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Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Featured Listing July 27, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale

7.25.2018: Josh has decided to upgrade this post to a Featured Listing. New asking price is $15k and interested parties can contact him here: jahshua@me.com

As much as I love the MV Agusta F4 750 in the classic red-and-silver colors, it's nice to know that it also looks pretty good in basic black-and-grey. Or flat-black. Or silver-and-blue, or... Reportedly, the design for the MV Agusta F4 was originally intended by Massimo Tamburini as the replacement for the venerable Ducati 916. And I'm sure in retrospect, Ducati very much wishes it had worked out that way, considering the reactions to their Pierre Terblanche-penned 999...

When it was introduced, I was a little disappointed that the new MV was powered by an inline four, instead of a v-twin. But the F4's radial-valved engine has a much more exotic quality than other four-cylinder engines: they sound sort of generically inline-y as they go by, but the pilot is treated to a much more complex noise. Or maybe I'm just infatuated.

In any event, this particular F4 is powered by the earlier, 749cc version of the engine. A claimed 126hp meant the MV was making the right power to compete in the 750cc class, but there were really two problems. One, it was also a bit heavier than other bikes in the class. And two, interest in the 750 class basically evaporated right as the F4 was introduced. Sure, Suzuki still made a GSX-R750, but it lived in the shadow of the new superbike king, the GSX-R1000. And the F4 750 couldn't hope to compete against performance like that.

F4s show up regularly for sale with incredibly low miles, which reinforces the bike's reputation for a punishing riding position. It also points out that they get bought as display items more than actual bikes. Which is sad, because they're pretty great, rewarding sportbikes. If you're expecting this to flatten your eyeballs, you will be very disappointed, and the F4 is hard, and uncomfortable, and very serious. Handling is more stable than agile, but the potential is there for a seriously rapid bike, if you're willing to deal with the uncompromising ergos and bit of extra weight.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300

The MV Agusta F4 was the motorcycle that launched the resurrection of MV Agusta in 1998. The F4 model was created by motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini at CRC (Cagiva Research Center), following his work on the Ducati 916. 

The F4 series bikes have a four pipe undertail exhaust, single-sided swingarm, large front forks (50 mm diameter) and traditional MV Agusta red and silver livery on the F4 Series Oro. The F4 model is also one of the few production superbikes to have hemispherical chamber 4 valves per cylinder engine.

After meeting and becoming friends, Formula One Racing Legend, Ayrton Senna and MV Agusta President, Claudio Castiglioni began a close collaboration. Borne of a mutual passion for speed, performance, and the painstaking quest for excellence, their friendship continued to grow. 

Today this spirit continues, embodied in the form of a very special motorcycle, the MV Agusta SPR SENNA. Based upon the SPR’s increased performance and capability, the SENNA edition is further distinguished by its limited production (only 50 imported into the USA) and exclusive black color, distinctive red accents, and SENNA graphics.

The SENNA was produced in a limited worldwide quantity of 300 units worldwide, with proceeds benefiting the SENNA Foundation. 

The SENNA Foundation was created to assist in improving the lives of over 300,000 Brazilian children and contributes 100% of its proceeds to the development and implementation of social programs.

The F4 750 Senna was released in 2002 and is rated at 0-60 2.9 quarter mile 10.7 @ 135. The Senna was a limited production run of 300 bikes like the orginal F4 Series Oro. The Senna shared the 136 hp (101 kW) engine of the Evo 02 but with a higher redline of13900 rpm, and top speed estimated at 175 mph (282 km/h) @ 12750 rpm . The Senna also had some suspension upgrades and some carbon fiber bodywork compared to other MVs. 

MSRP was $24,995 in 2002. Only 50 units of 300 produced worldwide arrived in the USA and this one with only 188 miles is arguably the finest Senna available anywhere!

7.25.2018: Additional note from the seller:

A little background why I'm selling these bikes is that I am raising capital to start a business for the first time in my life so I need to trim the fat sort to speak. The Senna F4 is by far the cleanest most beautiful bike I've ever owned.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 Senna #172/300 for Sale
Featured Listing July 26, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

Update 7.26.2018: The buyer fell through from the first eBay listing so Hans has relisted. Opening bid is $6k and no reserve. Good luck to buyer and seller! Links and seller description updated, plus a walkaround video is added as well. -dc

I’ve always been a “slow bike [and car, for that matter] fast” kind of guy, mainly because I could never really afford the fast bikes I wanted, but also because I'm pretty sure I'd have gotten into trouble riding something powerful all the time. But some folks just prefer smaller-engined motorcycles: on the road especially, you can barely get a modern sportbike into third gear unless you’re on the freeway, and winding one to redline, even in second gear, is likely to land you in jail if you do it in or around civilization… But that’s never a problem with something like today’s pristine Featured Listing Honda CB-1.

The 400cc class came about because of regulations that heavily taxed and otherwise displacements over 400cc in some markets, not because everyone was clamoring for them. In Japan, the 400cc sportbike, and even 250cc four-stroke sportbike classes were hotly contested, with Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha all producing smaller, more sophisticated machines than we ever saw officially in the USA. But licensing and laws aside, there are also fans of smaller displacement bikes that have the experience and skill to handle a legitimate sportbike and don’t want to be stuck with one of the torquey, but fairly crude-feeling singles or parallel twins you normally find powering bikes in the class.

Enter the Honda CB-1. Powered by a slightly detuned version of the CBR400RR's engine, the 399cc inline-four had some serious mechanical specifications, including sixteen valves and gear-driven dual overhead cams. The result was 55hp and a 13,500rpm redline, plenty to motivate the 400lb machine and push it all the way to 118mph, assuming you were prepared to thrash the sewing-machine-smooth engine mercilessly.

The CB-1 was one of only a couple of 400cc, inline-four sportbikes that were ever available in the United States, and that sophisticated little screamer is the main appeal here, along with the simple, sporty styling that has aged very well. The CB-1 did lose the CBR's aluminum frame and made do with tubular steel unit instead, but saved weight by losing the fairing and the CBR's second front caliper and rotor. Smaller valves and different tuning meant slightly less outright power that the CBR, but lower gearing meant it was a better real-world bike as well.

Unfortunately, as polished as it was, the CB-1 didn't really sell very well here in the USA, where bigger is always better and 600cc supersports are considered "learner bikes." But its surprising sophistication had fans then and now, and has become a bit of a cult bike here in the States. But if you missed the boat the first time around and didn't get to buy one new from your local Honda dealer, here's your chance: this one has just 9 miles on the odometer and is amazingly clean.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

2nd Chance! up for sale is my brand new 1989 Honda CB1 never registered. This bike has been in climate-controlled storage its entire life.

Originally sold in California, I bought it out of a collection in Colorado about 3 years ago. The previous owner had removed all the fuel and prepped the bike for long term storage. The 9 miles on the bike were dealer prep miles.

Since I took delivery of this bike, it has gone through another extremely thorough and expensive prep process for long term storage. This was all documented and the work was lovingly done by the master tech at Marin Speed Shop here in Marin California. There is absolutely no fuel in the tank or in the carbs or fuel lines. The bike was started two years ago prior to storage to verify its condition. It had a perfect leak down and we used an auxiliary fuel tank because we did not want to put fuel in the bike's tank. The bike started and ran perfectly. Afterwords the carbs were disassembled and all fuel was removed and the carbs and tank were then misted with oil.

This is a museum-quality bike, it is as brand new as the day it was sold. Every aspect of this bike has been gone through and prepped for this long term storage. Everything on the bike is original, even the tires, so if you want to ride it then the tires should be replaced.

Please look closely at the pictures. I will be happy to take calls and answer any questions. I have all the paperwork - I mean everything. I have the bill of sale, title, certificate of origin, all original pamphlets, all keys, everything.

There is no reserve on the bike except that I have started the bidding at $6000.00. I have spent quite a bit more than this so I am hoping to get more but the bike needs to go because we need the space.

Best of luck and thanks for looking,

Please call for any question you may have 408 391 8975

Hans

Obviously, with basically just delivery miles, you'd likely need to go through the bike top-to-bottom before riding it. So perhaps the biggest question here is, "Does anyone really need a museum-quality Honda CB-1?" Well since the bike was originally a practical, affordable, and sophisticated do-it-all scoot, I doubt this will have the universal, drool-worthy appeal of something like an RC30, a bike that was sold in very limited numbers and had very exotic components. But somewhere, you just know there are a couple folks who've always loved this classy little machine or are looking to complete their extensive Honda collection. Regardless, it's obvious there is real interest in this bike: although nice, well-used CB-1s regularly change hands for around the $3,000 mark, bidding over at the eBay auction is already up north of $6,000 with several days left on the auction!

-tad

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale
Featured Listing July 25, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale

Considering just how few Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin 1100s there are running around anywhere, let alone North America, I’ll forgive the “WTF” face your computer or phone’s built-in camera is secretly recording because of an undetected malware infection. You’re looking at what is functionally a Moto Guzzi sportbike, the company’s pushrod, two-valve twin and shaft-drive and dropped into a lightweight, better-handling package. Long associated with a slightly stodgy, “Italian BMW” image, Moto Guzzi got a kick in the pants in the 1980s when dentist and weekend warrior Dr John Wittner decided to base his racebike on Le Mans IV and reminded the world that the venerable Italian company had racing in its DNA, although the production bikes like the Daytona and Sport 1100 inspired by his efforts were still banking on their character, not their raw performance, to sell them.

Giuseppe Ghezzi and Bruno Saturno, two halves of the Ghezzi-Brian team, decided to follow Dr John’s muse and build highly-spec’ed, boutique sportbikes and even racers around Moto Guzzi’s characterful, but relatively antiquated powertrain. It’s a shame their MGS-01 didn’t see anything like mass production, but you can still pick up a legitimate Moto Guzzi sportbike like this Supertwin that could be considered a test bed for the ideas later used on the MGS-01 that was also Ghezzi’s brainchild.

Based on their successful racebike, the Supertwin 1100 took its name from the Italian Supertwins series, where it won 9 out of 32 races in the 1996 season. The main performance increase came from a significant reduction in weight: overall, the Supertwin tipped the scales at 427lbs dry, 55lbs less than the unfaired V11 Sport. Handling and braking were upgraded with an adjustable Paioli 41mm fork and a Bitubo shock out back, with distinctive perimeter disc brakes mount to the rim of the front wheel, instead of the hub, to further reduce weight and more evenly distribute braking forces. The concept never really took off for mass-produced motorcycles, excepting the ever-contrarian Buell, but they work well in practice.

The Supertwin makes do with the earlier five-speed box which is a shame as the torquey engine doesn’t really need a sixth cog, but the newer unit shifts much more smoothly. Luckily, the boutique nature of the Supertwin allows for a lightened flywheel that helps minimize the usual Guzzi torque reaction: the longitudinal crankshaft, flywheel, and shaft drive all conspire to give anything powered by a Guzzi twin its characteristic torque reaction that makes handling slightly asymmetrical, but you really do get used to it pretty quickly.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale

Rare opportunity to own a little known piece of Italian motorcycle history. Believed to be only 5 examples in the US, one of which can be seen at the Barber Motorsports Museum in Leeds, Alabama. Selling for a friend who has owned it for almost 10 years and is now thinning out his collection. For any questions, or if you'd like the owner to contact you directly, please reply through the listing.

Bike is in good original condition and ready to ride

Shorai lithium battery 

Recently re-surfaced front brake rotors

Known to have been down at low speed on left side and at a stand-still on right side

Left rear cowling has been cracked and re-enforced from underneath 

Various scuffs and scratches from normal use

Note: Odometer reading is in kilometers. Actual "mileage" calculates to around 10,600

Clear South Carolina title

Located near downtown Greenville, 29601

The seller also includes a nice video of the bike starting and running. These were pretty expensive when new: $15,000 in 2001 dollars, and the wild colors and abbreviated, curving bodywork suggest that Britten’s racebikes were an inspiration for the styling. It's not cosmetically perfect, but miles are still pretty low and the bike is ready to run, and minor issues shouldn't detract from the riding experience: reviews were very positive and the striking looks should get plenty of attention!

-tad

Featured Listing: 2001 Ghezzi-Brian Supertwin for Sale
Featured Listing July 24, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

The precursor to Yamaha’s extremely desirable OW01, this very clean FZR750R is actually even rarer, but a bit less exotic as well, both in terms of components and construction. Instead of rare materials and hand-welded parts, the RT was a bit more of a parts-bin special, but just 200 of the “T” were built in 1987 and another 200 in 1988 for the “U” model to satisfy homologation requirements for AMA Superbike racing.

The FZR750R formula should be familiar to Yamaha fans: an extremely light and stiff aluminum Deltabox frame that debuted in 1987 on the FZR1000 and was light-years ahead of cradle-style frames as seen on the GSX-R750, Yamaha’s signature five-valve “Genesis” head atop a 749cc block, and a six-speed gearbox in place of the bigger 1000’s five-speed. Front wheel was 17” and matched with a typical 18” rear often found on sportbikes of the period, and both were wrapped in radial rubber.

Suspension adjustable for preload and rebound at both ends was novel for the time, especially on a street-legal bike. Although Yamaha really didn’t intend for any of these to actually see the street, and actively discouraged dealers from selling them to anyone who was planning to use them on the road. Unfortunately, the 484lb [dry] package ended up significantly heavier than their road-racing rival over at Suzuki, and drag-strip performance was hampered by the ratios in the gearbox. But that was really beside the point, and the bike had some of the best brakes and handling available.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

Up for NO RESERVE AUCTION is a very nice original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT.

The precursor to the OW01, the FZR750R Genesis is a rare collectable. Homologated for AMA racing with only 200 examples made for the US market. This machine came out of a dealership in Oconomowoc Wisconsin and thankfully never seen the track.

I purchased this bike from its second owner in WI about 12 years ago. I have enjoyed owning this bike and took great care of it but its time to pass it on to a collector. I recently moved from WI to Denver Colorado where the bike is currently located. I've only had the bike here in Denver a few weeks,  it started right up but I haven't driven it because I anticipate it would need adjustments for the higher elevation. Have not registered the bike here in Denver either so it is currently titled and registered with collectors plates from WI. Title is clean and clear of any leans. Cycle has 26,403mi.

Bike recently had a $1500 overhaul including fuel pump rebuilding, fork seals, brake pads, carb cleaning, clutch, adjustments etc (see photo of receipt). Runs strong and as it should. Has 26... k miles. Has vintage Yoshi exhaust, vintage Storz steering stabilizer, is properly jetted for the exhaust, original race sprocket was changed out for a more street friendly ride. ALL ORIGINAL PARTS INCLUDED and many extras including vintage riding apparel, period Corbin seat, parts, all manuals, period feature magazines, bike stand, cover and more

Motorcycle is for sale locally so I reserve the right to cancel the auction early if sold. I work during the day so evenings are my best time to answer any questions.

I would really like to see the bike end up in someone's collection that will really appreciate it. I will be happy to help the new owner with loading the machine and any other arrangements to make it a smooth transaction.

The FZR750RT is a historically significant machine that was incredibly trick when it was new, and I expect we're seeing a low point for values right now. As the seller mentions, this is no garage queen but condition is way more important than mileage if you actually plan to use a car or motorcycle, and this example has been serviced and is ready to go. It's not a museum piece, it's a living, breathing bit of sportbike history.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale
Derbi July 21, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

End of an Era: 2006 Derbi GPR125 for Sale

This Derbi GPR125 was the very end of the line before the Spanish manufacturer, and pretty much everyone else, switched from two to four-stroke engines for their entry-level 125s. As you might expect, this led to the expected decrease in stinky two-stroke smoke and a massive reduction in fun. 125cc two-strokes aren't exactly barn-burners, but they make much more power than four-strokes of equivalent displacement while weighing significantly less, and the change meant the class went from being high-strung funsters with youth-safe limits to the boring, efficient commuters and learner bikes of today.

The two-stroke 125s were bikes for new riders, but they were styled to inspire wannabe racers and incorporated some advanced design elements. The frame was aluminum, and the box-section swingarm was braced, although the 33hp [once derestricted] engine probably didn't really require it. A six speed gearbox meant you could make good progress using the minimal power available, since the bike weighed in under 300lbs wet. And the styling seen here is extremely aggressive and the bike is surprisingly well-finished, with neat details like electric start, turn signals mounted in the mirrors, and an undertail exhaust.

The main issue is that all of the bikes in the class have limited straight-line performance and pretty basic suspension: they were meant to provide budget transportation and, looking past the manic engines, the bikes are fairly uninspiring, upside down forks, modern frame design, and sporty looks aside. Luckily, the geometry is excellent so the handling is good, in spite of the crude components, and the bike uses Yamaha's liquid-cooled TZR125 single, so reliability and parts availability should be no problem.

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Derbi GPR125 for Sale

Look closely, it's the only one you're likely to see here in the states! This is a 2006 Derbi GPR125 Racing. Only a handful of these were brought into the U.S. The engine was sourced from Yamaha, by Derbi, and it's the same engine used in the Euro-spec liquid-cooled Yamaha TZR125R street bike, and the DTR 125 2-stroke dirt bike. It's liquid-cooled, and has 6-speed trans, electric start, power valve, and oil injection, so premixing isn't necessary, just pull up to a gas pump and fill it up. I've only run Motul synthetic in it since I've owned it. If you don't know anything about 2-strokes, you should probably look elsewhere.

I've owned this bike ten years now. It's been unbelievably reliable, but I'm ready to move on to something else. It's currently showing approx 8300 miles on the clock, but I still ride it to work sometimes (although I also have other bikes I ride regularly). The indicated mileage is 662 miles less than actual. The original meters only read in kilometers. I picked up another set that reads in miles and mph. The difference between the two sets (after converting kilometers to miles) was 662 miles, that's the reason for the discrepancy.

The top end was rebuilt about 1500 miles ago, strictly for maintenance, not because there were any problems. I port matched the cylinder to the cases while I had it apart, because the factory matching was very poor. I also cleaned up all the ports. The cylinder is still standard bore and in excellent condition. This bike came in 1st place overall in the 2009 Lake Erie Loop, completing 659 miles in 11 hours 16 minutes. That's WFO across Canada for hours. If that's not a testament to reliability, I don't know what is! And it won by a long shot! http://www.lakeerieloop.org/race-results/2009-rr.html

The list of mods/upgrades/spare parts is long, so buckle up! Besides the top end work already mentioned, the stock carb was replaced with a Keihin PWK D-slide, it has Boysen dual-stage reeds, heavy duty clutch springs, a 3-degree advance key, and an Arrow undertail exhaust with titanium muffler. I also have for it a hand-built Jim Lomas side-exit pipe with a carbon fiber end can. Only ten of these pipes were built, and this one is serial numbered 007! (Just lucky) I also have a spare set of lowers that have been modified to clear this pipe. The air injection pump and associated plumbing have been removed. I think that wraps up the engine part of the program.

The front brake disc was replaced with a full floating wave rotor from Metrakit. The rear sprocket is a custom made, lightened aluminum sprocket. The bike came with no helmet lock from the factory, so I was able to add one from a Yamaha YSR50. The crazy heavy steel rear brake stay arm was replaced with a custom made aluminum one. The stock plastic shifter was replaced with an aluminum one from an Aprilia. The rear pegs and peg hangers have been removed, as has the long stock rear mudguard, and small LED turn signals were installed to clean up the rear end. The orange stripes on the rims are just rim tape. You can remove it in five minutes if you don't like it. The bike tips the scales around 285 lbs with a full tank of fuel. I also added a Sigma bicycle computer. They're super accurate, and you get a second trip meter in the deal. The stock windscreen was replaced with a Puig double-bubble screen (an incredibly nice piece!). From the factory, one headlight is for low-beam, one for high-beam. The only time both are on is when you hit the flash-to-pass switch. I added two relays, so now when you hit that stitch, both will come on and stay on, until you hit it again. I also installed headlight bulbs that are slightly higher wattage than stock. This was done a long time ago and there have been no problems. I'm a fanatic about NOT making mods that can't be reversed, so everything can be put back to stock if you choose, although I think all these mods are for the better. I have ALL the stock parts, except for the stock muffler, and stock front brake rotor. 

I have a HUGE amount of spare parts for this bike (I'm a motorcycle hoarder). I have a bunch of spare bodywork, some electrical parts, spare factory decals, all the stock parts that were removed, and other misc odds and ends. 

The swingarm stand down in the photos is NOT included in the auction. The bike has a regular side stand.

The common wear items, like tires, brake pads, and chain are in usable condition, but are nearing the end of their service life. Battery is in very good condition. The bike always starts easily, always goes, and there are no other issues I'm aware of, other than what I just mentioned. And since I know someone is going to ask, I've had it over 80 mph on flat ground with my 165 lb self on it.

The bike has a clear Ohio street motorcycle title.

This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I challenge you to find another one of these for sale in the U.S. So please, keep it real. I'll be happy to help with shipping from my end, but this is totally at the buyer's expense, and must be agreed upon ahead of purchase. Local pickup is available. Please ask your questions before you bid! I reserve the right to end the auction early, as the bike is also listed for sale locally. 

Well you can't say that the seller isn't providing plenty of detail in that listing, and the $4,500 asking price frankly seems like a screaming deal for such a cool and unusual bike. The main issue here is that it's obviously very limited in terms of function: good looks aside, it's still pretty slow, especially on US roads if you no longer have the physique of a 17-year old.

-tad

End of an Era: 2006 Derbi GPR125 for Sale
Yamaha July 18, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale

Update 7.30.2018: Ted has updated us that this bike is sold. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Yamaha threw their hat into the Grand Prix race replica ring with the… Well what this bike was called depended on where the thing was being sold. In Canada and Australia, it was an RZ500, which fits since it was like a bigger, faster RZ350. In Europe, it was the RD500LC, which also makes plenty of sense considering the RD series’ history, but with added Liquid Cooling! And in Japan, it was the RZV500R as seen in today’s Featured Listing, which sounds the most exotic to me.

And like Honda’s NS400R and Suzuki’s RG500, the RZ/RD/RZV was powered by a racing-inspired, two-stroke multi that was shared with no other bike in Yamaha's lineup. That made the bikes very exclusive, but not really cost-effective to produce. But really, what other sort of motorcycle would you power with a liquid-cooled 50° two-stroke V4 that featured twin cranks and a balance shaft displacing nearly 500cc? The rest of the package was likewise geared towards sportbike domination: a six-speed gearbox, a pair of YPVS power valves, Autolube oil-injection system, an underslung rear shock that was very exotic at the time, anti-dive forks, and 16” front and 18” wheels shod with typically skinny period tires.

Unfortunately, in spite of the racy looks and the inclusion of magnesium parts, the RZ500 still weighed in at a period-appropriate 450lbs dry. The problem was that rival Suzuki’s RG500 weighed significantly less while making more power than the RZ’s 88 claimed ponies. The RZ was designed from the start to be a civilized race-replica, but at the time the RG stole Yamaha's thunder with their much wilder ride.

But today, neither bike would be considered particularly fast on a racetrack and the appeal is a combination of nostalgia and the singularly exciting character of a big two-stroke, something the RZ still has in abundance and at a lower cost than an equivalent RG.  The RG has always been "the one to have," and steadily increasing values mean it's been priced out of reach for many fans. But although RZ prices have climbed to keep pace with the general increase of all 80s two-stroke sportbikes, they still lag behind the Gamma, making them the affordable choice.

This example is the Japanese-market RZV500R and featured an aluminum frame instead of the steel units on the other versions. Unfortunately, the aluminum frame wasn't something added to enhance performance, it was to offset the damage done by home market regulations that limited output to 64hp. Luckily, this example has supposedly been de-restricted and features a very sharp set of custom spannies that look far more upswept than the stock parts and should liberate more of the famous two-stroke crackle, along with FZR wheels, brakes, and front forks to match.

From the seller: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale

VIN#: 51X002446

Entering the world of RZ500’s has introduced me to several collectors who have shared some of their incredible knowledge of the Yamaha model. RZ500’s were built by Yamaha in model years 1984 and 1985. They were never sold new in the US and any that are currently here were brought in as Grey Market Vehicles. Yamaha Canada imported the RZ500 model which was also sold in Australia. The United Kingdom model was named the RD500 and came with a different color scheme than the RZ.

All of these models had steel frames and were delivered in what was considered unrestricted versions with higher horsepower than the domestic Japanese version of the motorcycle. The Japanese bikes with restricted horse power had smaller carburetors and exhaust systems to that end. In an attempt to balance the lost of power, the Japanese bikes were equipped with aluminum frames which were considerably lighter, but again, only for Japanese domestic consumption. That model of the RZ was called the RZV500, is model of bike being offered here. Our bike has the aluminum frame, different mirrors and decals identifying it as the RZV, the most desirable version of the bike if unrestricted. In this case that has been done with a set of Tommy Crawford Expansion Chamber Exhausts. The pipes are said to work well, are rare to find and are no longer made. A perfect storm so to speak.

This bike has been modified additionally with what we assume are a period FZR Front Forks and a set of matching wheels. There is also an Ohlin’s rear Shock Absorber in the back.

The owner of the bike was a huge enthusiast of Road Race bikes and at the time was doing some club racing. Being in the Service, when it was time to be stationed at another post, the Service took care of moving his personal property including his motorcycles. As per regulations, vehicles that were transported with personal property were to have all of their fuel removed, which was done with a tag hanging from the handle bar noting this. Unfortunately, medical issues evolved that prevented the bike from being recommissioned and it been in this state for over ten years. Sadly for the owner, he never was able to ride again and his family is selling the bike as part of his estate.

Collectors with an interest in the bikes have warned us about trying to start the bike without a serious inspection and reconditioning. Crank seals, carburetors and possibly other work may be needed and we are not in a position or capable of any of it. The bike, in running order, would most likely bring over $20,000 and is now priced accordingly to accommodate the possible needed work. It has an Oregon clear and clean title of ownership.

So this should pretty much be the highest-performing version of the RZ: the lighter aluminum frame combined with the full-power engine. More power, less weight, what's not to like? That is, once the bike is reconditioned, of course... The Seller is asking $15,295 $12,000 for this one and, if you're handy with the wrenches and love to tune two-strokes, or have deep pockets and Lance Gamma's number on speed dial, this could be a good opportunity to pick up a clean RZV with more modern running gear that just needs some mechanical attention.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale