Author Archives: Mike

Kawasaki October 27, 2017 posted by Mike

Icon: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R

In the American idiom, there is no substitution for cubic inches. Kawasaki understood the unmistakable allure of power and created what many regard as the iconic hot rod of the 1970s. And as hard as it may be to see, today's mega-hyper-super bikes can trace their lineage back to the Z1R. The recipe remains the same, even as ingredients evolve over time: start with (at least) two big scoops of power, spice it up with a stout chassis, mix in good suspension and brakes, and drizzle with a healthy dose of sporty touches such as rear-set pegs, short bars and aero bodywork bits. Today the power, chassis, suspension, brakes and aero are far superior to those of 40 years ago - but there is little that is truly new.

1978 Kawasaki Z1R for sale on eBay

The 1977-1978 model Z1R was the last of the era before new hardware released in the 1980s. As such, these are the most evolved of the line, and represent the best of this fantastic model. The engine remained the stalwart inline four, air-cooled of course, and breathed through carbs and 2-valve heads. The stock exhaust was a 4-into-1 design, which bordered on hooliganism. Electric push-button starting was the new order of the day, but early Z1s included a vestige of the past in the form of a removable kick start pedal located under the seat (yes, we really have come that far). On the chassis side, the Z1R included additional bracing around the steering head, and introduced triple disks that were drilled for performance and lighter weight. The finishing touch was the bikini fairing, hinting at a key design element for the next decade.

From the seller:
Here is a 1978 Z1R time capsule, I purchased from the original owner at 68yrs old. He purchased new when he was a young man. He rode the bike the bike less than a year. then parked it in his new house that he built. Drained the gas from it at sat until 2015 this was his pride and joy , I purchased the bike from him in 2015 , and brought it back to life. I recently put a new tire on the ,rear new oring chain and rebuilt carbs and syn them. also added kereker header for the 70s look. also have original header perfect shape, original BILL OF SALES! kind of yard to read writing but it there. Dont miss out on this 1 of a kind time capsule.

Long considered one of the first factory cafe racers, the Z1R was a 90 HP rocket that could turn and stop (nearly) as well as it could go fast. This was a sport bike that pushed the boundaries of power and performance; real men rode a Z1R. Today these are 40 year old geezers - there is simply no comparison to anything of the modern vintage. But there is an unmistakable draw, be it the striking stance, the visceral power of the huge four banger, or simply nostalgia. Clean Z1s are climbing in value, although as these were mass produced with no limits they do not benefit from the "Limited Edition" syndrome. However time takes care of that for us, making a great bike stand out today.

This 1978 Kawasaki Z1R looks fantastic; it has some modification (such as the period-correct Kerker pipe), but the auction includes the pricey stock exhaust. If you are a rider of a certain age, this one has to be tugging at your inner child. Even if you were not around or aware of motorcycles during this period of time, this Z1R should stand out. This was the original superbike, and holds its head proudly today. The internet seems to agree, as bidding has been strong on this bike. The auction is up to $11,600 at time of this writing, with reserve still in place. You don't get many opportunities to bid on a bike of this caliber - I recommend you check it out before it is gone. This is more than history; this is a collector model in collector condition. Good Luck!!

MI

Icon: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R
Ducati October 26, 2017 posted by Mike

Smarty Pants: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart

When Paul Smart rode a green-framed 750 to victory at Imola in 1972, Ducati history was made. No longer a bit player with smaller bikes, Ducati proved that they could compete on the world's stage. And since that 1972 victory, Ducati has hunted down championship after championship. They have also reached back into the land of nostalgia a few times and brought back neo-retro designs to evoke images of the older bikes, but wrought with newer technology. The early 2000s brought us the Sport Classic lineup, and few are as classic as the Paul Smart replica delivered in 2006.

2006 Ducati Paul Smart Replica for sale on eBay

At the heart of this machine is the same tried and true desmodue 2-valve, air-cooled motor found throughout the Sport Classic lineup (as well as the air-cooled monsters and the SuperSport series). A many-generation evolution of the venerable Pantah "rubber band" power plant, the belt driven valves and simple air cooling are offset by new tech such as twin spark computer controlled ignition and fuel injection. With loads of torque and wonderful character, the 1,000cc L-twin has plenty of grunt and makes all the right noises. The rest of the bike is a revised classic interpretation of the original green frame, with traditional Ducati frame and fairing artistry. There are numerous unique design elements (check out that asymmetrical swing arm with a single shock), and the whole package is wrapped nicely in green and silver.

From the seller:
2006 Ducati Paul Smart

2nd owner. Bike had 400 miles on it when I bought it about 8 years ago.
Termignoni Exhaust with race ECU
Rizoma Grips
Rizoma Reservoirs
CRG Mirrors
CRG RC Levers
Alpina Tubeless Aluminum Wheels
Fleda Brake/Turn signals
JCPB Fork Guards
Supersprox
Pit Bull stand
Battery tender/charger
Also have a full Zard Stainless 2-2 exhaust (louder than the Termis)

I have all the factory signals, exhaust, mirrors, sprocket, chain etc that came on the bike, as well as a Zard 2-2 Stainless full exhaust. There is a blemish on the engine case (pictured), and small crack on the rubber of the right hand grip, which are the only noticeable flaws on the bike. $800 service from Pro-Italia couple hundred miles ago.

Just don't ride the bike enough, sold the MH900E a while back, for the same reason.

The Paul Smart replica machines (also known as the PS1000LE) were made in limited numbers - data seems to indicate 500 were sold in the US out of a global total of 2000 bikes. That not only makes this an exclusive piece of kit, it also means that the laws of supply and demand start coming into play. Green-framed 750s are so far out of reach of mere mortals that it is not even worthwhile to look. The PS1000LE commanded a premium over the standard Sport Classic when introduced, but speculation and collectors have driven these up considerably since then. This particular bike is not stock, but the seller claims to have most of the stock items. The recent service from a well-known Southern California Ducati shop is another bonus.

The seller is looking for big dollars here: potential buyers need to pony up $24,000 USD just to get this auction started. That is potentially in the range for a great example of this breed (we have seen asks as high as $30k), but may be a bit too stiff for an opening move. The market will tell us where this one goes, although as of yet there have been zero bids. Check it out here to see all of the details and watch the fun (if it starts). If you are in the market for a Smart, you could certainly do worse. Good Luck!!

MI

Smarty Pants: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart
Sales Report October 18, 2017 posted by Mike

Sales Summary – February 2017

Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let's take a look back and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


2008 Buell XB12R Firebolt - SOLD for $4,200




1980 Ducati 900 MHR - SOLD for $15,778.90



1979 Honda CBX - SOLD for $9,999



1989 Honda CBR600F - SOLD for $3,050



1991 Honda NSR250 SP - SOLD for $9,299



1986 Moto Morini K2 - SOLD for $4,200



1984 Yamaha RZ350 - SOLD for $7,500

Unsold Bikes


2000 Aprilia RSV Mille R - No Sale with bids up to $4,000


2007 Aprilia RSV 1000 Bol D'or - Listing ended with a $5,260 ask

2009 Aprilia RS125 - Listing ended with a $6,000 opening ask.

1984 Bimota KB3 - No Sale with bids up to $7,100

1999 Bimota VDue Trofeo - No Sale with bids up to $15,100


2009 BMW HP2 Sport - No Sale. Zero bids at a $17,500 opening ask.

1987 Cagiva Allazzura 650SS - Listing ended with a $4,450 ask

1981 NCR Ducati 600TT for Sale - No Sale with bids up to $16,100

1990 Ducati 750 Sport - No Sale at $3,450 with 23 bids

2001 Ducati 748RS - No Sale with a $12,400 ask

2007 Ducati Monster S2R 1000 - No Sale - listing ended with bids up to $6,000

2007 Ducati Monster S4RS - No Sale at $8,100

2007 Ducati Sport 1000 Biposto - No Sale at $12,499

1989 Kawasaki ZXR250R - No Sale at $5,000

1984 LAVERDA JOTA - No Sale with bids up to $12,285.85

1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC - Listing ended with a $14,500 opening ask

1999 Laverda 750S Formula - No Sale with bids up to $5,000

1983 Moto Guzzi LeMans III - Listing ended with 9 bids at $7,300

2000 Nico Bakker Barracuda 1000 - Listing ended with a $22,500 ask. Later relisted and failed to sell.

1977 Suzuki RG500 Grand Prix Race Bike - No Sale - bid up to $34,101, reserve not met. Relisted and bid to $20k with No Sale.

1982 SUZUKI GS1000 KATANA - No Sale at $9,000

1997 Suzuki Katana 750 - No Sale at $1,200

1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No Sale. Auction ended with bids up to $8,800.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 - No Sale. Zero bids at a $5,000 opening ask.

1994 Yamaha YZF750R - No Sale at a $5,000 opening ask.

Honda October 13, 2017 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In 1978 Honda stunned the motorcycling world with a technological tour de force. The six cylinder, 24 valve CBX was the most ambitious - and the most visceral - Honda project to date. Dominated by an air-cooled inline format mounted transversely, this Honda made a statement like no other. And while Benelli introduced the world's first production six cylinder motorcycle, Honda completely owned it and made it their own. Seemingly an engineering exercise that got out of hand, the Honda CBX remains a remarkable piece of machinery. It is coveted by collectors as well, with prices following suit.

A bit portly at 600+ pounds wet, the CBX was considered a superbike at it's 1978 introduction. Part of that reason is that the world had never seen anything like it. With more than 105 HP on tap, the big bike was as strong in performance as it was stunning to look at. While you might not know it by looking, the big six was actually an evolution of the 50cc and 125cc GP race bikes of the 1960s and early 1970s. Honda claimed this lineage not only aided in meeting the performance targets of the 1047cc, 24-valve DOHC inline six cylinder, but also dramatically shortened the gestation period since this was a route already well traveled by Honda engineers. As a promotional stunt Honda provided bikes to the Isle of Man TT, which were utilized by course marshals and made a statement as to the sporting intent of the flagship Honda. Capable at the dragstrip, decent on the road course (especially endurance events), and at home at any boulevard in the nation, the CBX delivered on Honda's promise of engineering excellence.

From the seller:
1979 Honda CBX

This CBX bike comes from BAC, the famous automotive and motorcycle collection. In the early 2000s the owner of a famous automobile collection decided that post war 1970s and 1980s motorcycles were some of the most unappreciated classic bikes and set out to buy the best of the best of all the iconic bikes. The owner is nearing 80 years old and has decided to sell off his collection of Italian and Japanese classic bikes of the 1970s and 1980s.

More from the seller:

The CBX in this ad took him three years of traveling across the country to find the best CBX he could find. While the bike has just under 10,000 miles on it, the current owner is the second owner. The previous owner who purchased the bike new only drove it on sunny days and it has never seen a drop of rain or any major dust or dirt. Everything is original bike except for the bearings in the rear swing axle. The bike even has a matching color Honda period correct helmet. The owner says without a question; this has to be one of the finest CBXs in the nation. It runs perfectly and has never been taken apart and nothing sounds like a Honda CBX when it is winding up through the gears.

More from the seller:
The owner said in his opinion the most important part of any collector bike is the mufflers as they are almost in all cases impossible to reproduce. The mufflers on this CBX are immaculate.

This bike also comes with a matching helmet!

This 1979 Honda CBX is located in Chicago land: $14,500

From the pictures of the enormous engine, you might think you need to be a bow-legged cowboy to ride one. But thanks to intelligent design, that is not the case. Not only did Honda cant the cylinder bank forward some 30 degrees, the intake setup is arranged in a vee format to further narrow the bike's midsection; despite engine dimensions, there is plenty of room for the rider. And with a jack-shaft arrangement that moves ancillary components from the ends of the crank to behind the motor, the CBX is not nearly as wide as you might otherwise imagine.

Built from 1978 through 1982, the CBX was but one of the incredible models that Honda created during this wild time; other examples include CX500 Turbo, CX650 Turbo and later the V45 Interceptor. Yet the more conventional CB900F was the real showroom performer, outselling the engineering oddities by a large margin. As a result, the CBX remains a relatively rare model. Yet it still presents an amazing sight, and continues to stun today. The 1979 Honda CBX shown here is a low mile example. More importantly, this is a a completely original example that was recently liberated from a larger collection. If you are in the market for a 1970s collectable Honda, you want to source the cleanest, best example you can find. This particular machine meets those specs easily. The asking price is $14,500.

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!
Suzuki October 9, 2017 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

The market for factory replicas is hot right now, especially from the 1980s era of Superbike racing. These were the days of low-tech, skinny tires, big handlebars and manly men riders. Air-cooled, inline fours with two-valve heads and a quartet of carbs ruled the track. Motors were impossibly wide, bias-ply tires were (by today's standards) impossibly skinny, forks were still conventional and had yet to be turned upside down, and brake rotors had yet to grow to the insane proportions of current hardware. This was a key period of sport bike development, and this fantastic 1980 Suzuki GS1000S "Wes Cooley" replica highlights all that was right about the moment.

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Wester Steven Cooley won the 1979 and 1980 AMA Superbike Championships on a Pops Yoshimura-prepped Suzuki GS1000S. Suzuki never officially cashed in on Wes Cooley's name and fame, but the 1980 GS1000S was a stunning silhouette of the AMA racer. It was only in the years following that these models became know as Wes Cooley models - but it only seems fair given Kawasaki's similar creation of the ELR. To build the replica, Suzuki used the standard GS1000 offering; the limited edition "S" model came a year after the rest of the GS1000 lineup. The Wes Cooley replica did not have any material differences to the other GS1000 models in terms of engine, but it did share what was widely regarded as the best chassis to emerge from Japan during the era. Ultimately, that was the secret to the success of the bike on the track. For its first entry into the 1000cc market, Suzuki created a winner - both on the race track as well as the showroom.

From the seller:
1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley

Good solid riding classic, clean GA title, you don't see too many of these in this condition, although no museum piece it shows nice and rides well, starts right up and everything works like it did back in 1980. A cool survivor to ride "as is" or to do a complete showroom restoration, I have the stock air box and stock exhaust although the mufflers look good, underneath they are starting to give in to the dreaded rust.

New Michelin tires, new OEM petcock, new OEM clutch, new K&N pod filters, new Dynojet kit, new oil and filter, new OEM head gasket just installed (inc bills for work done) head decked, valves checked, new OEM o rings and gaskets used. paint work is shiny and shows well, no rust on or in the tank, has some signs of an older repair on the fairing, has had one re bore with OEM pistons and rings at 40k or 8 thousand miles ago. The seat really needs a new cover, the clock no longer functions, the fuel gauge is intermittent and the needle from the oil temp gauge has come off. This bike has been my rider for the past several thousand miles and gets plenty of attention everywhere it goes.

Just a good solid representation of a getting harder to find classic, ready to ride home to anywhere in the country today.

Make no mistake - this is a rare make and model. Suzuki had no plans to bring the GS1000S into America. But when US dealers saw it during an overseas dealer conference they pressured Suzuki into importing the model. Reports indicate that dealers in the US were allotted a single bike, with only 500 units imported for 1979 and 700 units for 1980. Today few survive in recognizable condition, and those that do are commanding higher and higher prices. This one has higher mileage than some we have seen, but there is still a lot of life left in it yet.

This beautiful Suzuki time piece is located in Georgia, and will be going to a good home at the end of this No Reserve auction. There have been a large number of bids early on, showing the level of interest that these Wes Cooley replica models generate. Jump in before it is too late, as this 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley Replica looks too good to pass up. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1980 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley
Sport Bikes For Sale October 6, 2017 posted by Mike

Sponsored Listing: Bonhams Autumn Stafford Sale!

From the fine folks at Bonhams comes the Autumn Stafford Sale - a dedicated motorcycle and motorcycle memorabilia auction to be held in person and online on October 15, 2017. While we don't have room to show you each of the 300+ lots, check out some of the fantastic offerings available below.


Jorge Lorenzo works 2007 World Championship-winning 2007 Aprilia 250cc RSW Grand Prix Racer

Hot on the heels of his first 250cc World Championship with Honda, Jorge Lorenzo jumped to Aprilia and took his #1 plate with him. Utilizing this factory works RSW, Lorenzo showcased his rise to fame with a second World Championship. This historically significant racer has been documented by Aprilia as the genuine article.


NEW 1987 Suzuki RG500 Gamma

RSBFS readers are pretty rabid when it comes to the Gamma. Representing the closest road-going racer available at the time, the square-four two stroke is a milestone machine for collectors. This particular bike is brand new, has only push mileage on the clocks, and has never been registered. This must surely be the rarest of the 500cc Gammas we have ever seen on these pages.



1990 Honda VRP-RS500 Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle


The Honda RS500 was a customer/privateer version of the works NS500 triple. With a long pedigree of success, the lighter three cylinder two stroke powerplant paved the way for Freddie Spencer's victory. This particular bike is one of only three 1990 machines built in Italy by Verona Racing Products (VRP). Using a custom chassis and updated components, this RS500 represented a major update to a machine originally launched in 1982.


1991 Honda VFR750R Type RC30

No high-brow motorcycle auction could be considered legitimate without an RC30. Long the bellwether of collector prices and trends, the VFR750R is THE iconic homologated superbike. This wonderful example is a UK bike, has but 3,976 miles on the odometer, and has some well-documented history. Is the collector market appreciating? This 1991 Honda RC30 might be the one to watch.



1983 Laverda TT1 RGS Corsa


The up and down fortunes of Laverda are highlighted by this stunning TT1 RGS Corsa. Pattered after the factory works machines from the year previous, only a handful of completed bikes were delivered to select customers. Considered semi-works bikes, these Corsas were campaigned in TT and endurance races throughout Europe. Sadly Laverda suffered more downs than ups in the intervening years - but this 1983 Laverda TT1 RGS Corsa gives a glimpse of what the future could have been like for the iconic Italian marque.



1997 Ducati 916 Senna II


Few motorsports celebrities command the respect reserved for the legendary Ayrton Senna. A Formula 1 phenom, a record breaker and a shooting star until his unexpected death in 1994, Ayrton Senna was also a social activist. Concerned with the large number of impoverished and homeless children in his native country of Brazil, Ayrton was a tireless supporter of their cause. The Senna edition of the sublime 916 was to raise money for his charity - and introduced the world to one of the most striking and rare Ducati models ever made.


1974 Laverda 744cc SFC
Laverda went all in for endurance racing in the 1970's, and the SFC ( super freni competizione ) was a half-faired homologation special, with triple-disk brakes and right-side gearshift.  Most often seen in the factory's signature orange, the model was a successful endurance racer and ride-to-the-race privateer machine. This 1974 Laverda SFC is documented in the SFC Registry, with the frame and engine numbers validated as correct.


1977 MV Agusta Boxer

What you are looking at is one of only two MV Agusta Boxer bikes ever produced. A naming conflict with a certain four-wheeled Italian manufacturer located in Maranello prompted MV to change the name of the line to Monza early in the production cycle. Born from the bones of the 750 America model, the Boxer/Monza model is punched out to 837cc improving power and top speed. This 1977 MV Agusta Boxer is an ultra-rare example of Count Augusta's finest work.


1975 Bimota 247cc YB1 Racing Motorcycle

You are undoubtedly familiar with Bimota's climb to fame with their legendary street bike kits, and later fully constructed motorcycles. But their roots were planted in the fertile grounds of motorsport competition; most notably, the smaller capacity roadracers that were popular in Europe. This 250cc 1975 Bimota YB1 is one of only 12 and was campaigned successfully in the World Championship by Swiss rider Bruno Kneubühler (whose career spanned from 50cc through 500cc GP bikes). Like all Bimotas, the craftmanship of the frame ensures flex-free handling, and the bodywork makes it look fast just standing still.


1976 Bimota 492cc SB1 Racing Motorcycle

Another fabulous and rare Bimota racer (number 20 of 50 frames constructed), this SB1 utilizes here is fitted with a Suzuki TR500 engine, the water-cooled racing version of the road-going T500 twin. Check out the auction details to see the innovative frame layout - this SB1 highlights the ingenuity of the Bimota crew. This amazing bike is offered in unrestored, running condition.


1986 Ducati 750 F1 Montjuich

Named after the fabled TT course laid out near Barcelona Spain, the Ducati 750 F1 Montjuich is a race-replica variant of the F1 line. Sporting engine, chassis, exhaust, and suspension improvements, the Montjuich was limited to a total of 200 units (all featured numbered plaques). This 1986 Ducati 750 F1 Montjuich is Number '002' and is truly a remarkable example of the model.


1981 BMW Magni

Arturo Magni is perhaps best known for his work with competition models from MV Agusta. But following the close of MV, he set up shop for himself, and branched out. This 1981 BMW is claimed to be one of the fewer than 150 units ever created. It sits in unrestored condition, with an unbelievable 134 miles on the odometer. Far from mainstream - yet accessible via ample BMW parts and drive train knowledge - this 1981 BMW Magni looks to be quite the exotic conundrum.


1994 Bimota SB6

This list would not be complete without a streetable Bimota - which brings us to this beautiful SB6. One of the more affordable lots in this incredible auction, the SB6 features motive power courtesy of the Suzuki GSX-R1100. Displaying a sense of artistry while serving up performance, the SB6 was one of the most successful Bimota road machines. This 1994 Bimota SB6 shows a mere 9,900 km (about 6,100 miles) on the dials.


1982 Hesketh V1000

This 1982 Hesketh V1000 won the popular vote with the RSBFS staff; ultra rare, undeniably cool, and a meteoric failure. The good Lord Hesketh set out to build his own brand of sporting motorcycles in the vein of Vincent, but his lavish lifestyle, failing Formula 1 team and other poor investments drained any capital and doomed this noble project. While Hesketh did launch the brand starting in 1980, from 1984 onwards it has sought suitors and investment to stay afloat (both Cagiva and Triumph were purportedly intersted, but passed). With only about 130 V1000 models created (and another 40-50 of the ultra rare "Vampire" sport tourer), this 1982 Hesketh V1000 remains an interesting yet obscure model for collectors.


This Bonhams Autumn Stafford Sale auction has so much more to offer, so be sure and review the full listing on the Bonhams website. Here are a few teasers of what you might find.