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Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Ducati July 10, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

The original listing for this 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica includes some good general information, but I'd love more specific details about the components. The seller mentions the frame was supplied by Roy Thersby, but did he build the frame, modify the frame, or just paint it? At a glance, it appears to be from a 90s SuperSport, which makes sense, considering the rest of the running gear. So it appears that what we're dealing with here is a fully-built 90s 750SS with brilliant retro-bodywork and paint. And headlamps. Those massive, retina-burning headlamps.

The original TT2 that inspired this build was a lightweight, Pantah-powered racebike displacing 597cc with a Verlicchi frame and Marzocchi suspension. Built between 1980 and 1984 the bike was very successful in competition and ultimately spawned the Ducati F1 road bike.

The engine in this replica is a 750, but it's looks to be the 90s version, since both carburetors live in the engine's vee: the 80s Pantah-engined bikes had both facing rearward, with the vertical cylinder's jutting out awkwardly towards the rider's knee. And the wheels are clearly 17" parts, in keeping with the 90s theme. Great for finding modern, sticky rubber, but not the most authentic-looking, if that's the goal, since the original used 18" hoops. And why choose non-adjustable front forks on this bike? Even set up properly, I'm surprised the builder didn't at least use the adjustable units available on certain 900SS models, since the upside-down forks give the game away anyway that this isn't really an 80s race bike.

Not doubting the craftsmanship, but there are some other choices I'm not big on, starting with the Koso instruments. I'm sure they're reliable and legible, but I don't really like them on recent Bimotas and I really don't like them on a retro-looking special. Something classic from MotoGadget would have given similar function with a much more appropriate look. The bar-end signals are a cool touch, but a bit too shiny for my taste and the grips and Union Jack tank pad are way too modern. And the M4 exhaust is perfectly fine on a GSX-R750 but a "classic" Ducati? But all that is relatively easy to change to suit the new owner's preferences anyway.

If it sounds like I don't like this bike, you'd be wrong: I'm really just picking nits and all of these minor issues are easily forgotten, looking at the red-and-yellow bodywork and those awesome endurance-racing headlamps. And although the listing doesn't go into too much detail regarding the engine, the Pantah engine can be tuned to make good power and, in a lightweight package, should make for a very entertaining bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

For the Ducati connoisseur, this beauty will enhance any collection. Frame came from British Ducati legend Roy Thersby. The bike was built by vintage Ducati guru Scot Wilson as his personal ride. Scot is the owner of Italian Iron Classics in Tucson, AZ. I've had the pleasure of owning a couple of Scot Wilson's builds and they are very carefully planned and meticulously executed.

The 750 engine was built by Tom Hull of Phoenix to "Pro-Thunder" standards with Carrillo rods, dual spark, lightened internals and all the special bits you'd expect. The engine was moth-balled after a rule change, acquired for this build and has about 1,000 miles on it. 40mm Del Ortos, fork set by Computrack. GP shift but could be changed. The bike was just serviced, all fluids changed, fuel tank cleaned, carbs cleaned and carefully checked over. It's ready to go.

The bike is street legal, has a clear Massachusetts title and goes like crazy. Headlights are Hella style as used for endurance racing. Bar-end turn signals are installed so the bike will pass my state registration inspection. The paint is as good as it gets and looks as fresh as the day it came from the painter's shop. If you are looking at this bike I don't have to tell you about Ducati F1-R's or TT2's. I've had the opportunity to do a (very careful) track day at a Ducati event and the bikes gets lots of attention. If the track's not your thing you could proudly show it at any event and it would draw a crowd.

While undeniably cool, bikes like this are always tricky when it comes to determining value. They're not collectible in the conventional sense, in that they're not real race bikes or limited-production factory machines: they've been built using high-quality components, but they're basically really nice lash-ups, "bitsas" made from the very best bits. Of course, a real TT2 would likely sell for far more than the $22,500 the seller is asking, and considering the quality and names attached, I'm thinking this is a pretty damn good deal as long as the lack of originality doesn't bother you, and you're ready for the snobs to give you static when they ask you "is it real?" But honestly, if anyone gives you a problem, you should just blind them with those massive Hella lamps.

-tad

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale
Yamaha July 6, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Over in the comments sections of another post, we've been debating the relative merits and values of some of the priciest motorcycles, but it's still possible to find something cool, collectible, and very competent if you're on a limited budget. It's not one of Yamaha's fastest sportbikes, but this first-generation FZR1000 might be their most historically significant. At the moment, it's also one of the most unappreciated machines of the modern era: if the GSX-R was the first sportbike of the modern age, it can be argued that the FZR1000 actually codified the formula.

The original version of the FZR1000 built from 1987 through 1988 seen here was powered by a 989cc version of Yamaha's inline four. It did not feature their signature EXhaust Ultimate Power or "EXUP" valve in the exhaust system, but did use their "Genesis" heads with three intake and two exhaust valves. Five-valve technology proved more useful in theory than in practice, in spite of the fact that Yamaha stuck with it for a pretty long time. But, perhaps more importantly, the Genesis engine's characteristic steeply forward-canted cylinder head allowed the airbox to be located under the fuel tank instead of between the rider's knees.

However, the bike's defining feature was the aluminum beam "Deltabox" frame, the first time one had been used in a big bike like this. The contemporary GSX-R used an aluminum frame, but the square-tube construction was more of a cradle-type that looked backward towards past designs, while Yamaha's beefy Deltabox was a much more forward-thinking concept. The frame spars were positively massive for the time, but the thin-walls meant the structure was as light as it was strong, and while five-valve heads proved to be a bit of a fad, thick beam frames have stood the test of time.

Looking at the spec sheet, all you'd need to do is add a sixth gear to the box and you could be looking at something from just a few years ago: the aluminum beam frame, liquid cooling, under-tank airbox, and 17" wheels all sound very modern. It's obviously from a different generation and is both heavier and less powerful by far than current literbikes. But it was very much the complete package when new, and the five-speed gearbox speaks to the bike's seemingly bottomless well of torque and flexible midrange, qualities shared with the GSX-R1100, a bike that also lacked a sixth cog.

Ideally, if you're looking at an FZR1000 you'd probably want something just a little bit newer, as the thorough redesign for 1989 featured a slight bump in displacement and the addition of the EXUP valve, but this is the original, and looks very sophisticated in blue and white speedblock graphics.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Up for auction is my 1988 FZR1000.  It is titled in my name and is currently registered in  the state of California til October 2018.  It is a nice survivor.  It has various scratches and some cracks here and there but overall in very clean condition.  It has good tires, a new fuel pump, fuel filter, various fuel lines, carb cleaning and synchronization done Dec of last year, rebuilt fuel valves, battery new last year, new windshield, front brake master cylinder rebuilt and a couple other things I can't remember  now.  It comes with a tank bag, some spare parts and a service manual. It handles, runs, starts, brakes fine....although maybe it could use another carb cleaning as it has been sitting.  Still you could ride it right now.....it has  good  power.

Some things it would need is a new headlight.  Choke doesn't work but it still starts easy when cold. Return throttle cable not hooked on.  Fuel pump is controlled by a switch in the back  so you may want to hook up correctly.....and I'm sure a few other things I can't remember right now.

If anyone is interested but not local...PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE ask questions and request photos of any area of the bike you would like.  I REALLY PREFER SOMEONE LOCAL WHO COULD COME BY AND KICK THE TIRES AND INSPECT IN PERSON but if not please ask all the questions you want before bidding.  Although this bike is clean and a survivor it has not been in a box the last 30 years ridden only 50 miles so keep that in mind.  It currently has 20950 miles. I may make a couple trips up the mountain before it's gone so there may be a few more miles on it.

Here is a video of it running.  

I am selling because  with my back condition I cannot use it like I thought I could.  

If you have any questions please ask.  If you think I left something out please ask.  If you need better pictures please ask.  I want to be as honest and accurate as possible so please ask anything.  If the winning buyer comes to pick it up and dosent want to go through with the deal for any reason no worries.....I will cancel the transaction....no problem.  The previous owner named this bike Noah. I want to see this go to a good home.

The Yoshimura tri-oval exhaust obviously isn't stock, and isn't even trying to look period-correct, but I actually like it: stock exhausts of the era are often pretty heavy and very ugly. Overall, the bike has some usual chips and wear you'd expect on a bike this old, but it seems honest. And the seller includes a nice video of the bike starting and running, with some closeups. Slingshot Gixxers and other late 1980s sportbikes have been rising in value, but the Yamahas seem to have been lagging behind a bit, and while the later EXUP models will probably be a bit more desirable, this early machine is historically significant. And also pretty cool. There are several days left on the auction and no takers yet at the $2,150 opening bid. It may not be original, but this could be a hell of a do-it-all machine with style if you're on a budget and looking for something out of the ordinary.

-tad

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Honda July 5, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2002 Honda RC51 SP2 for Sale

Update 7.11.2018: Seller reports that this bike has sold to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

After a couple decades building and racing their signature V4 machines, Honda finally decided to go with the flow and switched to a v-twin that could compete on a level playing field with Ducati. Their faith in the V4 as a package has ultimately been vindicated, as now Ducati is using a V4 for its roadgoing superbikes, and pretty much everybody is racing V4s in MotoGP. But for a couple years, the Honda RC51 showed the world that, all else being equal, they could go toe-to-toe with the v-twins from Bologna.

Well the new v-twin Hondas could compete with Ducati in terms of performance, at least. Style was another matter, and the VTR1000 SP1 and later RVT1000R SP2 seen here traded Tamburini's sensual shapes for altogether more practical lines and a digital dash with a bar-graph tachometer. Mechanically, the bike used an aluminum beam frame with side-mounted radiators that allowed the engine to be mounted further forward in the chassis to overcome the usual packaging issues associated with 90° v-twins, and a set of gears drove the dual overhead cams.

When introduced, the original SP1 was somewhat of a disappointment. Certainly the styling didn't help: it's sleek and purposeful, but not especially sexy, considering it was a follow up to the very trick-looking RC45. But more importantly, handling wasn't up to snuff, low-rpm fueling was pretty poor, and tank range was abysmal. The latter two issues are easy to overlook in a high-performance motorcycle, but the bike's understeer was a deal-breaker for many. Fortunately, the SP2 that followed in 2002 sorted out the handling with some suspension revisions, including a set of tapered spacers for the front wheel that improved feel when the bike was on its ear. Power was up slightly as well to a claimed 133hp, although the fueling was still an issue, a side-effect of the gaping throttle bodies designed for high-rpm power, not around-town driveability. If practicality is your bag, there's always the very nice and much cheaper SuperHawk... Although you'll still have to deal with limited range.

The style of the RC51 didn't really inspire lust in the way Italian machines did when the bike was new, but the clean design looks great these days. Today's Featured Listing is almost obsessively stock for a machine that's been used as intended and actually ridden, down to the rear license plate holder, huge signals, and ridiculously long hero blobs. Aside from the hero blobs, the signals and other original parts seem to suit the bike's chunky style, and the only thing I'd change personally is the stock exhaust: a big twin should sound big-twin-y and stock cans never really do them justice. I'd keep the original exhaust though, so I could return the bike to stock condition in case I wanted to sell it.

From the Seller: 2002 Honda RC51 SP2 for Sale

This 2002 Honda RC51 SP2 is 100% stock except for the addition of a Power Commander 3, and is unbelievably clean.  In 2002 the RC51 received a number of upgrades from the SP1.  This bike looks like it did on the showroom floor with all the OEM warning decals, reflectors, stock exhaust, and stock rear fender.  It has the complete stock tool kit and owners manual with it.  I recently replaced the windscreen, clutch slave, battery, and sprockets with Honda OEM parts.  It also has a new DID chain, and Dunlop Sportmax tires with less than 1000 miles on them.  This RC51 runs and rides perfectly and needs absolutely nothing but a new owner.  The fairings are clean and shiny!  The rear seat cowl/pillion cover was signed by Colin Edwards, who won the World Superbike Championship in 2002, the year this was built.  There is also an unsigned cover and the passenger pillion that go with the bike.  I had never seen an RC51 that was completely stock and in this condition, which is how this made it into my collection.  It has 22,500 miles, meaning it’s been properly exercised and maintained with only about 1400 miles per year since new.  The only single blemish is a minor crack at the mounting point under the left side upper cowl that’s been there for years, apparently common with these.  $5,900.00 or best offer. It’s located near Milwaukee, WI.

The seller's $5,900 asking price is pretty fair for an RC51, especially the improved SP2 version in this kind of mint and nearly stock condition. Obviously, the SP1 and SP2 are way too common to ever command the same sort of interest as the RC30 and RC45, but prices have hit their low point and appear to be on the way up. As always, originality counts for collectors and many RC51s have been modified and updated. If you're looking for a fast Honda with genuine racing heritage, you won't likely find one cleaner or more affordable.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2002 Honda RC51 SP2 for Sale
Aprilia July 4, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Museum Piece: 2004 Aprilia RS250 w/ ZERO Miles for Sale

Update 7.3.2018: Last seen in November of 2016, this 0 mile 2004 Aprilia RS250 is available for sale again on eBay with a buy-it-now of $14k. The previous auction ended and as commentors on this post noted it was for sale elsewhere for $15k at that time. Good luck to buyers and seller in 2018! Links are updated.

Have a great 4th of July everyone!

-dc

2004-aprilia-rs250-r-front

What is there to say about the Aprilia RS250 that hasn't already been said? After other manufacturers had ceased building their quarter-liter race-replicas, Aprilia persisted, and this particular bike is one of the very last examples available: the model was discontinued in 2004, the year this bike was built.

2004-aprilia-rs250-r-rear

Powered by a revised version of Suzuki's RGV250 engine, the RS250's version of the little water-cooled, two-stroke v-twin produced power on par with the rest of the class, with an added dose of Italian style: the aluminum beam frame looks similar to the Japanese offerings on paper, but is far more sculptural and it's a shame it's partly hidden behind the fairing.

2004-aprilia-rs250-front

The "GP-1" on the rainbow-hued tailsection and in the listing actually refers to the second-generation RS250 introduced in 1998: it's not a limited collectors-edition as far as I know. This particular example may not be road-legal here in the USA, but it's basically a time-capsule machine that's ready for display in your collection.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Aprilia RS250 GP-1 for Sale

Once in a lifetime opportunity to buy a brand new, old stock Aprilia RS250 GP-1 0 miles. You now have the chance to move even closer to the former world of two-stroke MotoGP with this last release of he 2004 Aprilia GP-1, the final version of the famous RS 250 GP replica motorcycle. This bike is sporting official Colin Edwards and Nori Haga team decals, the colors and graphics add to the bike that represents GP racing at its finest.

The unique look of the 2004 RS250 is dominated by its wrap-around fairing, designed and tested in a wind tunnel. The front mudguard blends perfectly with the fairing, and enhances the Aprilia RS 250's streamlined looks, the characteristic aerodynamic tail completes the Aprilia RS 250's racing image.

The bike was only sold in Europe and Australia.   I am the original owner and it has been on display within my home for several years.   The bike has completed it's new vehicle dealer delivery and prep so the bike has been started prior to my purchase and has 0 miles.  The tires are original as is every part on this bike.   It is untitled for the street as it was intended solely for my collection. The CLEAR title stated above applies to Australia only along with Australian Import Approval plate. I do not know about your state's requirements.  I have huge amounts of dealer promotional material for the bike.

In addition, this bike was judged the best European Two-Stroke bike at Motocarrera's famous Two Stroke Extravaganza held in 2005 in Los Angeles, California. This event was the largest gathering of two-stroke vehicles in America when it was held.  The bike was also displayed at the famous Quail Lodge Motorcycle Gathering Carmel, California in May 2016.

This bike is clearly a museum piece: with zero miles, you'd destroy some of the collector value riding it. It'd be highly unlikely you could register this for the street in most places anyway, and if you're looking for a track or race RS250, you'd be better off finding one with some miles and cosmetic wear on it. Bidding is active, and up to $7,100 with four days left on the auction and the reserve unsurprisingly not met.

-tad

2004-aprilia-rs250-l-rear

Museum Piece: 2004 Aprilia RS250 w/ ZERO Miles for Sale
Honda July 3, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1989 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

Update 7.11.2018: Seller reports that this bike has sold to an RSBFS reader. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Looking very much like an attempt by Honda to out-Monster Ducati, today’s Featured Listing Honda Hawk GT in fact predated the Galluzzi-designed machine by several years. The Hawk was also known as the NT650 and Bros in other markets, and less often by its “RC31” model designation, perhaps because it was designed as a versatile streetbike instead of an exotic homologation special.

1989 Honda Hawk GT for sale on eBay

Nevertheless, the Hawk GT incorporated some unusual technology, specifically the distinctive single-sided Pro-Arm rear swingarm that gives it a clear visual link to the RC30 and NC30. The 647cc 52° v-twin engine was liquid-cooled and had three valves per cylinder, with a claimed output of 58hp, enough to push the 393lb dry machine to a top speed of 107mph.

Overseas, the bike was successful and variations survived into the late 1990s but it was not popular in the US and sold for just three years here: 1988-1991. So what went wrong? Well the bike handled well and was very versatile, but it wasn’t really fast and was generally expensive, considering the price of a CBR600 Hurricane was just a few hundred higher and was far more exciting to American buyers for whom motorcycles were more toys than a practical means of transportation.

Of course, the general quality, nimble handling, and solid engineering meant that, although quickly forgotten by most, the Hawk GT has become something of a cult bike. Commuter, budget race bike, weekend canyon scratcher: simple modifications can give the bike focus it didn't really have from the factory, and a Hawk can be all things for those of limited means, since prices have remained relatively low, in spite of the bike's relative rarity.

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From the seller: 1989 Honda Hawk GT for Sale

This 1989 Honda Hawk GT / NT650 is 100% stock and is an exceptionally clean example.  It currently 14,880 miles and was recently refreshed with a few OEM Honda parts including a new chain and sprocket, along with grips and bar ends.  The fork seals were just replaced as well, along with a new battery.  The chrome on the stock muffler is perfect.  The paint was professionally redone by Artistimo, saving the factory tank decals, and looks absolutely stunning.   The original tool kit and owners manual are included with the bike.  This bike starts, runs, and rides perfectly and needs nothing.  I took it on a nearly 400 mile ride two weeks ago.  There are some very minor chips/scuffs in the paint on the rims consistent with the age and mileage of the bike.  The pictures accurately reflect the condition.  Asking $3800.00. It’s located near Milwaukee, WI.

Interested parties can contact John by email: jmilotzky@gmail.com

This example falls into that sweet spot between quality and price: the miles may not be just-out-of-the-crate low but the bike appears to be in stellar, very original condition, and includes the original tool kit. The $4,000 asking price, while high for a Hawk GT, is very reasonable, considering the overall presentation and increasing values of these quirky cult machines. And unlike the 9 mile Honda CB-1 that we recently featured, this Hawk isn't such a time-capsule bike you'd be afraid to actually ride it, if you're looking for a fun, quirky, versatile, weekend roadster.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1989 Honda Hawk GT for Sale
Ducati June 29, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Trick Track Single: 1995 Ducati Supermono for Sale

Some bikes take time to find their audience, but the Ducati Supermono was always going to be a classic. Created to compete in the Sound of Singles race series that supported World Superbike in the mid 1990s, the Supermono was a bit of a throwback to Ducati's past: a pure racebike with exotic components, quality suspension, some very innovative technology and, as the name suggests, just one cylinder.

Single-cylinder engines are lightweight, torquey, and mechanically simple, which makes them ideal for offroad applications and economic commuters. But they aren't all that suited for modern sports motorcycles, since vibrations caused by one cylinder limit maximum revs and therefore horsepower, and can be more than a little unpleasant for the rider at sustained high rpm, unless numb hands and blurry vision are your thing.

Ducati had a solution and, as is typical of companies with limited resources, it made use of as much existing hardware as possible but with an interesting twist. The new engine used most of the liquid-cooled, four valve v-twin engine from the 888 and 916, but with the rear cylinder blanked off, which seems simple enough. But here's the twist: a dummy connecting rod was fitted to approximate the force of a second piston and connecting rod of the missing vertical cylinder.

Ducati ended up with a 549cc single that could rev to 11,000rpm happily and made 65hp with a dry weight of 267lbs, although a larger, 572cc version came along in 1995. Brakes were the same as the much heavier 916,  so stopping power could be considered adequate and the bike handled as well as you'd expect. The bike was liberally sprinkled with carbon fiber: the gauge cluster, fuel tank, rearset brackets, and the self-supporting rear subframe were all made from the material. Engine cases, triple clamps, and wheels were all lightweight magnesium.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati Supermono for Sale

Probably one of the most collectible sport bikes of this generation, enter the Ducati Supermono racer. This 1995 model is one of only 25 produced in 1995. Total production from 1993-1995 was 67, rare. The most unique attribute is the way Ducati did the motor, using an 888 Corsa motor and counterbalancing system consisting of a second attached to a lever pivoting on a pin fixed in the crankcase, hence the name "doppia bielletta" [double con rod].

This is a one-owner bike out of a 60+ bike private collection. Original bill of sale, docs, etc. The bike is in stellar condition.

Approximately 67 were made between 1993 and 1995 and, as you'd expect from the mission statement, most were raced, and quite successfully: it pretty much dominated any class where it was allowed to compete. Styling was by Pierre Terblanche and is pretty much perfect: lean and efficient and spartan. You can clearly see the influence this design had on the revised 900SS, but the style doesn't quite translate: on the Supermono it looks clean and technical and light, but on the Super Sport it looks fussy and contrived. So what price perfection? Well this one has an eye-watering $149,000 starting bid, which shockingly seems a pretty fair place to start, considering what other examples have sold for.

-tad

Trick Track Single: 1995 Ducati Supermono for Sale