Author Archives: Marty

Full Name: Marty G Website:
Info: owner, zanemoto zane laverda nutter, currently owning more than I should bit of a collector too
Bimota August 9, 2017 posted by Marty

Unobtanium alert: 2008 Bimota 3D Carbonio

Here's one that meets all the major RSBFS criteria, a 2008 Bimota Tesi 3D in the rare carbon bodywork.  Enjoy!

2008 Bimota Tesi 3D Carbino on eBay

Ah the Bimota Tesi 3d...an evolution of an idea that began in 1991 with the 1D, continued with the 2D/Vyrus in 2005 and then reached its final form in the 3D in 2007.  The original Tesi was the work of Bimota founder and legendary designer Massimo Tamburini, the same person responsible for the Ducati 916 and MV Agusta F4 and a tesi is probably on every rare sport bike collectors "bucket list".

While the 3D certainly looks the business, in typical Bimota fashion the result didn't quite quite live up to the promise of the design concept.   It wasn't a major failure like the V-Due, but most reviews expressed a sentiment of it not being all that it could have been in large part due to the power limit of a 95 bhp Ducati engine.  Reviewers also noted a lack of front end feel which was no doubt due to the hub-centered front fork design.  But on the plus side, the same fork system offered improved braking due to no front-end dive and it still looks amazingly cool.

The seller indicates this is one of 29 Tesi 3D units.  While experience has taught us that any official production number information from Bimota should be taken as  leap of faith (cough-VDue-cough-SB6-cough) the Tesi is certainly something you don't tend to see at bike night.  Oh, and one additional note -  from what I understand, the carbon-skinned bodywork makes this a much rarer model.

This low mileage of this particular Bimota Tesi 3D seems to indicate it was a bit of a toy for the current owner.  As for condition, the seller indicates the standard Ducati belt service has not been done, the brake fluid looks dark and no mention is made of tire age so I am thinking this one has been standing for a while.   The seller does mention oil changes in the questions section of the ebay listing but overall I would expect to spend $1000 to put it back on the road and a few more thousand if the intent is to make it a concours-level machine.

Here is a recap of the info provided in the eBay post:

  • Mileage 4,355
  • Due for a timing belt/ inspection replacement
  • Has Zard carbon fiber slip-on's with the stock exhaust included
  • Last serviced in 2010 by Rockwell Cycles (dealer bike was purchased from) at approximately 2,500 miles.
  • I have personally changed the oil and filter several times since the initial dealer servicing.
  • Excellent condition except for small cracks in -pain at fuel tank fill (see photos).  Other than the paint crack near the tank it needs no other work and is basically a new motorcycle.

So let's just to the big question - is this bit of carbon skinned Italian goodness worth the current $30,000 USD Buy-It-Now asking price?   Well lets look at the positives and the negatives

  • Positives -  the Tesi 3D is probably the ultimate iteration of the hub-centered philosophy and given its low production number, this one will likely hold its value.  Also this is the carbon edition of which suposedly very few were produced and for collectors of factory offered carbon-skinned Italian exotics of this era, this is right up there with the Aprilia Nera, Benelli Tornado Tre and Ducati MH900e.
  • Negatives - the asking price is well above what we have seen other carbon Bimota Tesi 3D's go for on RSBFS. Furthermore, if the intent is to buy it as an investment, bringing it back to concours-level condition will probably involve a few more thousand in cost.

I have to admit that I am a fan of the 3D Tesi but I prefer the non-carbon version as it seems to be a more dramatic presentation of the hub-centered technology.  This carbon skinned Tesi 3D seems like it will appeal most to either a collector focused on Bimota's, someone who is already familiar with the Tesi/Vyrus lineup, or an investment oriented collector who is willing to put it into dry storage for a bit.

One additional note - the seller indicates offers are being accepted but I wouldn't expect to see any serious reduction from the asking price simply because even though its almost 10 years old, its still a damn cool bike.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Unobtanium alert:  2008 Bimota 3D Carbonio
Ducati August 5, 2017 posted by Marty

Ready-to-ride redhead: 1997 Ducati 916 Strada

Here is a Ducati 916 that is in good condition but probably won't appreciate in value as a collectors item.  It fact, it seems more likely this lovely redhead would be a fun acquisition for someone who missed out on the 916/996/998 experience or perhaps a way for a prior 916 owner to relive a bit of their youth.

1997 Ducati 916 Strada on ebay

There have been numerous previous posts on RSBFS that have explored the impact the 916 had on motorcycling, both when it was launched in 1994 and the subsequent SP, SPS, 996 and 998 models.  Rather than repeat this info again, I would suggest anyone who is curious click the link above and browse these past posts, leaving the remainder of this post as an analysis of this particular 916, focusing on the model, components, conditions, service history and best guess at a price.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

MODEL:
This listing appears to be for a standard 1997 strada/"street" version and not the higher end SP, despite the white tail piece.  For anyone not familiar with the differences between the two models, the strada was the base/street version while the SP was the more track oriented edition.   All 916's offered incredibly well balanced handling compared to the competition of the day but none had great power below 5000 rpm and only really started to get "on the boil" @ around 7000 rpm.  The SP (and susequent SPS) were much more track oriented machines with more powerful engines and track componenets but were actually worse on the street than the strada due to their engine setup;  the SP/SPS didn't really exceed the performance of the strada until you got them over 8000 rpm which made them much harder to ride on the street.

Summary:  Good way to experience the 916.  Not as collectible as a SP or SPS but easier to live with if the intent is to ride it on the street. 

COMPONENTS:
While the 916 was by design one of the finest handling machines of its time, two areas that came up as points of improvement where the rear suspension and the brake lines.   This particular 916 appears to be equipped with an Ohlin's rear shock which is good because it  was a big improvement over the standard Showa unit and helped to improve the ride quite a bit.  However the seller does not make any mention of the brake lines which were upgraded to braided steel in later versions so this might a question mark for this bike.

SUMMARY:  Looks good but might need to spend a few dollars to upgrade the brake lines.  Come to think of it, a full brake refresh would be a good idea.

CONDITION:
Mileage is shown as 13626 miles which is less than 1000 a year, although I would be the majority of that came more than 10 years ago. The seller does note some scuffs and a few cracks but I don't see any evidence of the bike having been down and replacements are available via ebay.   Parts look to be mostly OEM with the exception of the exhaust, the SP style rear fairing and perhaps a tail tidy/license plate unit.

SUMMARY:
If not having perfect bodywork bothers you, prepare to spend money or look for a different bike.  Overall nothing that looks to impact performance.

SERVICE:
The seller indicates fresh rubber and belts which has is good but also mentions a new clutch which might be an indication of more serious problems. The only issue I saw as the color of the fluid in the front brake fluid reservoir, although that might just be due to the lighting in the picture.

Here is what the seller has to say.

  • 12 k service done, new cam belt and plugs
  • new clutch EVR 12 tooth housing and plates.
  • new fuel pump
  • new Michelin Pilot tires
  • new factory air filters
  • New fuel tank release valves  
  • Recall 99v-360 rear axle spindle replacement done
  • Services done at Ducati dealer (have invoices) at 11,500 miles

SUMMARY:   Sounds good but a few questions, also it would be good to see the receipts.

PRICE:
As stated at the beginning of this post, given the year, model and condition this 916 is probably going to appeal more to someone who wants to ride it than to a collector.  Recent prices for these have ranged from $4,000 USD to $6,500 USD, although an under 2000 mile first year unit went for almost $19,000.   Based on the condition of this one, I would expect a price smack in the middle and this seems to be born out by the current bidding which is just a smidge under $5,000 USD with 3 days to go.

FINAL ANALYSIS:

I think this is a good opportunity for someone who never got to experience the Ducati 916 to see what all the fuss was about.  It could also be a fun toy for a somewhat older rider to relive a bit of their youth.   While it won't appreciate in value dramatically, it will probably hold its current value at least which is a a tribute to Massimo Tamburini's design.  And yes, it still looks great so bringing it to bike night will still be fun...not many 20 year old bikes that can be said about.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Ready-to-ride redhead:  1997 Ducati 916 Strada
Ducati July 4, 2017 posted by Marty

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS

The 1975 Ducati 900SS is something every serious collector has on their list and given that 1975 production was less than 250 units, today's post is quite an occasion.  This nice but not pristine version is located in Manhattan Beach, California USA but I wouldn't be a bit surprised to see it go to an international sale.

1975 Ducati 900SS For Sale on eBay

To understand the significance of this bike and why it is so prized, you need to look back to 1970 when the top level GP racing class was pretty much a battle between MV Agusta (with legendary rider Agostini) and Japanese two-strokes.  Ducati had left racing over 10 years earlier due to budget constraints but was now flush with new backing and had a new series of larger displacement machines under development.  In 1970 the company decided it would be going back to the track, in part to help increase visibility to their new machines but also to help in development.

Ducati hit the track in 1970 with a new 500cc L-twin engine with two-valve desmo heads but the new machines were still no match for the then dominant Agostini and MV Agusta.   In 1972 Ducati announced a new 750cc machine that incorporated the lessons learned over the last 2 seasons along with special racetrack-oriented cams, twin spark plugs, 40mm Dell’Orto carbs and billet connecting rods.  Other top shelf bits included Marzocchi forks and triple-disc brakes.

The new 750cc machine was set to debut at Imola on April 23, 1972.   Did it work?  Well, here is what happened when GP rider Paul Smart (yes, THAT Paul Smart) took the new Ducati out for qualifying:

"On the last lap I wound it up as fast as I felt comfortable.  I wasn't going completely flat out because it was basically just a safety-wired street bike..it still had the Dunlop TT100 street tires and even still had the centerstand lugs in place.   When I brought the bike back to the pits all the Ducati mechanics were jumping up and down...it turns out I had just broken Ago's track record.”

 

The new Duc actually finished 1-2 at Imola and the public immediately clamored for a 750ss for the street.  At the end of the 1972 season Ducati promised to make replicas of the Imola winning machine available to the public but  Ducati was still a small manufacturer so this didn't actually happen until 1974.  During this 2 year period the Japanese were undergoing a crash course in development and quickly catching up to its European rivals so when Ducati finally delivered the promised Imola replica 750cc machines they also introduced a new 860cc machine, the 900 SuperSport/SS.   The new "big" Duc was essentially the 750 series machine with more power and fortunately for Ducati, this wasn't a case where more power upset the balance of the bike. The new 900ss was able to continue the performance success of the 750 for several years.  Consider this - it was on a 1978 900SS that a just-out-of-retirement 38 year old Mike Hailwood would ride to a legendary victory at the Isle of Mann TT.

Okay, we have covered the history and ties to famous racers like  Paul Smart and Mike Hailwood, but you may still be wondering why this bike is so high on so many collectors lists.  The answer is that not only is it a first year bike but it also had some unique to the year components    The 1975 edition actually had many of the same components as the the 750cc Imola race replicas.  These components were offered on the 900ss for the 1975 year only.

A quick comparison of the components for the 900ss model years is below as an example:

1975 900ss  1976 900ss
 Gas Tank  Fiberglass  Steel
 Carbs  40mm  32mm
 Exhausts  Conti Lafranconi
 Turn signals  No  Yes
 Shift  Right side  Left side

 

Simply put, for many Ducati fans and collectors the 1975 900ss is considered to be the closest you can get to the race bikes ridden by people like Smart and Hailwood.

One final factor to consider regarding the why the Ducati is so highly prized by collectors is the generally acceptance that the 750/900ss Ducati along with the Laverda 750SFC and the Norton Commando were the first modern "GP-bikes-with-lights and a horn."  You could even think of the Ducati as the progenitor of bikes such as the Ducati 888SP3 and Desmosedici.

Now as for this specific example, here is a summary of what the seller has to say

  • #214 of 246 produced in 1974
  • Has only 12,000 kilometers/roughly 7,500 original miles in its 42 year lifespan.
  • Brembo disc brakes front and rear with all new brake pads, front forks were rebuilt and new seals added.
  • DMC electronic ignition installed as well as new voltage regulator.
  • It is a 42 year old survivor and it has some imperfections. At some point in the past Ethanol cause the gas tank to leak. It also caused a "bubble like" line at the base of the gas tank. It has since been treated by GTL of Los Angeles and DOES NOT LEAK anymore. The leaks caused paint to come off the swingarm, and some other areas of the frame.  There are also, "blemishes" on both side covers and gas tank.  
  • Also, the right underside of the muffler is scraped and the left has some light scratches.

So then, what's this first year bit of Italian goodness going to cost?  A quick search of Classic Sport Bikes for sale  shows 1970's 900SS going for around $32,000 USD a few years ago, but those weren't first year bikes.  Bonhams had a pristine 1974 750cc version that went for about $50,000 USD a few years ago as well but that was in better condition and wasn't a 900SS.   I am thinking  this one is going to attract attention from serious collections and wouldn't be at all surprised to see this one go for between $45,000-60,000 USD right from the listing.

One final note- there is no Buy-It-Now option on this one.  While patience is a virtue for collectors, given the rarity of this bike I think someone is going to make the owner an offer they can't refuse/the chances of this one being relisted are low.  To put in simply, if this one is on a list for your collection you might want to move quick.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Post Script:  Happy Canada Day and 4th of July ya'll!!!

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS
Moto Guzzi June 18, 2017 posted by Marty

Not so fast: 2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 in Italy

2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 in Italy

Moto Guzzi is often thought as being a sort of italian Harley Davidson, probably because  both manufacturers have a defining configuration that has long formed the basis of its lineup and neither is really thought of as a sportbike manufacturer.  Moto Guzzi has even used this portrayal in its own marketing, telling would-be owners that a Moto Guzzi is a motorcycle for traditionalists/for people who think the journey is more important that the speed at which they get there.  But back in 2002 Moto Guzzi had just opened a new design center and the company tasked their designers to come up with new designs around existing hardware.  A team of designers led by Giuseppe Ghezzi & Bruni Saturno took up the task and the MGS-01 concept was the result, a V-twin powered sportbike that was unlike anything the company had produced previously or since.

The MGS-01, which stands for Moto Guzzi Sport number 1, was powered by a 1200+cc 8V engine featuring chrome cylinder walls (!!!!), cosworth triple ring racing pistons, nimonic valves and a special lubrication system that sprayed oil under the pistons.  The MGS-01 would also come with an all new six-speed gearbox with reinforced clutch,  an aluminium swingarm, Ohlins for the rear shock, Brembo brakes and OZ aluminium wheels.  All in all, a huge departure from the typical Guzzi offering of the time.

The embedded video below gives you an idea of what this big red beasty looks and sounds like (skip to the 1:50 mark for just the sound).

Sounds like it can't miss, right?  Sadly, no. The MGS-01 had the misfortune of arriving right when parent company Aprilia was going through some serious financial troubles.  It took until 2004 for the first MGS-01 corsa editions to actually roll off the production line and when the Aprilia group was sold to to Piaggo in 2005 the new owners quickly pulled the plug on what they determined to be an unprofitable "halo" model.  Production numbers are under some dispute but most agree no more than 150 were produced, with the final editions going out the factory door as 2006 models.

For anyone who is interested in reading a very good writeup of the entire MGS-01 effort, click here.

As for this particular MGS-01, mileage is 2460 so its barely broken in.  The current seller does not provide any detailed service info in the Ebay auction so we are forced to rely on the pics which there are a good quantity and quality of but ..uh oh...one of the pictures shows a receipt for a repaired valve and some engine work.  The receipt does indicates mileage of 0 at the time so perhaps it was a factory recall but it it is a concern along with why the paint appears to be flaking off the engine case, the fluid color and what appears to be some sort of fluid on the tires.

So should you consider this particular MGS-01?  Well on the negative side of the ledger is the previously mentioned valve service receipt and the fact that the MGS-01 was a one-off model that marked the end of production for 8V Guzzi racing engines which means that service and parts would be an ongoing concern.   I suppose if you are really interested you could contact a dealership about parts availability and also the current seller to inquire about the valve service (or try to contact the owner who had the valve work done).   Location is also an issue unless you are willing to pay for import.

On the positive side of the ledger the M GS-01 is probably the ultimate expression of Guzzi's being used as modern day racers....you can think of it as the ultimate Dr. John Whittner Daytona.  And given its limited production run of 150 units the MGS-01 seems destined to be a rare sportbike that will appreciate in value over time.

As for price, from what I have been able to find OEM price from a MGS-01 was about $37,000 but the few of these we have had on RSBFS have been priced at at least that.  I don't think I can give an estimate on this one due to the service history concerns but I will say that I wouldn't be surprised to see it go for right around the OEM price.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Not so fast:  2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 in Italy
Yamaha June 12, 2017 posted by Marty

80% of an OW01?: 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R

1996 Yamaha YZF-750R on ebay

Back in the mid-1990's the main way most sporbike fans learned about the latest and greatest developments was through a subscription to a motorcycling magazine.   For me, the magazine was Cycle and I can clearly remember reading discussions about the different development philosophies of each major Japanese manufacturer.   These philosophies are reprinted below (or at least as best I can remember them) and I think most people who are fans of sportbikes from this period will agree these are still accurate for the Japanese mid -1990's machines.

  • The Honda Philosophy-  Strong in engineering and build quality but would sometimes over-engineer or develop something without a proven market.  The model line was refreshed in a phased approach over time instead of all at once.  Styling could be bland/conservative.
  • The Kawasaki Philosophy-  Great engines but suspect braking.  Not really an innovator but decent build quality.  Not as extensive a model line as Honda or Suzuki.  As for styling...well I hope you like green.
  • The Suzuki Philosophy-   Seemed to have a "try-everything-and-see-what-works" mentality resulting in a confusing model lineup.  The lower part of the lineup would sometimes have bikes with lower component quality in order to meet a price point.  Styling varied widely based on the model.
  • The Yamaha Philosophy-  Similar to Honda with great engineers but build quality not quite as strong.   Timeframe for innovation was longer than Honda and seemed more along the lines of trying to improve on a proven/existing concept rather than being a true innovator.  Model lineups were mid-sized but fortunately major components were common across the model line.  Styling choices were hit-or-miss and could sometimes be eye bending (cough-Vance-and-Hines-edition-cough-Marty).

 

The philosophy review above is relevant to today's post, a 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R. While the YZF-750R was the base version of Yamaha's YZF 750 lineup and wasn't as exotic as it's lineup siblings, it still had the same basic design. Yamaha tuned the R to be good for both street riding and canyon carving and the R actually won the 1996 Sport Rider magazine bike of the year.. While it didn't sell in the same numbers as the Suzuki or Kawasaki 750cc machines, he R version still has a very active fan base as evidenced by the EXUP Worldwide forum.

Here is what the seller has to say about this particular 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R.

  • 12,202 miles
  • all original plastics & graphics
  • spotless stainless exhaust with functioning EXUP valve
  • original windshield, blinkers,rear plastic fender
  • No aluminum ever polished or chromed
  • Some new parts  include battery, rear rotor, all brake pads, chain & sprockets, oil & filter.
  • few tiny paint chips on bottom edge of tank & one crack in top of right mid fairing 


In case you are wondering what the YZF would be like to live with today, there's some good buying advice available on VisorDown here.  I also found a previous post on the RSBFS archives which a nice video of a test of a few older bikes with the Yamaha being one of them (embedded below)

So now we come to the question of the value of this mid-90's middleweight.  Well a close inspection of the pics show some wear and tear and the spelling errors in the ebay listing are a bit of a concern.  Also given its level of components and condition, its not really a bike that will be likely to appreciate over time.  

That being said, the current bid price is below $1600 which seems stupid low (although reserve has not been met). And even though the 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R is the lowest spec model of the 1996 Yamaha 750cc sportbike line, the Yamaha philosophy means that this is probably an opportunity to experience 75-80% of the performance of the legendary OW01 at a fraction of the cost. Perhaps this one is best suited for our more senior RSBFS readers to experience or relive a bit of the 1990's 750cc sportbike experience, someone who wants to finally experience a EXUP machine without a huge outlay of monies. And I would be willing to bet you won't see another one anytime soon at your next bike night.

Marty/Dallaslavowner

80% of an OW01?:  1996 Yamaha YZF-750R
Laverda May 30, 2017 posted by Marty

WAUW: Cor Dees Laverda collection for sale (Netherlands)

I know this listing has already been posted on the RSBFS Facebook page and on other sites such as laverdaforum.com but this opportunity is too unique to not deserve a post here on the RSBFS mothership site - Marty

Late spring is usually the busiest time for RSBFS as people bring their bikes out of storage and decide they need to "thin the herd" a bit. A good example is the recent listings from seller Whiteknuckle in Springville, Utah who has been offering quite a wide variety of makes, models and conditions.   But over in the Netherlands another collection is up for sale that is truly amazing, the Laverda collection assembled by Mr. Coor Dees.  Apparently after 30+ years of collection Dees has decided to hang it up and the entire collection/museum is now up for sale with over 80 Laverda's as well as a huge amount of memorabilia such as cutaways of engines.  Also includes is a massive photo archive that tells the story of the Laverda marque decade by decade.

Laverda Motorcycle Collection/Museum in the Netherlands

Dees dedication to the Laverda marque has produced possibly the finest long term collection of the north-Italian Laverda marque.  He collected everything related, even artifacts and old machinery showing the agricultural roots of Laverda and his close friendship with the Laverda family allowed him to purchase many of the bikes and associated memorabilia directly from the Laverda factory.  Now, after thirty years of collecting, he feels that it's finally time to hand over the keys to his amazing collection.

The full list of the bikes that will be included in the sale is available via the link above but below are some some highlights of the offered machines.

*Laverda Racing models*
1973 Laverda 750 Side sidecar racer - factory SFC engine
1975 Laverda 750 SFC 1976 Belgium Champion
1975 Laverda 1000 spaceframe works endurance racer
1975 Laverda 1200 Franz Laimböck Monocoque racer
1978 Laverda 500 Formula Mk2 - one of 75 - Laverda Cup

*Laverda Prototypes*
1971 Laverda 1000 Milano EICMA motorshow - prototype
1986 Laverda OR 600 Atlas prototype
1986 Laverda 668 Cruiser prototype
1989 Laverda 668 Hidalgo prototype
1989 Laverda 700 El Cid prototype

*Laverda 650 & 750*
1968 Laverda 650 production number 17 - May 1968
1971 Laverda 750 SF
1972 Laverda 750 SF
1973 Laverda 750 GTF
1973 Laverda 750 SF1
1974 Laverda 750 Polizia Allessandria police
1974 Laverda 750 SF2

*Laverda 1000 & 1200*
1974 Laverda 1000 3C
1977 Laverda 1000 3CL
1980 Laverda 1000 Jota 180
1981 Laverda 1000 RGS Executive panniers & fairing
1982 Laverda 1000 Jota 120
1982 Laverda 1200 TS
1983 Laverda 1000 RGA
1989 Laverda 1000 SFC wire wheels - 2000 km

*Laverda Zanè production*
1995 Laverda 650 I.E.
1997 Laverda 668 Diamante
1999 Laverda 750 Formula

I have to admit I am personally happy to see some Zanè-era models also included as well as some prototypes I have never even heard of.  Amazingly even the original Laverda entrance sign of the old Breganze factory will be included in the sale (200 kg and 4m long, it was in the Laverda factory between 1952 and 2000).

Now before you begin looking through your checkbook, there are a few caveats with this offering.  Though the complete collection is for sale, Mr. Dees will (for now) keep the most significant specimen of Laverda engineering: the legendary Laverda V6.  After eight years of determination Dees has indicated he has almost completed the restoration of the 1991 V6 racer back to its 24-hour endurance race trim.  Dees has also indicated he wishes to continue working on the original 90-degree 1000cc Vee-Six prototype which caused a sensation during its presentation at the 1977 Milano Motorcycle Exhibition.

While not having these bikes in the sales of collection might disuuad some prospective owners, Dees has stated that once these two (of three!) existing Laverda 1000 V-Six machines come up for sale, the new owner of the collection will be given the Right of First Offer to purchase both machines as well as the remaining factory V6 spares and technical drawings.

Another caveat of the sales is that the collection has to be maintained.  This could be by being included in a museum or exposed as part of a larger collection of motorcycles but Dees also wants the collection to be based somewhere where there is a strong Laverda community, ideally near the companies home of Breganze, Italy.  Lastly he wants the collection open to the public so it can be admired on a regular basis by visitors from across the world.

It seems safe to assume the sale price for this amazing collection will likely depend on how closely the new owner is able to satisfy Dees requirements.  While Dees has stated he is ready to sell his collection at a very reasonable price if the next owner is a real enthusiast who is willing to exhibit the collection for the next decades, it has been my experience that when a lifetime-effort collection like this is sold what typically happens is the collection is parsed with the highest-end/most notable pieces being added to a major collection (possibly being rotated) while other categories are eventually sold off to collectors more oriented towards those aspects.

Given the size of this collection and the caveats on the sale, I don't think this one will be going to a private collector.  Perhaps it can be acquired by one of the big museums in Italy such as the Museo Nazionale del Motociclo.  If by some chance it does end up in private hands all I can say is hopefully whomever acquires this amazing collection will at least meet the final caveat of keeping the collection open to the public so fans of the marque can continue to enjoy these Northern-Italian lovelies.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

WAUW:  Cor Dees Laverda collection for sale (Netherlands)