Latest Posts

Moto Guzzi April 28, 2017 posted by

One Owner: 1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

There is something about big Guzzis that set them apart. It's not just one thing, either; it's the overall package that sets the mind wandering. Italian, long legged good looks, wonderful booming V-twin sounds, some degree of exclusivity due to relative rarity, and a reputation for longevity and long ownership. Moto Guzzis evoke class, elegance, a touch of danger, and total loyalty. In the hyperbike classes, loyalty lasts just long enough for something faster to come out - usually measured in tiny increments no longer than a year. In the Guzzi class, loyalty lasts as long as the bike - and the robustness of the transverse twin is the stuff of legends.

1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 for sale on eBay

Moto Guzzi considered the Daytona a Superbike - although by modern AMA/WSBK standards that is a bit of an overstatement. Still, this was a race-bred machine by design. Moto Guzzi, then under the ownership of Alejandro de Tomaso, tapped the brilliance of US-based Guzzi racer Dr. John Wittner - whose bikes won many prestigious BOTT, Pro Twin and Endurance races. Wittner was a dentist by trade, but when the call from Italy came, he answered. The outcome was a new 4-valve head attached to an updated big block motor with a reworked bore and stroke. Power was boosted up to 95 HP, thanks in part to the addition of fuel injection. All this hung in a frame that was based on Dr. John's race winning machines. This was the most powerful, fastest Moto Guzzi twin yet, and was named for the Florida track where Dr. John had enjoyed several victories.

From the seller:
1993 Moto Guzzi DAYTONA 1000
Less Than 9400 Actual Miles
All original, never raced, always garaged

Up for is the first and my favorite of all Moto Guzzi's produced. I'm no longer able to ride it, kept it for several years thinking my health would improve, it hasn't so I finally decided to part with it.

Description Of included Items:
Carbon Fiber Hugger
Heli Bars
Heated Grips ( never connected)
New Motobatt Battery
Single Seat cowling and seat never used with shelf ware (see photo 11)
Shop and Parts Manuals
Oil Change Parts
Special tools for Cam Belt Adjusting and Fork Oil Change
Stock Bars, Grips, Reflectors and other items

More Stuff
Low Mileage Tires, less than 300 miles on them
Spare Computer
Moto Guzzi Race Stand

Moto Guzzis are an acquired taste. Like a fine wine they age well, developing a complex flavor of the vintage year they were born. The Daytona 1000 is no different, showcasing a time when Guzzi was making an investment into the bikes, and a statement to the world. This example is a one-owner model, which is quite common in the M-G world, but less so for most 24 year old bikes. And with one-owner status, you gain all the eccentricities of this particular owner along with all the eccentricities of the bike itself. In this case, you gain what appear to be a considerable number of spares and maintenance items. The win here is not just in the parts; it's in knowing more about the history of the machine and its care.

If compared to a modern (or even period) Japanese sport bike, the big Guzzi Daytona would be trounced in terms of performance (lap time, quarter mile, etc). Yet years later, the Guzzi will hold its value while the Japanese machine (save for the homologation models) will depreciate as fast as the next model is introduced. Moto Guzzis are bikes you hold on to. They are keepers. This is why they are not commonly found for sale, and when they are they tend to command higher prices. This one is available with an opening ask of $7,800, and a BIN of $11,300. That is a bargain considering this was $15k when new, and the value will certainly appreciate over time. Lots of people are watching this one. If you need a Guzzi fix, this just might be your chance. Good Luck!!

MI


One Response. Join the Discussion!
Honda April 28, 2017 posted by

Overbuilt Race-Rep: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

Values of Honda’s overbuilt homologation special VF1000R have been shockingly low up until very recently, but these red-white-and-blue beasts are starting to see a significant increase in price. They’re not lightweight or nimble at nearly 600lbs with a tank of fuel, but Honda’s build quality and engineering prowess are on display throughout the bike: the 998cc V4 used gear-driven cams in place of chains, Torque-Reactive Anti-Dive Control forks for better performance under braking, modular Comstar wheels and radial tires when radial tires were still rare and exotic, quick-release axles, adjustable bars, and even a vented rear brake... No, I don’t mean cross-drilled, the rear brake was vented.

The style of the bodywork reflected the VF1000R’s endurance-racing roots and features some interesting little quirks: you can see where Aprilia got some design ideas from those funky mesh side-panels. Two different headlight configurations were available, depending on year: the dual-headlight setup is generally considered more desirable, although they’re both tucked behind a single rectangular lens so they don’t look like you’d expect if you’re picturing something like an RC30. This example uses the single headlight that has a couple of additional vents around the sides and top to take up the space left by the bigger unit. Why two styles? Honda was worried the dual setup wouldn’t pass US regulations and created an alternative treatment, just in case.

All-in-all it was typical Honda overkill, which is fine unless it leads to a significant increase in weight which blunts performance significantly: the VF1000R certainly isn’t a slow bike, but it’s not all that fast either. Handling was a bit ponderous, but good set up can help quite a bit and the positive news for road-riders is that the available performance is pretty effortless, the fairings provide good wind protection, and the bike can cruise at its near 150mph top speed with ease.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

This was the superbike of the day in 1985. I looked long and hard to find one in really nice original condition as it is getting hard to find good ones. This one was always stored inside and I have in in a climate controlled facility. I don't think it has ever been laid over as it is basically scratch free EXCEPT for on both sides of the front fender there are scratches that I guess were caused by someone's poor quality tie downs. You can see the scratches in the pic's. It has new tires. It has he original pipes which is unbelievable in itself.

The seller is right that these are rare bikes, although nice ones do show up pretty regularly on eBay. They're the kind of bikes people bought and cherished from new, so thrashed examples seem more like the exception rather than the rule. Which is good, because finding replacement parts is pretty difficult and the aftermarket is basically nonexistent. So why didn’t these capture the public’s imagination in the way the later RC30 and RC45 did? Probably a combination of the aforementioned visual and physical bulk. But maybe it also had something to do with the V4’s negative perception at the time that resulted from a few of the early VF750’s chain-driven cam lobes de-lobing, sometimes referred to as the “Chocolate Camshaft” syndrome. That issue actually affected only a small group of the early V4 bikes with chain-driven cams, but Honda's reputation took a big hit and required the incredible high-quality of the VFR750 that followed to erase that black mark.

-tad


No Responses Yet. Join the Discussion!
Yamaha April 27, 2017 posted by

Collector Alert: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 with 94 Original Miles for Sale

Sometimes, the amazingly low-mileage bikes that we stumble across surprise me. I mean, who at the time it was new would think to ferret away a pristine Yamaha FZR400? Of course it was always a cool bike, but the kind of thing you'd buy and preserve as a collectible? Seems strange, but the upside is that someone gets to bid on this example that has the classic white-and-blue "speedblock" graphics and just 94 miles from new.

Modern vehicle technology is incredible, offering up reliability, safety, and efficiency at an affordable cost. New motorcyclists are almost spoiled for choice these days, with slick, utilitarian offerings from Honda, Kawasaki, Yamaha, Suzuki, and even KTM that look good and perform well. They don't offer much in the way of inspirational engine notes or cutting-edge handling, however: all are powered by parallel twins or singles and sound a bit agricultural or slightly obnoxious, depending on whether you have a Two Bros exhaust fitted or not.

The middleweight sportbike class is fast disappearing as well, with just the GSX-R600 and R6 left as Honda and Triumph discontinue their 600cc sportbikes. But in the late 1980s, you were spoiled for choice, and the FZR400 offered a stepping-stone up in terms of refinement from something fast but a bit crude like a TZR250. Most of the 400cc sportbikes never made it to the USA officially, as demand for what would be considered "small" sportbikes has always been pretty non-existent. We got a few bikes with their genes like the Honda CB1, but those never sold well either, making all bikes in the class pretty rare and desirable these days.

The FZR400's 399cc four-cylinder produced a claimed 64hp, still plenty of power for a bike that weighed 410lbs wet, but, with little power below 5,000 rpm, the rev-happy motor meant you had to work it like a two-stroke to make fast progress for maximum rider involvement. Interestingly, the FZR400 was a much more serious weapon than the bigger 600 although they look nearly identical at a glance. The 400 made less power but handled better due to the lighter, stiffer aluminum frame used by the smaller bike, versus the 600's steel part. Yes, the 600 fits into the 400's frame, so if you come across a 400 with a blown or high-mileage motor, you might want to consider finding a 600 to rebuild and slot in instead.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR400 for Sale

Up for your consideration is a very RARE, very nice low mileage almost new 1988 Yamaha FZR 400 3EN1 with only 152 Kilometers (94 miles). It is in mint condition and has new battery, Yamaha filter & engine oil, new coolant flush, new fork seals and fork oil,  new brake fluid, new spark plugs and original air filter was serviced. Runs like the day it was new. Carburetor jets and needles are original and still comes with the factory jetting set from the factory. This FZR in mint condition and near museum quality. It still has the original factory tires, however there are age cracks in the sidewalls. There is patina here and there as you would expect from a 29 year old motorcycle. This FZR still has its original chain & sprockets, original brake pads and all original fairings and factory components. There is a small crack in the windscreen, however I have a new windscreen that will come with the bike. I haven't installed it to preserve the originality of the bike.

When we received the bike, It was taken apart and cleaned and inspected along with the full service. The muffler was chromed and re-finished to look new again. This FZR would make a excellent candidate for restoration, making it a true museum piece for your living room or just keep it and ride the hell out of it and make your friends jealous, lol. This FZR comes with a clean Utah title in my company name that will be presented to the new owner.

Okay, so the $8,999 asking price is pretty stupid money for a 400cc Japanese sportbike. Or at least is is right now: scoff all you like but I bet in a few years, Yamaha fans will be wishing they'd jumped in when these were so cheap... Especially at this mileage, although part of what's so cool about the FZR400 is the light weight and agile handling, so it's kind of a waste as a museum piece. I'm also not sure even very many of your motorcycling buddies will be very jealous if you have this in your garage or living room, let alone your more normal friends. Bidding's already up to $7,600 with plenty of interest, so I'll be interested to see if it makes it to that Buy It Now price.

-tad


6 Responses. Join the Discussion!
Yamaha April 26, 2017 posted by

Head on Backwards: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

Competition between the Japanese manufacturers in the 250cc sportbike class was fierce, with each trying for some small advantage in terms of performance, given the limited displacement and government-mandated power cap. On paper, they all seem to follow a pretty standard template: a compact two-stroke twin cylinder engine, power-valves of one sort or another, and an aluminum beam frame. But each manufacturer went their own way trying to maximize performance within those fairly narrow parameters. While development eventually led to the NSR, RGV, and TZR all using v-twins, there were a few experiments along the way, and today's TZR250 3MA represents an interesting attempt to solve the packaging issues inherent in two-stroke design.

Obviously, two-stroke engines are very compact by nature: with no overhead-valves or cams, they're short, simple, and very light. But while the exhaust expansion chambers required for a performance two-stroke may not weigh all that much, their bulging shape takes up valuable real estate in a motorcycle. The famous "gull arm" swingarms of the period were one solution to the problem and allowed the chambers to tuck in close to the centerline of the bike to maximize cornering clearance. But the 3MA version of the TZR250 went a different route by reversing the cylinder head so that the carburetors were at the front, with the exhausts exiting directly out the rear of the bike instead of curving around the sides or underneath. The bulbous expansion chambers fitted neatly into the seat, with the exhaust exiting through the tail.

The design was eventually replaced by the v-twin 3XV version introduced in 1991 after just two years, so the experiment can be considered a bit of a failure. But there's nothing inherently wrong with the idea, and this is one of my favorite bikes of the era, at least in terms of looks and the weird factor: it's my deep and not-so-secret shame that I haven't ridden one yet, but here's hoping that the stars will align and I'll be able to find a decent California-titled example when the time is right. Scouting around the message boards, it seems that the bike's reputation for poor reliability is exaggerated but, as these were not often seen anywhere outside of Japan, parts availability will prove difficult.

From the original eBay listing:  1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

The parallel twin reverse cylinder version. The bike is imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE) Start engine. Original Cowl. New Aftermarket Front fork innre tubes. Dragging brakes. Need to change tires (flat tire) and a battery. Some scratches and rust, so look carefully all pictures and video. This motorcycle is 28 years ago. Sold as is.

11271km (7003mile) LOW MILE. Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return. Buyer responsible for vehicle pick-up or shipping to your location. (ITEM AT CARSON NOW)

There's also a helpful clip of the bike starting, running, and revving. The seller's English is a bit limited, but it looks like the bike runs from the video and just needs a little TLC: a brake rebuild, new tires, and some minor cosmetic issues. Normally nothing you'd find shocking in a 28 year old motorcycle, but make sure you're prepared to troll eBay and use Google Translate to track down parts to keep this running. It's certainly not pristine and it's not the cleanest example we've featured on this site, but if the price is right, it won't take all that much to get this one on the road. Obviously, the usual titling issues apply, so I doubt this bike will remain in Southern California.

-tad


2 Responses. Join the Discussion!
Ducati April 25, 2017 posted by

Signed and Numbered: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale

 

Different motorcycle manufacturers have different ways of mining riders' nostalgia and their own history: Triumph makes motorcycles that look like they rolled straight out of the 1960s but perform like modern machines, while Harley Davidson makes actual 1960s motorcycles, only heavier and with 1980s brakes and electronics. Ducati's retro bikes manage to straddle the line between vintage and modern styles, so designs for their Sport Classic and Scrambler models have classic colors and shapes, but you'd never mistake them for actual vintage machines. When released, bikes like the Paul Smart 1000LE caused a sensation, but demand died out relatively quickly and the line was discontinued after just a few short years, with only the GT soldiering on until 2010.

Values for them second-hand have been surprisingly strong however, particularly for the 1000LE and Sport models. I'm a huge fan of the offset monoshock that looks like a dual-shock setup from the left side and the tubular swingarm, although that setup on the original bikes meant a solo-seat option only. Performance was fairly tame on paper, although 92hp is really nothing to sneeze at and can be put to good use because of the bike's excellent handling. This was a bike pitched at a more mature crowd and experienced riders who appreciate a fast motorcycle but weren't interested in bench-racing or pointless horsepower-measuring contests.

Paul Smarts show up pretty regularly on eBay, considering how few were built, often with low miles and exorbitant prices. This particular bike certainly fits that description, as the asking price is $27,500 only with even lower miles and the added bonus of Paul Smart's signature on the bodywork, which should be like catnip for Ducati collectors. I'm glad the factory pipes are included for originality's sake, but they are very ugly things clearly designed to be replaced by the owner as soon as possible. The Keihan exhausts currently installed suit the classic style of the bike, but are almost too vintage for my tastes, and are likely too quiet as well. Maybe some Termignoni pipes would be more appropriate? Or those wild Zard high/low pipes that only work on the solo-seat models?

From the original eBay listing: 2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE for Sale 

2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE Limited Edition. Perfect condition with just under 700 miles.  Autographed by Paul Smart on the tank and tail. Both have had a clearcoat applied over them. Always garaged. Collector owned. The bike is located in Washington DC, but I can arrange for shipping anywhere. Aftermarket Keigen pipes, but the originals will be included in the sale. More photos available upon request.

Aside from a relatively uncomfortable riding position, the 1000LE makes for a pretty great roadbike, with excellent handling, adequate power and a rich midrange, wind protection, decent fuel economy, and reasonable reliability, assuming you take good care of it. But in such perfect, low-mileage condition, and with that Paul Smart signature on the bodywork, I doubt anyone would want to destroy the bike's value by actually riding it. So it's a shame that such a practical exotic will  probably spend most of its time in an office, living room, or heated garage, sealed away as an investment.

-tad


7 Responses. Join the Discussion!

Search

Subscribe by Email

Get all our new posts delivered to your email automatically. Spam free! Enter your email address:

Featured Listings

Do You have a special sportbike that should be listed on our site? Sell your bike with a Featured Listing for just $59. We seek out 1985-2002ish model years that are near perfect and in original condition, that would appeal to collectors and enthusiasts. Our readers help sell another bike every 2-3 days! Email me to get started!

FB Like Box

Historically Significant MotoGP Artwork at MotoDeity.com

Archives