Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Featured Listing September 19, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

As the old saying goes, “It’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow.” That’s not to say it isn’t supremely fun to ride a fast bike fast, but let’s be honest here: most riders aren’t really capable of riding modern superbikes anywhere near their limit, even on a race track. And it also brings up the fact that today’s sportbikes are so fast, you can’t possibly access their full performance on the road without taking massive risks with your body and license. That’s not so much a problem with today’s Featured Listing, a Honda CBR400RR.

1990 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for sale on eBay

For most Americans, referencing the CBR400RR or “Baby Blade” just results in quizzical looks. But that’s no surprise, since the bike only recently became eligible for import here, and the CBR400 is still tricky to register if you have a strict DMV. Intended for the Japanese market, the bike has surprisingly sophisticated specifications for something with such a small engine.

It really is a miniature superbike: 399cc sixteen valve inline four with gear-driven cams and a six-speed gearbox. An aluminum beam frame, instead of the CBR600’s steel unit, with adjustable suspension front and rear. Power was 59hp stock, with another 10hp or so available with a bit of tuning and dry weight was a claimed 360lbs, so performance was pretty sprightly, in spite of the limited power. Interestingly, it was sold alongside the V4-engined VFR400R, so Honda had two different 400cc sportbikes available for sale at the same time.

This example is being offered up by our friends at Iconic Motorbikes in Marina Del Rey, California. I've seen it in person and, other than the surface corrosion visible on the fork legs and footpeg brackets, something common on Japanese imports and bikes exposed to the ocean air, it's complete and very sharp-looking.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale 

**NOT LEGAL FOR ROAD USE IN CA, TRACK ONLY!  OK FOR REGISTRATION IN MOST OTHER STATES**

Honda CBR400RR which is also known as an NC29.

These little 400's are very hard to find in the USA and even more rare on the road. The ones that you do find are typically REALLY rough or loaded with oxidation or aftermarket bodywork.

This little gem however only has less then 9,400 miles (15,063 km), all 100% stock and original and ready for a new owner.  She starts right up with a little bit of choke and has a smooth throttle curve thereafter. If you're looking for something that you'll likely never see pull up next to you on the road... this is your girl!

Quick note, notice the oxidation on the rearsets and fork legs.  Pretty much it's only major flaw but again, very common on Japanese imports and a super easy fix.  We have our own media blaster so we could essentially clean them up for the buyer if required but there's some shop time involved for pulling the forks and rearsets apart.  Either or 🙂

As the seller clearly indicates: if you live in California, don't even think about it, unless you are looking to build a small-displacement race bike, or just plan to display the bike. Bike currently has Arizona plates. Otherwise, this is one sweet little machine and would be plenty of fun on your local back road. The starting bid is $7,400 with no takers as yet, and a couple days left on the auction.

-tad

Sponsored Listing: 1990 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale
Honda September 18, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2006 Honda RC51 for Sale

Update 9.20.2018: SOLD IN 2 DAYS! Congratulations to buyer and seller! Contact me if you have a Rare SportBike for sale in excellent condition that needs similar exposure! -dc

The RC30 and RC45 that preceded today's Featured Listing Honda RC51 were pure homologation specials, built in very limited quantities and designed primarily as the basis for Honda's production-based racing efforts. The RC51 represented a pretty big change for Honda in terms of philosophy, and was produced in much larger numbers, making it a great way for Honda fans to get a piece of their racing heritage for less money, especially on the used market.

2006 Honda RC51 for Sale on eBay

Those previous bikes embodied Honda's belief in the virtues of the V4 powerplant, but World Superbike rules gave a significant displacement advantage to v-twins that helped them dominate the series during the mid-to-late 1990s. The RC45 had its own flaws and was never as successful as the stunning RC30, but Honda felt that the rules were biased and a shift to a v-twin platform was really the only way to compete against Ducati. Basically the RC51 was Honda proving a point: that, on a level playing field, they could beat Ducati at their own v-twin game.

The original SP1 version of the bike that was introduced in 2000 had some teething problems: the low-rpm fueling was poor, tank range was very limited, and the bike had significant understeer, something that was addressed when the SP2 was released in 2002 with frame updates and tweaks to the front end. Most importantly, the bike was a winner on track right out of the gate, and took the WSB title in 2000 and again in 2002.

Transverse v-twins are generally very skinny, but the RC51's side-mounted radiators give the bike some visual bulk Ducatis lack and helped solve one of the problems the Bolognese bikes faced: a 90° twin is a very long design and if you want an appropriate length swingarm for optimal traction, you end up with no space to fit a radiator. The side-mounted parts look trick, but I do wonder how well an RC51 crashes...

Personally, I think the RC51 is a little bit too nondescript and functional-looking in the more common silver, red, and black graphics, but the darker color scheme seen here on this SP2 looks very sleek and sinister and it should be a great bike on road or track, since it includes the updates to the handling mentioned above. You're still stuck with some snatchy low-rev throttle response, a result of the gaping throttle bodies designed for max power at high revs, and the small fuel tank, but that seems a pretty small price to pay. How small? The seller is asking $10,000 for this clean, low-mile example.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Honda RC51 for Sale

2006 Honda RC51 (MINT)

12,000 miles, show room condition OZ wheels, Brembo brakes, Galfer wave rotors, Akrapovic full titanium carbon fiber exhaust, Power Commander USB, Gilles rear sets, carbon tank protector, rear carbon tire hugger Magical Racing, Ohlins rear shock, Race Tech internals forks, Pro Tech suspension adjusters, Pazo shorty levers, and so much more 

Honda's largely deserved reputation for reliability and build quality means many RC51s rack up pretty high mileage, so the 12,000 miles seen here are relatively low, and the bike comes with some tasteful extras. Up until recently, the RC51 has, along with the Suzuki TL-R, languished in the sportbike bargain basement: actual racing success aside, it wasn't quite the Ducati-killer Honda hoped for and that seems to have kept prices relatively low. Of course it couldn't last: the bike may only have two cylinders, but this is a genuine piece of HRC history that looks great in this darker color scheme.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2006 Honda RC51 for Sale
BMW September 14, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Replika Racer: 2004 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika for Sale

Before the BMW S1000RR rocked the sportbike world, fans of Germanic sportbikes had to make do with stuff like the BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika. Not that this is a particularly bad thing: the Boxer Cup Replika is a pretty great roadbike, although it wouldn't really hassle a GSX-R or R1 or even a Ducati 1000SS on track. But does a ZX-10 have heated grips and ABS? I think not.

Handling was very good: the Boxer Cup had an increased ride height for improved cornering clearance, the Telelever front's usual lack of dive helped the bike under braking, and the upgraded Öhlins shocks at both ends helped to dispel the forkless system's sometimes vague feeling at the limit. The biggest issue with the R1100S is the sheer mass of the bike: the sportier S saved a lot of weight over the older RS, but the Boxer Cup was still pretty heavy compared to more aggressive rivals at 505lbs wet.

The other problem is the engine. The updated flat-twin incorporated plenty of modern technology but, at the end of the day, you're still dealing with just two cylinders lugging all that weight around, a sport-touring engine tuned for a bit more sport. Engine width is kept to a minimum by eschewing overhead cams: the pair of cams actually live in the heads, and operate the engine's eight valves via a set of short pushrods. A clean burn of the fuel-air mixture is helped by the twin-plug heads, and the cylinders themselves are cooled by air passing over them, while oil-cooled heads allow the bike to make pretty decent power and, presumably, help the bike meet ever-rising emission standards. The twin's displacement of 1085cc means great bottom-end torque and a strong midrange with a 98hp peak, but it does run out of breath pretty early.

Although the R1100S was the sportiest BMW at the time, it didn't really look all that competitive when pitched head-to-head against rivals. So to promote it, BMW sponsored a one-make race series, the Boxer Cup, as a support race for MotoGP at the time. The series managed to attract such luminaries as Kevin Schwantz and Randy Mamola, whose signature adorns the Cup Replika, and was supposedly plenty of fun to watch, with the close racing you'd expect with everyone riding the same machine.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika for Sale

After long deliberations, I am putting my 2004 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika #245 on the market.  In 2004, just 300 Boxer Cup Replikas were offered for sale in the US, making this a very rare and collectible motorcycle. With less than 3900 miles on the clock (not a typo) this is one of the lowest mileage and cleanest BCRs that can be ridden daily or shown at events.  Currently registered in California until July 2019 with a clean California title in hand. 

The oil head Boxer twin engine powering this bike is legendary for its reliability (will easily cover 100k miles with just regular maintenance). The Cup is one of the rare collectibles that can be ridden as much as desired without worrying about breakdowns or high cost of maintenance.

Boxer Cup #245 is a non-ABS, non-heated grip model which equates to lower maintenance costs (ABS service at the dealer will cost over $400 by itself) and increased reliability (ABS are prone to malfunction over time). Deleted equipment also contributes to overall weight saving.

It is equipped with a very desirable and hard to source full Remus exhaust system. The sound is amazing compared to stock exhaust. Ilmberger carbon fiber rear tire hugger is another desirable upgrade.

Up until 2016 this bike was part of a collection and was not ridden. It was recommissioned in June 2016 with 3076 miles on the clock by San Diego BMW and included the following:

  • Gel battery
  • Replacement of entire fuel system including fuel pump, lines, etc.
  • Spark plugs
  • Tank professionally cleaned
  • Front Metzeler tire 120/70R17
  • Rear Metzeler tire 180/55R17
  • Oil service
  • Safety inspection
  • TOTAL $2631

Detailed service receipt from San Diego BMW will come with the sale.  Bike is garaged in upright position (not on side stand) and is never ridden in rain or adverse weather conditions. There are few tiny rock chips on the belly pan, the largest is in the photo gallery. Otherwise this Boxer Cup looks a like it just rolled off the showroom floor. Bike comes with keys and books. I will include a BMW Front Pit Bull stand at full asking price.

This is a rare opportunity to buy perhaps one of the lowest mileage Boxer Cups in the US.

The $8,200 Buy It Now price is on the high side for a Boxer Cup, but this is a very clean, low-mileage example that has obviously been fastidiously maintained. 2005 and later bikes came with Laser cans to match the logo on the fairings, but the full Remus exhaust seen here is a desirable option and should give the flat twin a nice, throaty drone that will sound sporty but very different from a Ducati. As the seller mentions, this is a collectible you can actually ride.

-tad

Replika Racer: 2004 BMW R1100S Boxer Cup Replika for Sale
Yamaha September 13, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Fanboy Alert: Rossi-Signed 2006 Yamaha R1 LE #46 for Sale

Later Yamaha R1s like this 2006 LE aren't really collectible as yet, but I'm sure they will be down the road, particularly when decked out in these very flattering colors that recall Kenny Roberts' racing machines. This was one of the last versions of the R1 to use the flat-plane crank engine, so Yamaha folks who like their R1s screaming will certainly be interested, as will fans of a certain elder statesman of MotoGP, who apparently has a long-standing relationship with the tuning fork brand...

Just 500 R1 LEs were built for the US market: the rest of the world had to share 1000 examples of the R1 SP that had basically the same specifications. The Öhlins suspension and magnesium Marchesini wheels seen here are standard LE fare, and the bike also featured a slipper clutch to help smooth downshifts. Otherwise, the LE was pretty much a stock 2006 R1, and shared that bike's minor frame adjustments that fine-tuned the handling and engine revisions that meant a claimed 175hp, giving the 172kg [379lb] dry bike the magic 1:1 power-to-weight ratio.

The 5VY R1 definitely has its virtues, but the big appeal here is the fact that this particular bike is #46 of the 500 R1 LEs produced. The serial number is obviously significant because it matches Valentino Rossi's racing number, and his signature on the tank and license plate are just what The Doctor ordered. Sorry, I just had to work in a bad Rossi pun there somewhere... No more, I promise.

The swoopy curves of this version are pretty restrained and it's a good-looking bike, although we've obviously moved on from undertail exhausts that increase cornering clearance at the cost of weight carried up high and toasted passenger buns. It looks especially sharp in the black-and-yellow graphics seen here that give the overall bike a bit of the old and a bit of the new, as they provide a visual link to Yamaha's racing history that stretches all the way from Kenny Roberts to Valentino Rossi.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Yamaha R1 #46 for Sale

We are pleased to offer for sale this one of a kind unicorn 2006 Yamaha 50th anniversary R1 LE with only 1,566 miles. Now you might ask what makes this R1 LE a “Unicorn”? Well this R1 LE is number 46 of 500 and is autographed by “The Doctor” Valentino Rossi himself. If you are a racing fan you know who “The Doctor” is and is what really makes this R1 LE a collector’s dream bike. The 50th anniversary model is finished in a classic Yamaha Yellow/White and Black paint scheme and comes with magnesium forged wheels, brand new Michelin Power RS Tires, and Öhlins Suspension.

We offer financing and worldwide shipping. Please contact Michael at 630-936-2980 with any questions on this one of a kind Yamaha R1.

This is a low-mileage bike and the serial numbers and signatures make it more of a novelty than anything else, so if you're searching for an R1 to ride, you're probably best off looking elsewhere. Personally, this kind of bike interests me not at all, but I expect that for a certain type of collector it could prove to be very desirable. Considering how much interest there is in the listing, that seems to be true so far: bidding is very active, and up over $9,000 with several days left on the auction.

-tad

Fanboy Alert: Rossi-Signed 2006 Yamaha R1 LE #46 for Sale
Ducati September 9, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

One of the most collectible Ducatis of all time, the Supermono isn't even a v-twin. It is, as the name implies, powered by a single-cylinder engine. If you're a bit confused by this and thinking, "Hmmmm... I don't remember there being any Ducati singles in the 90s..." you're not actually crazy. There weren't any Supermono roadbikes and only about 65 Supermono racebikes ever built between 1993 and 1995.

Race bikes are built to race, but are generally designed to conform to a very specific set of series rules. In Supermono's case, it was the European Sound of Singles, a single-cylinder class designed to support World Superbike racing. It won just about everything it was eligible to race in.

The reason is revs: where most big single-cylinder race bikes are derived from dirtbikes and hammering their riders to dust inside their leathers by 7,000rpm, the Supermono can happily spin up past 10,000. The Ducati's party trick? It's a single that thinks it's a twin.

Looking at the engine, it's pretty obvious that, in building their racing single, Ducati simply blanked off the rear cylinder on one of their liquid-cooled four valve v-twins, keeping the horizontal piston for a nice, low center of gravity. But they also used a dummy connecting rod that simulated the forces of the second piston, likely increasing friction and rotational mass compared to a normal single, but massively reducing vibration.

That ability to rev meant power as well, and the claimed 65hp at 10,500rpm from the 549cc engine gave the bike a serious advantage, compared to other bikes in the class. Later bikes had displacement increased slightly to 572cc for a bit more power. The rest of the bike was incredibly light weight, with liberal use of magnesium castings on the engine and a few other parts, so the complete Supermono tipped the scales at a featherweight 267lbs dry.

Brick-wall brakes from the much heavier 888 bring the bike to a very sudden stop when necessary, which probably wasn't all that often, considering the bike's cornering abilities. Interestingly, this one appears to have been upgraded with modern radial brake and clutch master cylinders, for improved braking and... clutching.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale

1993 Ducati Supermono. #16 of 65. Originally delivered to Sweden.  

Video of #16 running https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tii5G9mm4wI

A new timing belt was fit prior to the video.

The video represents the last time it was ran.  It was set up for long term storage immediately after. Retrospeed, of Belgium Wisconsin was commissioned to prove that the bike was mechanically sound, change fluids and to set up for long term storage in February of 2014.

New slicks would need to be fit prior to track use.

Any and all questions can be directed towards Brady at Retrospeed 262-483-5399 

The owner, an Italian collector, is thinning his motorcycle collection to make room for a car purchase.

The Supermono is not titled, none were as they were produced for the sole purpose of racing.

The factory 955 Corsa in the last picture will be coming for sale soon.

The Supermono was never an entry-level racer like KTM's RC390R and was pretty eye-wateringly expensive even when new: $30,000 or so in 1993. These days? You're looking at something like this bike's $125,000 starting bid, which seems to be in line with recent examples. This particular bike is in far away Belgium... Wisconsin! Happily, the seller includes a video of the bike running before it was packed up for storage, so those of us who merely have the means to debate the values of these bikes can actually get a sense of what one might be like in person.

-tad

Super Single: 1993 Ducati Supermono for Sale
Yamaha September 7, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Street-Legal Stroker: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

Yamaha’s TZR250 doesn’t seem to command the same prices or attention as Honda’s NSR. Which is interesting, considering it's similar in terms of weight and performance, and the TZR is generally even rarer in every market outside Japan: both the 3MA and 3XV versions were officially sold in the Japanese market only, although plenty found their way to the UK, Europe, and Canada via “parallel import” laws.

Certainly, the TZR isn’t lacking in technology: the 3XV packs an electronic engine-management system to rival Honda’s PGM-IV that controls the ignition advance, the powervalve, and the carburetors’ fuel mixture. Yamaha’s Deltabox frame is light and stiff, and the RS version seen here adds a dry clutch, close-ratio box, and later models even included fully-adjustable forks. This example goes a step further and has been upgraded with Öhlins forks and a Nitron rear shock.

Ultimately, the package closely mirrored the rest of the class: 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin displacing 249cc, an aluminum frame, a six-speed gearbox, and the de rigueur powervalve to boost the two-stroke’s limited midrange. The seller is asking $11,500 for this updated, well cared-for example.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

You are looking at a super clean, well maintained and a hard to find TZR 250RS. The RS model comes with close ratio gear box, RS paint scheme, fully adjustable suspension and dry clutch. I upgraded the front forks with Ohlins components, Nitron R1 rear shock, Brembo calipers, Brembo pads, braided brake lines and full floating rotors. Maintenance was done which includes fresh Motul fluids (coolant, brake fluid and transmission oil), carbs been cleaned/synced. Bike is street legal, titled, registered and insured in NJ. Everything on the bike is OEM all original with the exception of the upgrades mentioned. You will never find another one in this condition. 

This one has been up for sale more than once in a couple different places, but appears to be very clean and comes with a New Jersey title, which is a nice bonus for anyone looking to ride their stinky little sportbike. The biggest question here is: has the bike been de-restricted? Collectors may not be too worried, but anyone looking to ride this anywhere outside a very tight, technical racetrack or a very twisty back road will want more than the government-mandated 45hp. The Japanese government, obviously: the US government regulates many, many things, but horsepower is not one of them.

-tad

Street-Legal Stroker: 1992 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale




Do You have a special sportbike that should be listed on our site? Sell your bike with a Featured Listing for just $59.