Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Bimota December 29, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Race History: Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K for Sale

Both a flamboyant racer and a cautionary tale, Anthony Gobert was a hugely talented rider who fell from grace after a failed drug test. Several times, actually. Racing today is obviously a far cry from the wild days of the 60s and 70s, where playboy racers partied with stewardesses well into the night before getting up the following morning to risk life and limb while nursing a hangover. Today's riders generally treat racing as the serious profession it has become, instead of as a way for daredevils to travel and booze it up on someone else's dime. I'm sure Gobert's missteps would have been laughed off in another era, but a failed test for marijuana, of all things, ended his MotoGP dreams in 1997, although he continued to race in Superbikes events in a variety of classes. Somewhere along Gobert's slow downward spiral, he got a ride on this Bimota SB8K and managed to make an underfunded machine from a tiny manufacturer briefly competitive, a testament to his talent.

Bimota's SB8 was really the TL1000R that Suzuki wasn't able to build, and one of their most successful models. There's no doubting the liquid-cooled, 996 v-twin engine's prowess: it's been used in various iterations by Suzuki since 1997 to power both sports and touring models. More importantly, both Cagiva and Bimota saw the potential for the engine to power some serious sporting hardware, and just needed to work around the layout challenges posed by the v-twin. As can be seen by the Ducati Panigale's side-mounted rear shock, a transverse 90° v-twin is very long, making it difficult to package efficiently in a compact sportbike while simultaneously maximizing swingarm length. Suzuki used an innovative rotary damper with roots in Formula 1 to support the rear of their TL1000S and TL1000R. Unfortunately, while the concept was sound in theory, it didn't work so well in practice, as the undersized unit tended to overheat and cause handling to go from "stable" to "exciting" without much warning.

Bimota took that throbbing, 138hp lump of an engine and put it into a machine that could much more fully exploit its obvious possibility. As with all Bimotas, the SB8's real party trick was a state-of-the-art frame. While I'm a sucker for Ducati's classic trellis unit, the SB8 used a wild composite design based around stiff, lightweight aluminum spars with carbon fiber side plates and a self-supporting carbon fiber tail section. You can see Bimota's solution to that rear suspension issue, peeking out on the right side of the bike from behind the main frame spar. Ultimately, the SB8 weighed in at nearly 50lbs less than the TL-R, although the bike is uncharacteristically broad and bulky for a v-twin, ironic considering the amazingly slim design of the Ducati 996. It's exotic for sure, but not especially pretty, and the carbon air tubes on the original SB8R also meant you'd better know where those hand controls are without looking, or you'd be craning your neck awkwardly trying to find the high-beam switch or cancel the turn signals. Best not to use them.

Of course, the locations of headlight and turn signal switches matter little in this particular case, since this is the updated SB8K version that did away with the massive carbon tubes in favor of a more conventional intake system. And this bike doesn't have signals or lights anyway, since it's the very World Superbike machine that Gobert used to win at Philip Island in 2000, reminding everyone of his talent, if not his self-control. Many who worked with him feel he could have been one of the all-time greats, and flashes of his brilliance can be seen in results he achieved on the SB8K.

From the original eBay listing: Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K for Sale

ex-Anthony Gobert, winning in Philip Island April 2000.

VIN: 00071

This is a legendary bike in a WSBK history for who remembers the victory in april 2000 in Philip Island when Fogarty ended his career... also it is an ICON for the Italian racing motorcyles enthusiasts and the Bimota collectors. 

Only 2 FACTORY bikes were built for the 2000 WSBK, frame #71 and frame #73. This is the only of the 2 fully preserved, complete (with telemetry) and owned by BIMOTA FACTORY from year 2000 to 2017. Full history know, fully untouched since the 2000 season ended.

The bike is fitted with SUZUKI FACTORY TL1000R magnesium/dry clutch engine but tuned then for Bimota by one of the TOP mechanics in the Italian motorcycling history, Franco Farne'... yes the Ducati legend! The bike comes with some spares: engine cases, 2 heads, spare rear wheel, box with bits and pieces.

Letter of verification by the FACTORY present.

Parade, race and collect!

Be sure to check out the photos in the gallery above. The shot of the injectors and one of the high-capacity radiator with the cutout for the front cylinder are especially cool. This is yet another ex-race machine being offered by the same seller as the YB4 racebike from a couple weeks back and, a bit of expected racing wear and tear and some significant discoloration on the swingarm, appears to be in very nice condition. There are several days left on the auction, and bidding is up to just under $9,000 with the Reserve Not Met.

-tad

Race History: Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K for Sale
Suzuki December 28, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Number One: Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Although displacement was technically a bit more than a liter, the first generation Suzuki GSX-R1100 really established the modern literbike formula: take a big inline four engine, and squeeze it into a 600 or 750 sized package. The philosophy that created the iconic Gixxer was initially tried out with Suzuki’s GSXR400, and the result was so good they applied the same lightweight methodology to a 750cc machine, and the GSX-R750 was born in 1985, with the 1100cc version following in 1986. Frames of the 750 and 1100cc versions aren’t identical, but are pretty similar, with the 1100 using thicker square-section aluminum tubing to increase rigidity and handle the extra power of the larger engine.

The 1100 engine actually displaced 1052cc and shared its SACS oil-cooling system with the 750cc version: in both cases, Suzuki avoided the additional weight and complexity that water-cooling would bring by using air and oil to keep the twin-cam, four-valve engine within appropriate operating temperatures. But the high-performance engine needed some additional help to keep from exploding, so the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System used a complex oil pump to circulate oil, lubricate bearings, cool the heads, and even featured oil jets directed at the bottom of the pistons. With 137hp on tap, the big Slabbie was a bit of a monster, as it had just 489lbs dry to push around. That’s obviously not hugely impressive today, but keep in mind that the bike’s 75lb-ft of torque isn’t all that far off a modern superbike and meant that the big Gixxer could pull like a freight train.

The 1100 wasn’t exactly agile, but it did handle well for the time on its 18” wheels with tires that are laughably skinny by today’s standards. The 1100 featured a set of sophisticated anti-dive forks and Suzuki’s Full-Floater linkage rear suspension kept the power in check, while providing a less punishing ride than was typical of hard-core sportbikes of the era. A modern-ish brake set up with a catchy Deca-Piston name slowed things down for the next bend: a pair of four-piston calipers up front mated to a twin piston item in the rear meant ten whole speed-retarding pistons were on hand to keep you from crashing into a hedge when the world turned twisty after you got a bit too liberal with your right hand. It all added up to a bike that was a little on the heavy side, but one that offered good stability and world-class power, a wildly fast GT with Japanese reliability. Obviously, companies like Bimota used the same elements to create their lightweight road weapons prior to the introduction of the GSX-R, but Suzuki took that basic formula, added a dash of reliability, and brought it to the masses.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Obviously the posted asking price is a silly one, but we are open to all offers that respect this motorcycles exceptional condition as well as its rarety and we will not scoff at anyones idea of what its value should, would or could be in todays international bike collectors market place

Suzuki GSX-R1100 No. 1 Details

This mid 1985 build / 1986 first registered Suzuki GSXR-1100 was one of the centerpieces of our small private collection and is one of just a handfull of bikes left from said collection which we have been dissolving this past year, mostly due to age and health related reasons and because we are consolidating all our personal items and scaling back from multiple locations to just one place to live and because we are giving up our motorcycle hobby alltogether

This is not a 'normal' motorcycle in 'average' condition so the text describing it and this sale's particulars might be somewhat different than what one would normally see in a listing here on Ebay. Please go to our Seller Feedback Rating to see what previous buyers have consistently been saying about us in the past 17 years in regards to every single item we have sold here on Ebay

The first GSXR 1100 was a groundbraking motorcycle in more ways than one, it started the era of large displacement, light weight Superbikes in the mid-80-ies

Being able to own an original, genuine, verifiable with factory documentation, unrestored Vin-1/Engine-1 vehicle of any type, make or model has got to be at the top of most collectors list of must-have‘s.

The vehicle being a top displacement model from one of the major motorcycle manufacturers should make it even more desirable

Details:

Mid-1985 build earliest prototype Suzuki GSX-R1100 in existence

Was the secret 'Star' in our small personal bike collection for many years

Verifiably a genuine Serial No.1 and Engine No.1 motorcycle. One of a small number of GSX-R1100-eds build by hand in the factory to set up the subsquent 1986 assembly line production run. This motorcycle was build with a handmade, prototype frame, on a prototype frame jig and it contains many one-off features and components.

Details on request in person would be best; to list just a few major ones:

This GU74 series bike has the early prototype exhaust without the toe-heatshield, it also has the early version clutch cover without any oil-amount stamped in the specific location where all other bikes have the cc amount stamped in

It has the correct, prototype-only all metal footpegs for rider and passenger since the rubber/metal type was not yet ready for use. It has all the original bodywork pieces mounted, in the original factory paintjob.

Some of the panels have some lines and colors that do not really match and line up correctly and do not match any other painted-alike original bike of the same type.

There are many more differences and details on this special bike,

too much to list them all here in this basic description

A correct and proper title exists for this motorcycle as does its original November 1985 first print Din-A5 owners manual.

Also present is the correct, original and super rare 4-language, first edition spareparts manual, printed in Dezember of 1985 in which this specific motorcycle’s exact Vin Number is listed as the starting Vin for the entire series of GSXR 1100 bikes for the next 3 year production run.

Four original sales brochures including the first edition english market version with print date of December 1985 are included in the memorabilia folder. The original keys, 4 correct A27 dark tinted turnsignals, the original toolkit with the rare Suzuki air gauge in its pouch, used for fork pressure and tires and the original GSX-R prototype factory display stand for motorcycle shows complete this offering.

We have owned this motorcycle for many years and have done a lot of research into the history of these early prototype GSX-R 1100-eds (the GSX-R750 also had some early prototypes build in the factory in Japan, none of which we have ever seen come up for sale in the past 15 years)

We have never seen any prototype GSXR-1100 for sale, they were not supposed to be sold to the public, being used mostly for press events, cycle shows and as photo models for the many different manuals and brochures. They were also being returned to the factory after they had been used for all these events and most of them were destroyed

Rumors of an early prototype 1100 existing in the UK in a private collection have so far not been confirmed. In any case, the bike offered here for sale is one of a kind, completely original, never repainted, never restored, exceptionally well kept up mechanically as well as cosmetically and should deserve a place in a serious motorcycle collection or possibly a private museum of some sort. It was ridden extensively in its 33 years, but always cared for and babied to keep it in this exceptional condition

We have prepared an online photo album showing this motorcycle in detail in more than 100 high quality images that might be of interest to a serious collector.

The seller mentions the "silly asking price" and $250,000 [yes, you read that correctly] is certainly silly for anything short of TE Lawrence's Brough Superior or a MotoGP bike in rideable condition with a truckload of spares. But they're just putting that out there, and are open to offers. Which is a good thing because, as cool as this is, I doubt it's worth anything near $250,000. Obviously, a rare bike is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, but I get the feeling that only a very particular sort of collector will want to pony up, since although it's rarer, it's also a little bit cruder, from the seller's description. The question is: what is it worth? Well, nice original "slabbie" GSX-Rs sell for around $7,000 or so, with only the GSX-R750 LEs really getting much higher. This one could obviously worth much more, being a prototype machine and the very first registered example of a bike that pretty much defined the modern superbike. I'll be curious to see where it ends up.

-tad

Number One: Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Yamaha December 22, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Racing Sport: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale

Update: A reader reached out to note that, "The forks are missing the compression and rebound clickers, those are R forks." Seller replied back to us, "I pulled out the books and it looks like the first year for the RS model was a 3XV8 which had the same forks as the standard R model. The next year, 3XV9 and 3XVA came with adjusters." Thanks to SmokinJoe B for the note and Gary for the response. -dc

Yamaha's two-stroke TZR250 was always a bit of an odd duck in the quarter-liter sportbike class. The first-generation TZR was the much more sophisticated follow up to the RD series of bikes and was pretty widely available everywhere but in the US, while later examples like the 3MA and 3XV seen here were only available outside Japan as grey-market or parallel imports and are considered exotic, even in markets where two-stroke sportbikes were common.

Early 1KT and 3MA TZRs used parallel twins, but the final 3XV version finally adopted an "if you can't beat them" philosophy and changed to a small 90° v-twin to match the competition from Honda and Suzuki. The new v-twin displaced 249cc and was backed by a six-speed gearbox. Like the NSR, it featured computer-controlled ignition and Yamaha's YPVS power valve system. In spite of all the trickery, it produced the usual 45hp, limited by the expected Japanese governmental regulations.

The rest of the specification was pretty similar to the rest of the class as well: a 278lbs dry weight with a stiff aluminum beam frame like other bikes in the class, in this case an evolution of Yamaha's Deltabox, with a banana swingarm to allow the bike's distinctive asymmetrical exhaust to tuck in close to the bike's centerline.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS Racing Sport for Sale

Up for auction to the highest bidder with NO RESERVE is a 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS with 16,709 kilometers (10,382 miles). This is the dry clutch Racing Sport model that everybody wants. Bike is in beautiful condition with a few scrapes and scratches. Tank is in perfect condition. All fairings are 100% genuine Yamaha OEM. Upper fairing appears to have been professionally re-sprayed. Bike has a tremendous amount of curb appeal. This RS is a solid rider and is ready to go. Full service just performed with new battery and fluids. Bike runs flawless. Bike comes with Utah state title and is titled as a streetbike for road use.

Merry Christmas!

Bidding is up to just $6,100 with a couple days left and the reserve has been met! As rare as all of these two strokes have been up until recently, I've seen quite a few Hondas and even a few Suzukis, but the various iterations of the Yamaha TZR are still uncommon here in the US, especially in clean condition with OEM bodywork. I'm not clear what "beautiful condition with scratches and scrapes throughout" means exactly, but I'm assuming it means it's been well cared-for and the paint looks good, but has the usual minor blemishes a bike picks up through normal use: a scratch on the tank from a belt buckle, a scuff on the tail from a boot while swinging a leg over, a scrape where another bike parked too close at a bike meetup.

-tad

Racing Sport: 1993 Yamaha TZR250RS for Sale
Ducati December 19, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Almost New: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE with 867 Miles for Sale

Hmmmmm, the text from the listing for this Ducati 900SS FE looks strangely familiar... One of the surprising things about having been writing these posts for the past few years is how often my words show up in sellers' listings. I probably shouldn't be encouraging folks to use my writing for free but, to be completely honest, I'm still more flattered than offended at this point. The main problem is that it means I have to come up with some other theme for my post...

Up until Ducati's most recent iteration, things were always pretty dicey for them financially and, on more than one occasion, they were reduced to trading on nostalgia to make ends meet. By 1978, Ducati's bevel-drive twin was massively outdated, but a lucky win at the Isle of Man TT by Mike "The Bike" Hailwood meant they could flog some fully-faired and gloriously red and green Hailwood-replicas  and keep the lights on. It's a very cool machine in retrospect, but on the eve of the GSX-R750's introduction, it looks like a dinosaur. A very cool dinosaur, but a dinosaur nonetheless. Similarly, by the late 1990s, Ducati's air and oil-cooled Super Sport bikes still had plenty of charm and charisma, but offered little to appeal to modern sportbike fans.

Even when new, the 900SS offered minimal handing advantages compared to a Japanese sportbike that would leave it for dead in a straight line. But Ducati obviously couldn't sell enough of their expensive, exotic liquid-cooled models to make ends meet, and the design soldiered on for riders who wanted to pretend they preferred the "mechanical honesty of a classic, air-cooled engine" [it does sound better than the liquid-cooled version] or those who were more honest about the fact that they were terrified of the four-valve Ducatis' expensive service requirements, but still wanted a genuine Italian motorcycle.

It's a bit disingenuous to try and capitalize on nostalgia for a bike that would obviously continue in a newer, better form. But right before the 1999 release of heavily-revised, fuel-injected version styled by Pierre Terblanche Super Sport, Ducati released the "Final Edition" of the earlier, chunky, rubber-cambelt v-twin sportbike to cash in on the looming demise of the well-loved but obsolete model before it was replaced. Although when you consider the critical reaction to the updated model, it makes a bit more sense. The FE featured a solo tail to save weight and allow the fitment of upswept exhausts for better cornering clearance. Adjustable suspension front and rear was decent, and the standard two-valve engine in standard tune was good for the standard 80hp. Ergonomics are very humane for anyone weaned on late model sportbikes, and the seemingly limited power is plenty to have fun with on canyon roads.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Time Capsule! Mint Condition, Torque For Days, Beautiful Ducati! Only 867 miles... yes you read that right. #288 of only 300 made

The 90s iteration of Ducati's famous SuperSport wasn't exactly a fast bike, even by standards of the day. And by the time the Ducati 900SS "Final Edition" rolled around, it likely appealed mostly to die-hard Ducati fans and collectors. Which is a shame because, although the 900SS didn't offer cutting-edge performance, it did offer plenty of charisma, great handling, and accessible real-world performance.

The chase for abstract performance numbers has always obsessed the world of motorcycles and cars. But the truth is that peak horsepower numbers are often pointless. Since these machines are only fully exploited by .01% of riders, and what works in ad copy isn't always all that useful on the road, it's not always the most powerful bikes that make the most rewarding bikes to ride, especially on the road. Look at the endless praise heaped on the K5 GSX-R1000 by modern reviewers and see how this year's Brutale 800 actually produces less horsepower than the previous version to make it a better roadbike, and it becomes easier to see why this Ducati might win your heart, even if it won't win any bench-racing sessions...

Powered by Ducati's long-lived two-valve Pantah engine, the FE featured a solo-seat tail that allowed upswept pipes for increased cornering clearance and some carbon-fiber parts ostensibly because of their light weight, although the savings on a front fender are probably negligible... With a claimed 80hp on tap and a big fat midrange these are very rewarding to ride stock and a huge range of aftermarket support means you can modify the bike to suit if that's more your thing.

This thing appears to be bone-stock, with under 1,000 miles on the clock, and bidding is up just north of $6,000 with very little time on the auction. It might have been laughable just a few years ago to consider the FE particularly collectible or desirable, but these have definitely increased in value in recent years, and this very low-mileage example should get the attention of collectors. It's sad that such a usable sportbike has been basically accumulating dust, but I'm glad examples like this exist for folks more interested in displaying their bikes than riding them.

-tad

Almost New: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE with 867 Miles for Sale
Kawasaki December 16, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale

There are no points for second place. Unbeknownst to Kawasaki and Honda, both manufacturers were developing the Next Big Thing in the 1970s, an affordable, reliable, inline four-cylinder motorcycle displacing 750cc's. Unfortunately, Honda's CB750 was first to market by several months, leaving Kawasaki with the unenviable choice: be the also-ran, or delay their machine to come up with something special. The Z1 that followed may not have been first, but the 903cc engine meant its performance blew the CB750 into the weeds, and the Kawasaki Z1R seen here was an evolution of that muscular 70s machine.

Of course, by the time the Z1R was introduced, the overall package was pretty long-in-the-tooth, with a dual-shock rear suspension and spindly front forks. Most of the updates were cosmetic, with more modern, angular styling and cast wheels. Frame reinforcements and triple disc brakes improved handling and stopping, and a displacement bump to 1015cc took care of the straight-line performance enhancements. The 550lb wet weight and long wheelbase mean that it won't exactly carve corners, but that same long wheelbase should make it easy to blast away from stoplights in a howling cloud of tire and exhaust smoke.

While the Z1R may not have been cutting-edge when it was new, time has been kind to it and the crisp styling and classy silver-blue color look very sharp today. Like all 70s muscle bikes, the Z1R has definitely been increasing in value, perhaps as a result of its association with its even wilder sibling, the turbocharged Z1R TC. The seller refers to this as a "nut and bolt, frame-off restoration" and it certainly looks the part.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale

Coming out of my private collection (only because I just restored another 1978 Z1R) is my matching numbers 1978 Kawasaki Z1R with 9,300 original miles in pristine restored condition. This was a full nut and bolt, frame-off restoration with no expense spared, with over $20,000 in parts, labor, and paint refinishing.

The engine was completely disassembled and bead-blasted, then rebuilt to factory specifications with new: pistons, rings, camshafts, cam chain and adjuster, transmission undercut, multi-angle valve job, bearings, seals, carburetors were rebuilt and synchronized, all the hardware new old stock "NOS" or re-plated/zinced/re-chromed.

The frame was bead-blasted, treated, and powder-coated in a matching "OEM" black finish. The forks and brake calipers/master cylinders were completely rebuilt. The wheels were bead-blasted and powder-coated back to "OEM" standards with new tires, "NOS" cables, and wiring harness.

The bodywork was meticulously refinished using the "OEM" paint code and looks like it did when it sat on the Kawasaki showroom floor. The tank and side cover emblems are new old stock "NOS." The original Kawasaki 4-into-1 Z1R exhaust has been replaced with a very similar late 70s triple-chromed 4-into-1 exhaust that looks stock but sounds better. 

Every single part, nut, and bolt has either been replaced with new, rebuilt, or refinished to the highest "OCD" restoration standard. She looks, starts, and runs just like she did in 1978. Please don't hesitate to call or text me with any questions or concerns: 954-816-0806 Bob.

This immaculate, show-winning Z1R is worthy of any motorcycle museum, and will be your pride and joy, sitting in your private collection.

Don't miss out. Tell your wife these bikes are appreciating 15% or more each year and you can get it in time for Christmas.

Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas!

Honestly, I haven't crunched the numbers, but I'd bet he's right about that rate of appreciation: the values of 1970s superbikes have been steadily climbing for years now, and with plenty of folks who owned these when they were new looking to relive a lost youth, I don't see that changing anytime soon. Plus, if you do need to sell the significant other on your intended purchase, keep in mind that long, flat 1970s seat should make it a viable date-night ride, compared to a more modern sportbike!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R for Sale
Aprilia December 16, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Sharp-Dressed Hooligan: 1997 Aprilia RS250 With Just 240 Miles for Sale

Built between 1995 and 2002, although the last couple years were "for off-road use only," the Aprilia RS250 was one of the last holdouts from the two-stroke brigade, following the RGV250 into history. It's also one of the best-looking: some folks can't say no to the garish neon graphics of their youth, but I'm a sucker for the basic black of the RS250. It helps to highlight the beautiful frame and swingarm that manage to look both strong and elegant. Every bike in the class used an aluminum beam frame, but units found on the RGV and NSR were far more straightforward and industrial-looking than the almost sculptural parts used by Aprilia.

I'd be happy with any RS250, but I'm a particular fan of this earlier version's styling, and I think it's one of the best-looking sportbikes of all time. The gauges in particular look less horribly dated than on the later machines. The engine was the same across both versions, and was taken from Suzuki's fierce little RGV250Γ. Aprilia claims that it was "modified" but that appears to have been marketing claptrap: readers more intimately familiar with both machines and with no skin in the game swear they're identical, barring some minor "Aprilia" branding.

Of course, the the fact that the RS250 shared its engine with the RGV250 might lessen its pedigree somewhat, but makes the spares situation much more palatable. In this case, it might not be a problem, since it seems like this particular machine is destined to be lovingly admired instead of happily thrashed...

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Aprilia RS250 for Sale

1997 Aprilia RS250, 240 miles, and a California plate registered to its original 17 digit VIN. That should pretty much sum it up. Bike is in 100% stock original condition and still has the original tires on it. These bikes have the VJ22A RGV250 motor in them which is fantastic when mated to the RS250 chassis ands factory Brembo brakes. Starts right up and purrs away as expected. This is a highly collectible two stroke as not many of these exist and only a handful are registered for the street [see pics]. Current registration, California title in hand, sold as is. Enjoy the ride… The bike is for sale locally so the auction can end at any time, FYI.

Bidding is very active, and up to $7,800 with a couple days left on the auction. It's always disappointing when the seller doesn't include more details about a bike, but what else is there to say? The thing has just 240 miles on it, so pretty much a couple weekends worth of canyon riding over the bike's entire 20 year life. The current tags add significantly to the value, since it's hard to get that paperwork for a grey-market bike in California without "knowing a guy." It's great to hear that it runs, but I can't imagine any new owner would put many more miles on it, and that is especially sad: I know a bunch of guys with very nice grey market two-strokes that would love a chance to thrash this little Aprilia out in the canyons.

-tad

Sharp-Dressed Hooligan: 1997 Aprilia RS250 With Just 240 Miles for Sale