Classified features and exclusions:

  • No RSBFS staff editorial, your content only
  • Vendors are welcome to list items for sale.
    Contact us for advertising your business.
  • 3 high resolution images
  • Up to 150 words
  • 1 month listing
  • 1 edit per month
  • $10 per month

Classified ads return to RSBFS!

While we focus on the very best SportBike for sale listings on the main page of the site, this area is to cater to everything else that our audience may find of interest:

  • Bikes that aren’t perfect
  • Bikes that aren’t SportBikes
  • Projects
  • Memoriabilia
  • Parts
  • Pretty much anything!

We handle every classified in the same manner we do our Featured Listings:  by hand and working with you via email.

Email us to get started!

Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Ducati June 20, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

I've spent some time poking around the Pierobon website, realizing that I will likely never own a Pierobon-framed track bike. As the seller mentions in their listing, this Ducati 1200DS-powered Pierobon X60R is one pricey piece of kit: the earlier F042's frame alone goes for about $3,500. And that's before you add a swingarm, fuel tank, appropriately snazzy suspension components, lightweight wheels, brakes, some minimalist bodywork... Oh yeah, and a motor. Two-valve Ducatis may not have as many parts as their liquid-cooled, four-valve stablemates  but it's not like that makes fully-built race motors cheap. Sure, you could just stick a dead stock 1100DS motor in there and call it a day, but why would you do that?

Oh, I'm sorry, you're lost. You're thinking, "Who the hell is Pierobon?"

If you're a racing fan, you might have heard of them. Located in Bologna, not far from Ducati's headquarters, they're fabrication specialists that have supplied frames and subframes, as well as swingarms and fuel tanks to Ducati's World Superbike and MotoGP teams for over 50 years. These days, they make track and racebike kits like the X60R that fit Ducati's two and four-valve engines, as well as lightweight replacement frames for all of Ducati's superbikes, up to and including the Panigale. That's right, they make a lightweight frame for the frameless Panigale. So if you've decided that the Pani's monocoque is just a bit too stiff and lacking in feedback, or if you just miss that signature trellis, Pierobon has you covered there.

I've always felt that a properly-prepared air-cooled Ducati twin would be really fun in a lightweight road or track bike and apparently the two-wheeled artists over at Pierobon felt the same way. As you can see from the photos, a finished X60R is elegant, minimal, and very expensive, as it uses only the very best components available. The resulting 300lbs wet is two-stroke territory but the 120whp obviously isn't. That's a pretty killer power-to-weight ratio and the Ducati twin, although pretty far removed from the street version in terms of output, should still have pretty great midrange shove, without the need to constantly rev the nuts off it.

From the original eBay listing: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale

This is a very special race/track bike, one of 75 worldwide. They are all very light (312 lbs wet, w/ fuel for a 9 lap sprint, just weighed on a FIM scale) nimble and a blast to ride, feels like a 250 GP bike with Superbike power. It has all race spec Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes and Marchesini magnesium wheels.

I bought this at the end of the 2016 season from a friend who had won 4 different championships with it during the 2015 and 2016 seasons and decided he wanted to buy a Suter 500 to play with. I had Boulder Motor Sports (the US distributor) go through the bike completely and prep it for the 2017 season spending over $8k to do a full rebuild and prep, this type of prep makes it basically like new. See the receipts in the pics. 

These bikes cost around $70k new as base model then up depending on the build. The motor is a Boulder spec w 120rwhp and 81ft lb tq, tuned to run on pump race 110. I have only taken it out on a few track days so its ready for a full season of racing and more. If you're just a track day junkie this will only need oil changes for years of  track use. The spec motor Brian built is super durable.   It comes with the rear stand and a extra rear sprocket for super short tracks. The gearing on it now works just about everywhere.

There is a spare brand new higher spec motor refreshed by MotoCorse available and a spare set of wheels too, these are at added cost, just inquire.

Why am I selling? I never got around to racing it as I have been focused on my other 2 Pierobon's a 848 powered X80R and a full electronic X60, I am short on space so its time to let one go. I have the reserve set at a reasonable price, fair to both. With only 75 in the world there wont be many chances to get one at a major discount from new. Just raced my 2010 spec X60 to a first in BOTT at Road America this past weekend. Cant say enough about the Pierobons and how they handle    

Pierobon is the name behind most of the racing chassis built for the Ducati factory racing team dating back to the 70's and into World Superbike along with being behind the success that Casey Stoner had on the Ducati GP bikes.

Frankly, considering how much these things cost new, the prep that's gone into it, the quality of the components, and the basically brand-new, ready-to-roll condition of this X60R, the seller's $30,000 Buy It Now price is kind of a steal. The appeal is naturally very limited though: this is a racebike with no historic value, or a very expensive, exotic track day toy. Hopefully, the right buyer will snap this one up while the rest of us consider selling organs so we can afford one of our own.

-tad

Track Day Exotic: 2015 Pierobon X60R for Sale
Harley Davidson June 19, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

American Thunder: 1983 Harley Davidson XR1000 Race Bike for Sale

This bike is why I get frustrated by Harley's modern offerings. I'm not suggesting a sportbike is the answer to their financial woes, but trading on outdated "Bad to the Bone" Sons of Anarchy stereotypes clearly isn't working. Upstart [irony!] Indian already beat them to the punch with their new FTR1200, exactly the bike I've been saying Harley should build for years, a bike to cash in on the rich history of flat track racing both Indian and Harley have here in the US. Of course, Harley also has a much less rich but still significant history of road racing and, if the collection of trophies is to be believed, this Harley Davidson XR1000 race bike has the goods to compete against the best v-twin sportbikes of its era.

Let's be clear: this resembles, but is not an XRTT, Harley Davidson's production road-racer, although it obviously looks to the 60s and 70s for inspiration. The XR1000 was actually a limited-production, flat track-inspired bike with a solo seat, unusually good brakes, legitimate power, a left-side exhaust that will probably only seem odd to Harley fans, teeth-rattling vibration, and the worst ergonomics this side of an MV Agusta F4. It was actually a pretty fast and fun bike, drawbacks aside. So of course it didn't sell very well when new. But that's a stock XR1000, which this obviously is not. In fact, it sounds from the seller's description like it's really just the transmission, bottom end, and maybe some other engine parts that carry over from the street bike.

The frame on this XR1000 is claimed to be a Buell unit, which is a great place to start if you want a Harley to handle, but I'm not really sure how this bike came to be. Buell was working on racebikes in 1983, but they were powered by an odd square-four engine, not a big v-twin, and the race wins shown in the photographs are from the late 1980s. The frame and swingarm do appear very much like the S1 Lightning, and less like the original Battletwin, which seems to more closely resemble Buell's original two-stroke racebike. In any event, I'm not challenging the bike's authenticity, I'd just love a bit more information about how this bike came to be.

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Harley Davidson XR1000 Race Bike for Sale

We have listed here is a 1983 XR1000 but it really is not one year, it is a handbuilt engine that is not like any other engine. Bill of sale ONLY from Robison Harley Davidson. RARE 1 of a kind XR1000 race bike- you will not find another Harley Davidson like this. It’s named the “unicorn” because of its rarity and uniqueness in the engine department. Although it sits in a Buell frame it is far from it- it’s a Harley Davidson xr1000 engine built by race tuner John Ward (who actually produced the very first xr1000 engine out of Robison Harley Davidson in 1979 and presented it to the Motor Company) they produced the engine to the public in 1983 after testing Johns. This engine was built by John and has rare 1 of a kind Sundance Harley Davidson xr1000 heads specifically for this bike. It has been ridden by Roger Reiman, Pat Mooney, Yavon Duhamel,  Richie Morris, Bobby Bossardet and a handful of other lucky riders. It has won more races than I can list but we have walls full of winner plaques and trophies around our shop. If you know anything about our shop and the history that it has produced you understand this bike and how rare it is. For this thing to actual come on to the market is a miracle and it’s time for us to pass it on to a new owner. You can watch this thing all you want but you have to bid to win- it will sell during this auction so don’t try to wait it out and get lucky then miss out on it- once it’s gone it’s gone. Good luck to everyone and if you have any questions we will do our best to answer them. 

From Pat Mooney who was the last racer to ride it. "The chassis came from Don Tilley and it’s a Buell tube chassis. John Ward built the engine, which came from that Mert Lawwill chassis that you have there. We won the Daytona Battle of the Twins class in 2000 on that bike. The cylinder heads on that engine came from Take San (Zak) in Japan (Sundance Harley Davidson). Let me know what you want for it as I know Zak in Japan would love to get those cylinder heads back and he may buy the bike to get them back"

So it's not really a classic factory Harley racebike, and it's not a road bike. It sure isn't pretty, but many racebikes are pretty rough around the edges since their primary goal is to be fast, not look good, and teams on a budget have better things to spend money on than cosmetics. But it is absolutely a genuine race bike, and one with an established track record of success. So it's proven, but not especially pedigreed: a very fast mongrel. So what's it worth? Well the seller hasn't set a Buy It Now or reserve price and this really is one-of-one. But there is interest in the bike and bidding is up north of $10,000 with another few days left on the auction.

-tad

American Thunder: 1983 Harley Davidson XR1000 Race Bike for Sale
Aprilia June 16, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

High-Spec Hooligan: 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing for Sale

After the introduction of their RSV Mille, Aprilia knew they needed something a little less extreme, at least in terms of riding position. But while Ducati’s original approach to the naked bike was to put a lower-spec engine into a frame from an older sportbike, Aprilia was forced by necessity to go a different route: they didn’t have a less powerful engine, or a different frame. The resulting Aprilia Tuono and especially this Tuono Racing was never gonna be great for cruising or posing or generally blatting around, at which the Monster excels.

Perhaps most significantly, unlike every other naked sportbike, the Tuono wasn't detuned at all: the 998cc Rotax-developed v-twin still made 126 hp and 74 lb-ft. torque, while balance shafts meant it was surprisingly smooth, considering the 60° configuration. The frame looks similar to the beautiful aluminum beam design seen on the RS250. I can’t imagine it’s the exact same part, considering the different engines, but I’m sure Aprilia tried that before designing a new one… And the Tuono was actually lighter than the RSV, owing to the lack of a fairing and some additional carbon bits. Throw in some high bars and you're looking at the original "supernaked."

The Tuono may not be quite as sexy as something like a Ducati 998 or a Monster, but it’s way more comfortable than the 998, faster than a Monster, more reliable than either of them, and likely more fun as well. It’s a bike to ride, not to look at, and that Rotax twin is famous for being virtually trouble-free and has reasonable servicing costs.

The Racing was the top-spec Tuono and Aprilia wasn’t kidding with the name: it was designed to compete in an Italian series against rival Ducati's S4R. And they weren't kidding with the components: suspension was by Swedish specialists Öhlins, a fully-adjustable shock out back and a 43mm fork up front, with a matching steering damper. Instead of a slipper clutch, Aprilia used their Pneumatic Power Clutch that used engine vacuum to disengage the clutch during downshifts to prevent the rear wheel from locking. Top-of-the-line radial Brembo calipers meant you could have stoppies to go with your wheelies.

From the original eBay listing: 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing for Sale

Up for sale is my 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing #002

This a very rare bike only 200 produced worldwide and 50 examples imported to the United States. This bike is #2 from the production run worldwide. This bike was sold to the public specifically so Aprilia could qualify to race it against and beat Ducati in the Italian Naked Race Series.

I have owned this bike since the summer of 2011 and I know I'm going to miss it, but I have a new kid and we are getting a bigger house so this has to go. I'll be hanging on to my two other Aprilias.

I have every original extra part that you received with the 2003 Racing, plus I have an extra Front Race Fairing and Track Belly Pan (most people don't have any of these parts and I have 2 sets, see below for additional price):

  • Carbon Fiber Front Racing Fairing x2
  • Carbon Fiber Track Belly Pan x2
  • Aprilia Racing Exhaust and Race Chip (both currently installed)
  • Original Stock Exhaust and Chip (in factory original box)
  • Passenger Seat
  • Carbon Fiber Solo Seat Cowl 
  • Passenger Pegs (currently installed)
  • Track Counter Shaft Sprocket
  • Aprilia Racing GP Shift Kit (currently installed)
  • Standard OEM Shift Linkage
  • Brake Light Delete Panel
  • Factory Drilled Bolts for Race Wire
  • Factory Manuals (Racing & Operator)

Non-Factory Parts:

  • Integrated Rear Turn Signals (I have the stock turn signals)
  • Rhino Frame Sliders (they are black and look nicer, I'm pretty sure I have the stock white ones)
  • Rear Fender/License plate Kit (I have the stock rear fender) 

The extra Front Race Fairing and Track Belly Pan would bring a pretty high price all by themselves, but I want to keep it all together.

Its in very good condition with about 10000-ish miles (I'll have to charge the battery and check). I've had it for a long time but put very little few miles on it. The bike is 15 years old and has been ridden so there are a few minor imperfections.

The extra set of carbon fiber race fairings I'll include for an additional $750.  

None of the parts are for sale separately please do not ask. 

I am willing to assist in shipping the bike, but it is 100% at the buyer's expense

Thanks

Okay, none of the Tuonos are really beautiful, but I think the first-generation is the best-looking of the bunch. It didn't even bother trying to be subtle, and the styling is just a bonkers mess of in-your-face. I mean that as a compliment. The seller's $8,000 is high for an early v-twin Aprilia in general, but first-generation Tuonos are pretty hard to find and seem to get snapped up pretty quickly. Given all of the available, often very hard to find extras and the overall condition, I wouldn't be surprised if he gets what he's asking.

-tad

High-Spec Hooligan: 2003 Aprilia Tuono Racing for Sale
Honda June 14, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

I’ve always been a “slow bike [and car, for that matter] fast” kind of guy, mainly because I could never really afford the fast bikes I wanted, but also because I'm pretty sure I'd have gotten into trouble riding something powerful all the time. But some folks just prefer smaller-engined motorcycles: on the road especially, you can barely get a modern sportbike into third gear unless you’re on the freeway, and winding one to redline, even in second gear, is likely to land you in jail if you do it in or around civilization… But that’s never a problem with something like today’s pristine Featured Listing Honda CB-1.

The 400cc class came about because of regulations that heavily taxed and otherwise displacements over 400cc in some markets, not because everyone was clamoring for them. In Japan, the 400cc sportbike, and even 250cc four-stroke sportbike classes were hotly contested, with Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Yamaha all producing smaller, more sophisticated machines than we ever saw officially in the USA. But licensing and laws aside, there are also fans of smaller displacement bikes that have the experience and skill to handle a legitimate sportbike and don’t want to be stuck with one of the torquey, but fairly crude-feeling singles or parallel twins you normally find powering bikes in the class.

Enter the Honda CB-1. Powered by a slightly detuned version of the CBR400RR's engine, the 399cc inline-four had some serious mechanical specifications, including sixteen valves and gear-driven dual overhead cams. The result was 55hp and a 13,500rpm redline, plenty to motivate the 400lb machine and push it all the way to 118mph, assuming you were prepared to thrash the sewing-machine-smooth engine mercilessly.

The CB-1 was one of only a couple of 400cc, inline-four sportbikes that were ever available in the United States, and that sophisticated little screamer is the main appeal here, along with the simple, sporty styling that has aged very well. The CB-1 did lose the CBR's aluminum frame and made do with tubular steel unit instead, but saved weight by losing the fairing and the CBR's second front caliper and rotor. Smaller valves and different tuning meant slightly less outright power that the CBR, but lower gearing meant it was a better real-world bike as well.

Unfortunately, as polished as it was, the CB-1 didn't really sell very well here in the USA, where bigger is always better and 600cc supersports are considered "learner bikes." But its surprising sophistication had fans then and now, and has become a bit of a cult bike here in the States. But if you missed the boat the first time around and didn't get to buy one new from your local Honda dealer, here's your chance: this one has just 9 miles on the odometer and is amazingly clean.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale

There isn't much to say other than this bike is literally a brand spank'n new bike. There are only "9" miles on the bike, as in "nine". These miles were put on at the factory. The tires are original and still have the injection nibs on them. I bought this bike out of a collection because I am a huge CB-1 fan. I own another CB-1 that I ride and use with my kids. They are amazing bikes and have a cult following. I bought this bike about three years ago simply because it was so cool and such a time capsule that I could not pass it up. I have never ridden it. It only sits covered in climate controlled storage. I never had the heart to ride it because it is so perfect. It is the curse of its newness. I spent some careful time and money prepping it for long term storage when I fist took delivery of the bike. The dealer did a full inspection, started the bike, and did a leak down prior to putting it into its cryogenic state. If you intend to do the sacrilegious act of riding it, then the battery will need to be re-installed and a few other minor checklist things, but easy to do. I can do this for you if needed. I have full records of what the dealer did to prep it for storage. You are welcome to check with the dealer and inquire what they did. The bike is PERFECT! Serious buyers are encouraged to look at it in person. Please feel free to ask me any questions. I'll do my best to reply quickly. I live in the North San Francisco area. I can help with organizing shipping if needed. I would prefer an in person inspection before it gets shipped. Buyer must pay for all shipping and crating if needed. Local pickup is of course preferred. I have "ALL" the paperwork... I mean everything down to the original pamphlets, certificate of origin, title, etc, etc. I also have both original keys. Payment must be completely cleared in my account before I will release the bike.

Update 6.14.2018:

There have been some questions about the long term storage of this bike so I feel I need to give some detail. When I received the bike it had no fuel or fuel residue in the tank, fuel lines or carbs. When I received the bike it had already been put into a long term storage state.

We I received the bike in order to test and run the engine we never put fuel in the tank. We did an external IV fuel drip to test the motor and it started immediately and ran perfect. After we were done the carbs were taken off and completely drained, dried and sprayed internally with an aerosol oil specific for storage. We sprayed the inside of the tank as well. The spark plugs were removed and the inside of the cylinders were sprayed.

Every single piece of rubber on this bike was generously coated with grease specific for long term storage of rubber and plastic. For example spark plug boots, all cables, hand controls etc. Much of this was wiped away for the photos but if you look at the chain that will give you an idea.

The forks were carefully inspected and treated but I need to look at the document to see what was done.

The engine was drained and then refilled with a specific oil to a higher level for long term storage to minimize any moisture buildup.

All of the exposed electrical was coated specifically for long term electrical storage. The battery was removed, I have a new battery ready to go.

The inside of the exhaust was treated to remove any moisture and the end of the exhaust was bagged and sealed. This seal was removed for the photos.

In summary this was a very expensive hibernation process that is fully documented over $2K. This was done at Marin Speed Shop as a labor of love by their master mechanic Max. Max took a great deal of time and care doing the research to ensure that this bike would stay in BRAND NEW condition for the next 30 years. Please call the shop to verify but only if you are a very serious buyer, respectfully please do not waste their time.

There are lots of small details I am leaving out but I'm almost certain that the shop still has the hibernation document if not I'm sure I do somewhere.

There is ZERO corrosion of any kind on this bike. If the buyer does the unthinkable and decides to ride it, I would suggest putting on new tires because tires do harden over time. That said the tires visually look perfect. I did not replace the tires because the tires are original to the bike as they were on the showroom floor and that's cool!

Hope this help, and good luck

My guess is that this could very well be the only brand new CB-1 in existence. If there is another one, it is probably in the Honda motorcycle museum in Japan.

Good luck on bidding and I look forward to meeting you.

Obviously, with basically just delivery miles, you'd likely need to go through the bike top-to-bottom before riding it. So perhaps the biggest question here is, "Does anyone really need a museum-quality Honda CB-1?" Well since the bike was originally a practical, affordable, and sophisticated do-it-all scoot, I doubt this will have the universal, drool-worthy appeal of something like an RC30, a bike that was sold in very limited numbers and had very exotic components. But somewhere, you just know there are a couple folks who've always loved this classy little machine or are looking to complete their extensive Honda collection. Regardless, it's obvious there is real interest in this bike: although nice, well-used CB-1s regularly change hands for around the $3,000 mark, bidding over at the eBay auction is already up north of $6,000 with several days left on the auction!

-tad

Featured Listing: Museum Quality 1989 Honda CB-1 for Sale
Yamaha June 12, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale

Update 6.13.2018: Unfortunately this bike sold while we were writing this post. Congratulations to buyer and seller! Check out the rest of Ted's inventory and thank you to Tad for the post. -dc

Yamaha threw their hat into the Grand Prix race replica ring with the… Well what this bike was called depended on where the thing was being sold. In Canada and Australia, it was an RZ500, which fits since it was like a bigger, faster RZ350. In Europe, it was the RD500LC, which also makes plenty of sense considering the RD series’ history, but with added Liquid Cooling! And in Japan, it was the RZV500R as seen in today’s Featured Listing, which sounds the most exotic to me.

And like Honda’s NS400R and Suzuki’s RG500, the RZ/RD/RZV was powered by a racing-inspired, two-stroke multi that was shared with no other bike in Yamaha's lineup. That made the bikes very exclusive, but not really cost-effective to produce. But really, what other sort of motorcycle would you power with a liquid-cooled 50° two-stroke V4 that featured twin cranks and a balance shaft displacing nearly 500cc? The rest of the package was likewise geared towards sportbike domination: a six-speed gearbox, a pair of YPVS power valves, Autolube oil-injection system, an underslung rear shock that was very exotic at the time, anti-dive forks, and 16” front and 18” wheels shod with typically skinny period tires.

Unfortunately, in spite of the racy looks and the inclusion of magnesium parts, the RZ500 still weighed in at a period-appropriate 450lbs dry. The problem was that rival Suzuki’s RG500 weighed significantly less while making more power than the RZ’s 88 claimed ponies. The RZ was designed from the start to be a civilized race-replica, but at the time the RG stole Yamaha's thunder with their much wilder ride.

But today, neither bike would be considered particularly fast on a racetrack and the appeal is a combination of nostalgia and the singularly exciting character of a big two-stroke, something the RZ still has in abundance and at a lower cost than an equivalent RG.  The RG has always been "the one to have," and steadily increasing values mean it's been priced out of reach for many fans. But although RZ prices have climbed to keep pace with the general increase of all 80s two-stroke sportbikes, they still lag behind the Gamma, making them the affordable choice.

This example is the Japanese-market RZV500R and featured an aluminum frame instead of the steel units on the other versions. Unfortunately, the aluminum frame wasn't something added to enhance performance, it was to offset the damage done by home market regulations that limited output to 64hp. Luckily, this example has supposedly been de-restricted and features a very sharp set of custom spannies that look far more upswept than the stock parts and should liberate more of the famous two-stroke crackle, along with FZR wheels, brakes, and front forks to match.

From the seller: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale

VIN#: 51X002446

Entering the world of RZ500’s has introduced me to several collectors who have shared some of their incredible knowledge of the Yamaha model. RZ500’s were built by Yamaha in model years 1984 and 1985. They were never sold new in the US and any that are currently here were brought in as Grey Market Vehicles. Yamaha Canada imported the RZ500 model which was also sold in Australia. The United Kingdom model was named the RD500 and came with a different color scheme than the RZ.

All of these models had steel frames and were delivered in what was considered unrestricted versions with higher horsepower than the domestic Japanese version of the motorcycle. The Japanese bikes with restricted horse power had smaller carburetors and exhaust systems to that end. In an attempt to balance the lost of power, the Japanese bikes were equipped with aluminum frames which were considerably lighter, but again, only for Japanese domestic consumption. That model of the RZ was called the RZV500, is model of bike being offered here. Our bike has the aluminum frame, different mirrors and decals identifying it as the RZV, the most desirable version of the bike if unrestricted. In this case that has been done with a set of Tommy Crawford Expansion Chamber Exhausts. The pipes are said to work well, are rare to find and are no longer made. A perfect storm so to speak.

This bike has been modified additionally with what we assume are a period FZR Front Forks and a set of matching wheels. There is also an Ohlin’s rear Shock Absorber in the back.

The owner of the bike was a huge enthusiast of Road Race bikes and at the time was doing some club racing. Being in the Service, when it was time to be stationed at another post, the Service took care of moving his personal property including his motorcycles. As per regulations, vehicles that were transported with personal property were to have all of their fuel removed, which was done with a tag hanging from the handle bar noting this. Unfortunately, medical issues evolved that prevented the bike from being recommissioned and it been in this state for over ten years. Sadly for the owner, he never was able to ride again and his family is selling the bike as part of his estate.

Collectors with an interest in the bikes have warned us about trying to start the bike without a serious inspection and reconditioning. Crank seals, carburetors and possibly other work may be needed and we are not in a position or capable of any of it. The bike, in running order, would most likely bring over $20,000 and is now priced accordingly to accommodate the possible needed work. It has an Oregon clear and clean title of ownership.

So this should pretty much be the highest-performing version of the RZ: the lighter aluminum frame combined with the full-power engine. More power, less weight, what's not to like? That is, once the bike is reconditioned, of course... The Seller is asking $15,295 for this one and, if you're handy with the wrenches and love to tune two-strokes, or have deep pockets and Lance Gamma's number on speed dial, this could be a good opportunity to pick up a clean RZV with more modern running gear that just needs some mechanical attention.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1984 Yamaha RZV500R for Sale
Bimota June 12, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Naked Italian Supermodel: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Look, I'll get this out the way up front: the Bimota YB11 does not "look way cooler with the bodywork off." Since the missing bits appear to be included, I'm going to assume, for the purposes of this post, that a lack of taste is the actual reason the bodywork isn't currently in place. Don't get me wrong, I love Bimotas shorn of bodywork: the minimalist frame, the simplified construction, the elegance. But with that headlight and tail sections in place and the rest missing? It just looks unfinished. It might run cooler though... Anyway, differing aesthetic opinions aside, the YB11 is certainly an affordable way to get into quirky Italian exotica: we're obviously comparing apples and oranges here, but you can generally pick up 90s Bimotas for the price of a new Ducati Scrambler.

Stripped of much of its bodywork, this YB11 looks like it might have more in common with an Aprilia Tuono or a KTM Super Duke than a modern liter-class superbike. The 145 horsepower claimed by Bimota for their mildly-tuned version of Yamaha's five-valve Genesis inline four means the YB11 is closer to “supernaked” than “superbike” in terms of power, as well. Certainly, the 1002cc displacement means it isn’t eligible for superbike racing classes.

But just as bikes in the supernaked class are less powerful, but sometimes more fun than full-blown superbikes, top-end horsepower might impress when you’re comparing stat sheets over a beer, or railing at 10/10ths on a race track, but it doesn’t necessarily translate that well to the real world. Take a look at the YB11’s 80 lb-ft of torque and 400lb dry weight: the Genesis engine has a famously fierce midrange and the bike is claimed to start pulling savagely from below 4,000rpm. Modern superbikes do make much more top-end horsepower, but also weigh a bit more and produce very similar amounts of torque, so you can imagine that a YB11 will still make for a very exciting ride.

Obviously, this old-school superbike comes from a much simpler time, something that’s easy to see once the bodywork is removed. One look under the skin of a YB11 alongside something like Ducati’s new V4 Panigale and you can see just how complicated modern superbikes have become, since modules and wires and hoses pack every available nook and cranny. It's a good thing the new Panigale has a heavily truncated frame, since I'm not sure where you'd fit a regular one. So no, an old beast like this Bimota isn’t as good as something truly modern. But you also shouldn't worry too much about more modern bikes running away from you out on the road.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

A beautiful work of art that looks like it was designed by Michelangelo, this bike is super-light (Superleggera) + excellent handling with 51mm front fork tubes (largest ever put on a production cycle!) + Brembo brakes front +rear, carbon fiber everywhere/ high perf. ARROW exhaust system/ 145H.P. with 12:1 lightweight forged pistons in a 1002cc Thunderace Yamaha engine with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft. Bodywork is off presently cause it looks way cooler with it off, but I do have all the parts that go with the bike.

I'm not clear from the seller's description whether the "12:1 lightweight forged pistons... with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft" are components from some sort of engine rebuild or if he's suggesting they were included in the original YB11. I'm pretty sure that Bimota made no internal changes to the stock powerplant and if the engine was rebuilt or otherwise modified, I'd love some more detail regarding what was included and why it was done. Bidding is active with a few days left on the auction, but only up to a bit more than $4,000 at this point. Aside from the missing bodywork [it is included in the sale as you can see below], this bike does look like it's in very nice shape, but Bimotas of this vintage are still a tough sell, so someone still might get a good bargain.

-tad