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Author Archives: Mike

Moto Guzzi March 19, 2018 posted by Mike

Alternate Italian: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS

If asked to picture a red, Italian vee twin sportbike, the majority of the world would come up with a single marque: Ducati. But in truth the Italians have been rather prolific with their sporty scoots across dozens of manufacturers, even though some brands may not be household names here in the United States. And some, while once well known, have fallen to the march of progress and the downfall of insolvency. One of those surviving iconic Italian brands is Moto Guzzi - holding the title of the oldest motorcycle manufacturer in Europe still in continuous production. Now owned by Piaggio but allowed to operate quasi-independently, Moto Guzzi soldiers on with a handful of cruisers and V7 nostalgia bikes. However Guzzi once was known for sport bikes, and none highlight the brand better than today's Daytona RS.

1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS for sale on eBay

Based on the very (for Moto Guzzi) successful 1100 Sport model, the RS contained a few extra goodies in the horsepower and handling department. Like many other successful brands, Moto Guzzi marketed the RS as a premium model, selling the extra performance. Unlike the 1100 Sport, the RS featured new 4-valve cylinder heads and a bigger cam to help with higher RPM breathing. Modern EFI provided the fueling. Down below, a new lightened crankshaft was connected to a lighter flywheel, carillo rods and forged (rather than cast) pistons. Moto Guzzis have always been known to be robust motorcycles, and the venerable transverse vee arrangement readily accepted these updates without complaint. On the chassis side, the RS received uprated WP dampers front and rear along with 17" rubber front and rear. Tipping the scales at the same rate as the 1100 Sport (approx 488 lbs), the RS offered 12 HP and nearly 1,000 RPM more motive power along with handling refinements and a 240 KM/h top speed.

From the seller:
Daytona RS, very rare, only 34 to North America. I have had the bike for ~3 yrs in southern Arizona. Runs very strong, great looking with everything working. Mileage ~9000 as I continue to ride it on occasions. New cam belts, forks rebuilt, valves checked, tires good (Pirelli angel gt). Aftermarket exhaust, handlebars and Creedon chip.

From a performance standpoint, the big Guzzis were largely outclassed by Japanese precision. From a local perspective, Moto Guzzi found itself losing ground to the group from Bologna - to the point where Ducati dominated the Italian vee twin sporting scene. Ultimately grouped into the Battle of the Twins class against Beemers and Harleys, Moto Guzzi never quite made the transition to the modern sportbike era. But to damn the brand because it refused to enter the hyperactive world of "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" would be missing the point of this Dayton beast. With long legs, great sounds and fantastic looks, this Daytona RS is timeless and offers so much more than a fleeting performance benchmark. This is a classic steed that performs well enough to hold its head up high while enveloping the rider in a cloak of quality and mystique. This is a bike that riders look at knowingly and longingly; this is ultimate cool, personified.

This particular Daytona RS looks to be in pretty good shape. There is some wear evident in the rash on the triple clamps - it is minor and does not affect functionality, but somehow marks in this area always aggrivate me - and some slight damage to the left side rear tail section. Otherwise this appears to be an honest bike, and presents well. The mileage is sub 9,000, and from the seller's text maintenance and care was performed as one would expect. There are some extras in the form of upgraded Termi exhaust as well as a tuner chip controlling the EFI, enhancing power delivery as well as rideability. These RS models are rare and in demand in the small circle of Guzzi fans, so this one may not last long. The opening bid started out at a rock-bottom $1,000 (with reserve), and the BIN is a reasonable $11,500. Check it out here, and revel in the artistry of Italian chic. Good Luck!!

MI

Alternate Italian: 1997 Moto Guzzi Daytona RS
BMW March 14, 2018 posted by Mike

What could have been: 2009 BMW HP2 Sport

In 2008 BMW launched the ultimate boxer sport bike, the HP2 Sport. An offshoot of the stillborn GP racer project (which management wisely decided could not be competitive in a straight up fight), BMW instead released a no-compromise sporting twin of uber-exclusive status. Limited in numbers and impossibly expensive, the HP2 Sport was a brief, flashy prelude to the more conventional S1000RR. I've been eyeing this example for a bit, and decided it was finally time to share with RSBFS readers.

2008 BMW HP2 Sport ABS for sale on eBay

The BMW HP2 Sport is a bit of a dichotomy. Long known as the gentleman's transport, BMWs staid reputation was based on longevity, quality and composure; out and out sporting intent was conspicuously missing. Incorporating all of the traditional elements of BMW - including the boxer twin and shaft drive - the HP2 Sport stretched the boundaries of what was possible. New cylinder head design opened up the airways with four valves, yet were shorter than older 2-valve assembly. That new dimension, bolted onto cylinders that were placed a bit higher on the bike, made for better cornering with less risk of touching down the heads during spirited cornering. Power was up - way up - with an estimated 130 HP on tap. While nothing compared to the following S1000RR's 200 ponies, this was a high water mark for a factory boxer. Top level brakes (Brembo) and suspension (Ohlins) complimented the package, along with a generous sprinkling of carbon fiber. Test riders universally liked the HP2 Sport, outside of the price tag and the limitations of the boxer packaging. By 2012 the HP2 Sport faded into the sunset, and with it the future of the boxer as a serious sporting platform.

From the seller:
For the BMW Motorrad enthusiast - a 2009 BMW HP2 Sport ABS in absolutely pristine condition. Freshly serviced by A&S BMW in Sacramento, it's been fitted with a rare Fat Cat slipper clutch (with less than 100 miles since installation). As used on the race versions, this Suter-designed clutch is the final piece that transforms the torquey HP2 into a fluid track day or backroad delight. Very few HP2 Sports have been equipped with one as they are hard to find (this one came from England) expensive to buy and install, but worth every penny on a big-bore high performance twin like the HP2.

This motorcycle has been garaged, covered, and impeccably maintained since new. Never dropped or down and in perfect mechanical and cosmetic condition. BMW made an iconic engineering statement with the HP2 Sport by building a very limited production, hand crafted "factory special" featuring DOHC radial valve heads, exotic internals and carbon fiber bodywork from an F1 constructor (signed by the technician who built each piece). The result was the highest performance BMW boxer twin ever made (136bhp), featuring sublime handling, ABS brakes, a factory-installed quick shifter and the first carbon fiber subframe on a production motorcycle. This bike sparkles with carbon fiber valve covers and tail light assembly, milled-from-billet foot controls/clip-ons/upper triple clamps, Motek MotoGP-style instrumentation (with programmable displays and lap timers), Magura levers, forged aluminum wheels, BMW's patented telelever/paralever front/rear suspension with fully adjustable Ohlins shocks and Brembo radial-mount monoblock calipers. The best components available were used in constructing these machines.

More from the seller:
Approximately 230 HP2 Sports were imported into the US (BMW kept the actual number confidential) and they will never make another Boxer like this one. A blue-chip collectible motorcycle that's a revelation to ride - it represents the ultimate evolution of the classic air/oil cooled BMW boxer motor, wrapped in bespoke carbon bodywork and mated to a lightweight chassis with world-class components. Understandably, it draws a crowd wherever it goes. The track stand (pictured) is also included. Original MSRP was nearly $27,000, and prices for exceptional examples like this now are on the rise.

The HP2 Sport was available as a base model, or with ABS. The option list was short, with both models benefitting from the same excellent componentry throughout. Price wise, this was a $25k+ motorcycle in 2008 - which was a princely sum. Prices for used models have slowly dropped as they infiltrate into the secondhand market, but overall the valuation of these bikes has persisted. What we are likely seeing is the common pricing dip prior to an eventual rise in overall values. This is a limited edition, very special model motorcycle that should present well for years to come. This is exactly the type of model that will appreciate in the future even if it was not as appreciated as a sport bike when first introducted. This particular model looks to be in very good condition, has a reasonable number of miles, and has been listed several times on eBay. The price point has slowly moved downwards since the first listing, making this example a good (possible bargain?) candidate. Bidding starts below $15k, which is in the range for the model. Check it out here, and if you're a BMW fan (airhead, oilhead, brick or inline) hit us up in the Comments and share your thoughts. Does the HP2 Sport push the right buttons for you? Good Luck!

MI

Ducati March 9, 2018 posted by Mike

Not The End? 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258

Touted as the end of the SuperSport era, the 900SS Final Edition of the venerable Ducati platform was both a beginning as well as an end. The last released model as designed by Massimo Tamburini, the FE was a numbered and exclusive marketing machine that represented the pinnacle of the air-cooled lineup. The next page of the new chapter of Ducati was written by a new character - the oft derided designer Pierre Terblanche - taking Ducati into new and interesting directions. The real sunset here is not the SuperSport lineup, but rather Tamburini's influence on the design... and ultimately Tamburini's effect on the platform. Today's example is #258 of the purported final 300 bikes targeting North America.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258 for sale on eBay

The second generation of the SuperSport platform rolled into the showrooms way back in 1988. With an updated Pantah-based motor, air cooled desmodue twin was a rough gem - it contained all of the basic DNA that you would want in a sport bike, with few of the amenities or polish found in Japanese contemporaries. The SS had style with a trellis frame, basic but good suspension, and a bit of Italian flair that made it unique. Ten years on the platform had aged relatively well, although performance would never be on par with 600s from the East. Carburetors fell by the wayside as fuel injection made an appearance (likely more for EPA reasons than for power or perceived performance). And while 10 years is a lifetime for a model, the bones of the SuperSport were so good that to this day these remain well-sorted motorcycles. Not the fastest, but characteristically Ducati.

From the seller:
have a 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258 for sale. Bike has 4180 miles on it. Had been in storage for last 11 years. New cam belts, valves checked, oil changed, new air filter, carbs completely rebuilt, new fuel filter, strainer and tank hoses, new Michelin power pilot tires, forks rebuilt with new oil and seals. New brake fluid and clutch slave cylinder rebuilt with new piston assembly. Inside of gas tank is rust free. No cracks in frame or aluminum swing arm. Bike starts and runs good up high but has a hesitation between 2000 and 4000 rpm that I can't figure out. A couple of hours with a Ducati mechanic and it should be good to go. Nearest one to me is 5 hours away so it's not an option otherwise it would be done. Bike did fall over in the garage on left side and has a small ding in front of tank, scuff on lower fairing and small crack in lower fairing where support bar holds it. Also has a section on bottom back of left fairing where battery leaked from the hose and removed the paint, which has been poorly touched up. I believe the fairings were repainted at some point as they appear to be a lighter shade of silver than the headlight surround.

Outside of unique silver paint and a limited edition number riveted to the headstock, there is not too much more to a FE than a one year earlier 900 SuperSport. Still, the Boys from Bologna executed well; the majority of limited edition models pull in higher dollars than standard models at auction. We have seen a few FE models past through these pages, and they always raise some interest. This particular example is not exactly a museum piece, but it looks to be an honest specimen with relatively few miles. It would appear that the owner has done a lot of work on this one, which could be a bonus if all checks out. This buyer is looking for $6,000 in a Buy It Now auction format, which could end up being fair money depending on the ultimate condition of the bike. Check it out here and relive the glory of Tamburini's classic design. Good Luck!!

MI

Not The End? 1998 Ducati 900SS FE #258
Sales Report March 4, 2018 posted by Mike

Sales Summary – December 2017

The final month of the calendar year brought with it weather for some parts of the country, but that did not freeze up the supply of great bikes. Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let's take a look back at December 2017 and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


2001 Bimota V-Due Evoluzione Corsa - SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


1996 Buell S1 Lightning - SOLD for $7,000


1998 Ducati 900SS FE - SOLD for $9,995


1986 Honda VF1000R - SOLD as a Featured Listing for $5,000!


1980 Kawasaki Z1R - SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


1999 Suzuki Hayabusa - SOLD for $5,700!


1993 Yamaha TZR250RS - SOLD for $8,301!


Unsold Bikes


2001 Aprilia RSV Mille R - No sale with bids up to $3,716


1988 Bimota YB4 Race Bike - No sale with bids up to $6,455


1992 Bimota Tesi 1D - No sale at $65,000


1995 Bimota SB6 - No sale at $24,900


2009 Bimota DB7 - No sale at $26,000


Ex-Anthony Gobert Bimota SB8K - Listed as no sale with bids up to $20,100


2007 BMW K1200R Sport - No sale at $12,999


1978 NCR-Ducati 900SS - No sale at $39,000


2000 Ducati 996S - Listing ended early


2006 Ducati PS1000 LE - No sale at $13,490


1986 Honda NS400R - listed ended early


1988 Honda CBR250R - Zero bids at $3,995 opening ask


1992 Honda VFR400R - No sale at $9,500


1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 - No sale with bids up to $6,599


1978 Kawasaki KZ1000 Z1R - No sale with bids up to $14,000


2011 KTM RC8R - No sale at $10,900


Suzuki Carbon Katana Resto-Mod - No sale with bids up to $18,500


Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 - No sale at $120,000


1991 Suzuki RGV250 - Listing ended early


1993 Suzuki GSXR400 - Listing ended early


1995 Suzuki RGV250 - listing ended early


2003 Triumph Speed Four - No sale with bids up to $1,175


1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No sale at $25,000


1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No sale with bids up to $15,200


1985 Yamaha RZ500 - No sale with bids up to $13,300


1987 Yamaha FZ600 - No sale with bids up to $3,150


1993 Yamaha GTS1000 - Zero bids with a $6,000 opening ask


2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE - No sale at $18,600

Benelli February 28, 2018 posted by Mike

Oh Sei can you see? Two Benelli SEI 750s on eBay

In striving to bring readers the best online classifieds every day, RSBFS writers are besieged by drought and deluge. Some rare machines might not be seen for months or more, only to arrive in pairs. Such is the case with today's 12-cylinder post; not one but two awesome Benelli 750cc six cylinder examples for your enjoyment. Widely known (pun intended) as the World's First production six cylinder motorcycle (despite the later attempts by Honda, Kawasaki and BMW), the Benelli was a technical and stylistic tour de force. Engineered by none other than Alejandro de Tomaso of Pantara fame (the sports car, not the band), the Sei persisted for more than 15 years until the ultimate merger of Benelli into Moto Guzzi. Interested in one of these ground-breaking machines? Read on!


1977 Benelli Sei 750 for sale on eBay

The first of the 750 Benelli Sei models were introduced way back in 1973. While Honda was busy wowing the world with their four-cylinder technological might, de Tomaso sought to one-up the Japanese by tacking two extra cylinders onto a copy of the Honda power plant. With that move, a 500cc four became a 750cc six - and history was made.

To keep the already portly engine block from becoming too unwieldy, de Tomaso re-positioned the alternator from the end of the crank (where it sat on the Honda) to behind the cylinders. This move not only narrowed the ultimate width of the engine, it also started a trend to centralize mass within the frame; a discipline followed to this day. Total power was not tremendous - rated HP was a mere 72 ponies.

From the seller:
Up for sale is this extremely rare 1977 Benelli 750 “Sei” (Italian for “six” – not “sex”!), one of the three vintage six cylinder bikes ever made. It is an un-restored original in excellent condition, With a clear title and only 10,463 miles, (16.742 Kilometers) this is one of the nicest survivors of only a thousand 750 Seis imported into the US from 1974 to 1978. And it’s a “rider,” not a trailer queen: driven once every month or two, and only in clear weather – has never been in the rain, nor been dropped or scraped. Only cosmetic flaw is a tiny chip on the tank.

In the year 1977 only 283, 750 Sei were made, making this year a very rare one. Breaks got a tune up and work just as well as a modern bike, all switches and gauges work as they should, gas tank received a coat treatment to prevent rust, it has new air filters, recently got carburetor tune up. This bike only has a small dent on one of the exhausts and very small paint chips on the gas tank(please see pictures).

I will include some spare parts, a copy of the owners manual, a copy of the shop manual, as well as a copy of the spare parts manual. Some magazines in which the bike was featured at that time. Previous owner kept this motorcycle in a museum. This motorcycle is only missing the tool kit and the rubber strap that holds the gas tank.

This particular 1977 example appears to be in great shape. Benellis of this era were not exactly known for robust reliability, so it is actually a huge benefit that this is a regular rider. Nothing ages a motorcycle like stagnation, and this one has thus far avoided the neglect that many of these complex machines have suffered. Check it out here, but be sure to bring lots of Lire - the starting bid for this one is a cool $19,000.


1979 Benelli Sei 750 with ZERO miles for sale on eBay

The Benelli Sei is as much an exercise in excess as anything you are likely to see. The frame is dominated by the huge engine and offset by six exhaust pipes. Nothing on this bike is subtle, nor was it meant to be. The visceral elements of the Sei were created by famed Carrozzeria Ghia (think of the VW Karmann Ghia or the Ferrari 212), the bodywork as striking as the mechanical elements. Benelli - under the guidance of de Tomaso - was going to make a statement: the Italians were the equal of Japanese technology and held all the cards in the styling department. At the end of the day, they surely succeeded.

Today the Sei continues to be more distinctive than anything short of a one-off, overwrought custom cruiser. To consider that this was a production model for sale publicly throughout the 1970s and 1980s is unbelievable. It is also pretty rare. Sei models were considerably more expensive than mass-produced counterparts; the dealer network was smaller than Japanese, German, or even other Italian marques.

From the seller:
1979 Benelli 750 Sei. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to buy a zero mile... yes , zero mile motorcycle. Here is the story as I was told when I bought it. This motorcycle was purchased new by a Florida collector, who at the time of his death (about 2 years ago) was 82 years old. The previous owner had amassed over 300 motorcycles, many of them being rare, high ticket items.

His widow sold 70% of his collection to a German collector, as a package deal. I managed to get a few of his other bikes, two of which were Benelli 750 Sei zero mile bikes. This collector, as described by his brother, was extremely eccentric, and not particular about the absolute care, and method of storage for his motorcycles. Consequently, although a zero miler, it does display various imperfections which are visible in the photos. Please feel free to contact me and we can do a video walk through closeup of the specifics. Included with the sale are, the original toolkit and manual.

1977 is listed as the final production year of the 750 model; the 900cc replacement version of the Sei entered as a 1978 model. However it is not uncommon for model year data to be based on the sale or registration of a given bike. It is also not uncommon for smaller European brands to have somewhat erratic record keeping, making exact determinations difficult. Regardless, this claimed ZERO mile example is certainly an albino of the Unicorn world. Low mileage specimens of low-volume production models will always perk the interest of collectors. There are lots of questions on this one - including the overall condition - but the seller seems open to answering them. Check it out here, and once again bring lots of Lire to the party: this one is $24,000 in a Buy It Now format, with the seller open to offers.


At the end of the 1980s Benelli was absorbed by Moto Guzzi. The name and rights were later sold to a Chinese company, and Benelli enjoyed a brief US revival in the early 2000s with the three cylinder Tornado and TNT models. Today Benelli - while still officially headquartered in Pesaro, Italy - is a Chinese company that partners with with DSK Group of India, producing smaller and middleweight motorcycles and scooters for those markets. There are Benelli imports into the US, but only officially through a third party (SSR Motorsports). The glory days of Benelli being a power house of style and technology are largely over. Better collect an old school example when you still can. Good Luck!!

MI

Oh Sei can you see? Two Benelli SEI 750s on eBay
Sales Report February 24, 2018 posted by Mike

Sales Summary – November 2017

The cooler months started the usual taper of available hardware, but there were still some strong offerings on hand. This must have been a record for homologation bikes (3 OW01 examples, two RC30s) in a single month! Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let's take a look back at November 2017 and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


2008 Aprilia RSV1000R Factory Race Bike - SOLD for $6,800!


2004 Ducati 998S FE - SOLD for $22,000


2007 Ducati Sport Classic 1000S - SOLD for $10,105


1986 Honda VFR700F - SOLD for $1,725


1987 Honda RC30 - SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


1989 Honda VTR250 Interceptor - SOLD for $2,499


1995 Honda RVF400R Restored by Speedwerks - SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R - SOLD for $17,500!

Unsold Bikes


1996 Aprilia RS250 - No sale at $9,500


2003 Aprilia Falco - No sale at $4,199


1983 Bimota SB4S - No sale at $22,142


1998 Bimota V-Due - No sale at $24,394


2018 BMW HP4 Race - No sale at $78,495


2002 Ducati 998S Troy Bayliss Edition - Listing ended with a $15,000 ask


2000 Ducati MH900e Prototype - No sale at $50,000


2006 Ducati PS1000LE - No sale for $29,500


2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE racer - No sale at $44,995


1988 Honda CBR400RR - No sale with bids up to GBP 1,400.00


1989 Honda VFR750 RC30 - No sale at GBP 35,000


1991 Honda RS125 - No sale at $5,999


1992 Honda CBR400RR NC29 - No sale at $9,500


1992 Honda NR - No sale at $79,453


1998 Honda RS250R - No sale at $12,660


2002 Honda NSR 150 SP - No sale at $9,100


1996 Kawasaki ZX-7R - No sale at $2,900


Two Kawasaki ZX7RR Muzzy Raptors - No sale at $39,995


2010 KTM RC8R 1190 - No sale at $8,999


1998 Laverda 750SF/Formula - no sale (pricing data not available)


2006 MV Agusta Brutale 910S - No sale at $9,500


2013 MV Agusta F3 SuperSport Race Bike - No sale at $8,140


2008 Suzuki B-King - No sale at $5,499


Toni Elias Suzuki GSX-R1000 Factory Yoshimura Superbike (MotoAmerica) - No sale at $25,085


1984 Yamaha RZV500R - No sale at $19,000 (relisted)


1987 Yamaha FZ700 - No sale at $3,600


1989 Yamaha OW-01 - No sale at GBP 14,950


1989 Yamaha OW-01 - No sale at GBP 16,495


1989 Yamaha FZR750RR OW01 - No sale at $26,500 as listing ended early


1994 Yamaha FZR400RR SP - No sale at $10,500