Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Suzuki April 24, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Future Classic: Clean, Low-Mileage 2001 Suzuki TL1000R for Sale

Look, here's the thing. If you're buying bikes [or cars, for that matter] that were hyped to be "instant classics" when they were introduced, thinking you can flip them for a profit... You may be waiting a while. Consider all the folks who bought the MV Agusta F4 750 Serie Oro when it was new, hoping it would be a valuable investment. That was almost twenty years ago and those are still selling at a significant discount, especially when you factor in inflation... So if you're trying to buy low and sell high, you need to to look around the fringes, find the slightly forgotten and overlooked bikes. Maybe bikes that got universally blah reviews and didn't sell all that well when new, but have strong performance, distinctive character and, if possible, a face only a mother could love. Something like this very low-mileage, banana-yellow Suzuki TL1000R.

When introduced, pretty much every review I read of the TL1000R was damning with faint praise. Billed as a "Ducati killer" it was too heavy, handling from the still-rotary-damped-dammit-Suzuki-stop-being-stubborn suspension wasn't as good as the 996, and styling was... odd. Sort of like the designers looked to the animal kingdom for styling inspiration, and found... the platyus. Still, the 996cc motor was a excellent, and made plenty of power with the fat midrange for which v-twins are justifiably famous.

See, when they're new, bikes get reviewed in context. But decades later, they get to stand on their own merits, without being compared unfairly to the bikes they were supposed to outperform. I'm joking a bit, but it's true: reading some magazine comparison tests, you get a sense that "if you ain't first, you're last" and I think many very competent sportbikes have been unfairly overlooked because they made a couple horsepower less than the class leaders, had questionable styling, or had handling that tried to kill their riders.

The TL1000R looks oddly bulbous, but it makes a great road bike, and a set of aftermarket cans like the Yoshimura bits seen here liberate some pretty great v-twin throb. The 135hp won't see you winning any stoplight races against newer tackle, but if you can't have fun with that much power on road or track, maybe you should choose a different hobby. The package was high-performance enough for Bimota to use in their SB8R, and Performance Bikes did a series a while back, turning a nice TL-R into a literal Ducati-killer with a wild big-bore engine build, new gearbox, and lightweight bodywork.

Significant upgrades to the power might be elusive or at least expensive for those of us without engine building friends or contacts with the gearbox specialists at Nova Racing, but fit some carbon panels and maybe a slimmer solo tail, change out the rotary damper at the rear for a more conventional unit, swap in a later GSX-R1000 front end for better forks and brakes, and you might be surprised at how much fun you can have on this affordable, reliable, easy-to-maintain v-twin sportbike.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Suzuki TL1000R for Sale

It's time to scoot your computer chair a little closer to the screen..... grab your reading glasses and prepare to view the cleanest Suzuki TL1000R on planet earth!!  This is no exaggeration, view any of the provided photo's below and you will see what I mean.  This bike was purchased brand new in 2003 by an elderly car / motorcycle collector and parked inside a carpeted and climate controlled garage it's entire life.  This bike has NEVER seen a race track and has never been ridden past 8,000RPM's, ever.  This is the most babied and well taken care of example you'll ever see, anywhere.  Literally looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor - as the photo's clearly show.

If you're a true motorcycle enthusiast, this particular bike will bend you at the knee's.  With with only 2,583 ORIGINAL MILES, it's probably the lowest mileage TL left in existence too.  Look anywhere you can think of...... Cycle Trader, Craigslist, Ebay, Offer up, or anywhere else you can think of and you will see how rare these bikes truly are.  Most of them have been highly modified, raced or stunted and abused.  Primarily because they are so well built and tough - they can handle the abuse of people beating the hell out of them.  As sad as that sounds, you will have nothing to worry about in that department with this bike.  Look over all of the provided photo's in detail and you will see what I mean.  This is the closest you will ever get to showroom perfect as they come.  And SURELY the cleanest 2001 TL1000R on the market - anywhere. Hands down... Guaranteed!!  You absolutely WILL N O T find a cleaner TL anywhere.  This bike is SO clean you could eat your steak dinner right off the engine.  I have provided close up images showing the inner wheel hubs, the engine cases, coolant lines, chain, seats, trunk, dash, brake levers, shocks....... everything you would hope to see if you were buying a bike.  Look closely at the images provided and you will see what I mean.  Being garaged and covered it's entire life, there is no rust, no corrosion and no discoloration from road grime or road salt etc.  This bike looks just as clean underneath and inside the fairings as it does on the outside.  The paint condition and quality is (literally) like new.  No pit marks or chips on the front end and no (dirty rag) swirls or marks on the body.  As I said - this truly is the cleanest one you will ever find.  This bike is so clean it could be parked on the showroom floor at a Suzuki dealership on a display stand just to show it off.  Unsuspecting customers would mistake it for a brand new bike....... it's THAT clean!! 

Although there are no internal motor modifications, there are a few bolt on upgrades:
- Dealer Installed Yoshimura RS-3 polished slip on dual exhaust
- Dealer Installed power commander
- Custom rear fender painted to match
- Carbon fiber brake & clutch levers
- Zero gravity smoke tinted windscreen
- Smoke tinted flush mount turn signals
- Smoke tinted rear tail light lens
- Brand new front & rear tires (just installed 4-18-18)
- Rear under tail fender setup painted to match (never installed)

Being a collector bike, all stock parts were saved, packaged, boxed up and will go to the new owner.  If the new owner would like to put everything back to OEM stock condition, the parts are here and can easily be re-installed.  It comes with the original sales contract when it was purchased new, the original TL1000R owners manual and original TL1000R CD service discs.  It comes with a matching yellow helmet, only worn twice.  There's a custom motorcycle cover too that will go to the new owner.  It fits the bike like a glove!!  I even saved the original OEM tires that came on the bike when new.  The tires were still in good condition, but I wanted to install brand new one's for safety.  Not good to ride on old tires in my opinion, so I just had brand new tires installed front & rear.  All of the extra's that come with the bike are shown below in the photo's.  
 
Flaws:
As with any pre-owned motorcycle or vehicle, normal signs of wear & tear may be present.  Scratches, nicks, chips, dings etc.  If you have any questions as to the condition of this bike, by all means - bring your mechanic and feel free to inspect it in person prior to bidding or purchase.  The only noted flaw I can find on this entire bike is on the left mid section of the fairing there is a small scratch in the chrome TL-R graphic.  Not even sure how it happened, but it's about the only noted flaw I can find.  Replacing the TL1000R left side logo sticker would eliminate this completely. Also on the back edge of the left fairing just above the letter "K" where it says SUZUKI there is a small mark.  At one point in the bikes past, the fuel petcock sprung a tiny leak and some gas ran down this specific edge of the fairing which caused the smudge area.  This can most likely be rubbed out or buffed back to yellow with ease.  Also there is a tiny smudge on the back left outer edge of the Yoshimura slip on.  Looks like it was done from shoe rubber.  Will most likely rub off with a bit of effort.  You would have to be sitting on the pavement looking eye level at the side of the bike to notice either of these imperfections.  However, it is Ebay and I value my reputation as a seller so it's something I wanted to point out. Aside from this, the bike is a close to mint as you will ever find.  This bike looks like it has barely been ridden. 

Obviously, I'm not really suggesting the TL1000R is a great investment opportunity. But they're surprisingly affordable, offer great everyday performance, and really should increase in value over the next decade or so. Maybe not as obvious: for all the cheap shots I've taken at the TL1000R, I like them. This example has seen just 2,600 miles so far, so you can actually do some riding on your duck-billed modern classic and still maybe make a few bucks when the time comes to sell it on to some sucker... err, collector, when values have really spiked down the road and you're ready to move on to the next forgotten superbike. And before you scoff too loudly, or in print in the comments below, remember that nice, first-generation GSX-R750s have pretty much tripled in price over the past few years. That may not be the reason you buy motorcycles, but it's nice to know you might at least break even on your weekend toy, after you factor in consumables and a bit of maintenance. The seller didn't set some wishful-thinking Buy It Now price either: bidding is very active and up to north of $4,000 as I write this.

-tad

Kawasaki April 21, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

They're relatively rare here in the US, even in states with lax registration requirements, but late 80s and early 90s quarter-liter two-strokes were pretty widely available elsewhere in the sportbiking world, considering their narrowly-focused role and limited audience. Kawasaki was largely absent from the intense class rivalry during that period, though. Their earlier KR250 was out of date compared to something like the original TZR and they didn't have a real competitor ready until 1988 when the Kawasaki KR-1 and the sportier KR-1S were introduced.

The KR-1 was discontinued in 1992, without any significant updates and well before the others in the class. Just 10,000 were built, making it a pretty rare sight outside Japan these days: Honda constructed more than ten times as many NSR250Rs! But although Kawasaki as a company didn't seem like they'd gone all-in on the idea of going head-to-head against Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha, it wasn't as if the KR-1S itself didn't measure up.

Like most of its rivals, the KR-1S was powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel twin and backed by a six-speed gearbox to exploit the razor-thin powerband although, also like its rivals, the Kawasaki did feature power-valve technology, here dubbed "KIPS," to boost the midrange. Modern bikes with their ever-larger engines and horsepower numbers are increasingly equipped with electronic up-and-down shifters and autoblippers, but they really don't particularly need them on the road, considering the available power. A quickshifter/autoblipper would get plenty of use on one of these, had they been available: there's only so much you can do with just 249cc and the bike's government-mandated 45hp, so dancing on the gear lever is a required, not optional activity when riding a little two-stroke.

The frame was the typical aluminum beam unit of the class and the suspension was good but, compared to other bikes in the class, the KR-1 was a bit... raw. Handling was "lively" and the bike managed a best-in-class tested top speed of 139mph. An engine balance shaft driven by the 180° crankshaft seems like it was the only concession to civility, and even that was probably justified as preventing vibration damage to the minimalist frame, rather than as a means to refine the experience of riding the wee beastie.

From the original eBay listing: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

The KR1S model here in the USA is one of the most rare of the Japanese 250 racer replica two strokes. If one can be found, it will usually be the green, white, and yellow bike. Sometimes the black and green bike, but never a factory genuine JDM Zeus Blue bike. These bikes were very limited in production. The factory Zeus Blue bikes differed from the export models in a few ways: indicators, mirrors, calipers, rotor center color, wheel color, all ID by the frame number. California titled and plated to its original VIN# Rare. Call Tim @714-746-5087 for more details.

When I purchased the bike a few years ago, I went onto the forums and found only a handful of original Zeus Blue KR1S models all overseas: one in Australia, one in the Netherlands, and one in the UK. I would go so far as to say this is the only one in the USA, and I know it’s the only one with a California title. This is THE rocking horse unicorn bike. To whomever buys the bike, you would be INSANE to remove the California title from the bike. That makes this bike so desirable. These bikes were ONLY JDM models never for export which is what makes them so rare. I have owned many many 2Ts (TZR, SPR, MC21, Rothmans, MC28, VJ23, V Model, Lucky, etc). These parallel twins really are amazing bikes. Having owned the four big Japanese manufactured bikes, to me there is no question Kawasaki is the most fun to ride. They literally are mad scientists and I LOVE IT! The KR1S was the fastest of all the 2T racer replicas. And if you know Kawasaki, they just built it and let it rip. Yamaha, Honda have their rev limiters, credit card ignitions, etc. Not Kawi. This thing will go all the way if you were to wind it out all the way. The sound of the parallel twin motor is simply the best. The cackling of the pipes. This bike has only had Motul 710 in it, runs fantastic, starts first kick, and purrs at idle. 18k miles on the clocks, float, gaskets, float valves all done, carbs serviced and cleaned, has Uni foam filter, new plugs, steering damper, factory toolkit, original key, etc. Clear California title in hand and current registration ‘til Jan 2019. Bike is for sale locally so the auction can end at any time. Thanks. Enjoy the ride…

Personally, I prefer my wild-haired Kawasakis to be vibrant green, and not the more civilized, metallic green they've been using on their modern, more sophisticated offerings. No, I want that lurid, fluorescent green of old. But this color scheme is exceedingly rare here, and that does count for something. Not to mention that it does look pretty sharp! The 18,000 miles indicated may not be stored-in-your-livingroom low, but the bike does appear to be you-could-eat-off-it clean and is in immaculate condition, with the very desirable California registration. And yes, the seller is correct that re-titling it in another state is absolutely a bad move financially: legitimately-titled two-strokes of this era are difficult to come by here, and there are plenty of well-heeled enthusiasts willing to pay extra for something they can legally ride.

-tad

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale
Ducati April 19, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

To some, it might seem like sacrilege to take a gorgeous, expensive, limited-edition Ducati superbike and turn it into a trackday toy. But if you've got the money to spend on something you can afford to wreck and want the very best, you can't go wrong with today's Ducati 1098R track bike. Honestly, homologation-special Ducatis don't really make practical roadbikes anyway: their uncomfortable ergonomics, race-bred handling, and ridiculous power only makes sense in an unrestricted environment.

History I'm sure will be kind to the Terblanche-styled 999. But at the time, the successor to the storied 916 was a relative sales flop, in spite of it being better in virtually every way. Power was up, electronics were more sophisticated, and the solo seat models even offered adjustable ergonomics. Unfortunately, the restyle went just a bit too far for Ducati's conservative fan base, but Ducati quickly learned their lesson. The 1098 that followed was really Ducati walking back their radical mandate, at least in terms of styling. It's a good-looking bike, but obviously kind of derivative, which was really the whole point after all. It may be my least favorite Ducati superbike, but apparently I'm crazy because I know more than a few guys who love it unreservedly. And you can't argue with the performance: in ultimate, 1098R form seen here, the v-twin pumped out a claimed 180hp, a huge jump over the earlier bike.

A big bump in displacement certainly helped: the 1098R actually had a larger 1198cc engine to exploit the full displacement allowed by World Superbike regulations at the time, an interesting reversal of the more recent Panigale 1299R that displaces less for the same reason... Aside from the bump in displacement that resulted from a larger bore and shorter stroke, the R also used titanium valves and connecting rods to help the bike rev higher. And while the 180hp is basically the minimum required for entry into the literbike club these days, the massive 99 lb-ft of torque should be enough to widen eyes everywhere.

Possibly the most significant aspect of the 1098R, aside from its competition-derived engine, was a race kit exhaust and ECU "intended for off-road use only" that liberated an additional 9hp and also activated the revolutionary Ducati Traction Control system with 8 levels of adjustability. It was relatively crude, compared to today's systems, but was undeniably effective and was used on Ducati's MotoGP and WSBK machines of the time.

After all that, it's almost easy to overlook the bike's trick suspension that included an Öhlins TTX36 twin-tube shock at the rear and represented pretty much the very best roadgoing suspension money could buy at the time. Just 300 examples of the 1098R were imported to the US, priced at $40,000. This one is number 277 of a total 450 produced worldwide and has only 2,800 miles on it, although most of those have accumulated on closed courses, and track miles are kind of like dog years...

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

ONLY 2,800 MILES

#277 of 450

THIS BABY IS BAD!

PLEASE UNDERSTAND THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, NOT A STREET BIKE

The 1098 R is the ultimate Superbike. The most advanced, most powerful twin-cylinder motorcycle ever built. It is the product of a team of designers and engineers focussed on one objective only – to win.

The ‘R’ is a race bike, pure and simple. Its competition specification and superior components together with advanced electronics and race-proven chassis technology deliver a level of performance that empowers you with confidence and capability. On the road, it distinguishes you as a connoisseur of high-performance motorcycles. On the track it promotes you to a higher level of riding and closer to realising your dreams.

World Superbike rule changes mean that the road-going ‘R’ version is closer than ever to our factory race bike. The 1098 R is not a replica – it’s the real deal. An incredible 180hp L-Twin Testastretta Evoluzione engine in a race-winning Trellis chassis set-up tips the scales at an unbelievably lightweight 165kg (364lbs) and comes with a race kit that introduces Ducati Corse’s world championship winning traction control system.

Once again, Ducati raises the bar and sets the world standard for sport bikes while turning the heads and racing the hearts of enthusiasts throughout the world.

The 1098 R – Built to Win

If you have a need for speed, then this is your answer. 

This motorcycle was bought stock from the Ducati Dealership in 2012 when it had only 331 miles. The previous owner has upgraded numerous parts over the past few of years. I do have most of the original parts here in a box. The bike does have a couple minor scratches and chips (most have been professionally touched-up). Normal wear items for a track bike. This 1098 has always been serviced at the Ducati Dealership. Please understand; THIS IS A TRACK BIKE, not a street bike. 

The Buy It Now price for this low-mileage, race-ready homologation special is a reasonable $19,995. That's less than other 1098Rs we've seen, but of course it's likely to see a harder life than most and that's going to make it less desirable to collectors. 180hp and primitive traction-control seen here might not sound all that impressive, in this age of the cornering-ABS-equipped, up-and-down quickshifter-ed, traction-controlled, 206hp at-the-wheel Panigale 1299R Final Editions. But this 1098R most definitely is a very significant and collectible homologation-special Ducati from the dawn of the Electronics Era, when rider aids shifted [see what I did there?] from simply improving safety to making riders faster. If you've got the cash to splash, this is a pretty cool way to get your trackday kicks, and a race track actually seems a more appropriate place for a 1098R than collecting dust in some collection.

-tad

Trick Track Toy: Low-Mileage 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale
Bimota April 16, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

Bimota's SB6R followed the earlier SB6, one of their best-selling models of all time, with approximately 1,200 made. The SB6R likely would have been produced in similar numbers, but for the debacle that was the radical, two-stroke VDue. That bike's failure pulled the whole company down into bankruptcy, and when the company was resurrected in 2003, the SB6R was not in the lineup, likely due to the discontinuation of the SB6R's GSX-R1100 powerplant with the demise of that model in 1998.

That GSX-R engine was famously powerful and bulletproof, and was backed by a five-speed gearbox that reflects the bike's freight-train character: the Bimota's claimed 156hp might not seem all that impressive, but the liquid-cooled inline four had a storming midrange and the SB6R was very light for the era. Paioli forks up front and an Öhlins shock round out a package that can still embarrass modern motorcycles in skilled hands, but a complete lack of electronic aids means it remains an "experts only" motorcycle.

The SB6R used the SB6's massive, aluminum "Straight Connection Technology" beam frame, with more modern, conservative bodywork that lost the SB6's swoopy looks and the exhaust hidden within the tail section. The styling elements of the updated SB6R may be derivative: fairing "speed holes" from a CBR900, a pair of undertail exhausts like a 916, and a trapezoidal headlight like an FZR... Okay, it actually was the headlight from an FZR. But somehow, even though the elements are familiar, the overall look was very much a Bimota. It's almost the anti-916: bulbous and curving instead of wasp-waisted and slab-sided, built around a beam-frame instead of a trellis, powered by an inline four instead of a twin...

This Bimota certainly isn't one of the best bikes of the era, but it is one of my personal favorites. This particular example is a rarity, a machine ready for the road that appears to have had the bugs worked out and only some very minor blemishes. It's also a very low serial number: 000023.

From the Seller: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale

I have come once again to your fine forum to move a jewel. I know you have featured a few of these, so I wont go through the Bimota propaganda and just get to the meat of what I have done. The usual Bimota story, well heeled individual purchased and rode very little, used more as a object d'art, rather than a mode of transportation for the majority of its life. She is now ready for riding. This thing rips, even with my 6'4", 220 pound, Yeti-like mass aboard.

  • Equipped  with the Bimota Corse Titanium exhaust
  • Kevlar brake lines
  • Michelins
  • Rebuilt carburetors, new needle valves
  • New NGK plugs
  • Oil and filter
  • New fuel pump from Bimota Classic Parts
  • New petcock from Bimota Classic Parts
  • All new Motion Pro fuel lines
  • New fuel filters
  • Cleaned fuel tank
  • The fuel system is now up to original Bimota factory spec.
  • This bike pulls like a freight train.
  • 2 small cracks in the gauge lens
  • Ridden and on the road
  • Every system functional
  • No issues
  • All paperwork in order.
  • 2 Original Bimota keys.

Price: $12,500
Contact Chris: gsxronly@aol.com or 407-492-5854

The seller is asking $12,500 for this SB6R, which is on the high-end, but the bike looks to be in highly functional condition, which is critical: Bimotas are often derided for their kit-bike quality when new, so set up is key. The fact that this one is claimed to be ready for the road is kind of a big deal, and mileage is pretty low as well. The Corse exhaust is a nice addition since it reduces weight from high up and at the tail end of the machine, and any Bimota with stock pipes is likely to stay that way at this point, unless you feel like having someone custom fabricate a set for you: just 600 were made so there isn't much demand for aftermarket parts.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1998 Bimota SB6R for Sale
MV Agusta April 14, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Evolution: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR for Sale

The MV Agusta F4 750 is so often referred to as "one of the most beautiful motorcycles ever created" that it's easy to forget it's actually a pretty good motorcycle as well. Sure, it's brutally uncomfortable and a little bit heavier than the competition, but the engineering is sound and it's an impressively refined piece, considering this was the company's first modern superbike, built from the ground up to compete against the very best sportbikes in the world. It fell a bit short of the mark, but not so far short you could consider it an actual failure, considering the bike's longevity.

The orignal F4 750 was introduced in 1999 and the later 1000cc version that followed in 2005 was basically the 750 with more displacement and some refinements, and every four-cylinder machine produced by the company was based on the same engine and frame, up until the complete redesign of the F4 for 2010. So you're looking at a pretty long-serving package, considering the normally rapid pace of sportbike development, and that second generation F4 introduced in 2010 is still used as the foundation for a mid-pack WSBK contender!

So what was wrong with the F4? Well basically, in a class where power-to-weight ratios are critical, the bike had just average power and about 50lbs too much weight. In any other motorcycle category, that would be pretty meaningless, but in the hyper-competitive sportbike world, it meant everything, especially when you consider the somewhat shocking cost of the F4. Ultimately, the F4 was just a step behind the leaders in a class that was now obsolete, as literbikes were suddenly the top dogs of the sportbike world. MV Agusta solved the power problems with their updated F4 1000 but the damage to their rep was done, and the bikes never really offered any performance advantage over a ZX-10 or GSX-R1000, with less reliability and a whole lot more cost.

The seller claims this is an SPR, but I was under the impression the SPR was introduced in 2004, the ultimate evolution of the F4 750 and is most commonly seen in flat black colors. Whether or not this is an SPR or an S, it's a later version of the bike and should be more refined and reliable than the first-generation examples. The included Power Commander is a nice touch: fueling on stock F4s is pretty terrible from the factory, lean through most of the rev range and then artificially rich at the top. It's especially noticeable on the 1000 but both versions benefit hugely in terms of usability from a fueling module and some dyno time. I've ridden a stock 1000 and a properly tuned example nearly back-to-back, and the difference is pronounced. The stock bike seems to almost bog when you whack the throttle open in the midrange, where as the tuned version pulls as you'd expect: like a freight train.

From the original eBay listing: 2002 MV Agusta F4 750 SPR for Sale

Need garage space, so newer bikes must go! This 2002 MV F4 SPR was one of two California-legal MVs, purchased from Grand Prix Motors, San Diego. Original owner was importer for MV Agusta in 1970s, Commerce Overseas Corporation. Designer of the MV750S America: pictured in the foreground with this F4. The bike comes with a ton of MV Agusta history accumulated by Commerce Overseas, including racing photos from MV glory days! With only 8,000 miles, this F4 SPR is in "as-new" condition. Equipped with rare MV factory racing exhaust, bike is tuned with a Power Commander. New tires, recent service. Stunning example of the F4 that was produced in SPR form after initial hiccups with early models.

The bike has 8,250 miles on it and there are no takers yet at the $10,000 starting bid. For the most part, it's pretty commonly accepted that the later 1000 is a better bike overall and that the 750 is underpowered and slightly overweight. It is the original though, and rarer, and should prove to be the better investment over time. Plus, an MV is still an MV, and none of them are actually slow. Try to think of them more as... mature, with just a little bit of middle-aged paunch over an athlete's build. Put it this way: if you're riding an F4 and someone is faster than you are on track or down a given stretch of back road, the problem probably isn't the extra 50lbs the F4 carries over a GSX-R... The problem is probably you.

-tad

Ducati April 13, 2018 posted by Tad Diemer

Little Brother: 2001 Ducati 748R for Sale

If you're a sportbike fan, bikes like the Ducati 748R might seem like the poor cousin to the 916/996/998, a bike you only bought because your funds wouldn't stretch to the more expensive, larger-displacement version. But no "R" model Ducati really takes a back seat to anything: they were homologation specials, and the 748R was designed to allow the smaller-engined v-twin to compete in World Supersport racing.

The higher-spec powerplant in the 748R used lightweight titanium valves and connecting rods, fed by shower-type fuel injectors made possible by a two-part carbon fiber airbox. Space for the larger airbox necessitated a lightweight version of the 996 World Superbike's frame, and the result was a real-world 106hp and midrange torque 600cc inline four rivals could only dream of, with additional power waiting to be unleashed by race teams unconcerned by trivialities like "longevity."

The carbon airbox served two purposes: in addition to providing more air and fuel at the higher revs made possible by the lightweight internals, it also helped stiffen the frame for improved handling. Adjustable triple clamps and Öhlins suspension front and rear refined the 748's already impressive handling: purists actually claim the 748 is a better handling machine than the 916, with less weight and increased agility, no doubt helped by the narrower 180-section rear tire.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati 748R for Sale

Time to make some room in my garage so I'm going to part with this rare beast. Its an original 2001 Ducati 748R.  No. 711. Not many of these around anymore and this one's good some nice goodies. it has 11k miles (I do ride it here and there so there may be some more)

I am the second owner and the previous owner did all of the upgrades. The bike is in very good shape, not mint there are a couple light scratches on the tank, a small scuff mark on the right fairing and the foam around the instrument panel is a bit melted from the sun. (I think this was due in party to the double bubble windscreen magnifying it). The paint is in amazing shape. It has much more power than a regular 748 and the R has a more unique sound due to the differences in the motors. Maintained at Munroe Motors Ducati in San Francisco. Head were checked at 10,000 miles and rockers/valves had no signs of issues.

Heres a list of some of the upgrades (I'm probably leaving some things out)

  • Heads by Guy Martin (he makes some of the toughest and durable heads for Ducatis, they also increase power about 15-20%)  http://www.mbpducati.ca/
  • CycleCat fully adjustable rearsets
  • CycleCat fully adjustable clip ons
  • CRG adjustable brake and clutch lever
  • BrakeTech AXIS Cobra Stainless Steel Series Wave rotors
  • BrakeTech pads
  • STM Slipper Clutch
  • STM Clutch Slave
  • Gubellini Steering damper
  • Fast by Ferracci 54mm full exhaust (ceramic coated) sounds amazing!
  • Carbon Fiber exhaust shield
  • Marchesini forged wheels
  • Pirelli corsas
  • Carbon fiber intake cover (larger and smoother bore than the stock ones
  • Zero Gravity Windscreen
  • Sargent seat
  • Ohlins shock
  • Ohlins fork
  • Carbon keyless gas cap/filler

Tech Specs: The top of the range model was now the 748R, Ducati's racing homologation model produced only in very limited numbers. This engine was again a derivative of the SPS model but with more tuning. The main difference is that the R model has an overhead shower-injector arrangement compared to the 748E and S model's traditional throttle bodies, titanium connecting rods, titanium valves and more extreme valve timing.

As such, the 748R has a larger, two-part airbox and thus the frame was also different in order to accommodate this. The suspension choice was Ohlins for both the rear shock and front forks, although the very first models in 2000 used Showa titanium nitride (TiN) front forks and a Showa shock absorber. The engine included a very basic slipper clutch to ensure that this would then be homologated for use in racing, as well as an oil cooler.

The starting bid is $7,500 with no takers yet. That's a great deal for a 748R, but this one is no garage queen and collectors might turn up their noses at things like the aftermarket turn signals. The miles are still pretty low and the bike comes equipped with some choice components: the 748R was available from the factory with some nice parts, but it's a Ducati, so you can always find nicer ones to fit any budget, no matter how large. This one probably isn't for the collectors, given the clean, but well-used condition and highly-functional, but non-stock configuration. This is one for the riders, for folks looking for a bike they can take to the track and not worry too much about adding a few more scuffs and battle scars.

-tad

Little Brother: 2001 Ducati 748R for Sale