Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Ducati January 22, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Time Capsule: 1994 Ducati Monster M900 with Just 931 Miles for Sale!

It's arguable whether or not Ducati's iconic Monster actually started the naked bike craze. Certainly, the Honda Hawk GT and CB-1 beat it to market by more than a couple years, but were relative failures and certainly didn't spark the public's imagination in the same way: being first to market doesn't really mean much if you're so far ahead of the curve that no one buys your innovative product. And Triumph introduced their Speed Triple just a year or so later and that's been a popular class benchmark for years now. But you can't really dispute that the Monster saved Ducati from financial ruin and has remained one of their best-selling, most accessible models. From the start, it managed to be enough of an authentic Ducati to capture the company's racing mystique, while being cost-effective enough to generate good profits for the eternally cash-starved company.

The secret? This iconic Italian motorcycle is a parts-bin lash-up: basically, the only new parts were the gas tank, the seat, and the plastic instrument surround. Everything else was sitting right there on the shelf. The frame? From the 888, obviously a terrific place to start. The engine? Ducati's air and oil-cooled, two-valve v-twin with a six-speed gearbox and dry clutch pulled straight from the 900SS. The suspension and wheels were from the base model 900SS, with fairly crude, non-adjustable forks up front, but it all worked fine for the bike's mission and kept costs down. It didn't even come with a tachometer at first, just the big, white-faced Veglia speedometer from the 900SS and a bank of giant, square idiot lights.

The lack of a tachometer might seem like a serious oversight but, frankly, while the 900SS engine may be redlined at 9,000 rpm, it runs out of puff much earlier, especially in the carbureted form seen here, so there's really no need to wind it out towards the hypothetical redline to make the most of the bike's claimed 75 hp. Even as late as the Dual-Spark 1100, Ducati's two-valve twin has always been about the midrange, and that suits the Monster's "sexy urban hooligan" image to a T. Just be careful or your carefully-cultivated sexy urban hooligan image may take a hit when you try to pull a quick u-turn and run afoul of the bike's shockingly limited steering lock. Stock gearing was a bit tall for actual urban riding, but is easily changed if that's where you spend most of your time.

The Monster is a blast to squirt from stoplight to stoplight, and the Brembo brakes were pretty much industry standard at the time and haul the bike down quickly, given the bike's 407lb dry weight. Of course, the bike's parts-bin nature meant upgrades were sitting down at your local Ducati dealer or at the breaker's yard: the fully-adjustable rear shock from the 851 bolts right into place, adjustable forks from the SS/SP slide into the triple clamps with no fuss and even use the stock brakes and front wheel. Big-bore and high-compression kits exist to take your Monster to a fire-breathing 90hp and beyond, although it's not really going to give anything modern a hard time and you'll impact reliability. And of course in the years following the bike's introduction, an entire aftermarket industry sprang up to create a wealth of bolt-ons and dodads and carbon-fiber farkles to make your Monster one-of-a-kind.

All of which makes the Monster sort of like an Italian Harley-Davidson Sportster, but 2/3 the weight and less likely to ground out at the first sign of a corner.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Ducati Monster M900 for Sale

This is it. Where it all started for the Monster Era. 1994 was the very first year for the Monster in the USA and i am proud to present this amazing piece of Ducati history for auction today. This is an all original 1994 Ducati Monster 900 with 931 ORIGINAL miles on it. Yes, you read that right. 931 miles. This is an amazing machine that has been extremely well preserved and retains all of its originality down to the original Michelin M89 Tires with no dry rot!  I am the second owner of this bike, however, it was never titled in my name so it is technically an original 1 owner bike. I have a clean NYS title in the original owners name with the mileage on the title as 00002. I have some great original documentation on the bike including the original Ducati owners identification card and Ducati limited warenty for street motorcycles paperwork. Papers you received when purchasing the bike new. I also have the original mirrors that will go with the bike in the sale as well as another set of factory exhaust cans i aquired that are brand new originals. Two original Ducati Keys as well. This bike still retains the original oil from Ducati! As you can see the original exhaust cans and even the big licence plate bracket that everyone removed back then, remains. This is truly a collector piece for anyone looking to have in their motorcycle collection. With that said, this machine can be ridden as well. The bike runs absolutely flawless. I own a motorcycle repair shop here on Long Island and personally own and did the carb service on this machine. Carbs were removed, cleaned in an carburetor acid bath and fully rebuilt with all new parts I.E. float needles, gaskets, o-rings, float bowl gaskets etc. Fuel tank does not have a drop of rust in it anywhere as this bike has been stored in a heat controlled area since new. If someone purchases the bike locally and chooses to ride this machine, i would love to see the bike come back to my shop for any service work. The paint on the bike i would say is a 9.5 out of 10. Giving the .5 to two extremely small nicks all the way at the front of the fuel tank as seen in pic. Some touch up paint and you wouldn't notice. There is also come scratches on both left and right side foot rest brackets i can only assume is either from someone transporting the bike and it got scratched from incorectly strapping it down or the original owner had something on his boots that scratched it up. Never the less, with some paint, it can def be repaired/touched up. Just want to be 100%. Other then that, as you can see, the bike is flawless and retains all of its original components. Factory EVERYTHING. Factory tool kit is under the seat as well.  I can honestly say i challenge anyone to find another first year M900 monster in this color combo, with this mileage and condition anywhere in the world. I feel you will be hard pressed to find another and that owning this machine is a once in a lifetime opportunity that will not come around again. These bikes are just not around anymore and if you do see one, it has a ton of miles on it and is most likely run down. With 931 miles on it, its a true collectors piece and will be as close to a new bike as you will get. I have no problems with a local sale and anyone that would like to come see it personally is absolutely welcome to do so. I also have no problems shipping the bike. It will be the buyers responsibility to arrange/pay with shipping but i will help with this any way that i possibly can. Please, if you aren't fully prepared to purchase, do not have the money on hand, or any other issues pertaining to an easy smooth sale, please refrain from continuing with my auction. Anyone truly interested in owning this motorcycle is welcome to call me directly at 631-872-5009. My name is Jay. This is a land line number so please do not text. I have tons of pics so if there is something you specifically want to see, please let me know. Starting bid will be $1.00, so bid to win! Buyer will be responsible for a $200.00 non-refundable deposit via pay pal after the sale of the bike. The remaining balance must be made by either bank wire transfer or cash in hand. The machine will not leave my possession until funds are cleared or cash in my hand. Whoever purchases this bike is getting a true original historical piece that will only go up in value. A true investment if you will. I do not have to sell it, but unfortunately i have a few to many toys and not enough space.

I also have a set of original FG Italy front and rear stands that are period correct for this bike that i am open to selling to the winner of the bike if he/she wants them. The rear can be seen in pic. They will NOT be included in this auction.

Thank you and happy bidding!

So obviously, you may be thinking, "Yeah, the Monster may have saved Ducati from being a motorcycling footnote, but these things are freaking everywhere!" And they are. But what we're looking at here is probably one of most pristine examples in existence, with just 931 miles on the odometer, in relatively unusual metallic black. Bidding seems stalled out at $6,000 with the reserve not met. That's obviously very high for a Monster, but a pretty fair price for a classic, practical roadster, especially one that was featured in the Guggenheim's Art of the Motorcycle exhibit.


Time Capsule: 1994 Ducati Monster M900 with Just 931 Miles for Sale!
Suzuki January 17, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Literally Found in a Barn: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

The term "barn find" pretty much says it all: the collectible car or motorcycle in question was found sitting in an actual barn, where the previous owner stored it when it stopped running. Possibly hidden under a layer of dust, old blankets, back issues of Playboy, and mold. The implication is that it is in complete, original condition, but has been somewhat neglected cosmetically and mechanically. The term gets thrown around regularly as a sort of shorthand for "original, low-miles, and in need of restoration," but seems to be exactly the case for this Suzuki GSX-R1100K "Slingshot."

The second generation GSX-R1100's nickname came from the quartet of 38mm semi-flatslide Mikuni "Slingshot" carburetors that fed the dual overhead cam, four-valve, inline four engine. It actually displaced 1127cc, up a bit from the original's 1052cc, but still featured Suzuki's Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" to keep things within optimal temperatures. SACS used a multi-chamber oil pump to effectively cool and circulate the oil, with circuits in the cylinder head and jets directed at the pistons. Later GSX-R1100s adopted a more conventional set up with a radiator and coolant, but here Suzuki stuck with the concept that simpler was better and lighter, although the Big K isn't exactly a flyweight. Mass continued to creep up throughout the 1100's successive generations and the new frame used here was both stiffer and heavier than the one found on the Slabbie. With a dry weight of 462lbs, the "K" version was never going to be particularly agile, so it was more of a GT than an actual sportbike, something that Suzuki tried to rectify the following year when they made changes to the suspension.

Unfortunately, the GSX-R1100K never really matched up with expectations: I have an old issue of SuperBike magazine that describes it as "... quite pretty. To look at, sure, but never to ride." But it's really the beefy engine that defines the GSX-R1100 experience anyway. It was a powerhouse, the Small Block Chevy of the time: endlessly tunable with a wealth of performance parts available. People set them up for drag racing, and even created road-race hybrids by squeezing the 1100 engine into the GSX-R750, which is pretty much the same idea Bimota had when they built their lightweight and extremely quick SB6, although it was a very tight fit in both cases...

Of course, a GSX-R1100 by its very nature isn't necessarily all that uncommon, but ones in this kind of condition are very rare these days: the powerful engine, reasonable ergonomics, and good wind protection meant they got used as intended, racking up huge miles, battle scars, and less-than-tasteful aesthetic "upgrades" popular at the time. People looking to make them into the corner-carvers the looks advertised tried all manner of fixes that worked or didn't in varying degrees, but the end result was very few remain as delivered by Suzuki, and even fewer have covered so few miles. With just 722 miles on the odometer, I doubt you'll find a less used example anywhere outside a museum.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

1989 Suzuki GSXR 1100 perfect condition with 722 miles,  was a barn find been stored since 1991 but not climate control storage literally in a barn. The bike was redone but didn't need much as the miles are so low. The body was completely done to perfect factory spec's no cracks or any problems, the wheels are original but do have a bit of chips,  bike runs great and needs nothing. Full tune tires everything done including carbs. This one for collection beautiful bike and super rare. Also comes with passenger seat parts. Bike will sell no matter what

The seller's opening bit is set at $7,000 which seems pretty fair considering the condition and low miles, but there are no takers yet with very little time left on the auction. It's a shame the pictures aren't better lit, since I think this is the very best-looking version of the long-running GSX-R series, especially in classic Suzuki blue-and-white. If you're looking to actually ride it, I'd expect there are plenty of shops out there who can recommend suspension changes to make a Slingshot handle, probably using off-the-shelf Suzuki components, along with brake upgrades and weight saving measures. At the very least, you can probably swap the original 2-into-2 exhaust for a 4-into-1 and save 20 pounds. But honestly, the original bike offered plenty of stability, even if it lacked agility, and this one should probably be enjoyed for what it is: a freeway blaster par excellence or a great two-up weekend rider. Given the low mileage though, I'd bet it might end up stored away in a collection somewhere.


Kawasaki January 11, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Cali-Titled Two-Stroke: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

During the 1980s and early 1990s, the vibrant quarter-liter two-stroke class saw the NSR, RGV, and TZR go at it with knife-fight-in-a-phone-booth intensity. Notably missing from much of the action was Kawasaki. It didn't help that Kawasaki didn't start building a two-stroke sportbike until 1988 and abandoned the class in 1992, before the other Japanese manufacturers and, as a result, the Kawasaki KR-1S is a bit of a holy grail for two-stroke fans in the USA. They're really nearly impossible to find in any market, as Kawasaki produced less than 10,000 examples in total, and they were obviously never sold here in the US.

If all you've done is glance at the spec sheets of the class competitors, you could be forgiven for thinking the bikes in this class were pretty much the same, with two-cylinder, liquid-cooled two-strokes, aluminum beam frames, six-speed gearboxes, and a suspiciously identical 45hp output. In fact, sometimes only a catchy acronym for the power valve gives the manufacturer away, although KIPS, ATAC, SAPC, and YPVS all performed basically the same basic function. But period road tests and two-stroke enthusiasts claim that each has a distinct character that seems line with corporate sterotypes: Honda's NSR was sophisticated and refined, while Suzuki's RGV was a bit of an unruly wild-child, fast and a bit fragile. But although Kawasaki joined the party late and left early, they left an indelible impression and their KR-1S was claimed to be the fastest, the easiest to tune, and have the hairiest handling of the bunch.

The KR-1S was powered by a liquid-cooled 249cc parallel-twin with a 180° crankshaft that also drove a balance shaft to improve smoothness, and put power to the back wheel through a six-speed gearbox. The "S" model seen here featured wider wheels at the front and rear, and tested top speed of 139mph. An "R" model was also available, but is nearly impossible to find, with fewer than 200 built. Interestingly enough, last month's Practical Sportbikes features an article that discusses the rebuild of a KR-1R in detail.

Like yesterday's ZX-7R, this KR-1S is slathered in green, white, and blue graphics that suit the bike's brash personality. Happily, the seller also includes images of the bike with the fairing removed, as it shows off the very slick aftermarket expansion chambers and another odd detail: the engine sits almost entirely below the frame! That of course keeps the bike relatively narrow, but seems strange that most of the engine is suspended beneath the frame, rather than nestled between the frame spars.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale

1990 Kawasaki KR1S C2. I am relisting and selling another bike out of my prize collection. Journalist called the KR1-S the most exotic and fastest of all the 250 2 stokes of that era. This KR1S is a UK model. Which means UK CDI power box, mile per hour speedo. Non-restrictive. Always been in street bike form. Not a converted back race bike. This is truly a rare bike. Unlike NSR’s, TZR’s and RGV’s and even Aprilia RS’s that come up for sale now and then, you very rarely see one of these for sale. I have owned this bike for over 10 years. I have spent many of thousands of dollars on upgrades. I mean many! I installed a pricy set of Dyna mags magnesium rims. The old KR1S aluminum rims came with a 17” front and an 18” rear. These are 17” front and back. Light weight magnesium and make sporty tires more available. I have put on a set of Michelin pilot sport tires. Green D.I.D.  O-Ring chain with gold aluminum sprocket. Beautiful high end custom steering damper. Then I had made a JMC fully braced swingarm with eccentric adjustment. Beautifully polished. I was told at the time that this was the only top braced swingarm that JMC has ever made for the KR1S. I installed a huge custom made “Pace” radiator made for the KR1S. This radiator is huge, and solves the problem of any overheating. If anything I have to tape of part of the radiator when its cool out. But a nice position to be in. Silicone radiator hose are used. Then I purchased a nice new set of Jolly Moto pipes with Carbon silencers. Bikes sound great and pulls better. I had the rear shock rebuilt and the shock spring powder coated green to match the bike. Front forks have been recently rebuilt with all new bushings, oil and seals. Rebuilt both the front and rear calibers with new stainless pistons, bolts, and seals. I had them powder coated too. Custom made steel braided brakes lines with aluminum fittings. They look like new. I also installed new light weight disks front and back.  Have a fortune in light weight titanium, stainless, and aluminum bolts throughout.  All the lights and switches work. The bike has 16,600 miles on it. So a far as I know the motor has never been touched.  I had plans to rebuild the motor and including all the parts to do it.  I have everything needed to build it included. But now I have gotten old and don’t have time for this project. I have tuned it up, changed all the fluids. Adjusted the power valves, etc. Bike does still run strong but mileage is getting up there for 28 year 2 stroke. The original bodywork on the bike is not too bad for its age but not perfect either. I had a few tabs and small cracks repaired. The tank has a couple tiny little chips, but is in remarkably in good shape for its age. No dents. The tank is clean inside without rust. The body panels have a few scratches and touched up spots.  Still not all that bad for its age either. Please refer to the pictures for more details. I am including the stock rims with a brand new fresh powder coat on them. The stock pipes, radiator, manuals, and various other parts as seen in my list and pictures. Lots of stuff.

The following is a list of some of the parts that are included with the bike, but not complete. No much to list. Please refer to pictures.

  • 4 brand new piston sets, including, rings, pins, clips, and small ends
  • Complete set of crank seals and crank bearings, plus new rod sets. Everything needed to completely rebuild the crank like new.
  • 3 gaskets set, plus one extra head gasket
  • New Water pump part set
  • New carb sets including floats
  • Power valve seals
  • New billet aluminum power valves and power valve wheels
  • 1 extra new front disk
  • Numerous new seals and bearing that go into the motor
  • Stock pipes in good condition
  • Stock swingarm with fresh paint and new bearings and seals. Like new
  • Stock radiator in excellent condition
  • Stock wheels with fresh powder coating, sprocket,  and cush drive

All the old wheel bearing, wheel spacers, front and back disks, sprockets, brake lines, and caliber parts. The old original nuts and bolts that were replaced with titanium and stainless, aluminum

Bike comes with a current California registration and title!  Has all the correct serial and engine numbers, but is listed as a 1980 instead of a 1990. You might think that wow I am asking way too much for this bike? I say “find don’t buy it then”. What I can say how often you see one of these for sale in this condition, with all these extras and titled too? Try to find another? These bikes are only going to increase in value as time passes. Plus I am including thousands of dollars in extra parts.

So the $17,500 asking price is big money for a two-stroke sportbike, but I'm betting it will find a buyer: if that California title is valid, I know a couple folks who'd love to snap it up, and it's really not all that far off what folks have been asking for pristine NSR250s recently. It isn't completely stock, but all of the upgrades described by the seller are clearly intended to thoughtfully boost performance and handling. All-in-all, it's one of the coolest bikes we've posted recently.


Cali-Titled Two-Stroke: 1990 Kawasaki KR-1S for Sale
Kawasaki January 10, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Forgoing the elegance and class of the European sportbikes, Kawasaki's unabashedly garish ZX-7R, or ZXR-750 as it was known in other markets, is splashed with jagged graphics in vivid green, white, and blue. Not a modern, metallic, beetle-green, of course. Kawasaki's impossibly green green, with the un-self-consciously adolescent "Ninja" in fluorescent lettering splashed across the tank, along with a pair of HVAC air tubes that don't actually feed a pressurized airbox, just direct cooling air at the cylinder head... I hated these bikes when I was younger. But I'd buy one in a heartbeat now, since I could ride a Ninja with a sense of humor about the name, and not be worried that people might think I had a pair of tabi boots in my closet and some shuriken in my sock drawer next to a pair of nunchaku...

The ZX-7R was Kawasaki's entry into the hotly-contested 750cc superbike class in racing and on the street, their answer to the Suzuki GSX-R750, Yamaha's YZF-750R, and Honda's RC30. At the time, the 750cc inline four was the go-to configuration in World Superbike competition, unless you were Ducati. Of course, each manufacturer built limited-production homologation specials to help create the very best foundation for their World Superbike entries, except for Honda, whose RC30 was basically an homologation special to begin with.

The ZX-7R sold in 1991 is generally known as the "J1," so what's going on here with what the seller claims is a "K1"? Although they provided a wide range of tuning parts for their ZX-7/ZXR-750 that allowed them to compete successfully, Kawasaki didn't really create an homologation special until the 1991 model year's ZX-7R K1. The K1's solo seat and aluminum tank meant it was was lighter, while flat-slide carbs and higher compression meant the engine made a bit more power and could rev a bit higher. Different ratios with a taller first gear were better for the track, but made stoplight getaways a clutch-slipping pain. Price was nearly double the stock bike, but worth it if you wanted to be competitive.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale

Some of the most exotic motorcycles ever sold to the public were built during the 1990s, the golden era for homologation Superbikes.  For sale is a rare and wonderful example of such a motorcycle - a limited edition 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 production-based race bike.  

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7R K1 was a special limited edition of Kawi’s ZX-7R used in AMA Superbike. Kawasaki enjoyed tremendous success in competitive racing with this bike, and plenty of that tech made it to the ‘civilian’ version. Required to produce 500 examples for homologation purposes, Kawi packed this bike full of features like 39mm Keihin flat-slide carbs, an aluminum gas tank, and a close ratio six speed transmission with an exceedingly tall first gear. All these goodies nearly doubled the MSRP compared to a base ZX-7R, but for the lucky 142 riders in the US who got to buy one, it was well worth it.  Weighing 10 pounds less than a base ZX-7R, the K1 had a tweaked engine with higher compression and a redline that was 500 rpm higher. This powerplant produced 120 horsepower at the crank, leading to a top speed of just under 160 miles per hour. (from the website bike-urious).
This particular model has only 3,100 miles and starts, runs and rides beautifully...and sounds great with Muzzy exhaust.  The upper fairing near the right side mirror has a couple small cracks (don't ask), but the bike is in remarkably nice shape overall and shows no sign of having been down.  A new lithium battery is included, as well.

Please Note:  I’m listing this bike for a friend who has an exceptionally nice collection of motorcycles for sale, including other homologation bikes (Honda VFR750R RC30, Yamaha FZR750R OW01, numerous rare Ducati’s), a Vincent Black Shadow, an Ariel Square Four, two BSA Gold Stars, a 1937 UL Flathead Harley Davidson, etc. (additional photos included above).

These are very rare and were extremely expensive when new, and there's been plenty of interest in sportbikes of the late 1980s and early 1990s recently. The starting bid for this ZX-7R K1 is $18,000 with no takers yet and several days left on the auction. The last one we featured sold for $14,500 back in 2015, so $18,000 seems like a fair price for this very clean, low-mileage example but maybe a bit high for a starting bid?


Mean and Very Green: 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7R K1 for Sale
Ducati January 5, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!

Made for just two years between 2002 and 2003, the Ducati 620 Sport was intended as an affordable way into Ducati ownership for riders more interested in the Ducati brand than in actual speed. But Ducati being Ducati, they were unable to build a sporty bike that actually handled badly, and they managed to create an entry-level machine that encapsulated the best and worst of the brand. Of course, that means that it may not be ideal for the newer riders it was obviously targeting: the riding position is extremely aggressive for a bike with such modest ability, typical Ducati steering lock means an inconveniently large turning circle, and the suspension is harsh.

The silver and black on the 620 recalls the style of the original 1980s Pantah, which is closely related to the 620 Sport in more ways than one. The Pantah was the very first Ducati to be powered by their then-new 500cc L-twin that had the single overhead-cams driven by toothed rubber belts, instead of a complex arrangement of tower shafts and bevel gears. This change to belts meant the engines were simpler to produce, but at the cost of maintenance, since the rubber belts require regular replacement, a service that's ignored at the owner's peril: second-hand two-valve Ducatis are currently very cheap, but a wrecked engine can quickly turn your affordable exotic into a pricey proposition...

The 620 uses the crank from the 750 for a slight increase in displacement to 618cc and a bump in torque, compared to the earlier 583cc 600SS, while the addition of Marelli fuel-injection means a broader spread of power with fewer hiccups, compared to the original's carburetors. Like the Pantah, the 620 uses a five-speed gearbox and a wet clutch, instead of the 900's six-speed and dry clutch arrangement. A gearbox with fewer cogs in a smaller-engined bike might sound like a retrograde step, but the torquey, flexible v-twin works well with the wider ratios of the five-speed and the wet clutch means it will take more abuse, which is ideal for the newer riders and commuters dealing with traffic.

Although the bike is down on power compared to its bigger siblings and pretty much anything in the 600cc class, the 60 claimed horses and 29 lb-ft of torque mean the bike is responsive, if not particularly fast when you're hustling the 400lb machine through a set of curves, which is really where the Ducati shows its breeding. The fork and shock are relatively primitive and non-adjustable, but the bike shares its frame and basic geometry with the 900SS so handling is very good, even if the ride quality is a bit harsh, while a pair of Brembo calipers and discs up front mean stopping power on par with much more powerful machines.

Interestingly, these rare bikes seemed to get snapped up by racers looking for an affordable v-twin platform to modify into a production race bike when they come up for sale. You may be thinking, "Why the hell would you do that when there are loads of liquid-cooled, four-valve Suzuki SV650s lying around?" Apparently, the Ducati's sporty frame geometry makes for a better-handling foundation, and I'm sure there are also some weight penalties imposed on the more sophisticated SV to keep racing close.The air and oil-cooled, two-valve twin responds very well to tuning and is supposedly much more reliable than the Suzuki unit as well, especially when used in racing applications.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport for Sale

Collectors dream! 2003 Ducati 620 SuperSport with 936 original miles!

I purchased the bike from the original owner with 580 miles on it who had it stored in a climate controlled garage.

No wreck or "tip over" damage, stock original except for some tasteful decals the original owner added on, I just left them on.

Clear NC title in my name.

Owned by mature 55 year old, I'm needing to change to a different riding position so selling my sporting motorcycles.

No wheelies, no gearbox abuse, no track use, just country roads near my house.

No smoking or weird engine noises. Starts, idles, shifts gears and runs as new.

No leaks of any kind, oil, fuel, forks, brakes.

Stock motorcycle, no intake, fuel, exhaust or electrical modifications, no aftermarket computers, no headers, none of that stuff

Recent maintenance performed:

Oil and filter change
Timing Belts
Spark plugs
Brake fluid change (with new Ducati caps and seals on reservoirs)
Internal rubber fuel lines (OEM Ducati)
Fuel filter (Mahle)
Tires (Shinko 009 Radials)
Yuasa MF battery
Kaoka cruise control

Chain and sprockets still as new, no rips or tears on seat, windshield nice and clear.

Mufflers have no dings or scratches.

Inside fuel tank perfectly clean, no rust, no sealant. Some very small scratches on top of tank near filler, hard to see but if you look closely at the photo of right side of tank you can make them out.

Still has a full set of original keys, owners manuals,tool kit, owners card,etc. as shown in photo. Also still have the original key fobs from the factory with ID numbers.

Sale also includes Factory Service manual and a Haynes manual.

It is ready to ride, collect or display, a beautiful time capsule Ducati.

Runs great, just had it out last week for a ride in nice weather. The motorcycle rides great, nice and smooth, gears change effortlessly. It is ready to ride and needs nothing... No disappointments here!

Motorcycle is located near the coast of NC, if you would like to see in person let me know.

This thing is pretty immaculate, as you'd expect from a bike with just 936 miles on the odometer. I'm not sure the matte silver really flatters the lines of the Terblanche-styled SuperSport, but it's certainly more subtle than the usual red or yellow. Bidding hasn't even reached $2,500 yet with the reserve met and time left on the auction. So whether you plan to buy this nearly museum-quality Super Sport as a rider, an odd footnote to complete your air-cooled Ducati collection, or as the raw material for forging a class-dominating v-twin race bike, this looks like a pretty good place to start. Although it would be a shame to chop it up... Power will never really be much to write home about, but a quick stop on eBay will turn up some nice, used suspension bits from a 900 or 1000 SuperSport that should bolt up easily and improve the bike's handling further.


Pristine Entry-Level Italian: 2003 Ducati 620 Sport with Just 936 Miles!
Bimota December 30, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1980 Bimota SB3 for Sale

Most of our readers probably think of Bimota as a manufacturer of overpriced two-wheeled status symbols dripping with billet and carbon fiber and Italian style. But Bimota originally took its name from founders Valerio BIanchi, Giuseppe MOrri, and Massimo TAmburini. Yes, that Massimo Tamburini. And his genius is on display in this 1980 Bimota SB3 that was one of their earliest and most radical machines, considering it was based around the inline four cylinder engine from the very typical for the period Suzuki GS1000.

Japanese bikes of the 1970s and early 1980s, even those from factory racing efforts, had engines that were famously more advanced than their frames. Road bikes were often especially bad, with flexibility that meant some felt like they had an extra hinge in the middle, and into this handling void came Bimota. A tradition of boutique frame builders actually sprang up all over Europe and Great Britain to fill the need for bikes that went around corners as well as they ate up straight lines, and Bimota was one of the most successful.

It's a shame Bimota didn't make naked bikes during their heyday, since the tubular frame seen on the SB3 is a work of art, and incorporates innovative ideas like the concentric swingarm pivot that kept the geometry constant throughout the swingarm's travel and allowed the chain to be run with virtually no slack. The frame fit so tightly around the engine that it actually split to allow servicing, once the one-piece tail and tank-cover was removed.

Even without the handling improvements provided by the frame and suspension upgrades, the SB3 still would have been blisteringly fast: the air-cooled Suzuki four was lightly tuned, but the overall package was a staggering 79 pounds lighter than the stock machine. It was incredibly rare, incredibly exotic, and incredibly fast, although it was also incredibly uncomfortable: a torturous riding position and unforgiving suspension meant it was only at home on very smooth, curvy pavement.

From the Seller: 1980 Bimota SB3 for Sale

1980 Bimota SB3 #187 of 402 with spare unused factory fairing and windscreen. 

Trades considered. - Items of interest - Ducati's or toys using Ducati 900ss engine, will accept or add cash for the right deal.

The SB3 had its debut at the Milan Show in 1979 and showcased some radical thinking; particularly in the frame design. The chromoly frame is assembled around the engine and uses aircraft style 'conical' joints to connect the front and rear halves. It also has a 'perimeter' swing arm, which pivots exactly at the transmission sprocket axis, eliminating the need for chain slack and geometry changes that go along with that. Modular bodywork, top-line (for the day) Italian components (Brembo, Marzocchi, Campagnolo,). Powered by Suzuki's bullet-proof GS1000 power plant, only 402 copies were made during its production.

Local Texas bike that has been ridden/enjoyed over the years. The bike has some wear from use which is listed below. The only upgrades are period correct Keihin CR 31 smoothbore carburetors, Dyna S ignition, and fresh coils. 

Wheels have been brought down to bare magnesium and dye tested for cracks. After testing came back fine they were then properly primed and painted with color matched from an original color chip. Wheels have new bearings front and rear. 

Bike comes with a spare fairing as the builder of the bike planned to use it as a race bike but never ended up doing so. Lately, I was able to source a spare original windscreen in clear so you have a color choice. Front and rear suspension rebuilt in 2016. Recent engine removal for valve adjustment.

Parts are able to be sourced online from and your local Suzuki shop.

• Slight rash on right side fairing pictured from garage tip over.
• Some rock chips in paint on forks from road use as pictured.
• Some paint cracking and peeling around gas cap (damn ethanol). Inside of tank looks fine.
• Left fairing is shows bubbling under the paint. Use the new spare fairing while this is sent for repair.
• Odometer does not work as no speedo sending unit is installed. Currently a spacer is installed where a speedo sending unit would mount. I will include the Garmin wrist wearable GPS I leave on the upper fork brace I use to track speed and mileage. 
• Swingarm under rear shock mount is missing some powdercoating and shows surface rust.
• Upper fairing has a slight crack on the left side near the petcock. Was like this from my first meeting the bike 25 years ago and has not grown.
• Petcock has been rebuilt. Does not use vacuum from carbs to operate so should be switched on and off and likely cause of above mentioned crack.
• Recent replacement of coils, wires, and upgrade to Dyna S ignition module. 
• Magnesium wheels freshly dye tested and properly prepared (chromate treatment) before paint which was properly paint matched from original.
• Fresh spark plugs, caps and wires.
• Fresh tires, tubes and wheel bearings front and rear.
• New chain.
• Rear brake caliper recently rebuilt, parts on hand to rebuild front when required.
• Front forks and rear shock rebuilt in 2016 by 812 Suspension.
• Clutch cover freshly powder coated to match original engine color.
• No oil leaks.
• Engine has solid compression and all cylinders within 5% of each other.

The seller is asking $13,500 for this mechanically very sound SB3 with a few clearly shown cosmetic imperfections. Certainly a good place to start for a restoration, or just ride it as-is! Even better, follow through on the bike builder's original intent and enter the bike in some classic races! Skinny tires and vintage power output aside, I'm sure it handles well and would certainly be in the true spirit of Bimota's original mission. Considering how impossibly stiff the stock machine was supposed to be, that might be the best use for it...


Featured Listing: 1980 Bimota SB3 for Sale