Monthly Archives: July 2014

Aprilia July 31, 2014 posted by

Function over Form: 1999 Aprilia RSV1000 Mille SP for Sale

The first-generation Aprilia RSV Mille  is a pug-ugly bike. There, I said it. The styling is bulbous and overwrought, with weird, gimmicky details and bits that don't really hang together.

Look, owners and fans can spare me the outraged comments: I really like these, and I'd take one over almost any Japanese sportbike you could name. I’d take “ugly but distinctive” over “pleasing but bland” all week long and twice on Sunday.

1999 Aprilia RSV Mille SP R Fairing

And the disjointed stealth-fighter design is certainly distinctive: there’s nothing else like it on the road and, in an era where the easiest way to tell bike brands apart is by what paint jobs they’re wearing, a defining corporate style is no small thing. But who cares what it looks like anyway? These things just flat work.

1999 Aprilia RSV Mille SP R Rear

At first glance, it looks very much like Aprilia simply stuffed a big v-twin into their pretty RS250’s frame. The bike was designed to compete directly on road and track against Ducati's 916, but Aprilia definitely did its own thing: no perfect primary balance 90° twin here. They went with a very compact 998cc 60° motor from Rotax for packaging, fitted with twin balance shafts to smooth things out.

1999 Aprilia RSV Mille SP Engine Detail

Someday, the styling may be considered classic, but for now the dated looks just mean that prices for these very capable machines are relatively low, considering the performance on tap. This one, however, isn't quite so affordable, and for good reason...

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Aprilia RSV Mille SP

This is a 1999 Aprilia RSV 1000 Mille SP (sport production) number 147 of 150. The Mille SP is one of the rarest Aprilias made, a 1000cc 60 degree V-twin Superbike. Just 150 were built, which was the minimum requirement for Aprilia to enter the Superbike World Championship.  Even fewer made it Stateside.

It’s a true homologation bike, not just a body work replica. Nearly every meaningful part is different from the standard Mille. The engine, built with input from Cosworth, has sand cast cases and a different bore and strike. The frame has adjustable engine position, steering head angle and swingarm pivot. Tuning by way of a race chip and not an ECU. The fairing is carbon-fibre. The exhaust is true duels with twin cans. The fuel tank is aluminum and the Öhlins suspension are fully adjustable.   Dry weight is 407lbs (about the same as a Ducati 996R and nearly 70lbs lighter than its sister Mille R.) Horsepower said to be near 150 with a reported top speed of 173.36 mph (versus 167.7 mph for the Mille R and 167.8 for the Ducati 996R).  As far as Aprilia goes, this is the one to have, the first year homologation entry. In 1999, Aprilia finished 6th. (Ducati was 1).

This Aprilia came out of a collection from California and has just 984 original miles. It comes with factory-correct DOT lightweight street wheels (magnesium wheels were not approved by DOT back then). The bike was just serviced by a certified race-proven tech at Eurosports in Coopersburg PA (an Aprilia dealer) and needs nothing.

I love that the SP actually has adjustable engine mounting points. Keep in mind that the SP is not simply a chip-tune and exhaust job. It is in fact a heavily revised, shorter-stroke version with significant input from Cosworth, as mentioned above.

1999 Aprilia RSV Mille SP Dash

Reliability for the RSV is generally better than equivalent Ducatis and service intervals less frequent. They’re also a bit roomier for larger riders, with a slightly more humane riding position. All-in-all, a funky alternative to folks not sold on Ducati hype, or those who believe that appearances are secondary to function.

Or for those who just love bikes with jagged, stealth fighter looks.

-tad

1999 Aprilia RSV Mille SP R Side Rear

Function over Form: 1999 Aprilia RSV1000 Mille SP for Sale
Yamaha July 30, 2014 posted by

Small Things In Small Packages: 1986 Yamaha FZR250

Looking to get into sportbikes, but thinking maybe a used GSX-R1000 is a bit much? And maybe a Ninja 250 looks and sounds a bit too cheap, and is maybe a bit too common? Well this rare little gem of a Yamaha FZR250 might just be the ticket!

1986 Yamaha FZ250 L Side

Made between 1986-1988 with a shrieking 250cc four-cylinder that redlined at 17,000 rpm and managed to punch out 45hp, this may have been small-displacement, but it offered very real performance. Later models were designated the FZR250R and got Yamaha’s EXUP valve. These were originally intended for the Japanese market only, but some of these have managed to find their way overseas.

1986 Yamaha FZ250 Clocks

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Yamaha FZR250 for Sale

This is a very rare 86 FZR250, probably only a handful in the states, and fewer with a CA title. Cosmetically it is not perfect, but mechanically is very solid, it has had a very thorough going through and it carburates beautifully and runs like a sewing machine. Recent oil change and coolant, and last week just did fork seals and fresh brake fluid front and rear.

Please look at the pictures closely and email or call with any questions. This is a rare Japanese model not imported in the states.

Major flaws are a poor paint job, small rip in pax seat, slightly faded switchgear and it is sporting older rubber. All of these things are easily sorted! You can buy cheap Chinese painted kits or spend a little time and money and make it very nice. This is an incredibly rare grey bike that needs a new home, and it is a bit out of place in my Honda collection.

Very original, will be an easy clean up and restore or even ride as is. Please check out the pics closely and let me know if you need more or of any other part of the bike not pictured.

This bike is not in perfect condition, but should clean up nicely. It's obviously been down on the left side at some point, but it looks like a decent new paint job on the fairings would get you close to where you'd want to be. The original listing does include some very clear, high-resolution images so you can get a good feel for what you’re getting into. And while you should always be careful with a grey-market bike, that CA title and registration goes a long way toward increasing buyer confidence concerning this machine.

1986 Yamaha FZ250 R Side Fairing

While 45hp may not sound like all that much, it’s also nothing to sneeze at and should allow for a rider to exploit all of the bike’s power with minimal fear of it biting back. It’s not a “starter bike” -- it’s a bike to learn about serious cornering, one you can grow into with time and experience, not simply use as a stepping stone to bigger bikes.

And experienced riders could keep this thing pinned basically all the time. As the saying goes: “It’s more fun to ride a slow bike fast than it is to ride a fast bike slow…”

1986 Yamaha FZ250 Dash

It is truly a shame that in the US, a 600cc supersport bike is considered a "learner". Sportbikes of any displacement are far from ideal bikes for beginners in the first place. Their tall silhouette allows for maximum lean on track, but makes it hard to put your feet down flat. They can be reasonably comfortable on the move, but you’re perched over the bars, feet tucked up under you, making them very awkward to maneuver at low speeds, and limited steering lock just makes things worse. And modern 600’s make well north of 100hp, power that no first-time rider should have access to, combined with handling far beyond what a new rider can exploit.

We're breeding generations of motorcyclists who have had the crutch of speed to hide very limited riding skills. Having been to a few bike nights frequented by the sportbike crowd, I can safely say the skill level of the Cephalopoda inexperius or Common Road Squid found all over the United States is very, very low. If they'd learned on something like this Yamaha FZR250 instead of Hayabusas, that might not be the case

-tad

1986 Yamaha FZ250 L Side Rear

Small Things In Small Packages: 1986 Yamaha FZR250
Ducati July 29, 2014 posted by

Featured Listing: A True Race Replica – 2008 Ducati Desmosedici

Update 8.27.14: I've been alerted that this bike is now sold. Thanks again for choosing a Featured Listing Ted! -dc

Introduced in 2008, Ducati's Desmosedici RR is perhaps the most collectable of modern Ducatis. Much more than just another WSB homologation-special or a tape-and-paint Repsol Honda, it’s a true race-replica sporting a genuine Moto GP V4, detuned slightly for road use.

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The Desmosedici [literally “Desmodromic Sixteen”] Racing Replica was based on Ducati’s moribund GP6 race bike and powered by a 989cc V4 making almost 200hp. Only 1500 were made and considering the price, it’s likely many of these have been cocooned in heated garages, displayed in living rooms, or packed away in unopened crates. Which is a real shame with top-shelf suspension, front and rear and a 200-section rear tire, this thing is the closest all but the very elite will ever get to riding a Moto GP motorcycle. A bike where you are the limiting factor.

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With a funky, catfish-like gaping air intake and bulbous fairings, it may not be the prettiest bike, but while Ducati could have designed a better-looking bike, that would be defeating the whole purpose of the exercise: a true replica of their GP machine, with some detuning for longevity and lights for road use. It was even fitted with an authentic 16.5” rear wheel. Make sure you budget for tires to fit that...

canvas

It does look purposeful, like nothing else on the road, and the thundering howl these make, especially with the new exhaust featured on this bike, will quickly erase any doubt about which bike just flashed past you down the main straight of whatever track you’re riding.

From the original listing on AutoMania: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

The motorcycle was purchased new from Moto Corsa in Portland, Oregon by Michael Czysz of MotoCzysz fame. He returned the bike to MC when it had just over 1.600 miles and a local buyer brought it home. 300 miles later, moving has cost him the use of garage space and the bike has to be sold. While in his tenure, the accessory full on Race Exhaust System was installed, requiring the accessory Carbon Fiber Body work, for a mere extra $7,500. New tires were installed and an oil change completed. The $1000 rear stand, cover and books all come with the bike along with the stock exhaust system and body work.

canvass

These were originally $70k, with people paying more than that speculating on increasing prices. But this hasn’t happened yet, and may not for some time. These seem to trade in the upper $40k’s right where this is priced, and that exhaust and bodywork make it that much tastier: the original exhaust exited through the top of the tail section, which is just plain weird. It also makes me wonder how Jason Statham’s girlfriend rode on the back during filming of The Expendables…

Fairly priced with less than two-thousand miles on the clock and desirable upgrades. If you’ve been looking to jump into the Desmo market, this may be your chance.

-tad

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Featured Listing:  A True Race Replica – 2008 Ducati Desmosedici
Honda July 28, 2014 posted by

1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 #257

1994 Honda RC45 for sale

Let's start Monday with a bang: a 1,400 mile Honda RC45 should do the trick! Described as stunning with minor wear from 20 years of light use. Noted as owned previously by a Japanese collector, it is presumably still in Japan though offered for worldwide consideration from sellers in New Zealand. The buy-it-now price is a $40k USD, which would place it at the upper end of the price range for an RC45 but it's Monday, we can dream!

dc

1994 Honda RC45 for sale on eBay

from the seller:

*** COLLECTABLE HONDA RVF750R RC45 - FRAME 257 ***

Following the terrific success of the RC30 in the World Superbike Series, HRC was under pressure to produce a viable successor and the RC45 was born. After the iconic NR750, the RC45 is often noted as the most collectable Honda due to its relative rarity. John Kocinski won the 1997 World Superbike Championship on an RC45, followed closely by Kiwi Aaron Slight (trailing by just 3 points).

Just 200 of these bikes were produced in year 1, with many being delivered directly to race teams. A further 500 bikes were produced for the Japanese domestic market with most of these going to collectors. This example is a very rare find, having travelled just 1400 miles in the past 20 years. Frame 257 has spent all of its life in the hands of a private collector in Japan and has been well cared for evidenced by the deep sheen in its paint work. There are a few very minor cosmetic defects in keeping with a 20 years old bike which has been lightly used and never restored, but overall this is a stunning stunning bike.

Carbon Garage is a licensed motorcycle dealer with a showroom, workshop & cafe located in Auckland, New Zealand. We have a partner warehouse in Tokyo, Japan and specialise in sales, service and restoration of classic Japanese superbikes from the 80s, 90s and later. We are motorcycle collectors ourselves and have an extensive collection of homologated superbikes on display in our cafe.

We ship worldwide and can provide a quotation for packaging and freight to the destination of your choice.

1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 #257
KTM July 27, 2014 posted by

No Bull: 2010 KTM RC8R Akrapovic edition

The RC8 was KTM's first attempt at a big sportbike and wow, what a first attempt. Right from the start it was designed to compete directly against Ducati’s 1098/1198 Superbikes as well as the Big Four Japanese liter class bikes. When it debuted in 2008, the RC8 received positive but not glowing reviews, mostly due to the way it looked. "...looks like a stealth fighter crashed into a motorcycle factory"..."Certainly wasn't designed by an Italian..."..."Haven't we had enough undertail exhaust bikes already?"...

ktm rc8 arakapovic for sale

Once people started really examining the bike, it became apparent that while the looks of the bike were a bit unusual, in typical Austrian/KTM fashion it was actually form over function. The RC8 was developed with racing in mind, spent long hours in the wind tunnel during development and was almost infinitely adjustable when it came to setup, including the following components.

  • Front brake lever : Ok, thats available on lots of bikes, so no major bonus points there.
  • Clutch lever: Surprisingly still unavailable on many modern motorcycles.
  • Handlebars: The conversion from almost sport-tour-y to racebike is accomplished with four bolts and fewer minutes.
  • Seat: Not just the seat but the entire subframe, altering seat height from 31.7 to 32.5 inches in mere minutes.
  • Foot pegs: Lots of legroom when set in their lowest position yet still difficult to drag. Virtually unlimited ground clearance when in their high position.
  • Shifter: Adjustable for length (3 positions), leverage and GP-shift conversion.
  • Brake pedal: Nub adjustable for length in 3 positions.
  • Rear ride height: An eccentric allows simple adjustment over a 12mm range.
  • Gauges: Separate displays for street or track, most available via a pair of toggles on the left clip-on. The Road setting has displays for trip meters, clock, fuel mileage, miles to empty (best- and worst-case scenarios), trip time and ambient temps. The track setting has displays for lap timers, top speed, max rpm and race duration.

ktm rc8 arakapovic 5

After introducing the standard RC8 in 2008, in 2009 KTM introduced the racing model,designated as the RC8R. The RC8R had several advantages over the standard RC8, including more power, different steering angles, and lighter wheels. And then to go one step further, in 2010 KTM produced two separate 25 unit limited-edition series with Akrapovic titanium exhaust systems and updated ECU's, designated as the Red Bull and Black Akrapovic editions.

2010 KTM RC8R - Black Akrapovic edition for sale on eBay

Here we have one of the 25 black Akrapovic edition bikes with only 1650 miles. This particular bike is listed as being # 8 of 25 for the black Akrapovic edition and overall the bike looks good, although the standard rear tail unit has been removed (a common update) and replaced with a tail tidy.

ktm rc8 arakapovic 4

ktm rc8 arakapovic 2

So whats it worth? Well KBB lists retail value for a standard 2010 RC8R at 11k but there are no prices available on KBB for the Akrapovic editions. Also, the Red Bull edition seems to be a bit more popular than the black Akrapovic, probably due to the Red Bull graphics being less of a contrast to the orange frame. But given the low miles and rarity of the edition, I would expect reserve price to be somewhere north of 13k. And since these bikes actually include some technical updates and the titanium Akropovic exhaust system, they will probably increase in value over time so maybe get yours while you can?

DISCLAIMER: I own a 2010 red bull edition RC8R that I picked up last year

-marty/dallaslavowner

No Bull:  2010 KTM RC8R Akrapovic edition
Cagiva July 25, 2014 posted by

Hail Hail: 1983 Ducati Mike Hailwood (MHR) in AZ

Joey Dunlop, Agostini, Fast Freddy Spencer, Wayne Rainey, Mike Hailwood, and Valentino Rossi, all have had legendary careers in motorcycle racing.   But only a very few were able to endure over multiple decades, and even fewer managed to do it with a break in-between.   Seriously, to take a multi-year break from racing and then return is impressive in itself, but to come back and win a major race is the stuff legends are made of.

Mike Hailwood was one of the few who managed this feat.  Mike “The Bike” Hailwood won the Isle of Mann TT race 12 times including what many historians consider to be the most dramatic Isle of Man race of all time, the 1967 Senior TT against his great rival, Giacomo Agostini.  In 1978 Hailwood returned to motorcycle racing after an 11 year hiatus and won the legendary isle of Man TT again, this time on a Ducati.  A few years later, Ducati produced the 900MHR to commemorate the event and the bike was an instant hit.

hailwood 1

1983 Ducati 900ss Mike Hailwood Replica for sale on eBay

From a production numbers standpoint, the Hailwood replica is actually not that rare (see production info here) but it still always seems to draw interest from avid motorcycle fans.   The seller indicates that this is bike was previously in Japan and that the bike has the optional factory big cams and Conti pipes. The seller also lists lots of recent refreshes including:

  • new Pirellis front and rear
  • new brakes
  • new cush drives
  • new battery hold down, tank hold down, battery tray.
  • New rebuild on the rear master cylinder.
  • New fuel lines (correct green) and clamps.
  • New alternator harness.
  • New steering head bearings.
  • New turn signals.
  • Petcocks reworked.
  • Carbs looked over at Ducati Phoenix (the carbs were rebuilt by the Woods Bros in Cal in an earlier workup).
  • EFX clipons installed. but have original ones.

hailwood 3

The seller includes both standard and hi-res photos as well as a link to a video walk around in the auction.  This particular MHR certainly appears to be in immaculate condition.

hailwood 4 hailwood 5

While bidding on this one has been minimal at this point (the reserve is still in place), the current price is right at the KBB retail limit.  Past MHRs featured by RSBFS have been bid up over $15,000 so I think this one will get a bunch of last minute bids.

-martin/dallaslavowner

Hail Hail: 1983 Ducati Mike Hailwood (MHR) in AZ

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