Classified features and exclusions:

  • No RSBFS staff editorial, your content only
  • Vendors are welcome to list items for sale.
    Contact us for advertising your business.
  • 3 high resolution images
  • Up to 150 words
  • 1 month listing
  • 1 edit per month
  • $10 per month

Classified ads return to RSBFS!

While we focus on the very best SportBike for sale listings on the main page of the site, this area is to cater to everything else that our audience may find of interest:

  • Bikes that aren’t perfect
  • Bikes that aren’t SportBikes
  • Projects
  • Memoriabilia
  • Parts
  • Pretty much anything!

We handle every classified in the same manner we do our Featured Listings:  by hand and working with you via email.

Email us to get started!

Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Ducati May 26, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Super Premium: 1995 Ducati 916SP for Sale

If you’re shopping for a rare homologation Honda from the 80s or 90s, it’s usually not that hard to be sure you’ve got the real McCoy. Does it have a V4 and a single-sided swingarm? It’s probably the real thing. But Ducati was a much smaller organization, with much less in the way of financial resources or manpower, so introducing and entirely new machine just to make their production-based racers more competitive wasn’t possible. That means bikes like today’s Ducati 916SP can be a little more difficult to identify. The SP especially was largely similar to the regular 916: later bikes like the SPS had more obvious visual changes, but the SP was Ducati’s first stab at a 916 special, and most of the most important and exotic changes were under the skin.

It helps that the 916 and its variations were pretty heart-attack serious sportbikes to begin with. Obviously no one else was going to get away with 6,000 mile service intervals and a riding position that pretty much had your hands grabbing the front axle and your ass higher than your head. And it makes things even more complicated that Ducati had a pragmatic, “hey, whatever’s on the shelf Luigi: these bikes are supposed to ship out on Friday” philosophy when building the bikes. Sure, maybe an SP was supposed to have a carbon-fiber airbox, but if you're looking at a bike without one, it could still be authentic. Ducati might just have been out of them the week the bike was built. It means verifying the truly rare versions of the 916 can be tricky, since most everything special-looking, like the Öhlins shock and carbon fender, can be bolted on, and the really tricky stuff is hidden behind the engine cases.

Which is where we can start: the cases are sand-cast, and the heads are slightly different as well, lacking the usual "DESMO 4V" text. Inside, you'll find Pankl H-beam titanium connecting rods, higher compression pistons, larger valves, more aggressive camshafts, a lightened flywheel, big 50mm throttle bodies with a pair of injectors each to fill the cylinders, and other tweaks and changes to handle the rigors of racing. Power was a claimed 126 and while that's not all that much in today's terms, it's a charismatic engine with fairly brutal delivery. Riding it on the road is what you'd expect: like riding a barely detuned racebike on the street. The gearing is wrong for daily use, it doesn't want to idle, doesn't like low rpm or part throttle...

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati 916SP for Sale

This is a 1995 Ducati 916 SP ~ A wonderful bike, distinctive and very collectable. As like the ones Carl Fogarty use to race with, this 916 has the impossible to find Magnesium Chromate Wheels, they are not painted gold, its the color of the metal. I will leave them on the bike, for an additional $3000.00. I do have the original ones as well and will mount them on this 916 if the buyer chooses not to include the Magnesium Chromate. This 916 was brought into the US and owned by "Fast by Ferracci" and was sold at the time for $21,885. Feel free to e-mail me at alex@mygpracing.com or call me at 916 276-1080 if you have any questions. I am also selling a 1955 F.B. Mondial "Sogno" 160cc, a Ducati Cucciolo Bicycle, an MV Agusta Disco Volante and a couple of other vintage bikes.

The Buy It Now price is listed at $21,000, but is this the real deal? I'm not enough of an expert to say, and the relatively low-quality photos don't help. What's it worth? Um. Probably less than an SPS but more than a regular 916? Technically, this is a Ducati 916S P2, and just 401 were supposedly built. Once again, who really knows for sure? See above. The 1994 models were the SP1, the 1995 models the SP2, and the 1996 version was the SP3. Of course, the SP stands for "Sport Production" and not "Super Premium" but you could be forgiven for making that mistake if you'd tried to buy one new, since the 916 wasn't cheap to begin with and the SP was even less cheap: an eye-watering $21,885 when new, just $885 more than the Buy It Now price...

-tad

Super Premium: 1995 Ducati 916SP for Sale
Suzuki May 24, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Wes Cooley Replica: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S for Sale

It may not look like a sportbike or a race-replica to riders weaned on GSX-Rs and Repsol Hondas, but this classic blue-and-white Suzuki GS1000S is both. In fact, this upright, bikini-faired, four-cylinder monster is one of the original "superbikes," and competed on road and track against other air-cooled inline fours from the Japanese manufacturers. "Bigger is better" was the order of the day, and displacements grew along with cylinder count, and weight crept steadily upwards to match.

It's hard to imagine today a serious sportbike could have twin shocks and skinny handle bars mounted to risers on top of the triple clamps, but there you go: we all have to start somewhere. And, believe it or not, the Suzuki GS1000S was quite the handler at the time. In fact, that was its calling-card: the GS didn't have the power of a Z1 or CB, but it could out corner them. And with engines developed by the legendary "Pops" Yoshimura and riding taken care of bike the likes of Wes Cooley, the bike saw significant success in competition.

Interestingly, the 997cc motor that powered the GS1000S was a development of the GS750 engine, but was actually lighter. The bike was originally intended for the European market, where folks actually cared about going around both left and right corners. But Wes' championship wins in AMA racing led to the blue-and-white bike being unofficially called the "Wes Cooley Replica," and the name stuck.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica for Sale

The bike you  are looking at is a mostly original 1980 Wes Cooley replica, I bought the bike the way you see it with the front fork brace, aluminum handlebars and front fork air gauge other than that the bike looks to be all original sans new tires. The bike is unrestored but looks amazing and has just been serviced and runs unbelievable. The bike is not flawless but is very nice with just the right amount of patina not like a 38 year old bike that it is, but more like a 4 or 5 year old bike might have. Look at the pictures and decide for yourself and email with any questions and I will do my best to answer promptly. I have a large collection of Japanese Superbikes from the 70's and early 80's and I have decided to sell some as I just can't ride them all and they have become too time consuming  to maintain and store, and I have included some pictures in this auction of some bikes that will be coming up for sale and they range from flawless some of the best in existence original bikes, to best of the best top quality restorations and survivor bikes that look new or restored. Every single bike I own runs to perfection and is ready to go. If you have an interest in a bike let me know I will tell you when I am going to list it.

The Suzuki GS1000S is actually very rare, with approximately 1200 made: 500 in 1979 and 700 in 1980. This second-year model featured electronic ignition, a stepped seat, slotted brake rotors, and other minor updates to its appearance. There are over 21,000 miles on the odometer, but the GS1000S is built like a tank and it should have plenty of life left in it: Suzuki’s big four cylinder was extremely popular among drag racers and can handle all sorts of abuse and still make it home under its own power. Bidding is very active and up to $8,500 with another day or so left on the auction. Considering the age of the bike, this one appears to be in exceptional condition.

-tad

Wes Cooley Replica: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S for Sale
Suzuki May 22, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

"Ram air" was a very 90s gimmick with dubious benefits, especially on the road, but they gave bikes of the 1990s like this Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD a distinctive style, with oversized fairing nostrils and large intake tubes that curved through the rider's view and into the top of the tank to pressurize the airbox. Well "ram air" implies airbox-pressurization at least, but the reality in this case was more form than function. But that minor point aside, the new model was a significant milestone in the history of the Gixxer, and there are very few remaining in this kind of clean, low-mileage condition.

After generations that saw Suzuki's range of sportbikes getting more refined, but ever heavier and slower, the 1996 GSX-R750 SRAD and the smaller 600cc version finally reversed that trend. Suzuki's new Ram Air Direct model was really a complete overhaul of the existing GSX-R: an entirely new aluminum beam frame with claimed ties to Suzuki's GP bike replaced the cradle design, the liquid-cooled engine was narrowed by moving the cam-chain to the end of the block, and basically everything was made smaller and lighter, more compact. It debuted with a bank of carburetors, but the 1998 version seen here added fuel injection.

The result? A bike that was, marketing hype aside, as light as a contemporary 600: 395lbs dry, almost 45lbs lighter than the previous version, with a screaming, 128hp rev-monster motor and a very slick six-speed box that you really needed to abuse if you wanted to make good progress up to the new Gixxer's near 170mph top speed. But that wasn't a problem because the new Gixxer liked abuse. Fully-adjustable upside-down forks helped the bike handle and the six-piston calipers up front may have fallen out of fashion, but certainly look pretty trick.

No one I know seems to be able to clarify for me: do you say "es ar ay de" or do you say "srad" when talking about these bikes? When I ask people keep looking at me like, "Hey, I thought you were supposed to be the expert." However you say it, the SRAD is a nearly classic sportbike with the handling, if not the outright power, to take the fight to modern machines. But throw on some fresh rubber, modern brake pads, and a set of steel-braided lines, and this could be one fun bike with the performance to go with all that nostalgic 90s style.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 fuel-injected with only 8,000 actual miles! 100% stock. Adult owned! Looks and drives like new! Never dropped! Always in a garage! Has a factory Suzuki bike cover, rear seat, tie-down strips, color-coded tank bra. This is a must see! Turns heads wherever it goes!

I've spared you the all-caps listing and deleted a whole bunch of extraneous exclamation points. You can thank me later. The seller's enthusiastic writing style aside, this is a very clean bike with a clean title and just 8,000 miles. It'd probably be even more desirable in classic Suzuki blue-and-white, but I'm sure the more subtle red-silver-black seen here has its fans.

-tad

 

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale
Ducati May 19, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

In The Beginning: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale

Ducati's modern era really started here, with the 851. The air-cooled Pantah engine, with its rubber cam belts, was a step forward, compared to the bevel-drive twins and set the stage for Ducati's move into the future. But it was the liquid-cooled, four-valve version of their classic L-twin that finally brought them fully into the modern era and allowed them to compete against the very best sportbikes from Japan in the newly-formed World Superbike Championship.

Sure, their throbbing, torquey v-twin was down on power, compared to a screaming inline four. But a fat, useable midrange helped make up for some of the theoretical horsepower gap, and a bit of additional displacement took care of the rest. The 851 wasn't as reliable or as affordable as the Japanese competition, but it could handle with the best of them.

The new liquid-cooled, four-valve engine was dubbed, naturally, the Desmoquattro and displaced 851cc. Truth in advertising! The bike was fed by very effective Weber-Marelli fuel injection for a claimed 104hp. The original bikes look a little bit awkward and old-school, rolling on 16" wheels, but those were quickly changed to 17" hoops and, by the time this 1992 version rolled around, it looked very modern and exotic, although not nearly as elegant as the 916 that followed. The upside is slightly more comfortable ergonomics that work better on a bike far more likely to be used for 7/10th canyon rides than 10/10ths race track sorties these days.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale

BEAUTIFUL 1992 Ducati 851 

*PERFECT CONDITION* 7k miles

Well maintained! 

Never dropped/crashed!

VERY light signs of (normal) use! 

Magnesium Marchesini wheels

Spaghetti exhaust

Obviously not as beautiful as the 916 that followed, but it is very purposeful and aggressive, with the white frame adding a classic touch. I do wish the seller had removed some of the bodywork so we can see the condition, along with some better shots of the "spaghetti exhaust," a reference to the system's smooth tangle of large diameter piping that was based around equal-length headers and replaces the ugly crossover junction with actual tubes. Sure, a set of carbon-fiber cans will help your red stallion sound more Ducati-y but if you really want it to sound like the real deal, you need an expensive full system. This set is likely a Silmotor system to match the end cans, since I believe they're still in production. Otherwise, this is a clean, low-mileage example of an appreciating classic sportbike, and has a couple of pricey aftermarket bits that should genuinely enhance performance.

-tad

In The Beginning: 1992 Ducati 851 for Sale
MV Agusta May 18, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Launched at almost the same time, MV Agusta's Brutale has always lived in the sleeker F4's shadow. Styling aside, it was just a little bit lower-spec, a little less focused, a little too practical. Like that's a dirty word. I happen to love the design, although it's hard to argue that the F4 isn't a better-looking bike. But you have to suffer for that sublime style. The fact is, as much as I love the F4, it's hard work: the riding position puts lots of weight over the front wheel, the pegs are high, and the suspension is stiff. The Brutale, while by no means plush, certainly can feel that way after spending time on an F4. Which makes sense, since the F4 was designed for the track. For the road? It honestly doesn't get much better for canyon hooliganism than the Brutale.

Like the original F4 750, the Brutale 750S was considered by some to be "too slow," as if 127 high-strung horses in a lightweight naked bike with a nearly dirt-track riding position isn't a recipe for a good time. The 910R seen here followed the original Brutale and displaced... 910cc. At 136hp, claimed power isn't up all that much, but midrange is improved and honestly, it's all the power you need in a naked road bike. Seriously, who is riding these things and really thinks they're not fast enough? Sure, moar power is great and all, but the later 1078 and 1090 versions just seem like overkill, making the 910R the Goldilocks of the Brutale range: not too fast, not too slow. Just right.

The seller of this very clean example mentions a Titanium exhaust, and it looks like a set of beautiful headers and a de-cat link pipe have been fitted, but the bike retains the original "shotgun" style end-cans. Not the worst choice, as the aftermarket never really did come up with anything that looks quite as elegant as these slash-cut bits, although the actual openings in the ends do look kind of... inadequate. But if you're worried about a lack of noise, trust me: this one probably isn't all that quiet.

The only problem I see here is a lack of a Power Commander. MV's of this era can generally use fueling help. They're typically very lean through most of the rev range, then run overly rich at the top end. It makes sense, given limited development resources and the fairly crude technology available when the bike was introduced, but an aftermarket fueling module and some dyno time gives the instant response and fluid midrange the bike was always designed to have. It's perfectly rideable without one, but is well worth the investment.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale

Selling an MV Agusta Brutale 910R in excellent condition

KBB value at $5880 without considering the premium extras we have here. Price firm.

With top notch quality accessories
1. Titanium exhaust
2. Stock carbon fiber body parts (from MV Agusta)
3. Rizoma mirrors
4. CRG clutch and brake levers
5. MV Agusta cover and upright stand
6. Trickle charger

Title status: clean 
Transmission: manual 

Never down or raced/tracked. Low miles:4890 !!! 
Serviced at Ducati dealer every time.
Have the stock exhaust as well.

Have title in my name.

Good to know the title is clean, but did the seller really need to tell us the transmission is a "manual"? Does a constant-mesh, sequential gearbox even qualify as a manual? The seller also seems pretty impressed by all the "premium extras" included but honestly, this is basically a stock bike, by MV Agusta standards. And that's really the appeal of this one: it's clean, looks very sleek in the unusual black, and hasn't been messed with too much, although the missing Power Commander is something I'd rectify as soon as possible if it were mine. Is it worth the maintenance hassles? Well that's a different story: a Street or Speed Triple certainly handles as well, has plenty of character, and is much easier to maintain. I'd like to say those bikes are less expensive as well, except at the moment they're not: the asking price for this particularly nice Brutale is $5,999. That's pretty much bang-on for a good 910 these days, but Brutales in general are a screaming deal, considering the looks and performance. Anyone have $6,000 they can loan me?

-tad

Handsome Brute: 2007 MV Agusta Brutale 910R for Sale
Ducati May 17, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Clean, Low-Mileage, and Nearly Stock: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale

After languishing in infamy for a few years, Ducati's 999 is finally getting a bit of respect for being the impressive machine it has always been. If the 999 had been built by anyone other than Ducati, and it had been the follow up to pretty much any bike but the 916, its praises would have been sung from every rooftop. But although the regular and S model bikes are finally getting a bit of respect, collectors were always on to the 999R.

The 999 was an improvement over the 916 in terms of power, reliability, and ergonomics, but the 999R stood head and shoulders above the more common versions, even though they don't look very special to the casual observer: Ducati's R bikes are always pretty subtle. A bit of a red frame here, a flash of gold from shock or fork tubes, a logo unpainted to let the carbon weave show through the paint...

The main changes are under the skin, since the R was created to allow the 999 to compete in various racing classes, including AMA Superbike racing. And we're not talking about some cams and a different fuel map. The 999R featured an entirely new cylinder head design, along with high-compression pistons, titanium rods and valves, all hidden within sand-cast engine cases. The result was much more oversquare than the stock bike for exactly 999cc, along with 134hp at the wheel.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale

Immaculate 2 owner 2006 Ducati 999R. Only 1740 miles. I purchased from the original owner in 2010 and have accumulated a grand total of an additional 225 miles. Recently serviced and new battery. I added a slipper clutch but still have the original. Also added bar end mirrors. Never dropped, no dings, dents, no track. I am not comfortable riding the bike as can be seen by the mileage. Have the original owner's manual and service manual CD. Absolutely no disappointments with this bike. If you have read this far you know all about the 999R and that 2006 is most likely the best year. No trades.

Bidding is currently up to $12,300 and the Reserve is Not Yet Met. But since the Buy It Now price is set at $15,995 I expect that won't be a problem by the time the auction ends, since there's plenty of time left and there is lots of activity on this one already. That might be because the bike has very low miles and is mercifully unmolested: the awful original license plate holder even includes the stock reflectors! The bar-end mirrors look pretty silly and, depending on the position of the clip-ons, might be nearly useless, but should take all of five minutes to remove. The slipper clutch might not be original, but is a very practical addition in keeping with the bike's character, and can always be removed.

-tad

Clean, Low-Mileage, and Nearly Stock: 2006 Ducati 999R for Sale