Author Archives: Tad Diemer

Bimota December 8, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Nice Curves: Low-Mileage 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

The SB6 and SB6R were some of Bimota's best-selling bikes of all time, and featured what must be the mother of all beam frames. That distinctive, very rigid aluminum unit used Bimota's "Straight Connection Technology," designed to link the steering head directly to the swingarm pivot. This improved chassis rigidity at the expense of servicing: you pretty much have to unbolt the engine and swing it forward to adjust the carburetors, change the spark plugs, replace the front sprocket, or access the alternator drive that tends to fail...

Fortunately, this earlier SB6 at least features a set of Suzuki gauges, a good thing since the later Bimota units supposedly pack it in with unfortunate regularity. They may look fairly mundane, but least they work! The engine should be pretty reliable too, and powerful to boot: those gauges are matched to the inline four and five-speed gearbox from Suzuki's GSX-R1100.

I much prefer Bimota's follow up to this bike, the SB6R which pretty much embodies my favorite aspects of 1990s styling. Sure, the 916 might be the more iconic 90s design, but part of the reason is that it doesn't actually look like anything else from that era. The SB6R has the bulbous curves of the donor GSX-R, but with better colors, less weight, and more all-around Italian-ness.

But the strength of the original SB6 is that it looks like pretty much nothing from any era, unless you count Crea's weird, organic-nightmare bodywork kits from the era... Go ahead and Google that, and then promise me you'll never complain about Pierre Terblanche's 999 ever again. The SB6 is striking wrapper that contains all the analog performance you could ever want, along with a powerplant that should be at least easy to get parts for, even if it isn't actually all that convenient to work on.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

This is a one owner bike that has been stored inside a house.

Only 670 Miles!

The bike fluids have been drained and cleaned for proper storage. The bike is all original and near perfect.

It has never been on the market until now. I have had the bike in my house for over a year and just moved it to my warehouse and decided to let someone else enjoy it. I got the bike from a friend that knew the original owner and connected us.

I am open to fair offers. I listed the bike at top market price because someone might pay that. However make a fair offer and you might own this very rare, one owner Bimota.

Also, it has the Suzuki 1100 motor... Dyno specs in pics from years ago.

Since the seller "got the bike from a friend that knew the original owner and connected us," wouldn't that technically make this a two-owner bike? Even though the second owner only had it a year? Unfortunately, 1990s Bimotas were a bit unfinished from the factory, and great concepts suffered from pretty poor execution. If you had the time or money to go through your expensive Italian exotic to correct electrical faults and set up the suspension properly, you were left with a serious weapon for road or track. Of course, most buyers wanted their money to buy an actual, functioning motorcycle, and Bimota's kit-bike quality certainly hasn't helped values.  The $24,900 asking price is very ambitious for an SB6 but, with those kind of miles, maybe a collector who wants a very clean, low-mileage example of a very cool machine will bite. However, I'd say the seller's negotiation technique could be... stronger.

-tad

Nice Curves: Low-Mileage 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Honda December 1, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Triple Time: 1986 Honda NS400R for Sale

Honda's two-stroke NS400R was ostensibly intended to capitalize on their Grand Prix racing efforts, but with less displacement and one fewer cylinder than rivals from Suzuki and Yamaha, it got lost in the shuffle at the time and suffered from a perceived lack of hairy-chestedness, compared to its 500cc competition.

So why did Honda go with a 400cc triple instead of a 500cc four, like Yamaha and Suzuki? Well in fact Yamaha and Suzuki did produce 400cc versions of their engines, in order to make these performance machines more appealing in their home market of Japan, where taxes and licensing laws made owning the 500cc version prohibitively expensive. So instead of building different versions of their repli-racer to suit the laws of different countries, Honda simply used the 400cc version for all markets.

The performance gap, especially between the NS400R and the RZ500 is actually pretty minimal, due to the Honda’s light weight: the liquid-cooled 387cc V3 produced a claimed 72hp and the bike weighed just 360lbs. A six-speed gearbox helped keep the two-stroke “on the pipe” and the bike featured sophisticated suspension at both ends, with TRAC anti-dive forks and a Pro-Link rear setup. Modular Comstar wheels were fitted with radial tires, a relative novelty at the time.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Honda NS400R for Sale

This bike has been meticulously restored from bottom to top as a shining example of the replica Honda put out in honour of the legend Fast Freddie Spencer! For the hard core era two stroke enthusiast and collector, this machine will not disappoint you!

I also have another 1986 NS400R that is in parts. Everything mechanically is there for restoration except some of the body fairings. I would not be fair to part this unit out as a result. I am prepared to sell both as a package or separately. 

Ask and I can send you the link to the Youtube video.

Period reviews praised the bike’s handling, and the overall package was surprisingly refined, considering the bike’s light weight and racy specification. I wonder if that didn't hurt the bike's reputation, although it should have been a bonus at the time. It's the same thing that let down the RZ500: in an effort to make a better road bike, Yamaha lost sight of why people were interested in a big-bore two-stroke in the first place, and the result was needlessly heavy and somewhat less exciting than Suzuki's Gamma. The NS400R doesn't have a weight problem, but it doesn't seem to have the RG500's wild reputation, either. They were relative bargains for a long time, but values have risen significantly over the past few years and this restored example is being offered for approximately $9,400 US. Note that this bike is currently in Canada, so keep that in mind before you hit the Buy It Now or Make Offer buttons.

-tad

Triple Time: 1986 Honda NS400R for Sale
Ducati November 29, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Factory Prototype: 2000 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ducati built just 1,000 of the stunning MH900e in 2001 and 2,000 the following year, making this one obviously a bit interesting right out of the gate. It's apparently a pre-production prototype, with some clear differences between it and the regular production version, although the original flat-black pre-production bodywork has been replaced with a set of very sexy carbon-fiber Ducati Performance parts as seen in the photos.

Pierre Terblanche's redesign of Ducati's 998 superbike may have been controversial, but he was on-point here with this Mike Hailwood tribute. The styling of the MH900e wraps a modern-ish two-valve v-twin powertrain, stiff trellis frame, and quality suspension in bodywork that manages to be both futuristic and retro at the same time. There are hints of NCR's racebikes, the Ducati Pantah, Hailwood's TT machine, and the undertail exhaust suggests the 998.

Power from the 904cc air and oil-cooled twin was modest, with a claimed 75hp at the rear wheel, although the engine's flexibility and torque mean that there's more performance on tap than meets the eye when pushing the 410lb machine. Ergonomics were pretty cruel and the seat very tall, but at least the tiny stock 2.2 gallon fuel tank meant plenty of chances to stretch when you pause to fill up: even allowing for the Ducati's good fuel mileage, you're still looking at just 90 miles or so between stops.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Ducati MH900e Factory Prototype for Sale

For sale a unique, once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire the real factory prototype of the DUCATI MH900e.

Here below a little description of this particular model:

The MH900e began as a concept created by the Ducati designer Pierre Terblanche in homage to Mike Hailwood's 1978 win of the Isle of Man TT. Giving way to the model designation "MH".

In September 1998 the sketch was presented to the general public at the Intermot Show in Munich and met with rave reviews. Due to the enthusiastic response from the press and public, Ducati decided to post a questionnaire on their website to test the true interest of the MH900e fans. 300 Ducatisti responded positively. With this information, Federico Minoli and Massimo Bordi (General Manager of Ducati) decided to take the risk and produce a limited run of two thousand hand-built bikes. The first one thousand bikes would be produced in 2000 and the second thousand would be produced in 2001.

The sale of the MH900e was as unique as the bike itself. Ducati made the decision to sell the new bike directly to the consumer exclusively via the Internet in a form of e-commerce known as B-2-C (Business to Consumer). This was a first for any motorcycle manufacturer. It was a risky move, but the result could not have been any better

The Ducati website opened for orders on January 1, 2000 at 00:01am GMT at a price of 15,000. The first 1000 units were sold out in 31 short minutes. The remaining bikes were sold over the next few weeks. Individuals made purchases from 20 different countries. The estimated breakdown of the sales was 30% from Europe, 30% from the US and 39% from Japan.

This particular bike was used by Ducati Experience Department to control all assemblies, parts and components, to make sure everything was fitting and operating properly before production started. Many components are "one-off", and many were pre-production pieces. the battery holding frame is unique, showing a different position of the battery with respect of the production bikes. also the front fairing frame is a bit different than production ones. All of these parts were carefully kept to maintain the originality of the bike, and to show the real spirit of this amazing prototype. like the top fork tee which was left raw instead of being polished like the production ones.

On the gas tank there are signatures and dates, possibly showing various stages of testing and different phases of assembly. every single piece on this bike is authentic and original Ducati for this model, nothing has been altered or manufactured to complete it.

The bike was acquired from Ducati with a non-production plastic body, painted flat black like the rest of the bike, including frame and swingarm. the exhaust was also custom-made, clearly an assembly try-out, yet perfectly working.

We did a "conservative" restoration on the bike, taking it completely apart, making sure every original bit and piece was kept and restored to obtain this amazing piece. we also decide to maintain the black look that sported when we got it, just upgraded it a bit with proper carbon body and custom-made graphics (Ducati made them for us).

the frame and swingarm are pre-production original and authentic DUCATI MH900E, with correct ZDM homologation number, properly and correctly stamped on the neck, with frame serial number being 0000001. everything legit and correct. fully documented with invoice showing frame and motor number.

Some minor parts like clutch, oil tank, and front brake tank aluminum holders, or the steering damper, are not installed but will be in a short time. Everything works perfectly as it should on this amazing piece. A solid investment for any collector or Ducati aficionados, this is the kind of bike that, few years down the line, will be popping up at auctions. Don't loose the opportunity.

Shipping worldwide properly crated. Bike is located in Modena, Italy.

There are no takers yet at the $50,000 starting bid, but there's plenty of time left on the listing. Regular production bikes already command prices of just under $20,000 or so, so I expect that the right collector would pay more for this museum piece. Certainly, it'd be criminal to run it on the road, considering its historical value, even if you could legally register it for road use...

-tad

Factory Prototype: 2000 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati November 28, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Featured Listing: Very Clean 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale

Update 11.27.2017: The seller has renewed the Feature Listing for this very clean 748S and has dropped the price to $4,950. Thanks for helping to support the site Brett and good luck to potential buyers! -dc

2001 Ducati 748S R Side Glamour

America is the land of Golden Corral, the endless buffet, a place where "more is better" and we often shop by the pound. Do we really need an endless pizza buffet? Of course not, but wow, what a deal! And in that world, a bike like the Ducati 748 makes little sense. I mean, for just a couple grand more, wouldn't you rather have the 916? If you finance it, it's just like $40 more per month. But people who subscribe to that reasoning really will never understand the 748.

2001 Ducati 748S R Naked

It’s a situation where less really is more. Sure, the 916 came first, and the 996/998 are definitely more powerful. But the frame and suspension were identical, and the 748 came with a narrower rear tire that gave the bike sharper handling and better turn-in while that smaller engine was sweeter, revvier, and still made a solid 95hp. The bike needed to be worked just that much harder to get the most from it and, since the entire 916 series was a complete disaster when not being properly caned, it’s not like you’re really missing out on a relaxed experience the package never provided anyway.

2001 Ducati 748S Engine

Today’s featured listing isn’t some zero-mileage garage queen, and about 13,000 miles have rolled under the wheels since 2001. But while there may be examples out there with fewer miles on them, there aren’t too many that are cleaner. And even better, this one is yellow.  I realize that many purists will disagree, but I actually prefer yellow to the more traditional red. There aren’t too many motorcycles that look good in yellow, but this is one of them.

2001 Ducati 748 Rear Clutch

From the seller: 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale

While it may not be as collectable as a 748 ‘RS,’ or ‘R,’ - it is in excellent shape.  And the 748 S, while not sporting a number badge, is a series of Ducati that can be hard to find nowadays,  if you’re looking for a lower mileage, supremely clean, professionally maintained, and nearly OEM example.  There are plenty of monopostos out there, but not as many actual ‘S’ series – with the proper TiN Showa suspension, adjustable steering head, grey frame, and grey 5 spoke Marchesini wheel upgrades. 

The Termignoni exhaust is a professional repack and has under 500 miles – the canister carbon is in amazing shape.  A lot of the carbon on the Termis turned amber from years of heat.  Not this set.  These are now very hard to find in good shape.

Also: Carbon fiber clutch cover, cowl, and rear wheel hugger. 

Like the 749R that you provided the featured listing for, this cycle has been ridden constantly, about 850 miles per season. Never in the rain, never on a track. Dedicated mechanic. Kept in a heated garage. 

Timing belt replacement and complete tune and safety inspection less than 1000 miles ago by ECS in Middletown, NY.  Less than 500 miles on Michelin Power Pilots.  Cover and Pit Bull stand would go with the cycle.

2001 – 13,200 miles.

Asking price is $4,950 and the owner can be contacted by email: Brett.Demello@kregtool.com.

2001 Ducati 748 Exhausts

As the seller mentions, the S model isn’t as collectible as the more desirable R, but you do get the very nice Showa suspension front and rear, including the titanium-nitride forks, along with very stylish five-spoke Marchesini wheels that I prefer to the earlier three-spoke items. And you can’t go wrong with the glorious noise generated by a classic set of carbon Termignoni cans.

Certainly, you can find a 748 for less than the seller is asking, but you probably won't find one better and I think this represents a very good opportunity for fans of the Tamburini superbikes.

-tad

2001 Ducati 748S R Side

Featured Listing: Very Clean 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale
Kawasaki November 23, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

A Pair of Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors for Sale

If you replace or heavily modify every single component of a motorcycle, does it become something entirely new? That's kind of the philosophy at work behind the Muzzy Raptor, a thoroughly massaged version of Kawasaki's ZX7RR built by tuner extraordinaire, Rob Muzzy. That might sound like the stage name of an 80s glam rocker, and "Raptor" could definitely be the name of a hair-metal band, but Rob Muzzy's memorable moniker is outshined only by his incredible racing successes in both AMA and World Superbike.

Muzzy basically disassembled a brand-new Kawasaki ZX-7Rs and rebuilt it from the ground up to build each Raptor, using top-shelf suspension and engine internals, including gear-driven camshafts. Various exotic options were available, including adjustable steering heads and swingarm pivots, along with a very slick, 916-esque single-sided swingarm. The Formula USA class or "FUSA," required that a minimum of fifty road-going examples be built. Muzzy probably didn't build quite enough Raptors to qualify, but it seems no one complained too loudly.

Roadbikes displaced either 750 or 850cc, although this pair of competition machines appear to be fitted with 800 and 750cc motors, presumably to meet race class requirements. Both engines have been heavily massaged, with the aforementioned gear-driven cams, and you can see the Öhlins forks and AP six piston front calipers for handling to match the power.

From the original eBay listing: A Pair of Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors for Sale

Twin Muzzy Raptor FUSA Race bikes. These were ridden by Dave Sadowski in FUSA and owned by a privateer. He made a deal with Muzzy to allow Sadowski to run the bikes at several FUSA events. Raptors have gear drive cams, gear drive oil pumps, billet crank, 800cc, with many World Superbike parts, custom pistons, valves, rods... you name it, they have it! One bike currently has the 800 motor, the other bike (with body off) has 1998 Doug Chandler 750 AMA motor. Spare freshly serviced 800 motor comes with bikes. Have all paper work to verify bikes and 750 motor from Muzzy.

Included with the 2 bikes are as pictured:

  • Spare 800 motor that was freshened by Muzzy with 0 time on it. All motors Tuned/maintained by Vic Vasola. Motors were sent back to Muzzy or direct to Vic ever 2 race weekends.
  • Body sets as pictured, I think there are 3-4 spare sets in various conditions. One brand new set.
  • 1 carbon fiber tank with cap
  • 3 spare magnesium wheels with rotors as shown.
  • These are very rare bikes and if they become legal for AHRMA Next Gen Superbike you will have a ready to win package.
  • Bikes will come with PA titles.

I have a ton of spares that are also available that I will sell separate which include several new mufflers, titanium headers, gearing, steering damper, pegs, levers, clutch parts, brake and clutch masters/perch/levers, wiring, coolant plumbing, stock forks, ohlins shocks, steering and engine mount eccentrics, fenders, front and rear sub frames, battery box... The list is huge and there is everything you need to race these bikes. I also have a 1997 ZX7RR street bike in pieces, all body work freshly painted by Sean Lezott of Connecticut Cycle Refinishing.

Hilariously, the bikes are claimed to come with Pennsylvania titles, so I'm guessing that you could theoretically convert them back to road use, assuming you live someplace with a permissive DMV. The Buy It Now price for the package is $39,995. For that price you get a pair of racing motorcycles and a boatload of spares, including bodywork and engines and, as the seller says, enough to use the bikes in anger. Considering the raw materials in this package, that seems like a good deal for someone looking for race-ready bikes or some very serious track day machinery.

-tad

A Pair of Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors for Sale
Honda November 21, 2017 posted by Tad Diemer

Baby ‘Blade: 1992 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale

The Honda CBR400RR was designed to appeal to buyers in certain countries that were limited to bikes of smaller displacement because of tiered licensing requirements or heavy taxes on larger machines. Racing classes in those markets also existed to campaign 400cc motorcycles, and were hotly contested by the usual suspects: Yamaha, Suzuki, and Kawasaki also had smaller versions of their popular sportbikes. Honda even went a step further, and offered a second 400cc sportbike in their V4-powered VFR400R. Unlike today's smaller-displacement offerings, these were grown-up sportbikes in miniature: instead of a simple single-cylinder engine or an economical parallel-twin, the CBR400 used a 399cc inline four with sixteen valves, gear-driven twin overhead cams, backed by a six-speed gearbox, and suspended in a stiff aluminum frame. Straight-line performance was modest by today's standards, but bikes in the class had handling that was often better than their more powerful, but generally heavier siblings.

Americans saw a variation of this bike in the short-lived CB-1 that used a slightly detuned version of the CBR's inline four, including the sexy gear-driven cams, but wrapped in a steel frame instead of the CBR's lighter aluminum beam design. A lack of bodywork on the CB-1 kept the weight reasonable compared to the sportier CBR and the bike was a good handler, but Americans just weren't ready for a pricey, naked machine like that in the late 1980s. Would the CBR have sold any better, had it been brought over? America had a pretty binary motorcycling culture through the 80s and 90s: people bought sportbikes or cruisers, with little interest in more practical machines. The CBR would have been similar to Yamaha's offerings, whose little FZR400 was actually more sophisticated than the bigger-engined, but heavier, steel-framed FZR600. FZR400 is certainly a cult bike now, but its relative rarity suggests the CBR wouldn't have been much of a success at the time, although I expect it might have sold better than the CB-1.

At the end of the day, without the laws and taxes that conjured the 400cc class into being, there isn't much to recommend the bike over the CBR600 or CBR900, aside from superlative handling. The main appeal here is rarity, agility, and the fun of a motorcycle you can cane the hell out of without needing the skills of a professional racer, or a helicopter airlift ride to the nearest trauma center.

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Honda CBR400RR for Sale

Very rare 1992 Honda CBR400 (baby Fireblade) NC29 legally imported from Japan and currently titled, insured and registered here in NJ. Bike has 13220 miles, fresh Motul (brake fluid, engine oil and coolant) fluids, TSR slip on, new NGK plugs, Continental Attack tires, carbs were cleaned and fuel tank drained/cleaned. This bike is very clean and in excellent condition. Please feel free to message if you have any questions. 

From the relatively low-resolution photos, this appears to be a very nice example of a cool, grey-market CBR400RR, but unfortunately the Buy It Now price is an eye-watering $9,500. New Jersey's DMV may not be as draconian as California's in terms of emissions requirements, but they're even more strict in other ways, so the NJ title and registration suggests that the seller hasn't cut any corners making this legal although, as always, caveat emptor.

-tad

Baby ‘Blade: 1992 Honda CBR400RR NC29 for Sale