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Aprilia March 17, 2018 posted by

Skin Deep: 2004 Aprilia Tuono 1000R Factory for Sale

Look, I need to get this out of the way  up front: this Aprilia Tuono 1000R Factory is a very ugly bike. The proportions are strange, the details are overwrought, there are creases and angles everywhere... Honestly, the only really positive thing you can say about the bodywork on the Aprilia Tuono 1000R is that there is less of it than on the RSV, but that's definitely damning with faint praise. But before you legions of Aprilia fans whip out your pitchforks and head to Southern California, there are two things you should know. One, it's been raining here a lot and not only are the canyon roads a mess, the drivers here really don't know what to do with this kind of weather, so you should wait a month. And two: I genuinely like the Tuono.

2004 Aprilia Tuono 1000R Factory for sale on eBay

When introduced, the RSV had the monumental task of being the other Italian v-twin superbike. Ducati had the heritage and sexy looks, so Aprilia desperately needed to differentiate themselves, and went with hypermodern styling that wasn't a big hit then, and hasn't aged all that well. But there was surely nothing at all wrong with the mechanical parts, and both the RSV and the Tuono have long been, along with the "touring" Falco, the affordable, reliable choice for fans of Italian handling and sound.

The aluminum alloy beam frame is gorgeous, with clear links to the RS250 and the compact, 60° Rotax v-twin is a bit more coarse than Ducati's famous L-twin, but also a little happier to rev, with a distinctive character. Packing 998cc and 127hp, up from 123 in the regular Tuono, the Factory makes plenty of power and the right kind of noises, but the biggest advantage is the twin's reliability. Low prices and low maintenance make it the budget Italophile's dream, and the odd looks just mean owners can pretend that they're much more interested in performance than in something as shallow as appearance...

Handling is impressive as well, with lightweight forged wheels, Öhlins forks and shock, an Öhlins steering damper, radial Brembos, and the usual bits of carbon that will inevitably fade after a few years of occasional exposure to sunlight, be expensive as hell to replace, and probably saves half a pound compared to the stock machine. Interestingly, the RSV didn't feature a steering damper, but the Tuono had less weight over the front, owing to the lack of a fairing and the raised bars so the result was a more wayward front end.

From the original eBay listing: 2004 Aprilia Tuono 1000R Factory for Sale

Number 63 of 200 
Bike comes with track kit. 2 factory Aprilia pipes. One in box. Full carbon body work for track use.
Never tracked bike, 19,500 miles. Never down, never dropped. New tires. Just serviced. 
Do not ride this anymore. Have title. Tags just paid. No issues with bike. All Carbon perfect, no scratches, no dents, no nothing. Owned with pride. All stickers removed from street carbon body work. Carbon track kit is hard to find. Some people sell separate. I'm selling as package.

  • Ohlins Suspension
  • Extensive Carbon Fiber Body Parts
  • Carbon Fiber Belly Pan Track - Never Installed
  • Carbon Fiber Headlight Track Shroud - Never Installed
  • Ti Mufflers 2
  • OZ Wheels
  • Brembo Monobloc Brakes
  • Ohlins Steering Damper
  • Sargent Seat
  • CRG Levers
  • 139hp
  • 472lbs wet
  • 408lbs dry
  • Holds 4.7 gallons of fuel

So the Tuono offered up superbike power, great, but slightly hairy handling, in-your-face styling, and reasonable comfort. Top speed was lower than the RSV, but for 95% of riders 95% of the time, the Tuono was a better choice. Tuonos may not be pretty, but they are pretty impressive machines in every other regard, and those low prices make them a great bang for the buck. Of course, "affordable" is relative and the first generation Tuonos have been more valuable than the RSV for a while. I'm guessing that's because, at least here in the US, they are much less common and it's been a while since I saw a really nice one up for sale. Miles aren't collector-bike-low but the bike is in very nice condition, with some desirable extras.


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Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Ducati 750 F1 Laguna Seca for Sale

Update 3.16.2018: Recently serviced late last year at local Ducati specialist, including new timing belts, idler and tensioners, valve adjust,all fluids changed - including brake and forks, and carb rebuild with new accelerator pump. New price is $18,500 or best offer.
Contact Adam by email:

If you were looking to jump onto the Ducati 750 F1 bandwagon early with an eye towards making big money flipping one... That ship has sailed: these Pantah-powered race replicas now command some serious money. For years, these occupied the same place as the early Super Sport, in part because they straddle two generations of Ducatis, pre and post-Cagiva ownership, but don't seem to fully belong to either. They've got a slightly shed-built quality from the older era, combined with the "modern" Pantah L-twin and more 80s style. When new, build quality was criticized and suspension, as delivered, was a bit crude. But the potential was there from the beginning in bikes like today's featured 750 F1 Laguna Seca, it just needed a bit of development.

The 750 F1 used Ducati's characteristic trellis frame, designed in this case by Verlicchi and visibly wrapped around the lightweight aluminum tank. It was powered by a 749cc version of their air/oil-cooled, two-valve twin making a claimed 76hp and styled to look like the successful TT1 race bikes of the period. Dry weight was just 385lbs and the 16" front and 18" wheel gave nimble handling. The Montjuich, Santa Monica, and this Laguna Seca were all limited editions of the F1 that were priced higher when new and featured improved performance and a higher top speed.

For years, the F1 languished forgotten and relatively unloved, but the fact that it was conceived before the company's takeover by Cagiva and the perceived mass-production that followed seems to be the exact quality now driving the increase in prices. Looking closely, there's one obvious indicator that the F1 came before Cagiva's ownership: bikes that came later reversed the rear cylinder so that both carburetors could be fitted into the engine's vee for much more efficient packaging. Some F1s have awkward pod filters fitted that bulge out from behind the fairing, but this example doesn't bother with something as trivial as "air filtration" and just has mesh screens to keep out rocks, stray animals, and small children.

ZDM750LS-750139 / DM750L1-750238

Recently out of long-term collection in Japan - this Marco Lucchinelli Replica is a time capsule in beautiful shape with only ~2500km  / 1600 miles. Original paint and bodywork is excellent; red paint on the beautiful trellis frame very nice with some darkening on the upper surface of each tube. Clip-ons and muffler have visible surface corrosion. Runs great - bike starts right up, idles well and runs like it should. Original mirrors included in sale.

The F1 Laguna Seca, along with the Santa Monica and Montjuich, represented the pinnacle of the factory Pantah-based TT race-bikes. These hand-built race-replica bikes were closely based on the forks F1 racers with open-throat Dell'Orto carburetors, 10:1 compression pistons, bigger valves and less restrictive exhaust. Transmission uses straight-cut (like the works bikes) instead of helical primary drive gears. The Laguna Seca is fitted with Verlicchi aluminum swing-arm and solo seat.

Widely acclaimed when new - Cycle World stated, "They May Be Bargains. This last Ducati is a throwback in the spirit of the 750 SS of 1973, the F1's most famous predecessor. Like the 750 SS, the F1 is the Italian sportsbike of its era."

Mick Walker summarized in his 1989 Ducati Buyers Guide, "If you find, or already own, an F1 my advice is to hang on to it. If you are doubly lucky to have been able to afford one of the 'limited edition' models, then guard it with your life, for you have a real classic of the future. Any one of the Monjuich, Laguna Seca or Santamonica models is worth a full five stars, for they are both beautiful and rare."

This gem will make a fabulous addition to your collection. Offering with low reserve and reasonable buy-it-now. Currently on it's importation paperwork - Japanese de-registration certificate / English translation of certificate / NHTSA HS7 / EPA 3520-1 / CBP 7501 (stamped). Washington State title is available for $400 documentation fee approx. 5-week wait. WA state buyers responsible for Tax & License.

As the seller mentions, the bike isn't cosmetically perfect, but no bike that's thirty years old and in original condition is likely to be. Bodywork is very sharp, but some of the exposed metal parts have some surface corrosion but the paint on the bodywork looks very nice and mileage is extremely low at just 1,600. The seller is asking for $27,500 $18,500


Ducati March 16, 2018 posted by

Fresh Street Racer: 1993 Ducati 888 SP05

The Ducati 888 filled the gap between the brand-redefining 851 and the legendary 916, bumping the 851's fuel-injected, liquid-cooled, four-valve L-twin to 888cc. The inbetweener status didn't phase the bike much, though, as it was enough for Doug Polen to net back-to-back World Superbike championships in '91 and '92. Production ended in '94 as the world geared up for the Tamburini-penned 916. Ducati sent fewer than 300 to the States.

1993 Ducati 888 SPO5 for sale on eBay

This 1993 Ducati 888 SP05 is number 270 of 500, and has covered just 125 miles since its original UK delivery. The SP versions of the 888 never made it to our roads, as they couldn't get past American DOT laws. Now that the bike has reached the magic 25-year mark, it might be possible to bring it in and secure registration, though it probably should be ridden sparingly.

From the eBay listing:


We are pleased to present the opportunity to own a very rare collectable Ducati 888 SP5. This example is number 270 of just 500 made. A beautiful 1993 model having covered just 125 miles from new. This is the ultimate concourse example and the best we have ever seen

This bike is supplied with the original handbook, and will have a full belt service and MOT prior to the new owner taking possession.

The 888 was a motorcycle manufactured as an upgrade to the 851. The earlier 851 had introduced liquid cooling, computerised fuel injection and four-valve heads to Ducati's two cylinder motors. After increasing the capacity of the 851 to 888 cc they then released the iconic 888 SP5 in 1993.

A small deposit will secure this Ducati and we offer finance packages to suit and can also arrange delivery both UK and worldwide.

The bike is listed with a classified ad, meaning that the price -- about $55,000 USD -- won't change over the course of the listing.

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Suzuki March 15, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – Street-Registered 1986 Suzuki RG500 Racebike

Update 3.15.2018: SOLD IN ONE HOUR! Congratulations to buyer and seller. -dc

Please note: Ted from AutoManiaGP has asked us to open the comments on this post in the hopes that the RSBFS community can assist in determining what has been done to construct this bike. There was no accompanying documentation and we would appreciate your help by examining the pictures and commenting with any additional information you can provide. The text below is our first shot but we look forward to what else can be learned. Please forward widely and thank you for your help! -dc

Suppose you had been a racer, and owned a race team, over the years acquiring intimate knowledge of several different brands of factory race gear - what might you build as a street machine?  The few production years of Suzuki RG500 Gamma imprinted Mike Canepa of 10K Racing, and he put together a race-derived machine with Spondon Engineering chassis, with trackside details stem to stern, in race livery.

Suzuki RG500 For Sale at AutomaniaGP

Suzuki's RG500 used a twin-crank square-four two stroke, with almost unmatched power-to-weight, 95 hp in factory street tune.  No doubt well above that with racing carburetors and exhaust.  Like any privateer's racebike, specs are hard to come by, but this RG appears to have a Spondon chassis, an English specialty manufacturer with a long history of chassis development for major manufacturers and well-heeled weekend warriors.  The twin spars are at least twice the size of a road-going RG.  Later upside-down Showa forks are installed, with Nissin 6-pot front calipers radially mounted.  The swingarm is thought to be from a Yamaha TZ250, an asymmetrical fabrication with a massive right side but straight left side with a brace to allow the chain to pass through.  Fairings are quite like a later RGV-500, with air scoops just above the front fender feeding the four sidedraft carbs inside.

Unlike any actual racer, this RG500 is clean, polished, and road legal despite the Skoal Bandit graphics.  Trim carbon mudguards are installed, along with a full featured instrument cluster.  Conflicted as the four expansion chambers and turn signals, there's a locking gas cap on the tank.  The fairing's post-and-pin supports are safety-wired to keep the cotter pin around.  Consigning dealer Automania of Oregon has a great collection of pictures - here - and says this about the bike:

Mike Canepa, owner of race team 10-K Racing was in the later stages of building this race bike for the street when he passed. I had been hearing about it for over two years and unfortunately did not pay attention to what he was telling me at the time. Hind sight is 100%. The engine is V-4 Two Stroke out of a 1986 Suzuki RG500 according to the records we found, but everything else has been a guess or information others have offered up. It was not finished, but he had been riding it recently.

This motorcycle is based on a 1986 Suzuki RG500 but everything except the engine is either custom or race track sourced. The rear swing arm looks to be from a 1991 Yamaha TZ250, the front forks Honda RS250 and the frame appears to be a Spondon that had no identifying numbers or manufactures id on it. It has been titled with an assigned OR State VIN plate and the bike is registered for the street. I am open to anyone looking at the images and suggesting where they think the parts came from. Don’t be shy…

The selling price is $16,695. The VIN# is ORSPERG9G1003 and miles are unknown.

Hard to tally up the hours and dollars invested in this racer-with-lights, though the preparation is immaculate.  Likely the frame has a pedigree, and Spondon Engineering has quite a following, even a fan website for reference.  Power-to-weight is probably more important here than on a factory machine, and the weight should be closer to 300 than 400 lbs.  Evidently inspected by Oregon DMV, it is titled and has road registration, which speaks to how close to completion the bike is.  RG and RGV did well in the 500cc years of Grand Prix racing, accounting for four championships and seven constructor's titles.  Automania invites knowledgeable comment and asks $16,995 for this one-of-one, and can be reached at (541) 479-8888 or emailed - here -.

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Yamaha March 15, 2018 posted by

Racetrack Refugee: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

Yamaha's R7 was among the last in a long line of machines from the Age of Homologation Specials, where the manufacturers competing in AMA and World Superbike racing created limited runs of insanely expensive bikes that looked like production models, but were chock full of trick bits like adjustable steering heads and exotic engine internals. For the most part, these were based on pretty common machines from each manufacturer's lineup. But in situations where nothing in the manufacturer's stable really matched their needs, companies sometimes whipped up a bike whose whole production run was designed to allow the bike to compete in a variety of racing classes. By the late 1990s, the 750cc class was pretty much on its way out as a viable category for streetbikes, but that didn't stop Yamaha from introducing their very trick and hideously expensive YZF-R7. How trick? Well the frame was claimed to have been based on Yamaha's 500 Grand Prix machine. Just 50 were imported to the US out of 500 built in total. And how expensive? Well, the R7 was $32,000 late-nineties dollars, and that was before you included the race kit that actually made it fast.

Just one problem: from the factory, the R7 made just 106hp, which didn't really provide the performance the looks or pricetag promised. The solution? Just pony up for the race kit that activated a second, dormant test of injectors and replaced the airbox for a revised part that unleashed a more appropriate 162hp but also gave racebike-like reliability. The biggest limitation of the R7 was that engine, and unleashing the full potential could be tricky and expensive, so owners that wanted to use their bikes on the road sometimes switched out the 749cc engine for the 998cc unit from the R1, which seems to have been done in this particular case. I'm under the impression that this was a relatively simple swap and, although it could be considered sacrilege, actually had several benefits: it gave very similar maximum power to the original engine, but with far more midrange, and it also meant the original engine could be saved to preserve the bike's value for future collectors. That appears to have been done here, although the seller's description does leave me with some questions.

This R7/R1 hybrid appears to have been built to a high standard by Graves Yamaha, so I'm sure they knew what they were doing and I've no doubt the bike is very special. But it would really help if the owner was clearer about what he has: he calls the powerplant a "OWO1 1000 superbike motor" but the OW01 was 749cc, although the five-valve inline four was related to both the R7 and the 998cc R1 units. The OW02 engine was supposedly based on that earlier engine and has the same displacement to conform to class limitations, but I'm not sure it can simply be punched out to a full 1000cc.

More likely, it has a later R1 engine, which was, as stated above, the simpler, much more reliable way to get the fully-unleashed R7's 162hp without all the explode-y engine drama. Maybe it's a full-factory superbike R1 unit? The seller also mentions the "half R7 and half R1 frame" which would require some very serious surgery if true. And which halves were used? Front and back? Left and right? Maybe it's the R7 Deltabox with the R1 subframe? It's also listed as a 1998 model, but I was under the impression that the bike was sold in 1999 and 2000.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha R7/R1 for Sale

This bike was built in house built by factory Graves race team and was one of Chuck Graves personal bikes. It might be one of only two left, this bike has every goodie you could imagine on it: Brembo brakes, Ohlins forks and rear shock, superbike radiator and tank, swing arm, custom half R7 frame and half R1 frame, Yamaha OWO1 1000 superbike motor, rear Brembo brakes, thumb brake, brake lines, rearsets, Akro pipe, after market wheels, chain sprocket kit, offset triple clamps. This bike new with the race kit harness was $43,000 and only 32 came to the US that year, it is a very limited production bike, to rebuild this bike in today's time would cost over $100k plus the 1000 donor bike for parts, this bike looks like it just rolled off the race truck.

All-in-all, this modified R7 is a very cool machine, with plenty of very trick bits plainly visible, but I'd definitely want some answers to my questions before bidding on this one. Many, many questions, but worth asking, considering it is a Yamaha R7, after all. I'd especially want to know if the original motor is included, as a good chunk of the bike's value is wrapped up in its originality, and while this might be an amazing machine and a true track-day weapon, all those modifications likely hurt the collector value. As always, if you have any insight into the bike, please feel free to fire away in the comments!


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