offers no real benefit for a street bike... The NSR's little 249cc v-twin featured about 45bhp stock, but can be tuned to make as much as 60 without breaking a sweat, and that makes for a potent package in a bike that weighed in under 300lbs dry.

Honda NSR250 L Side Rear

In addition, this example features a host of tasty, high-spec upgrades to the bike's components, swapping in lighter, or higher-performing items to increase racetrack prowess, although it still has road-legal lights and signals. It looks to be in great shape, but there's a bit of a fly in the ointment... From the original Craigslist posting: Honda NSR250 for Sale

Honda NSR250 titled and street legal in SC. Bike is in very nice condition, but it is not 100% original so I am pricing accordingly at $8500 obo with SE wheels and stock credit card PGM, or $10.5k obo for SP wheels and PGM with stock and HRC credit cards w/ other HRC upgrades:

1) Titled in SC as a 2008 ASVE NSR250 w/ an assigned VIN# different from the original. That means the bike was reassembled in 2008, and I could not use Honda's name. This has nothing to do with salvage, so everything is perfect with the paperwork, and both VIN's show on the bike and coincide in the DOT computers in TX and SC. I originally titled it in TX in 2008, and then moved to SC in 2010, and titled it in SC in 2014.
2) Frame is not original 1995 SP since original frame was altered by first US owner in Washington State, therefore I have a different frame that does not have the '95 SP series VIN #, but I suspect it was a '94 or '95 frame.
3) I sold the original SP forks and it now has SE forks on it. They look great and were rebuilt recently.
4) I do not run oil injection and I do not have the parts, but they are available on ebay cheap.
5) 1995 SP Dry Clutch Motor is fully rebuilt with less than 50 miles on it. It is awesome, pulling small power wheelies in partially restricted mode/stock carbs in 1st and 2nd gear. Wiring is stock and not spliced yet.
6) JHA aftermarket pipes with Tyga silencers
7) HRC airbox with Hi-Flo reeds, stock carbs, and Uni-filters
8) HRC single core radiator, hose, lower head conversion, and overflow system with no thermostat - continuous flow and works great
9) Penske Rear Shock that was rebuilt/sprung by Thermosman
10) Very nice 1995 SP bodywork with an excellent OEM spare upper fairing
11) 1995 SP Tank was repainted with original OEM decals and then cleared over - looks very good.

Honda NSR250 Dash

The list goes on, and includes modifications and updates. Those modifications destroy the originality a bit, but it uses appropriate, high-quality parts that should improve performance and look very trick... Unfortunately, the price seems a bit on the high side, considering those title issues that the seller mentions. Whether or not this will present a problem for you will depend on where you live and your intended use: many state DMV's have relatively lax rules, but the iffy status could cause problems if you try to register it in someplace like California or New York... So, caveat emptor.

Of course, if you buy this as a track bike, a role for which it should be ideally suited, you can sidestep that whole problem.

Honda NSR250 L Side Front

So: a great-looking rider, not a collector. A really, really nice "bitsa" as the Brits say. If your local DMV doesn't object to the funky title, this will be the perfect tool to terrorize your local back roads. If they do object, sell the lights and street bodywork on eBay, fit some lightweight panels, and have yourself a grand old time passing much bigger machines on the brakes and in the corners at your local race track.

-tad

Honda NSR250 L Side

All the Toys: Honda NSR250
Yamaha December 31, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Even Better Than the Real Thing? Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica

Update 12.31.2014: We first saw this GP replica in July when it failed to get any action with an opening bid of $26k. It's back on eBay now with a buy-it-now of $24,500. Happy New Year everyone! -dc

This Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica is the rarest of the rare, a one-of-a-kind opportunity to buy a one-of-a-kind motorcycle. Meant to recreate Yamaha’s iconic year 2000 OWK6 racing machine in the classic Marlboro livery, this bike may not be the original article, but is a hugely impressive machine in terms of the enthusiasm and money invested. Powered by a tuned 500cc V4 two-stroke engine and suspended by Yamaha R6 bits, with an authentic replica frame and bodywork, this might be the closest you’ll ever get to riding an actual GP machine.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica L Front

I am no expert on these bikes, so I’d love to see the peanut gallery weigh in as to the accuracy of this replica. I’ve been next to full-on WSB and Moto GP motorcycles and it’s always interesting to me how they still basically look like motorcycles. Racing cars, especially Formula 1 machines, really look nothing like actual cars, aside from the four round rubber bits. But racing motorcycles? It’s the details that really impress, since they have the same basic silhouette as their road-going counterparts, but chock-full of amazing details.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica L Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica for Sale

A replica of the legendary Yamaha YZR500 from year 2000. Based on a chassi handbuilt in aluminium by Mick Costin "Costin motorcycle enginering" Sydney Australia. An exact replica but made to accept the Yamaha RD500LC 2 stroke v4 engine. Also rear sets and suspension linkages comes from Mick. This one has a 1985 1GE engine rebuilt with new bearings, oil seals, clutch, pistons, and it is tuned "TSI mods" done by Orluff racing in sweden. 1 mm overbore. Samco silicon hoses for the modified Yamaha R6 radiator, Jim lomas custom made exhausts in stainless steel with carbon silencers. New Mikuni TM28 flatslide carburettors with new K&N Filters. The bike was run in a dyno bench in may 2014 and has 99 hp on the rear wheel. Forks, triple clamps, swingarm, rims and rear brakes comes from a 2006 Yamaha R6. Rear shock and front fender in carbon comes from a Yamaha TZ250, PVM radial front brake master cylinder, goodridge steel brake hoses to tociko 4 pot calipers. Galfer wave brake discs front and rear, new galfer brake pads, Fuel tank is a heavy modified unit from a VFR400 nc30 with a Pingel dual outlet fuel tap. Fairings are copys in glasfiber made by Motoforza from a 2000 YZR500 painted in Marlboro red. Standard RD 500 tacho and temp gauge, New Regina 520 chain and Afam alu sprockets, Only scrubbed in Michelin power supersport tires, The bike has only been ridden twice since it was built. I have many more pictures taken from building this bike that i will send to seriosly intrested buyer.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica R Rear

I’m seriously impressed with the dedication and money that went into creating this motorcycle, but I’m not actually sure what you’d do with this thing after you buy it: it’s not the genuine article, so it’s a tough call for collectors, and it’s very, very pricey for a track day or vintage racing junky. On the plus side: you can actually ride it, without worrying you'll crash a priceless and historic racebike.

Or maybe, if you live in a more permissive state, it can, as the seller mentions, be registered for road use… How hilarious would that be? Suction cup a little projector-beam headlamp and a bicycle taillight, a pair of LED turn signals… I’d read recently that Britain actually has a special “track bike” MOT that allows limited use of track day bikes lacking the usually required road equipment to get to and from the racecourse during daylight hours.

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica R Side Engine

It’s certainly a very nice curiosity, and one I hope finds the right buyer. At $27,000 with the Reserve Not Met, that’s going to be a tall order. Please also note that the bike is currently in Sweden, if you didn't notice the non-USA license plates on the cars in the background of the photographs. Regardless, there’s very little time left on this auction, so move quickly if you want to get your hands on this one-of-a-kind motorcycle!

-tad

2000 Yamaha YZR500 Replica L Side

 

Even Better Than the Real Thing? Yamaha YZR500 GP Replica
Yamaha December 30, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Exotic Yammie: 1989 FZR750R OW01 in New Zealand

Update 12.30.2014: This OW01 is back on eBay with a buy-it-now of $20k. If you missed it the first time, this is a very reasonable buy! -dc

Because the specs and overall silhouette for the Yamaha FZR750R are misleadingly similar to the regular FZR750 and don't feature an exotic engine configuration like the Honda's RC30's gear-driven V4, it might be easy to overlook the OW01 as simply a warmed-over FZR. But it's every bit as exotic as its rivals, boasting pure racing guts and high-spec bits throughout.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 L Side

In fact, with only 500 made between 1989 and 1991, it’s fair to say that the OW01 is even more rare and desirable than the RC30, although it was not nearly successful in racing as the Honda.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Frame Plate

Because while it might look like a fairly standard FZR, everything about the OW01 is “bespoke”: castings of magnesium, internals of titanium, bore x stroke not shared with any other production Yamaha, flat-slide carbs to fed fuel, and even the frame, while looking stock, was made from higher-quality aluminum. The bike featured Yamaha’s signature five-valve heads and midrange-fattening EXUP valve that gave the motor a surprisingly street-friendly drivability, assuming you kept in mind that the flat-slide carbs couldn’t just be whacked open at low revs…

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Rear Wheel

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

The OW01 was Yamaha’s answer to the Honda VFR750R RC30 and is much rarer and exotic. When launched for 1989 in the UK the OW01 cost a staggering £12,700, more than twice as much as an FZR1000, with the optional race kit adding £2,415 to the price. Just 197 made their way to the UK, and only 88 were road registered, many of which went straight into collections. By way of comparison, the Honda RC30 cost £8,499 but its race kit was considerably more extensive and expensive. (Yamaha included much more race-orientated trickery as standard, hence the difference). To put all that into perspective, the 2014 list price of a Yamaha YZF-R1 superbike is just £12,399 .

We bought this example in Tokyo and it is frame #648. It is in excellent condition and has travelled just 4,700 miles or 7,600 kilometers. The OW01 is super collectible, we have another example on display in our Auckland showroom which has travelled just 2,800 kilometers. The OW01 is better than stocks or money in the bank we think.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Tank

The 119hp output seems pretty lukewarm by today’s standards, but this was state-of-the-art in 1989, a barely-tamed animal for the road that existed only to enable Yamaha's World Superbike racing efforts, although the EXUP valve did make it reasonably usable on the street. Just keep in mind: like most homologation specials, these require much more maintenance to keep them running than the everyday FZR on which it was based.

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Dash

It is designed for the track, although tragically, most have ended up in living rooms. They didn’t have the winning record of Honda’s RC30, but sheer rarity and exotic specifications make this a blue-chip collectable of the first order. Bidding is up to $15,000 US with just one day to go. Keep in mind that this bike is in New Zealand if you're looking to bid!

-tad

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Shock

Exotic Yammie: 1989 FZR750R OW01 in New Zealand
Ducati December 29, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Practical Exotic: 2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore for Sale

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore L Front

Bimota could be thought of as an Italian alternative to Harris, Metisse, or Egli, companies that took the refined engines and transmissions from established industry giants, and then provided frames and new bodywork to create desirable exotics you could service at a local dealer... Although at this point, only Bimota is still building complete motorcycles.

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore Tank

The most successful bikes in Bimota's sometimes spotty history have been the result of their ongoing collaboration with Ducati. The DB4 that followed the DB2 and DB3 Mantra was powered by a dead stock 904cc air/oil cooled engine and 6-speed transmission, but replaced Ducati's trellis frame made from tubular steel with one made from oval-section aluminum. Bodywork was much simpler and more elegant than the controversial Pierre Terblanche restyle of the 900SS that donated its powertrain, although the available paint schemes were pretty loud...

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore R Side Detail

The philosophy behind the DB4 is basically "keep it simple, stupid," with light weight, aggressive geometry, quality suspension, and a flexible, entertaining engine wrapped up in distinctive bodywork. It's not the fastest thing on the road, but the complete package allows skilled riders to revel in the quality components and exploit what limited power there is. And anyway, didn't anyone ever tell you: it's more fun to ride a slow motorcycle fast than it is to ride a fast motorcycle slow...

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore for Sale

800 Miles! Very Rare 2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore w/Factory Race Kit
This motorcycle is a very nice and very original 2000 Bimota DB4 with factory Tri-Colore paint scheme -
my favorite model and paint scheme that Bimota has ever made. It is equipped with the rare Factory
Race Kit which includes Keihin FCR Carbs (no choke), a special Bimota gas tank to clear the carbs, Corse
titanium exhaust, and an Ohlins rear shock. The bike is from my personal collection and is one of 3 I own.

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore Exhaust

The single exhaust can on this bike is a definite improvement over the "shotgun" style original paired units. I actually have a set of Keihin FCR 41 carburetors on my Ducati Monster and they really do transform the bike's character, although the lack of a choke does make starts on cold mornings a bit of a pain... I believe some people also fit FCR 39's and the seller doesn't indicate which are fitted to this bike. I am also a little curious about the "special Bimota gas tank" since the Keihin carbs are quite a bit more compact than the original 38mm Mikuni items and take up less space when installed. Anyone have any experience with this? Did the "race kit" actually include a different tank as well?

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore Tail

The "Buy It Now" is pretty steep at $20,000 although the ridiculously low miles may go some way to justifying that price... Someone please rescue this wonderfully rideable motorcycle and put some miles on it already!

-tad

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore R Side

Ducati December 28, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Something Special: 1989 Ducati 851 Factory Superbike Prototype for Sale

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike R Side Front

1987 saw the introduction of a new four-valve, water-cooled L-twin engine in Ducati's new 851. While the air/oil cooled two-valve motor was and continues to be a motor with impressive tuning potential and durability, it had hit its performance limit in racing, and something new was needed to compete against the four-cylinder bikes from Japan. The liquid-cooled twin was based generally on the air/oil cooled motors: the clutch covers are even interchangeable. But the new engine could rev higher and breathe better, and this meant that Ducati could once again compete on the world stage. Displacing, strangely enough, 851cc's and producing nearly 100hp in roadgoing trim, the bike challenged the high-winding fury of the fours with a thundering midrange, while the narrow engine allowed for slipperier aerodynamics.

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike R Side Rear

Some bikes look great, no matter what paint scheme, like Ducati's 916: in nearly any color or race-rep scheme, it always looks terrific. Some are best as roadbikes, like the Triumph Daytona 675: the missing headlights on track bodywork give the bike a sort of blank look to replace the smirking catlike face of the stock machine. Other bikes look much cooler in track bodywork: I really dislike the design of recent GSX-R's in roadbike trim, but somehow that bulging fairing center that replaces the headlight on an aftermarket fairing gives the bike an aggressive, shark-like aspect.

With slab-sided bodywork and rectangular headlight, I always feel like the 851 just looks dated as a road bike. As a race bike though, it looks brutal and purposeful and this example is much, much more than just some battered privateer 851 racer...

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike L Side Stripped

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Ducati 851 Factory Superbike Prototype for Sale

Fresh from over 20 years of ownership by Mario Calonaci is this Ducati 851 works SBK 1990 prototype. He was a works Ducati mechanic for Giancarlo Falappa, season 1990, 1991, 1992 (and later in SuperSport with Gia.Ca. Moto Ducati 748 with Casoli) but his experience is impressive! He was partner of Segoni and was the mechanic for all his bikes through all the Endurance competitions in the 70’s, then 2 years in Formula One, etc… Unbelievable…

The bike is amazing even if conditions are a little scruffy (stored since 1991, untouched!) as from every detail you see it is a real prototype- hand built!

It has many AMAZING details…such as the casting of the engine cases is marked 1987!!! Please note that production of 851 started in 1988, these are proper early prototype cases (you see also from other details).

Very rare front brake calipers like only the 1990 works (the 1989 were same shape but more gold)-magnesium Marchesini wheels-only works 1989/1990 magnesium yokes made by Marchesini forged (this one marked 20) the following ones were production made by Ohlins-MagnetiMarelli/Weber elettronics with Raychem (f1 silver cables) wiring with position of the CPU on the back, from 1991 they were in front close to the dashboard-all bottom of engine cases machinered for lightning reasons (!!!)-engine cases casting 1987 as only the first racing serie bikes had-amazing unique prototype swingarm!-rear metal subframe, only 1989/1990 works, from 1991 was alluminium-alluminium Termignoni silencers, from 1991 works were carbonfibre- 1989 works clutch -handstamped VIN (with also the homologation code, SBK rules!) as only the first Racing had, later ones were different stamping-as you can see the heads inside are machinered and unused-spring on the rear brake master cylinder as i the works 1989

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike Brake Detail

There are plenty of other quality photos at the original listing, and are well worth a look. The listing also includes a letter from previous owner Mario Calonaci that describes a bit of the bike's history. The starting bid is $27,500 so you're looking at a hefty chunk of change for an 851, although even bone-stock examples are steadily increasing in value. This is a very cool machine, although it will probably need a bit of [expensive] love before it's ready to terrorize your local race track, as it's been sitting for a while. So buy it and leave it as-is to display it, or get it ready to go as well as it shows and expect to answer a whole lot of questions when you arrive at the track.

-tad

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike L Side

Something Special: 1989 Ducati 851 Factory Superbike Prototype for Sale
Suzuki December 22, 2014 posted by Tad Diemer

Move Fast: 1986 GSX-R750 Limited Edition

Note: We've seen this one before, but it's been a couple years and Tad has a fresh perspective to consider. -dc

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE R Front

We generally try to stay away from modified machines at this site, but this GSX-750R LE is exactly the type of motorcycle I love: a bike that shows evolutionary change, a gradual improvement to more closely match the needs of the owner and address performance shortcomings from the factory. I'm sure the spoked wheels will generate a bit of controversy here, but they do look pretty sharp, and the listing includes his reasons for the swap. Most importantly, it should make the bike much more usable: the original 18" items don't have much in the way of high-performance rubber available these days...

The GSX-R was introduced in 1985 and featured a 750cc four-cylinder that eschewed water-cooling in an effort to save weight. The bike basically set the pattern still being followed today, with an aluminum beam frame, four piston calipers gripping triple-disc brakes, and monoshock rear suspension.

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE Carbs

This “LE” or “Limited Edition” version of the Gixxer was intended to homologate parts for racing, specifically the distinctive vented dry clutch, aluminum fuel tank, and anti-dive forks that were an electronic alternative to Honda’s mechanical system. The swingarm was lengthened for 1986, although this example uses the shorter item from the 1985 model for a shorter wheelbase and quicker steering.

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE Dry Clutch

The description includes a pretty detailed account as to the changes that were made and why, and they all do make plenty of sense in context. He also includes a video clip of the bike starting and running, although the sound quality is pretty horrendous. It’s nice to see that the bike starts up quickly and settles into a nice idle, but if you’re curious about the dry clutch sound, you’re best off clicking around YouTube for another video.

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE Rim

It’s also interesting to note that, although regulations in Europe concerning noise can be very strict, he was granted an “exception” for his modifications, which seems so strangely… reasonable. It’s pretty impressive that the German equivalent of the DMV has folks on-hand knowledgeable enough to make that sort of determination!

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition

I am offering up for sale a very unique bike. I have outfitted this bike myself and have used it on the roads in Germany, before moving to the USA. I have all the German registration documents and those from the original owner. I have owned or ridden most every GSXR and a fair number of other bikes, this bike by far is the best road going sport bike I have ridden. The wheels I had special made by WIWO in Germany, they are numbered and dated 1994. They are 3.5 x 17 F and 5.5 x 17 rear The tires are 120/65/17 and 180/55/17 I have run Metzlers without any problem. The wheels are certified tubeless. The rims are AKRONT. There is no damage to these wheels and they run true. This bike is outfitted with the short 1985 swingarm giving it a 55 inch wheelbase. There has never been any wobble or shake at speed. 260kph seems to be the top speed and it is quite a joy to ride at any speed. The motor is on the original bore, however the cylinder head was fitted with Yoshimura 1mm oversized valves and a Serdi blended 3 angle valve job performed to correct the factory valve jobs which were not very accurate. The ignition box is a Yoshimura item. The difference is night and day. The engine will rev to 12,000rpm. The hit at 7000rpm is quick. The exhaust is a 4-2-1 stainless system custom made to fit this bike by Shaefer Racing in Germany. I had the bike on a Dyno outdoors. At 7000rpm the shreak from the carbs drove everyone for cover. It is louder than the pipe. 

At some point you will ask, 'Why spoke wheels?'....When this bike was being drawn up, the fastest bikes were all examined in great detail. One of the fastest bikes at that time was a TZ750. If you look at the two bikes they share the same basic shape. Since the first TZ had spoke wheels I had a set made up for this bike. They are TUV certified. At the time I could get magnesium wheels but they were not allowed for road use. Aftermarket aluminum wheels were not widely available. The Mitchel wheel from Lockhart was an option, however they are heavier than the spoke wheels. These wheels run perfect true and none of the spokes has ever needed adjustment! This bike will accept any standard 3 spoke GSXR wheel from the first or second generation bikes. Remember that the original Limited Edition has a 15mm front axle and is more prone to flex. The small amount of frame flex in the 750 seems to be ideal for road work. The Akrapovic end can was added to keep the bike road legal. All modifications have been signed into the brief. The process of doing this is a story in itself. I first went to the TUV engineer and asked to have the airbox removed. Stock exhaust, stock engine, dry clutch. Since the dry clutch made more noise than either the exhaust or the intake (before engine tuning) I was granted an exception. I had the exhaust fabricated and the road legal Akrapavic end can installed. Back to TUV and another modification signed into the brief. I have the original swing arm, which is quite long, and the original footpegs in perfect condition. I do not have the original exhaust, wheels or forks and triple clamps. .This bike has never been crashed or dropped!

With just one day left and a starting price of $7,500 and no bids so far, it looks like the seller may be aiming a bit too high. That’s the problem with making changes to the bike to suit your personal preferences: they may not match anyone else’s! Plus, the missing fairing lower may be putting casual browsers off as, at a glance, this looks like just another well-worn Slabby.

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE Headstock

I'd find a fairing lower and paint to match, but this is otherwise a very cool resto-mod that seems to be very much in the spirit of the original bike. Note that the seller does not have the original fork or wheels, so be prepared if you plan to buy this and return it to stock appearance. All-in-all, this is definitely not a bike for collectors, but for folks looking for something that evokes an earlier, simpler era of riding but has a few nods to advances in technology.

Or ex-Ducati owners who miss the rattle of a dry clutch.

-tad

1986 Suzuki GSXR LE R Side

Move Fast: 1986 GSX-R750 Limited Edition