Author Archives: Mike

Yamaha September 22, 2017 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

OK folks - time to pay attention. Often referred to as the Holy Grail of collectable sportbikes, the OW01 is Yamaha's homologation equivalent to Honda's RC30. Both were created in order to go Superbike racing, were made in limited numbers and offer the very best possible equipment for the time. Both are eminently valuable, and continue to appreciate with each passing year. Of the two, we see the Yamaha less frequently.

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01

The FZR750R OW01 was built to go WSB racing - period. One look at the dry-break rapid refueling ready tank should tell you that. The fact that the OW01 has lights and other DOT niceties was merely a means to an end. Unlike a typical street bike, the OW01 was an uncompromising race bike, built in just enough numbers to meet WSB homologation rules. But buyers didn't purchase these bikes for commuting or sport touring; these were privateer race bikes and collector items from Day 1.

The motor consisted of the now familiar 20-valve Genesis head (3 on the intake, 2 for exhaust), but was in a much higher state of tune. Ports were hand finished. High compression, short-skirt pistons with only two rings (reduces friction at the expense of oil consumption) were connected to titanium rods and a lightened crank to reduce rotational weight. Ram air fed carbs of the flat-slide variety; better for high-RPM and full throttle power, but relatively awful for road use. An effective EXUP exhaust valve maximized available torque. All told, you are looking at 120 HP and a 14,000 RPM redline. Put it all together and you have a fantastic race motor, but a peaky and tempermental unit for the street. Maintenance intervals followed that of a race bike.

An the chassis side, the twin spar frame was developed as a derivative of the FZ750R, but utilized higher-quality materials and alloys. Suspension was the very best Ohlins had to offer, including a remotely adjustable rear shock acting on a bespoke swing arm with adjustable pivot points. This was all driven via a close-ratio six speed box. Brakes are huge, and squeezed by Nissin calipers. The riding position is what you would expect for a track bike. The bodywork is thin, lightweight, and seating consists of a thin layer of foam. The rest is sprinkled with titanium, magnesium and other unobtainium materials. The OW01 is a technological tour de force of performance and rarity.

From the seller:
Up for you consideration is a beautiful 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 with only 5039 kilometers (3131 miles). Bike is in mint condition, this OW01 looks gorgeous but if you want to put it under a magnifying glass, there are few light surface cracks in the clear coat on the left side rear cowling below the seat. There is a tiny crack and a chip in the paint on the right front side of the rear cowling that can only be seen from underneath the bike. Previous owner touched up a few handling marks with touch up paint. Lower fairing has been re sprayed and looks beautiful. All fairings are 100% genuine factory original. No dents or dings in the tank, exhaust looks perfect. Windscreen is crisp and there is no rust or corrosion. Previous owner took very good care of this bike. Lol, it was loved as a child. I just installed brand new Michelin pilots front and rear on newly powder coated wheels. Bike is a Japanese import and has been de-restricted for full horsepower. Bike runs flawless better than the day it was new. Other than the new igniter box, bike is completely stock original condition. Service just completed with new battery and engine fluids. This is a fantastic bike that won't disappoint.

As stated above, the FZR750R OW01 was built to go racing. And many of them did. That is what makes a low mileage, housebroken example such a rare beast. Today's FZR750R OW01 is not just a unicorn; a survivor in this condition is akin to an albino unicorn. The fact that it comes from a noted collector familiar to these pages only strengthens the story. No need to fear shady dealings from an unknown entity in your quest for the best; here is an authentic OW01 in fantastic condition situated in the US and looking for a new home.

Homologation race bikes from the 1980s and 1990s are in short supply and high demand. As a result all examples command a high price in today's market. However like all bikes you see on RSBFS, the best specimens fetch the highest prices. This example is very, very good indeed - and it is priced to sell. The seller is looking for $25,500 USD - and is open to offers. That is fair money for such a rare and desirable Yamaha homologation model, and is not likely to remain for long. Check it out here before it's gone. Good luck to the seller - and good luck to potential buyers as there is bound to be a lot of competition for this one!

MI

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01
Ducati September 22, 2017 posted by Mike

Less Popular Duck: 1992 Ducati 750SS

The 1990s were good for Ducati and Ducatsi alike. On the Superbike side, the 851 paved the way for the 888 and the amazing 916. But it was the offerings across the Super Sport line that really broadened the marque's appeal. Consider the original 900SS, augmented by the Super Light (SL), the Sport Production (SP), and the Cafe Racer (CR) in both full and half fairing versions. The CR model was further bifurcated into the 900SS and the 750SS. The latter is one of the most under rated motorcycles from Bologna - and quite limited in numbers (i.e. rare) in its own right.

1992 Ducati 750SS for sale on eBay

Essentially a 900SS CR model on a diet, the 750 SS offers the same visceral motoring experience as its bigger brother. Sure, it makes due with a few less cubic centimeters and a couple of fewer ponies (66 vs 84 HP), but the ride is essentially the same. It utilizes the same air cooled L-twin, spins its cams by rubber belts, and opens the valves in the same Desmo manner. By the numbers, the 750SS is nearly 20 pounds lighter with the remainder of the running gear and chassis being identical. The 750 model, as a result of its lighter weight and lower power numbers, achieves braking performance via a single disk up front. What you give up is approximately 3-4 tenths down the quarter mile, and about 10-12 mph of top speed. The rest is pure Ducati goodness in a more rare format.

From the seller:
1992 Ducati 750SS Great Shape, runs great just had carbs cleaned and new fork seals. Left side fairing has been repaired no decals have been replaced, right side fairing has some spiedering around bolt hole, scratches on left side exhaust a couple of small scratches where seat is rubbing see photos. over all bike is in great shape.

The Ducati Super Sport lineup is a popular one. Parts are plentiful, as is knowledge of how to service and maintain these machines. Because the 750SS is based on the 900, many parts are interchangeable. So popular was this model that in European markets there is also a 350cc, 400cc and 600cc model - which are all patterned after this 750SS. The Super Sport is the kind of motorcycle that has the bones to last; it may not be the fastest in a straight line, but with gobs of torque, a stiff chassis and willing suspension, a 750SS can motor very swiftly indeed.

Today's bike is the rare 750cc variant. The seller claims that it has a new left side fairing, and the exhaust has some scratches on the same side. That is pretty convincing evidence of a tip over - but does not necessarily mean a high speed off. This era Ducati has a spring-loaded kickstand that retracts as soon as the bike is picked up. Many bikes suffer inadvertent cosmetic damage in this manner, always on the left. It would not shock me to discover that this damage is minor and the result of the infamous self-retracting stand. Otherwise it looks to be in good shape, has reasonable miles (these bikes beg to be ridden), and is available for what feels like a song. You might wish to inquire as to the whereabouts of the original mirrors, however. This bike is not likely to appreciate any time soon, but it will always be appreciated; you would be hard pressed to find a more solid, long-term bike for your stable. Check it out here, and be sure and jump back to the Comments to share your thoughts. Have you ever been bitten by the wretched Ducati self-retracting stand? Let us know. Good Luck!!

MI

Less Popular Duck: 1992 Ducati 750SS
Honda September 19, 2017 posted by Mike

Classic 80s: 1983 Honda CB 1100F

For riders of a certain age, the CB1100F represents a significant moment in time. The last serious Honda sport bike to utilize air cooling, the CB1100F was part standard, part sport bike, and part sport touring machine. And while today each of those segments represents a different motorcycle, the CB1100F was the jack-of-all-trades bike to get them all done. It won AMA races. It beat Honda sales records. It did it all. And today, despite the fact that these were mass produced in a "stamp out as many as you can make while people are buyin' 'em" sort of way, 34 years later it is hard to find one that looks presentable, let alone in riding condition.

1983 Honda CB1100F Survivor for sale on eBay

The CB1100F owes it's roots to the CB900F. It's easy to tell them apart thanks to the bikini fairing on the bigger bike. But somehow the CB1100F was more than the mere sum of its parts - it was more than minor bodywork tweaks and a punch up above the liter mark. The CB1100F could hold its own against the big bikes of the day, yet had the requisite Honda quality of that time; here was a big sport bike that was reliable enough to commute on, comfortable enough to take for a weekend, and potent enough for Saturday morning rides in the canyons. This is a bike that stood out because it did everything well enough.

From the seller:
This is a reluctant sale of my 1983 Honda CB 1100F. A stunning collectable motorcycle that is going up in value. Most of the ones I have noticed have been modified or neglected. This has been garage kept all of it's life. I am the second owner. Title is clear in my name.

Color is a Maui Red and Pearl white. Carbs were recently done by Jack Wagner of Old School Carbs in San Jose, Ca. (Jay Leno uses hid service). He also rejetted with a Stage 1 Dynojet kit. The Tank is an OEM new tank I acquired that was still in the box. All the rest of the paint is excellent as well. New Avon Road Rider tires. The stock (junk) OEM starter clutch drive has been replace with a better unit. NEW Works performance shocks. The Black Chrome is in excellent condition throughout. This stock "Race Bred" version of the CB1100F was inspired by the likes of Superbike road racers like Freddie Spencer and Mike Baldwin. Think Laguna Seca, Seattle International Raceway, Sears Point, Willows!! How many summers do we have left?

16 valve smooth engine with 108 horse power. Fastest super bike in it's day and still surprises a few of the newer modern sport bikes. Over $2000 in receipts to make it turn key. Come with tool kit. Manual. Original Brochure. I have not seen a better version of the red and white CB1100F

When it comes to the massive production numbers of UJMs, there is relatively little value in collecting unless you can find a near-pristine example. Otherwise the cost to restore a ratty example back to new (or near new) condition can easily eclipse the value of the bike. Still, the prices for iconic machines from the 1980s are rising. The pretty CB1100F will continue to appreciate over time, but expect lower appreciation over a longer period of time than you would with a more popular and/or more rare model.

The seller has this listed in auction format with a Buy It Now. The opening ask for the auction is $4,900 with reserve in place. It is likely that the opening number will scare off many potential bidders. The BIN for this bike is a lofty $6,900. That is big money for a not very rare model, although as we have noted the condition does aide in the rarity consideration. Still, it is nice to see a preserved piece of history - especially when the model in question highlighted Honda's dominance of the period. Much would change in the following year, but for 1983 the Honda CB1100F was a key bike. Check it out here - and then be sure and jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on this beautiful F model. Did you have one? Good Luck!

MI

Suzuki September 13, 2017 posted by Mike

Mr T: 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo

Given the title, I'm sure you're looking for some "I pity the fool..." type of comments here, but you will get none from me. Although looking back some 34 years from the future - in a world where nearly every car (from econo box to sports car) is either turbocharged, supercharged or both - it feels like we have not come very far at all. And while every one of the Big Four offered a puffer-enhanced model in the early 1980s, each was a dismal failure in the showroom, despite the investment and technology. Take the 1983 Suzuki XN85: this 650cc sport bike was labeled as the best handling motorcycle of that year. But nothing ages faster than last year's model, and the heavy, expensive, complicated XN85 was quickly left behind.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo for sale on eBay

Looking back, the XN85 paved the way for more successful Suzuki models, such as the original GSX-R series. In fact, the air/oil cooling technology that enabled the GSX-R's light weight was pioneered on the XN85. What about the GP-inspired 16" front wheel? Today this is seen as an antiquated attempt to lessen gyroscopic forces and improve transition maneuverability, but given the chassis technology at the time it was effective. So, too, was the adjustable anti-dive fork and the single shock rear suspension - which was carried onto other sporting models. Computerized fuel injection was a necessity for the turbo application, but represented a giant leap forward in the day (despite the computer being roughly the size of a toaster). Today this technology is a given, but the DNA has deep roots and a long memory.

From the seller:
For sale is a 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo. Bike is original an survivor with only 07772.1 miles. Read item condition for specifics, look over the photos or email for any questions. Thanks for looking.

This one year only model looks to be in decent condition; no obvious missing pieces or major damage. It would have been nice for the seller to take a minute to wipe the bike down (or, gasp!, wash it) before taking pictures, but this is not the worst we have ever seen. The corrosion is pretty typical of the age; most of these models have some rash on the brake master and the aluminum forks. While it does detract from the aesthetics, it should not prevent the bike from being ridden. And Turbo bikes need to be ridden regularly. Otherwise critical seals become old and crack, waste gate actuators stick, and myriad other problems can develop.

The Suzuki XN85 is perhaps the rarest of the US-imported Turbo bikes. Suzuki did everything they could to deny its existence, and buyers boycotted the extreme price differential between the XN and a performance-comparable GS750. Today these are interesting milestones along the racetrack of development. They are unique, rare, and relatively affordable. Prices are on a very slow ascending curve, making this a collectable you can afford - and afford to ride. Parts are difficult to find (especially the computerized bits and the bodywork), but if you locate a good one there are few weaknesses in the overall package. Boost is slow to hit - and doesn't hit nearly as hard as say a CX650T or Turbo GPz - but the handling is sublime by 1980s standards. This particular bike is a true survivor. Check it out here, and get boosted. Good luck!!

MI

Mr T:  1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
Honda September 12, 2017 posted by Mike

Trophy Bike: 1986 Honda GB400

The cafe racer craze makes an appearance on a regular, cyclical basis. From the original cafe bikes "doing the ton" through sanctioned TT events such as the Isle of Man, the cafe racer evokes a rebel streak with a distinctly English flair. Sporting, brash, forward and yet somehow very basic, the cafe racer stirs your inner Mike Hailwood to life. And while authentic cafe racers are custom affairs, manufacturers such as Norton, Triumph, Royal Enfield, BSA and Vincent have all had a hand in producing models in this image. Honda, too, tried their hand at the cafe scene. The result was the "GB" series of Tourist Trophy-inspired bikes, including today's rare GB400.

Rare 1986 Honda GB400 for sale on eBay

The Honda GB was born from humble beginnings. Utilizing a necked-down XL600 thumper motor, the GB was made available in both 400cc and 500cc configurations. The stone-simple and reliable air-cooled single was augmented by a a solo seat (a dual-seat model was available), a TT-style fairing, and clip-on bars. Wire wheels and a requisite megaphone-style muffler gives it some element of English authenticity. Those sidecovers? Made of metal, just like back in the day. Technology intervened in the manner of electric start (a kickstarter is attached to be period correct) and a single disk brake up front. The rest is basic but effective. Like the SRX models from Yamaha, the GB was a throwback to the past, a nod to lightness and simplicity and a relative failure.

From the seller:
It took me forever to find one of these and due to something coming up I have to sell it. I'd planned to keep it for the rest of my life so this is truly a regretful sale.

I bought it with 5600km. It currently has less than 11,000km. I have meticulously looked after it. This is the work I've done to it:

Three oil and filter changes up to now. It is important to change the oil on these often.
New front and rear brakes
Cleaned carburetor
New Bridgestone Battlax BT45 tyres put on at 6000km - great tyres in the rain
Installed gold DID525 X-ring Chain and aftermarket rear sprocket at 6000km
the guy at the shop said the front sprocket was good enough to not need changing.
Aftermarket foot pegs (still have the original pegs that you can have)
Shaken valid until 2019 (only important if you are buying in Japan)

I also have an extra carburetor kit that can come with it if you ever need to clean the carb further down the line.

More from the seller:
I never use the electric start but it works fine. This is my daily driver, it kick starts every morning literally on the first kick, every time. Exceptionally reliable. It's really light, really forgiving, and fantastic for Japanese roads.

Never dropped, crashed or anything like that.

I think it had been sitting for a long time before I picked it up. There is some pitting on the engine block, handlebars and some faded paint behind the rocket cowl. Cosmetically I would say it is about 7/10.

Mechanically, it's a excellent. I don't know how to polish metal but I've always kept it clean. I have always parked it with a cover everyday and overnight. It also comes with the factory installed centre stand.

I have seen some online sell overseas for a lot more. These are rare and the value will only increase over time, especially ones like this with such low miles.

Available in Japan and export markets from 1985 - 1990 (and the US as a 500cc model in 1988-1990), the GB is a relatively rare machine. Sales were stronger in home markets and European pockets, but the US turned up its collective nose at this faux Brit bike. Today these are coveted machines for what they represent. This particular 400cc example was never seen in the US, and today resides in Japan where it was born. Check it out here if you are hankering for a reliable throwback - grab your pudding bowl and goggles and try for the ton. Good Luck!!

MI

Trophy Bike:  1986 Honda GB400
Bimota September 9, 2017 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: NOS 1992 Bimota Tesi 1D

Sept 9 Update: Due to some issues with eBay UK, the seller has relisted this rare Tesi 1D. Links updated. -MI

From the RSBFS International Desk comes this amazing New Old Stock (NOS) 1992 Bimota Tesi 1D. Created as a thesis for his Mechanical Engineering degree, Bimota Designer Pierluigi Marconi’s hub-steering Bimota TESI 1D was first launched in 1990. The bike was an instant sensation with a swing arm arrangement both front and rear, and an evolution of the DB1's all-enveloping bodywork. The Tesi also utilized Ducati motive power. Today's bike is the rare 904 SR version of the 1D, utilizing a factory-stroked Ducati 888 Superbike mill.

1992 Bimota Tesi 1D 904 SR for sale on eBay

The Tesi - like all Bimota designs - was based around a "function first" ideology. The goal of the strange front end was to isolate the braking forces from other suspension work (such as bumps). The end result is a bike that resists nosediving under hard braking, yet can still be compliant over bumps and road irregularities. The target was no different than what Honda attempted with their TRAC anti-dive front fork; the Tesi front swing arm was simply a different way to achieve it. Ultimately, Honda discovered that a conventional fork that was properly calibrated was more ideal than their TRAC trickery - and Bimota eventually came to the same conclusion. But today, the Tesi continues to conjure evocative imagery and remains a super-exclusive rarity by collector standards.

To find this NEW example (the term "museum quality" loses all luster when compared to this specimen) in this rare configuration available is unheard of - and unlikely to happen again. Coming out of a museum located in Germany, I'll let the seller pick up the tale on this rare find:

From the seller:
This 1992 Bimota Tesi is one of a handfull of bikes left from our collection which we have been dissolving this past year due to continued health related reasons which in turn require us to consolidate all our personal items and to scale back from multiple locations to just one.

Being able to own an original, genuine, brand new, never used Bimota Tesi 1D has got to be special for most serious collectors ; it being a 904SR, the rarest of all 412 Tesi versions ever build should make it an even more desirable and unique affair.

More from the seller:
New motorcycle, never ridden, never run, properly prepared for longterm display. Specifically ordered from the distributor without any fluids when new in 1992. Neither the hydraulic brake system front and rear, nor the cooling system nor the original battery have ever been filled with fluids. All mechanical components inside the engine are most likely still coated with assembly lube from the Ducati factory. The engine is filled with a light-weight oil to preserve internals, it has never been started or run. The 904SR was Bimotas first special version, build in only 20 units and based on the Ducati 888 engine, but with a longer stroke to come up to 904cc. It was the most powerful of all Tesi's in unrestricted tune and several of these 904's were used by very wealthy enthusiasts in racing series in Europe during the 90-ies

More from the seller:
This Bimota Tesi was kept in a climate controlled environment without UV light present, so there has been no deterioration of any rubber pieces and no discoloration of any painted or coated surfaces. Of course there is no oxidation present on any metal surfaces or fasteners. The protective yellow zinc plating on all
3 cast iron Brembo rotor surfaces is still present, the seat foam on the molded solo seat pad and backrest is still uncompressed. The tires mounted were specified to be racing tires when ordered new. Levers, grips, pegs, chain, sprockets as most everything else on this motorcycle are as new as they were in 1992.

More from the seller:
This Bimota comes with all the original ownership documents, the owners manual, the warranty booklet, copies of the parts manual and workshop manual and the original Tesi toolkit in duplicate. The original early Tesi rear stand, the one off custom front stand (for displaying the bike with both tires off the ground) both mph and km/h dash boards (km dash & computer packed up, mph dash with protective white film still underneath mounted in fairing) and two original Weber Marelli P7 ECU computers, one chip'd for regular street use and the other fully open P7 ECU chip'd for race use performance, are also included. Multiple other original spares come with the bike. Of course the red Bimota cover is present and in its correct Bimota bag, but has never been used.

More from the seller:
There are absolutely no guidelines as to what the value of this motorcycle might be in the current international market place. The Bimota Tesi was unique and different when it came onto the market in the early 1990-ies. With only 412 Tesi 1D (all street versions, across all production years, all displacements sans racing bikes and prototypes) build during the 1990-ies it is today probably one of the rarest collectible bikes anyone could own from that or any other period. It was the epitome of italian engineering at the time

Riding a Tesi is said to be far more conventional that it would appear; other than a relatively horrid turning radius, one cannot tell that there is anything different once underway. But I doubt this would be the bike to use to learn of that experience. A motorcycle can only be new once. It can only have zero miles once. If you are in the business of collecting, you look for the very best example you can find. When it comes to a 1D model Tesi, this absolutely has to be the most stunning, original bike we have ever seen. Values are so difficult to ascertain because we very rarely have real sales data for bikes in this condition. The seller has thrown out a rather large number as a starting point, but is open to considered counter offers. There are also a ton of pictures and even more detail on the auction page. Check out this perfect Tesi 1D here; you will not see another like it again. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: NOS 1992 Bimota Tesi 1D