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Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Ducati June 27, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Update 8.12.2018: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Italian bikes are sometimes accused of putting style before function, but I think it's more accurate to say that they prioritize performance and style over comfort and practicality... But in the case of the Ducati MH900e, style was far and away the most important priority, and everything else came after. Penned by Pierre Terblanche, the MH900e was meant to evoke Mike "The Bike" Hailwood's race-winning Isle of Man TT NCR-prepped machine and the replica MHRs that followed. The "e" at the end of the name was for "Evoluzione" as the bike is the spiritual successor of those storied machines.

The MH900e's concept bike looks are wild and impractical, but its beating heart is Ducati's long-serving oil and air-cooled two-valve L-twin. Displacing 904cc, the twin pumps out an honest 75hp at the rear wheel along with respectable midrange torque. It's obviously not a powerhouse, but the 410lb machine has Ducati's race-bred frame geometry and quality suspension at both ends. The riding position is committed, with a long reach to low bars over the tank, high rearsets, and a tall seat that requires long legs if you want to put your feet flat at traffic lights.

Frankly, there are just two things really stopping the bike from being a great back-road bike like the later Sport Classics: the brutal ergonomics and the insane, Harley Sportster-sized fuel tank. The ergonomics you can justify, but the tiny, 2.2 gallon tank means about 90 miles between stops, even with the two-valve twin's surprisingly decent mileage. It's a little shocking, since the bike looks like it'd have a generously-sized fuel cell, but most of what you're looking at is apparently an airbox.

Luckily, California Cycleworks makes a much larger 4.6 gallon unit that doesn't require any permanent modifications to the bike to install. It appears to still be available and would make the bike much more practical. With just 2,000 produced between 2001 and 2002, they're rare and valuable enough that most seemed doomed to a life as display pieces, but that's a shame, considering the excellent handling, solid reliability, and easy-to-service engine.

From the Seller: 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ultra Rare 2002 Ducati MH900e for sale

Limited production 1812 of 2000
Mileage: 4,500 Miles
US bike from Oregon
Clean title like new condition
Price: $19,600 $18,000 USD

Factory upgraded Ducati Performance carbon fiber bodywork and tasteful parts including:

  • DP Clutch Cover
  • DP Slave Clutch Cylinder
  • DP Signals
  • Speedy Moto Pressure Plate & Basket
  • Rizoma Handle Bar Grips
  • Rizoma Mirrors
  • Staintune Slip-on Exhausts

Bike comes with:

  • Owner plaque
  • T-Shirt
  • Rear stand

All services done. Timing belts changed in 2017. New tires. Needs nothing. Bike is as is and does not come with additional parts.

Bike is located in Vancouver BC Canada. Serious inquiries only. No PayPal. Wire or cash only. The bike can be easily exported back to the US because it is an US bike. Shipping can be arranged at buyer’s cost.

Price in USD

It is unfortunate that the original bodywork and other parts don't seem to be included, but the Ducati Performance panels are obviously an appropriate modification and look great, even if exposed carbon fiber reduces the visual ties to the red and silver of the original NCR bikes. The bike also includes a set of Staintune exhausts that look very similar to the stock system but let the bike sound more appropriately Ducati-ish. Considering the prices of Sport Classics these days, the $19,800 $18,000 asking price seems pretty reasonable, and is in line with other examples of the MH900e that we've seen lately.

-tad

Featured Listing: Carbon-Bodied 2002 Ducati MH900e for Sale
MV Agusta June 27, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

From the Racing Department: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC for Sale

The second generation of MV Agusta's superbike as exemplified by this F4RC was more sophisticated, more refined, but no less dangerous. It's not really a question of power: there are obviously plenty of other literbikes with similar [or better] power-to-weight ratios. It's the general sense of wildness, an absolute willingness to murder you if you get too familiar with it. I was speaking with a husband and wife over the weekend about one, describing how it just feels far more serious than something like an Aprilia RSV4 that makes similar power and weighs about the same. At the end, she said, "It has no pity." Which I think pretty much perfectly sums up the MV Agusta F4: it does not suffer fools gladly.

The team working on the second generation of the F4 faced a big challenge: how do you update a motorcycle that is widely considered to be one of the most beautiful designs of all time? How to you revise it so that it looks noticeably more modern, yet still maintains clear visual links to the earlier bike? I do prefer the original Tamburini bike, but it's hard to argue that MV didn't knock it out of the park: it's a bit more angular, a bit more technical, but still retains the overall shape and proportions that made the previous design so iconic.

Perhaps most importantly, the electronics are far more sophisticated and a huge leap forward for the bike, with 8-level traction control and multiple engine power maps for throttle sensitivity, torque, engine braking, and response. Your ego might make you think you need whatever the equivalent of "RACE" mode is, but for most riding, I'm sure a less-aggressive map would help the bike's tendency to wheelie and generally try to kill you. Honestly, with the kind of power this thing makes, it will always feel fast. Power was up significantly: even the "entry level" F4R made a claimed 195hp at the crank, and this 2016 F4RC was supposedly good for an outrageous 212hp. From cold, it still has the distinctive loping idle and a hard-edged, exotic wail when revved, but overall it feels far more refined than the earlier bike.

Ergonomics were improved as well, although that really isn't saying much and the bike is still pretty uncomfortable for anything like regular riding. Unfortunately, heat is still a significant problem and the F4 will still roast your thighs and try to boil over if you get caught in traffic. Keeping an eye on the temp gauge is difficult though: the updated LCD gauge cluster and blue lighting looks very sophisticated, but is difficult to read at a glance.

Interestingly, the bike wasn't even all that expensive when it was introduced in 2010, comparatively speaking. Sure, there was a premium to be paid for owning and Italian exotic, but the new F4 was priced just a few thousand dollars higher than a Yamaha R1, and while performance was similar, there's no comparison in terms of the bikes' styles. These days you can pick up a nice, low-mileage F4R for $12,000 and people will still think you're riding a bike worth ten times that. Seriously: I've overheard those conversations. Unfortunately, this particular F4RC is much closer to what the hoi polloi might be expecting, and the bike's asking price is a cool $35,995 although maybe those are Canadian dollars...

I'm generally not a fan of race-replica graphics, especially on a premium Italian motorcycle, but I think the RC red-white-green looks pretty sharp. The biggest draw for me is that stunning Termignoni exhaust that addresses the only real design element of the second generation F4 that I find disappointing. The organ-pipe setup on the first generation bike is terrific, but the revised design tried to maintain the four undertail pipes with an updated style that used squared-off tips, and generally looked like it was trying too hard. The twin Termignoni cans suit the bike well and sound amazing.

From the original eBay listing: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC Reparto Corsa for Sale

Used like new, very rare motorcycle MV Agusta, F4 RC Reparto Corsa AMG, 2016, 237 miles (380km), must see.

WSBK Ready, 212 Hp, Only 250 built around the world in 2016. Limited warranty available, not included, call us for details.

Price based on local pick-up, shipping available worldwide.

Contact us to check the shipping and/or customs fees according to your location.

Applicable sales tax.

Race ready motorcycle, it is up to the buyer to take the information according to his locality for the possibility of road registration.

We are not partners with Uship and do not confirm the accuracy of their quotation, call us for a more accurate price.

http://www.motosillimitees.com/fr/powersports/occasion/mv-agusta-f4-rc-reparto-corsa-amg-212-hp-2016/10766748/

Motos Illimitées

Well this is obviously being offered by a dealer and there isn't much information about the bike's history. But as usual with a bike that has so few miles, there probably isn't much to tell. If you want a nice F4, you certainly don't need to pay this kind of money, although it's pretty comparable to top-shelf Ducati Panigales and a bargain, compared to the Superleggera. Modern MV Agustas don't get much more collectible than this.

-tad

From the Racing Department: 2016 MV Agusta F4RC for Sale
KTM June 26, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Orange Crush: 2012 KTM RC8R for Sale

First of all, a big shout out to all of the RareSportbikesforSale fans I met at Laguna Seca over the weekend while working with the guys at the Iconic Motorbikes booth! Was really great to meet you and hear your stories. Also, I apologize profusely for any financial difficulties or domestic drama our little blog may have caused...

The KTM RC8R was introduced in 2008, making the design ten years old now, but honestly, it's unlikely that anyone unfamiliar with the bike would ever realize it's been around that long. Pretty much every available color combination was : from the planar stealth-fighter look of the all-black version to the origami white-and-black design, they all make the bike look like a pre-production concept or a design student's digital rendering.

My favorite though is the orange-and-white scheme seen here. I have no idea what anyone else calls it, but I refer to this color combination as "Creamsicle." Apparently, KTM owners recognize the cartoonish quality because I've seen a SoCal RC8R in these colors with a large "ORANGE CRUSH" bottlecap sticker on the fairing... But the upside to KTM's concept-bike styling made flesh is that it still looks fresh nearly a decade on.

Under the brash looks was surprising practicality: ergonomics were highly adjustable, and the bike was designed for ease of maintenance. The 75° v-twin originally displaced 1148cc although it was later increased to 1195cc for the 2010 model, with an output of 175hp and a stump-pulling 90 ft-lbs of torque, right on par with other twins of the period. Of course the liquid-cooled lump featured four-valves and chain-driven cams, along with twin spark plugs per cylinder. Unfortunately, the early models were plagued by a clunky gearbox and high prices, although the second-generation bikes with the larger engine were much improved.

From the original eBay listing: 2012 KTM RC8R for Sale

Excellent condition, garage kept 2,200 miles. Tons of tasteful upgrades. Around 2,200 miles and may go up a little as I still ride her some.
Clear title in hand. Only 1 of 250 imported from 2012 and 2011 in US.
Tons of extras as you can see including matte carbon fiber front and rear fenders.
Next service not due for over 3k miles.
Never wrecked, never down, no scratches and no surprises.
My favorite sport bike on the planet, fully-adjustable for all size riders, and that twin!
Why am I selling? Scaling back and slowing down. At least for now…

The listed price for this RC8R is $10,400 which seems very reasonable, considering what sellers are typically asking, the very low miles, extras, and general condition. It obviously doesn't have the top end power of a Panigale, but that's not necessarily a problem, considering the fact that the Pani already seems to be a bit of a handful. And a lack of electronic aids might also appeal to experienced riders who want a relatively analog experience in an increasingly digital landscape. The distinctive looks are aging particularly well, I'm just never sure that, as much as I love this particular color combination, I'd have the nerve to actually ride one: subtle, it is not. Especially with the accessory Akrapovic exhaust I'd want fitted...

-tad

Orange Crush: 2012 KTM RC8R for Sale
Ducati June 20, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

I've spent some time poking around the Pierobon website, realizing that I will likely never own a Pierobon-framed track bike. As the seller mentions in their listing, this Ducati 1200DS-powered Pierobon X60R is one pricey piece of kit: the earlier F042's frame alone goes for about $3,500. And that's before you add a swingarm, fuel tank, appropriately snazzy suspension components, lightweight wheels, brakes, some minimalist bodywork... Oh yeah, and a motor. Two-valve Ducatis may not have as many parts as their liquid-cooled, four-valve stablemates  but it's not like that makes fully-built race motors cheap. Sure, you could just stick a dead stock 1100DS motor in there and call it a day, but why would you do that?

Oh, I'm sorry, you're lost. You're thinking, "Who the hell is Pierobon?"

If you're a racing fan, you might have heard of them. Located in Bologna, not far from Ducati's headquarters, they're fabrication specialists that have supplied frames and subframes, as well as swingarms and fuel tanks to Ducati's World Superbike and MotoGP teams for over 50 years. These days, they make track and racebike kits like the X60R that fit Ducati's two and four-valve engines, as well as lightweight replacement frames for all of Ducati's superbikes, up to and including the Panigale. That's right, they make a lightweight frame for the frameless Panigale. So if you've decided that the Pani's monocoque is just a bit too stiff and lacking in feedback, or if you just miss that signature trellis, Pierobon has you covered there.

I've always felt that a properly-prepared air-cooled Ducati twin would be really fun in a lightweight road or track bike and apparently the two-wheeled artists over at Pierobon felt the same way. As you can see from the photos, a finished X60R is elegant, minimal, and very expensive, as it uses only the very best components available. The resulting 300lbs wet is two-stroke territory but the 120whp obviously isn't. That's a pretty killer power-to-weight ratio and the Ducati twin, although pretty far removed from the street version in terms of output, should still have pretty great midrange shove, without the need to constantly rev the nuts off it.

From the original eBay listing: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

This is a very special race/track bike, one of 75 worldwide. They are all very light (312 lbs wet, w/ fuel for a 9 lap sprint, just weighed on a FIM scale) nimble and a blast to ride, feels like a 250 GP bike with Superbike power. It has all race spec Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes and Marchesini magnesium wheels.

I bought this at the end of the 2016 season from a friend who had won 4 different championships with it during the 2015 and 2016 seasons and decided he wanted to buy a Suter 500 to play with. I had Boulder Motor Sports (the US distributor) go through the bike completely and prep it for the 2017 season spending over $8k to do a full rebuild and prep, this type of prep makes it basically like new. See the receipts in the pics. 

These bikes cost around $70k new as base model then up depending on the build. The motor is a Boulder spec w 120rwhp and 81ft lb tq, tuned to run on pump race 110. I have only taken it out on a few track days so its ready for a full season of racing and more. If you're just a track day junkie this will only need oil changes for years of  track use. The spec motor Brian built is super durable.   It comes with the rear stand and a extra rear sprocket for super short tracks. The gearing on it now works just about everywhere.

There is a spare brand new higher spec motor refreshed by MotoCorse available and a spare set of wheels too, these are at added cost, just inquire.

Why am I selling? I never got around to racing it as I have been focused on my other 2 Pierobon's a 848 powered X80R and a full electronic X60, I am short on space so its time to let one go. I have the reserve set at a reasonable price, fair to both. With only 75 in the world there wont be many chances to get one at a major discount from new. Just raced my 2010 spec X60 to a first in BOTT at Road America this past weekend. Cant say enough about the Pierobons and how they handle    

Pierobon is the name behind most of the racing chassis built for the Ducati factory racing team dating back to the 70's and into World Superbike along with being behind the success that Casey Stoner had on the Ducati GP bikes.

Frankly, considering how much these things cost new, the prep that's gone into it, the quality of the components, and the basically brand-new, ready-to-roll condition of this X60R, the seller's $30,000 Buy It Now price is kind of a steal. The appeal is naturally very limited though: this is a racebike with no historic value, or a very expensive, exotic track day toy. Hopefully, the right buyer will snap this one up while the rest of us consider selling organs so we can afford one of our own.

-tad

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale
Harley Davidson June 19, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

American Thunder: 1983 Harley Davidson XR1000 Race Bike for Sale

This bike is why I get frustrated by Harley's modern offerings. I'm not suggesting a sportbike is the answer to their financial woes, but trading on outdated "Bad to the Bone" Sons of Anarchy stereotypes clearly isn't working. Upstart [irony!] Indian already beat them to the punch with their new FTR1200, exactly the bike I've been saying Harley should build for years, a bike to cash in on the rich history of flat track racing both Indian and Harley have here in the US. Of course, Harley also has a much less rich but still significant history of road racing and, if the collection of trophies is to be believed, this Harley Davidson XR1000 race bike has the goods to compete against the best v-twin sportbikes of its era.

Let's be clear: this resembles, but is not an XRTT, Harley Davidson's production road-racer, although it obviously looks to the 60s and 70s for inspiration. The XR1000 was actually a limited-production, flat track-inspired bike with a solo seat, unusually good brakes, legitimate power, a left-side exhaust that will probably only seem odd to Harley fans, teeth-rattling vibration, and the worst ergonomics this side of an MV Agusta F4. It was actually a pretty fast and fun bike, drawbacks aside. So of course it didn't sell very well when new. But that's a stock XR1000, which this obviously is not. In fact, it sounds from the seller's description like it's really just the transmission, bottom end, and maybe some other engine parts that carry over from the street bike.

The frame on this XR1000 is claimed to be a Buell unit, which is a great place to start if you want a Harley to handle, but I'm not really sure how this bike came to be. Buell was working on racebikes in 1983, but they were powered by an odd square-four engine, not a big v-twin, and the race wins shown in the photographs are from the late 1980s. The frame and swingarm do appear very much like the S1 Lightning, and less like the original Battletwin, which seems to more closely resemble Buell's original two-stroke racebike. In any event, I'm not challenging the bike's authenticity, I'd just love a bit more information about how this bike came to be.

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Harley Davidson XR1000 Race Bike for Sale

We have listed here is a 1983 XR1000 but it really is not one year, it is a handbuilt engine that is not like any other engine. Bill of sale ONLY from Robison Harley Davidson. RARE 1 of a kind XR1000 race bike- you will not find another Harley Davidson like this. It’s named the “unicorn” because of its rarity and uniqueness in the engine department. Although it sits in a Buell frame it is far from it- it’s a Harley Davidson xr1000 engine built by race tuner John Ward (who actually produced the very first xr1000 engine out of Robison Harley Davidson in 1979 and presented it to the Motor Company) they produced the engine to the public in 1983 after testing Johns. This engine was built by John and has rare 1 of a kind Sundance Harley Davidson xr1000 heads specifically for this bike. It has been ridden by Roger Reiman, Pat Mooney, Yavon Duhamel,  Richie Morris, Bobby Bossardet and a handful of other lucky riders. It has won more races than I can list but we have walls full of winner plaques and trophies around our shop. If you know anything about our shop and the history that it has produced you understand this bike and how rare it is. For this thing to actual come on to the market is a miracle and it’s time for us to pass it on to a new owner. You can watch this thing all you want but you have to bid to win- it will sell during this auction so don’t try to wait it out and get lucky then miss out on it- once it’s gone it’s gone. Good luck to everyone and if you have any questions we will do our best to answer them. 

From Pat Mooney who was the last racer to ride it. "The chassis came from Don Tilley and it’s a Buell tube chassis. John Ward built the engine, which came from that Mert Lawwill chassis that you have there. We won the Daytona Battle of the Twins class in 2000 on that bike. The cylinder heads on that engine came from Take San (Zak) in Japan (Sundance Harley Davidson). Let me know what you want for it as I know Zak in Japan would love to get those cylinder heads back and he may buy the bike to get them back"

So it's not really a classic factory Harley racebike, and it's not a road bike. It sure isn't pretty, but many racebikes are pretty rough around the edges since their primary goal is to be fast, not look good, and teams on a budget have better things to spend money on than cosmetics. But it is absolutely a genuine race bike, and one with an established track record of success. So it's proven, but not especially pedigreed: a very fast mongrel. So what's it worth? Well the seller hasn't set a Buy It Now or reserve price and this really is one-of-one. But there is interest in the bike and bidding is up north of $10,000 with another few days left on the auction.

-tad

American Thunder: 1983 Harley Davidson XR1000 Race Bike for Sale
Aprilia June 16, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

High-Spec Hooligan: 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing for Sale

After the introduction of their RSV Mille, Aprilia knew they needed something a little less extreme, at least in terms of riding position. But while Ducati’s original approach to the naked bike was to put a lower-spec engine into a frame from an older sportbike, Aprilia was forced by necessity to go a different route: they didn’t have a less powerful engine, or a different frame. The resulting Aprilia Tuono and especially this Tuono Racing was never gonna be great for cruising or posing or generally blatting around, at which the Monster excels.

Perhaps most significantly, unlike every other naked sportbike, the Tuono wasn't detuned at all: the 998cc Rotax-developed v-twin still made 126 hp and 74 lb-ft. torque, while balance shafts meant it was surprisingly smooth, considering the 60° configuration. The frame looks similar to the beautiful aluminum beam design seen on the RS250. I can’t imagine it’s the exact same part, considering the different engines, but I’m sure Aprilia tried that before designing a new one… And the Tuono was actually lighter than the RSV, owing to the lack of a fairing and some additional carbon bits. Throw in some high bars and you're looking at the original "supernaked."

The Tuono may not be quite as sexy as something like a Ducati 998 or a Monster, but it’s way more comfortable than the 998, faster than a Monster, more reliable than either of them, and likely more fun as well. It’s a bike to ride, not to look at, and that Rotax twin is famous for being virtually trouble-free and has reasonable servicing costs.

The Racing was the top-spec Tuono and Aprilia wasn’t kidding with the name: it was designed to compete in an Italian series against rival Ducati's S4R. And they weren't kidding with the components: suspension was by Swedish specialists Öhlins, a fully-adjustable shock out back and a 43mm fork up front, with a matching steering damper. Instead of a slipper clutch, Aprilia used their Pneumatic Power Clutch that used engine vacuum to disengage the clutch during downshifts to prevent the rear wheel from locking. Top-of-the-line radial Brembo calipers meant you could have stoppies to go with your wheelies.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing for Sale

Up for sale is my 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing #002

This a very rare bike only 200 produced worldwide and 50 examples imported to the United States. This bike is #2 from the production run worldwide. This bike was sold to the public specifically so Aprilia could qualify to race it against and beat Ducati in the Italian Naked Race Series.

I have owned this bike since the summer of 2011 and I know I'm going to miss it, but I have a new kid and we are getting a bigger house so this has to go. I'll be hanging on to my two other Aprilias.

I have every original extra part that you received with the 2003 Racing, plus I have an extra Front Race Fairing and Track Belly Pan (most people don't have any of these parts and I have 2 sets, see below for additional price):

  • Carbon Fiber Front Racing Fairing x2
  • Carbon Fiber Track Belly Pan x2
  • Aprilia Racing Exhaust and Race Chip (both currently installed)
  • Original Stock Exhaust and Chip (in factory original box)
  • Passenger Seat
  • Carbon Fiber Solo Seat Cowl 
  • Passenger Pegs (currently installed)
  • Track Counter Shaft Sprocket
  • Aprilia Racing GP Shift Kit (currently installed)
  • Standard OEM Shift Linkage
  • Brake Light Delete Panel
  • Factory Drilled Bolts for Race Wire
  • Factory Manuals (Racing & Operator)

Non-Factory Parts:

  • Integrated Rear Turn Signals (I have the stock turn signals)
  • Rhino Frame Sliders (they are black and look nicer, I'm pretty sure I have the stock white ones)
  • Rear Fender/License plate Kit (I have the stock rear fender) 

The extra Front Race Fairing and Track Belly Pan would bring a pretty high price all by themselves, but I want to keep it all together.

Its in very good condition with about 10000-ish miles (I'll have to charge the battery and check). I've had it for a long time but put very little few miles on it. The bike is 15 years old and has been ridden so there are a few minor imperfections.

The extra set of carbon fiber race fairings I'll include for an additional $750.  

None of the parts are for sale separately please do not ask. 

I am willing to assist in shipping the bike, but it is 100% at the buyer's expense

Thanks

Okay, none of the Tuonos are really beautiful, but I think the first-generation is the best-looking of the bunch. It didn't even bother trying to be subtle, and the styling is just a bonkers mess of in-your-face. I mean that as a compliment. The seller's $8,000 is high for an early v-twin Aprilia in general, but first-generation Tuonos are pretty hard to find and seem to get snapped up pretty quickly. Given all of the available, often very hard to find extras and the overall condition, I wouldn't be surprised if he gets what he's asking.

-tad

High-Spec Hooligan: 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing for Sale